WorldWideScience

Sample records for british neurological surgeons

  1. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  2. Congress of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Month September 2016 32-Year-Old Female with Numbness How would you treat this month's ... All Events Corporate Partners Learn More About Our Industry Allies Council Partners Congress of Neurological Surgeons 10 ...

  3. Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS): current practice among British surgeons.

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteley, M. S.; Smith, J J; Galland, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS) has recently caused considerable interest among British surgeons. There are no data indicating which, if any, patients benefit from SEPS. A series of 47 British surgeons, identified as having taken up SEPS, were sent a questionnaire asking about their current practice; 26 were returned completed (55% response rate). Of those surgeons replying, 22 (85%) had performed their first SEPS procedure within the previous 21 months, 18 (69%) within t...

  4. Chapter 39: an historical overview of British neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2010-01-01

    In the UK, neurology stemmed from general (internal) medicine rather than psychiatry. In 1886 the Neurological Society of London was founded, with Hughlings Jackson as its first President. After World War I, Kinnier Wilson was made Physician in Charge of the first independent department of neurology, which was at Westminster Hospital in London. Although before the 17th century there were British doctors who took an interest in diseases of the nervous system, e.g. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1230), who distinguished epilepsy from apoplexy, and Bartholomeus Anglicus, whose encyclopedia (c. 1260) provided the first picture of a dissection printed in English, John of Gaddesden (1280-1361) was the first in Britain to produce a manuscript on neurological disorders. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) was the founder of Neurology, being the first to use the term, and was also the leader of the first multidisciplinary team in neurological science, helping to shift attention from the chambers of the brain to the brain substance itself. He wrote seven books, all but the last in Latin, and his second one, Cerebri anatome (1664) was the first on the nervous system to include the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves, introducing such new terms as lentiform body, corpus striatum, optic thalamus, inferior olives and peduncles. Most of his neurology was in his fifth book, De anima brutorum (1672). Before Willis the brain was a mystery, but his work laid the foundations for neurological advances. After the 17th century of William Harvey and Thomas Sydenham and the 18th century of William Heberden and Robert Whytt there followed the 19th century of James Parkinson (1755-1824), John Cooke (1756-1838), Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), Marshall Hall (1790-1856) and Bentley Todd (1809-1860). Besides its "Father," Hughlings Jackson, the giants who established the unique superiority of British neurology were Sir William Gowers, Sir David Ferrier, Kinnier Wilson, Sir Gordon Holmes and Sir Charles

  5. Norms of care in British and American neurologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menken, M; Hopkins, A; DeFriese, G H

    1988-01-01

    At a Consensus Development Conference on the Scope of Neurological Practice in the United Kingdom, 26 British specialists in the field of neurology constructed norms of care for patients with 11 neurologic disorders. For each disorder, these specialists specified the percentage of all patients who should see a physician, as well as the percentage who should see a consultant neurologist, the appropriate duration of the initial patient encounter, and the appropriate frequency of follow-up visits per annum. When compared with American estimates used in health manpower planning, British neurologists generally make a far greater allowance for patient self-care, as well as care by nonphysician health care providers, allow less time for patient encounters, and see a need for follow-up care less frequently. These marked differences in the perceptions of specialists of a normative character may determine, in part, the different "practice styles" of physicians in different regions that cannot be explained in economic terms. Results suggest that the practice style concept should be broadened to include the use of health personnel of many types, the scope of specialty medicine, and the role definition of primary care.

  6. Art, passion, and neurosurgery: the role of the Society of Neurological Surgeons in academic neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Neurosurgery is at a crossroads in a time of economic uncertainty. It is also a time of remarkable potential for innovation resulting in dramatic improvement in the way neurosurgeons care for patients and the quality of outcomes. Analysis of this key time point of neurosurgical history is drawn from reflections for a presidential address to the Society of Neurological Surgeons. It is the author's opinion that the best of academic neurosurgery must and will accept this challenge by developing not only the research but also the creativity and art of what neurosurgeons do for maximal patient benefit in research, educational, and clinical missions.

  7. Navigating the Strait of Magellan: mapping a new paradigm for neurosurgical residency training. Presidential address to the Society of Neurological Surgeons, May 7, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A John

    2008-10-01

    At the conclusion of his year as 81st president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the author delivered the following address at the 2007 annual meeting of the Society of Neurological Surgeons in San Francisco. In his address, Dr. Popp used the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan to illustrate the present climate affecting residency training and why the current training paradigm must be examined and, where necessary, changed. Based on this call to action the leaders of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, The American Board of Neurological Surgeons, The Congress of Neurological Surgeons, The Council of State Neurosurgical Societies, The Residency Review Committee for Neurosurgery, The Society of Neurological Surgeons, and the Washington Committee for Neurosurgery agreed to hold an unprecedented Education Summit meeting to investigate a comprehensive approach to evaluating and changing the current neurosurgical residency training model.

  8. Farmers' perception of the role of veterinary surgeons in vaccination strategies on British dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, I F; Hobson-West, P; Brennan, M L; Lowton, R; Kaler, J; Wapenaar, W

    2015-11-01

    There is limited research investigating the motivators and barriers to vaccinating dairy cattle. Veterinary surgeons have been identified as important sources of information for farmers making vaccination and disease control decisions, as well as being farmers' preferred vaccine suppliers. Vets' perception of their own role and communication style can be at odds with farmers' reported preferences. The objective of this study was to investigate how dairy farmers perceived the role of vets in implementing vaccination strategies on their farm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 dairy farmers from across Britain. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that farmers perceive vets to have an important role in facilitating decision-making in all aspects of vaccination, including the aspects of vaccine distribution and advice on implementation. This important role is acknowledged by farmers who have regular veterinary contact, but also farmers with solely emergency veterinary contact. Given this finding, future work should investigate the attitudes of vets towards vaccination and how they perceive their role. Combining this knowledge will enable optimisation of vaccination strategies on British dairy farms. PMID:26530434

  9. 2016 Laboratory guidelines for postvasectomy semen analysis: Association of Biomedical Andrologists, the British Andrology Society and the British Association of Urological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P; Woodward, B J; Muneer, A; Kirkman-Brown, J C

    2016-07-01

    Post-vasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is the procedure used to establish whether sperm are present in the semen following a vasectomy. PVSA is presently carried out by a wide variety of individuals, ranging from doctors and nurses in general practitioner (GP) surgeries to specialist scientists in andrology laboratories, with highly variable results.Key recommendations are that: (1) PVSA should take place a minimum of 12 weeks after surgery and after a minimum of 20 ejaculations. (2) Laboratories should routinely examine samples within 4 h of production if assessing for the presence of sperm. If non-motile sperm are observed, further samples must be examined within 1 h of production. (3) Assessment of a single sample is acceptable to confirm vasectomy success if all recommendations and laboratory methodology are met and no sperm are observed. Clearance can then be given. (4) The level for special clearance should be methods contained within these guidelines. Surgeons are responsible both preoperatively and postoperatively for the counselling of patients and their partners regarding complications and the possibility of late recanalisation after clearance. These 2016 guidelines replace the 2002 British Andrology Society (BAS) laboratory guidelines and should be regarded as definitive for the UK in the provision of a quality PVSA service, accredited to ISO 15189:2012, as overseen by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). PMID:27083211

  10. Assessment of online visibility of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS): a strategic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Serriah, M; Wong, L; Dhariwal, D; Banks, R J

    2014-02-01

    The Internet is a powerful method of acquiring and sharing information. In marketing and business, online visibility is vital for publicity and the reputation of an organisation. To our knowledge, the importance of such visibility in medicine in general, and in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) services in the UK, has not previously been investigated. We aimed to provide a better understanding of the way that patients use the Internet by asking 450 patients to complete a questionnaire when they attended outpatient OMFS departments at 2 centres. We also assessed the online visibility of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS) and investigated the correlation between the strength of online visibility and professional reputation. Results from the self-administered, anonymous, validated questionnaires showed that 82% of patients agreed that the Internet was a powerful source of information, and two-thirds associated online visibility with a good reputation. However, the perceived online visibility of the BAOMS was poor (2%). This study mirrors findings in business publications, and confirms the link between online visibility and professional reputation. It also shows that there is a gap between patients' perceptions and the level of uptake of professional resources. We propose various strategies to bridge this gap and to promote the online visibility and professional reputation of the BAOMS and of OMFS services in the UK.

  11. The scientific contributions of British Plastic Surgeons to the Revue de Chirurgie Plastique and the Revue de Chirurgie Structive, Brussels (1931-1938).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrebos, J

    2001-01-01

    In 1931, Maurice Coelst, M.D. from Brussels started the publication of the first international journal of plastic surgery ever published: the Revue de Chirurgie Plastique (1931-1934), which eventually became the Revue de Chirurgie Structive (1935-1938). In 1936, he established the first European Society of Structive Surgery, which held its first congress in Brussels. Further congresses were held in London in 1937 and in Milan in 1938. It is the collaboration and the participation of British plastic surgeons in this Society, this journal, and these meetings that I want to stress, because I am firmly convinced that these documents fill a gap in the history of Plastic Surgery in Great Britain, since--as far as I know--no detailed information concerning this period was ever published in Plastic Surgery literature.

  12. American Association of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletter AANS/JNSPG Publications AANS Neurosurgeon Issues Abstracts Journal of Neurosurgery Subspecialty Section Newsletters Advertising and Marketing AANS Neurosurgeon Policy Statements Sections/Related Organizations Young ...

  13. British plastic surgeons who contributed to the Revue de Chirurgie Plastique and the Revue de Chirurgie Structive (1931-1938): "the Big Four" in their Speciality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B O

    2001-01-01

    The Revue de Chirurgie Plastique and the Revue de Chirurgie Structive, Brussels (1931-1938), edited by Maurice Coelst, M.D. from Brussels, were the first, full-fledged medical publications devoted specifically to plastic, reconstructive, and aesthetic surgery. Publishing original articles by H.D. Gillies, P.T. Kilner, A.H. McIndoe, and R. Mowlem--the "Big Four" as they were known to both English and American plastic surgeons--the Revues drew attention to these four surgeons who were mainly responsible for developing the prestige of English plastic surgery in the early 1930s.

  14. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  15. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Reproductive Surgeons Home About Us About SRS Mission Statement Officers The Role of Reproductive Surgeons For ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SRS is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  16. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by oral and maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Having Orthognathic Surgery The AAOMS and AAO present "Having Orthognathic ... by oral and maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Having Orthognathic Surgery The AAOMS and AAO present "Having Orthognathic ...

  17. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... So You Want to Be a Surgeon Resident Resources Teaching Resources Online Guide to Choosing a Surgical Residency Clinical ... Patient Safety Advanced Skills Course for Rural Surgeons Support the Work of the Nora Institute ... Advocacy Advocacy Overview Quality Payment Program QPP Resource Center QPP Resource Center What Surgeons Can Do ...

  18. American College of Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... So You Want to Be a Surgeon Resident Resources Teaching Resources Online Guide to Choosing a Surgical Residency Clinical ... Patient Safety Advanced Skills Course for Rural Surgeons Support the Work of the Nora Institute ... Advocacy Advocacy Overview Quality Payment Program QPP Resource Center QPP Resource Center What Surgeons Can Do ...

  19. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  20. NASA Robot Brain Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Mechanical Engineer Michael Guerrero works on the Robot Brain Surgeon testbed in the NeuroEngineering Group at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Principal investigator Dr. Robert W. Mah states that potentially the simple robot will be able to feel brain structures better than any human surgeon, making slow, very precise movements during an operation. The brain surgery robot that may give surgeons finer control of surgical instruments during delicate brain operations is still under development.

  1. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... December 1 – 3, 2016. This year’s course includes didactic lectures by outstanding surgeons and educators who are ... held in high esteem by other medical societies. Education Evidence-Based Medicine article published in OBG Mangement ...

  2. Surgeons' vision rewarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Surgeons and clinical staff, theatre circulation and scrub personnel, and anaesthetists, as well as the estates and facilities team at Kent's Maidstone Hospital, have worked with specialist supplier of integrated audio, video, and instrumentation systems for the operating room, Olympus Medical, to develop what is claimed is among the UK's most advanced operating theatres yet built for laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie discussed the project with Amir Nisar, the surgeon who championed efforts to get the facility built, and Olympus Medical national sales manager, systems integration, James Watts. PMID:20839526

  3. General or specialist surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B M

    2009-01-01

    General Surgery is a broad surgical specialty that focuses on diseases related to abdominal organs, skins and hernias, both in elective and emergency settings. With the prevalent trend for increasing subspecialisation in today's surgical practice, general surgery has lost some of its former glory and scope. This has led to suffering of the image of the general surgeons (GS) in the eyes of trainees, peers, the public and even GS themselves. A comprehensive review of literature is presented to address the controversy surrounding the role and future of general and specialist surgeons in the current perspectives. PMID:20795470

  4. Current neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases

  5. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  6. Neurological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  7. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  8. Body dysmorphia, self-mutilation and the reconstructive surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James Kwok-Kwan; Jones, Sophie M; Heywood, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a disabling preoccupation with a slight or an imagined defect in appearance. It is recognised in some patients who present to the plastic surgeon requesting multiple cosmetic procedures. Very rarely, BDD patients may wish for amputation of a healthy limb and may even mutilate themselves deliberately in order to necessitate amputation. These patients pose a diagnostic challenge as BDD is uncommon and they are often uncooperative whilst appearing mentally sound. Furthermore, they raise difficult ethical and legal issues for the surgeon. Although there is some guidance for the management of BDD patients seeking elective amputation, there is currently none for the management of those who present in the emergency setting. Illustrated by the case of a man who, having failed to find a complicit surgeon, attempted self-amputation of the hand, we review the relevant ethical, legal and management issues with advice by the British Medical Association and General Medical Council. PMID:20392680

  9. Occupational neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, R G

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders.

  10. British Association of Clinical Anatomists: Abstracts of papers presented at the Annual General Meeting, 1983

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The Annual General Meeting of the British Association of Clinical Anatomists for 1983 was held at the Royal College of Surgeons of England on 14th January 1983. The following are abstracts of the papers presented.

  11. British Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Andersen, Christine Bang

    2014-01-01

    The case deals with the rather tumultuous executive leadership changes of British Petroleum (BP) over the past decade from 2005 to 2014 in the wake of two dramatic incidents: The Texas City refinery explosion in 2005 and the explosion of the oil rig Deepwater Horizon in the Mexican Gulf in 2010...... guidelines and governance practices. The case captures the intricacies of corporate management and provides a realistic overview of the complexities that often surround leadership approaches and executive decisions. Hence, it can be used in various graduate and executive courses in strategic management......, leadership development and corporate governance that all grapple with issues of responsible ethical behaviour. This case is part of the CBS free case collection (visit www.thecasecentre.org/CBSfreecases for more information on the collection). This case can be downloaded by educators as a clean pdf...

  12. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  13. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  14. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  15. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  16. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus Information Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus? Lupus (also called systemic lupus erythematosus ) is a ...

  17. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character. PMID:27256150

  18. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  19. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  20. [Improving the surgeon's image: introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tomoo

    2004-05-01

    The number of medical students who aspire to become surgeons has been decreasing in recent years. With a vicious spiral in the decreasing number and the growing deterioration of surgeons' working conditions, there is fear of deterioration of surgical care and subsequent disintegration of overall health care in Japan. The purpose of this issue is to devise a strategy for improving surgeons' image and their working conditions to attract future medical students. However, we cannot expect a quick cure for the problem of the decreasing number of applicants for surgery since this issue is deeply related to many fundamental problems in the health care system in Japan. The challenge for surgical educators in coming years will be to solve the problem of chronic sleep deprivation and overwork of surgery residents and to develop an efficient program to meet the critical educational needs of surgical residents. To solve this problem it is necessary to ensure well-motivated surgical residents and to develop an integrated research program. No discussion of these issues would be complete without attention to the allocation of scarce medical resources, especially in relation to financial incentives for young surgeons. The authors, who are conscientious representatives of this society, would like to highlight these critical problems and issues that are particularly relevant to our modern surgical practice, and it is our sincere hope that all members of this society fully recognize these critical issues in the Japanese health care system to take leadership in improving the system. With the demonstration of withholding unnecessary medical conducts we may be able to initiate a renewal of the system and eventually to fulfill our dreams of Japan becoming a nation that can attract many patients from all over the world. Furthermore, verification of discipline with quality control and effective surgical treatment is needed to avoid criticism by other disciplines for being a self

  1. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  2. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection.

  3. Neurological surgery during the Great War: the influence of Colonel Cushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanigan, W C

    1988-09-01

    Despite von Bergmann's work in the Franco-Prussian War and Makins' experiences in the Boer conflict, military surgeons in World War I were unprepared for the nature and extent of intracranial injuries. Poor triage, disorganized transportation, incomplete surgery, and sepsis resulted in a mortality of over 50%. In 1915, as a volunteer to the Ambulance Américaine near Paris, Harvey Cushing spent 5 weeks observing the Allied medical system. He quickly recognized the technical importance of early, definitive intracranial surgery and the logistical requirements for a unified triage system located along the main lines of traffic. Cushing returned to France in 1917 as director of Base Hospital #5, known as the Harvard Unit. Immediately detached to the British Expeditionary Force, he operated at a smaller casualty clearing station close to the Belgian front. The patients treated during the third battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) formed the basis of his technical reports. He standardized intracranial injuries into nine categories with separate mortality rates. In addition, he recommended the surgical techniques of en bloc bone resection under local anesthesia with suction debridement and primary two-layer closure. Shell fragments were removed by magnets when possible; dichloramine-T was used as an antiseptic. By reducing infection and secondary complications, Cushing halved the earlier mortality rates. In September 1918, as senior consultant to the American Expeditionary Force, Cushing was in charge of organizing the neurosurgical care for the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives. His instruction of individual surgeons in operative techniques and the creation of identified hospital centers with suitable equipment and trained personnel helped to establish neurological surgery as a military specialty.

  4. American Academy of Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting by October 24, 2016. SUBMIT NOW It’s Neurology Career Week, October 3–7 The AAN’s Neurology Career Week offers the best Online Job Fair ... AAN is fighting on behalf of neurologists and neurology. Updates on Zika Virus Stay up-to-date ...

  5. Scapular dyskinesis: the surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Simon J; Funk, Lennard; Sciascia, Aaron; Kibler, W Ben

    2015-10-01

    The scapula fulfils many roles to facilitate optimal function of the shoulder. Normal function of the shoulder joint requires a scapula that can be properly aligned in multiple planes of motion of the upper extremity. Scapular dyskinesis, meaning abnormal motion of the scapula during shoulder movement, is a clinical finding commonly encountered by shoulder surgeons. It is best considered an impairment of optimal shoulder function. As such, it may be the underlying cause or the accompanying result of many forms of shoulder pain and dysfunction. The present review looks at the causes and treatment options for this indicator of shoulder pathology and aims to provide an overview of the management of disorders of the scapula. PMID:27582990

  6. Psychoneuroimmunology and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagge, Edward P; Natali, Elizabeth Lee; Lima, Evan; Leek, Dustin; Neece, Cameron L; Randall, Kiti Freier

    2013-08-01

    The mind-body connection is receiving increasing scrutiny in a large number of clinical settings, although research has lagged in the pediatric specialties. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a novel interdisciplinary scientific field that examines the relationship of the mind to the patient's neurologic, endocrine, and immune systems by examining critical parameters such as the effects of mental stress on wound healing and infection rates. Techniques that modify a patient's emotional and mental responses to illness and surgery have positive effects on their physiology resulting in improved recoveries and higher patient satisfaction rates. In the appropriate clinical settings, an awareness of PNI can enhance outcomes for pediatric surgical patients.

  7. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    OpenAIRE

    Girija A.; Rafeeque M; Abdurehman K

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002) on the admitted cases with neurological complicat...

  8. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century. PMID:20303312

  9. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century.

  10. Neurology and international organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private–public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and c...

  11. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  12. [To be a good expert surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabiki, Takahiko

    2004-05-01

    The clinical and scientific level of Japanese surgeons leads the world needless to say, in the field of early gastric cancer, supported by double-contrast roentgenogram, endoscopy and surgical procedure including lymph node dissection with good outcomes. Surgical skills of Japanese surgeons have been improved by watching of cine or videotaped programs at the academic assemblies, breaking through apprenticeship. Ambitious young surgeons could freely learned excellent technical procedure from the pictures. Young surgeon must be an ever-thinking surgeon to get any hint on the film. Even though medical examinations and treatments including surgical procedures are on the way of standardization through EBM, manuals, guidelines and DPC payment system, medical doctors including surgeons must critically continue to think and seek for better treatment for the patients. Since the every patient differs in terms of age. sex, stage of disease, complicated conditions and social background, the treatment should be different, patient to patient, as tailor made fashion. Unless any progress is made, science and arts of medicine will decline. As another advice for a young surgeon from my experience you should write an operation protocol of every procedure by your self, even if that operation is the first experience or you joined as an assistant. After you wrote, you read the protocol by your instructor. Then you learn many knowledge and surgical know-how. Certainly, the book of the protocols will be your valuable treasure. Furthermore, you should not aim to be a skillful surgeon, but to be a good surgeon performing reliable and gentle operations for the patients. PMID:15176525

  13. Surgeon volume and outcomes in benign hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kemi M; Milad, Magdy P; Gossett, Dana R

    2013-01-01

    Annual surgeon case volume has been linked to patient outcome in a variety of surgical fields, although limited data focus on gynecologic surgery performed by general gynecologists. Herein we review the literature addressing the associations between intraoperative injury, postoperative morbidity, and resource use among surgeons performing a low vs high volume of hysterectomies. Although study design and populations differ, individual and composite morbidity outcomes consistently favored high-volume surgeons. Given the growing emphasis on competency-based evaluation in surgery, gynecology departments may soon consider volume requirements a component of privileging. PMID:23622760

  14. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P ...BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... and on PC1. For all subjective measures, a marked deterioration was seen on PC1. CONCLUSION: Surgeons' circadian rhythm was affected by working night shifts....

  15. Chronocentrism and British criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Criminologists display a largely unexamined propensity to ignore writings that are more than fifteen or so years old, with evident consequences for the public presentation and validation of expert knowledge. A citation study was combined with detailed observations from British criminologists to ascertain quite how that disavowal of the past was accomplished.

  16. Prevent and "British Values"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Alex; Ghale, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    At the recent National Union of Teachers' conference the role of the Prevent strategy and the introduction of "British Values" in the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills framework emerged as key issues for delegates. Two of the speeches made at the conference are presented here.

  17. 1927: a British eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The total solar eclipse of 1927 June 29 was the first to be seen over the British mainland for 203 years. It caused nationwide excitement, induced mass population movement to the towns, villages, moorlands and offshore waters of Wales and the north of England, and severely tested the country's transport and communication systems.

  18. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  19. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup;

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...... alongside patient safety. The present literature study supports the need for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individually designed training program for surgeons performing MIS....

  20. Sir Donald Ross, pioneer aortic valve surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, David

    2015-06-01

    Tribute to Sir Donald Ross by David Wheatley, as read by Robert Kleinloog, President, Society of Cardiothoracic Surgeons of South Africa at the Annual Congress of the South African Heart Association 19 October 2014.

  1. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. PMID:22902159

  2. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  3. Haematology and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Steven; Cohen, Hannah; Losseff, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed. PMID:17369588

  4. Neurologic emergencies in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, J O

    1991-06-01

    Any one neurologic emergency is rare during pregnancy. As a group, neurologic disorders are a major cause of maternal mortality. Optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach and ready access to the collective experience of other clinicians. This article discusses the management of status epilepticus, eclamptic hypertensive encephalopathy, stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, myasthenic crisis, porphyric crisis, acute Guillain-Barré syndrome, autonomic hyperreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, chorea gravidarum, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:1945251

  5. Post dengue neurological complication

    OpenAIRE

    Hasliza, AH; Tohid, H; Loh, KY; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respirator...

  6. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region.

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. PMID:25890773

  8. Attitudes and beliefs about placebo surgery among orthopedic shoulder surgeons in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Wartolowska

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To survey surgeons on their beliefs and attitudes towards the use of placebo in surgery. METHODS: British orthopedic shoulder surgeons, attending a national conference in the United Kingdom, were asked to complete a self-report online questionnaire about their beliefs and attitudes towards the use of placebo related to surgical intervention. The survey included questions about ethical issues, the mechanism of placebo effects, and any concerns regarding its use. RESULTS: 100 surgeons who participated in the survey believed that placebo surgery is ethically acceptable (96%, especially as a part of a clinical trial (46%. Respondents thought that a placebo effect in surgery is real i.e. has a scientific basis (92%, that placebo can be therapeutically beneficial (77%, and that it involves psychological mechanisms (96%. Over half of the respondents (58% have used a surgical procedure with a significant placebo component at least once in their professional career. Their main concern about placebo use in surgery was that it might involve an element of deception. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Surgeons generally agreed that a placebo component to surgical intervention might exist. They also supported placebo use in clinical trials and considered it ethical, providing it does not involve deception of patients. More studies are needed, particularly among other surgical specialties and with larger numbers of participants, to better understand the use of placebo in surgery.

  9. American and British English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁波

    2004-01-01

    @@ The difficulty for the nonnative learner of English is there is no standard English form. He is confronted(面对) with two English dialects (方言) to learn: British English and American English (leaving aside Australian,Indian, South African English ete.) And despite the many cross-cultural influences, it seems that the vocabularies, spellings and pronunciations of these two dialects are diverging year by year.

  10. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to reco

  11. GM2 gangliosidosis in British Jacob sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, M E; Holmes, J P; Jeffrey, M; Jackson, M; Mackintosh, A; Kolodny, E H; Zeng, B J; Wang, C B; Scholes, S F E

    2014-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease) was diagnosed in 6- to 8-month-old pedigree Jacob lambs from two unrelated flocks presenting clinically with progressive neurological dysfunction of 10 day's to 8 week's duration. Clinical signs included hindlimb ataxia and weakness, recumbency and proprioceptive defects. Histopathological examination of the nervous system identified extensive neuronal cytoplasmic accumulation of material that stained with periodic acid--Schiff and Luxol fast blue. Electron microscopy identified membranous cytoplasmic bodies within the nervous system. Serum biochemistry detected a marked decrease in hexosaminidase A activity in the one lamb tested, when compared with the concentration in age matched controls and genetic analysis identified a mutation in the sheep hexa allele G444R consistent with Tay-Sachs disease in Jacob sheep in North America. The identification of Tay-Sachs disease in British Jacob sheep supports previous evidence that the mutation in North American Jacob sheep originated from imported UK stock. PMID:24309906

  12. Occupational health related concerns among surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Anjuman Gul; Naeem, Zahid; Zaman, Atif; Zahid, Faryal

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon's daily workload renders him/her susceptible to a variety of the common work-related illness. They are exposed to a number of occupational hazards in their professional work. These hazards include sharp injuries, blood borne pathogens, latex allergy, laser plumes, hazardous chemicals, anesthetic gases, equipment hazards, static postures, and job related stressors. However, many pay little attention to their health, and neither do they seek the appropriate help when necessary. It is observed that occupational hazards pose a huge risk to the personal well-being of surgeons. As such, the importance of early awareness and education alongside prompt intervention is duly emphasized. Therefore, increased attention to the health, economic, personal, and social implications of these injuries is essential for appropriate management and future prevention. These risks are as great as any other occupational hazards affecting surgeons today. The time has come to recognize and address them. PMID:27103909

  13. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Advancements in minimally invasive surgery have led to increases in popularity of single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) and natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES(®); American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy [Oak Brook, IL] and Society of American...... Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons [Los Angeles, CA]) due to their postulated benefits of better cosmesis, less pain, and quicker recovery. This questionnaire-based study investigated Danish surgeons' attitudes toward these new procedures. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A 26-item questionnaire was developed...... become standard techniques for cholecystectomy within 6 years. CONCLUSIONS: The importance of risk of complications has not surprisingly a high priority among surgeons in this questionnaire. Why this is has to be investigated further before implementing SILS and NOTES as standard of care....

  14. A Bariatric Surgery Primer for Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsberg, Jessica G; Halpern, Alan A; Hill, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are now presenting to orthopedic surgeons for elective arthroplasties. In addition, orthopedic surgeons themselves are referring more patients for consideration of bariatric surgery in anticipation of future elective procedures. Although the full effects of bariatric surgery on metabolism are not yet known, the altered digestion associated with these surgeries poses several issues for orthopedic surgeons. In this article, we address 3 aspects of care of this class of patient: review of the most commonly performed procedures and their metabolic consequences; suggested preoperative assessment of bariatric patients for any conditions that should be corrected before surgery; and evaluation of outcomes of elective procedures performed after bariatric surgery. Awareness of the unique characteristics of this group of patients helps minimize the potential for complications of planned orthopedic surgeries.

  15. Orthopaedic Surgeon Burnout: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; DePasse, J Mason; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-04-01

    Burnout is a syndrome marked by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low job satisfaction. Rates of burnout in orthopaedic surgeons are higher than those in the general population and many other medical subspecialties. Half of all orthopaedic surgeons show symptoms of burnout, with the highest rates reported in residents and orthopaedic department chairpersons. This syndrome is associated with poor outcomes for surgeons, institutions, and patients. Validated instruments exist to objectively diagnose burnout, although family members and colleagues should be aware of early warning signs and risk factors, such as irritability, withdrawal, and failing relationships at work and home. Emerging evidence indicates that mindfulness-based interventions or educational programs combined with meditation may be effective treatment options. Orthopaedic residency programs, departments, and practices should focus on identifying the signs of burnout and implementing prevention and treatment programs that have been shown to mitigate symptoms. PMID:26885712

  16. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  17. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  18. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje;

    2014-01-01

    was performed. MRI assessment included age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) grading (mild, moderate, severe according to the Fazekas' scale), count of lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts, and global atrophy rating. Of the 633 (out of the 639 enrolled) patients with follow-up information (mean age 74.1 ± 5......, presence and number of neurological examination abnormalities predicted global functional decline independent of MRI lesions typical of the aging brain and other determinants of disability in the elderly. Systematically checking for neurological examination abnormalities in older patients may be cost...

  19. Creativity and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  20. Ancillary services available to the orthopedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Jack M

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of high quality medical services is approaching a crisis situation in the United States. As physician reimbursements decline and overhead increases, orthopedic surgeons must seek additional sources of revenue to remain financially viable and control the quality of medical care that they deliver. The orthopedic surgeon group is well positioned to control its own service lines and deliver excellent patient care as a result. This article reviews the possibilities of multiple types of ancillary service lines available for the orthopedic group practice. PMID:18061762

  1. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs. PMID:24973949

  2. How helpful is capsule endoscopy to surgeons?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Ersoy; Bulent Sivri; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a new technology that, for the first time, allows complete, non-invasive endoscopic imaging of the small bowel. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of suspected small bowel diseases has been established. Important applications for surgeons include observations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel neoplasms.

  3. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs.

  4. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  5. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  6. Treatment trends in allergic rhinitis and asthma: a British ENT survey

    OpenAIRE

    Theochari Eva G; Natt Davinia K; Karkos Petros D; Natt Ravinder S; Karkanevatos Apostolos

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Allergic Rhinitis is a common Ear, Nose and Throat disorder. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis are diseases with similar underlying mechanism and pathogenesis. The aim of this survey was to highlight current treatment trends for Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma. Method A questionnaire was emailed to all registered consultant members of the British Association of Otorhinolaryngologists - Head and Neck Surgeons regarding the management of patients with Allergic Rhinitis and related d...

  7. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  8. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  9. Post dengue neurological complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  10. Neurology and detective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions. PMID:24006370

  11. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  12. [DR. SHOSHANA SZKOP-FRENKIEL: THE FIRST FEMALE PLASTIC SURGEON IN ISRAEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehory-Rubin, Zipora

    2015-11-01

    In the history of Israeli medicine, Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel is regarded as the first plastic surgeon in the country and among the founders of the profession of plastic surgery. This article describes the long road she traveled, from her acceptance into medical studies in Vilna--at a time when the entry of any woman to the faculty of medicine was strictly limited and of Jewish women in particular; her emigration to Eretz Israel and her struggles as she underwent training in internal medicine at the "Hadassah" Hospital in Tel-Aviv, when she was denied training as a surgeon; and up to the moment she was accepted by the plastic surgery unit of the Tel Hashomer Hospital and became the first such female practitioner in Israel. Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel thus fulfilled a childhood dream to become a surgeon at a time when women were excluded from surgery on the grounds that it called for "male" characteristics. This article is intended to illustrate the character of a female doctor pursuing a career in surgery during the time of the British Mandate, to illuminate her professional travails in Israel, and to emphasize her important contribution in the field. PMID:26821508

  13. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. L...

  14. Hither neurology: research.

    OpenAIRE

    Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    Neurological disability may be prevented, or it may be alleviated if prevention is impossible or ineffective. Research into prevention and alleviation can be "laboratory" or "clinical", the latter being no less scientific than the former. All proposed treatments must be properly evaluated to ensure that effective interventions are widely adopted and ineffective ones abandoned. Unless an intervention has a major effect on outcome (which most do not), the most efficient assessment is by random ...

  15. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    VERKHRATSKY, ALEXEI; Rodríguez, José J.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Astroglia encompass a subset of versatile glial cells that fulfill a major homeostatic role in the mammalian brain. Since any brain disease results from failure in brain homeostasis, astroglial cells are involved in many, if not all, aspects of neurological and/or psychiatric disorders. In this article, the roles of astrocytes as homeostatic cells in healthy and diseased brains are surveyed. These cells can mount the defence response to the insult of the brain, astrogliosis, when and where th...

  16. Feline neurology. Diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definitive diagnosis of neurologic conditions in cats, as well as other species, has been greatly facilitated by rapid development of new techniques. In some cases, these developments have involved refinements of existing methods, whereas in others, essentially new techniques have evolved. Diagnostic tests developed in earlier years also continue to be of value. The application of many of these techniques is illustrated throughout this text. In this chapter, attention is focused on certain particularly valuable tests

  17. Simulation in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported.

  18. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Charles R. Newton

    2011-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled profess...

  19. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  20. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  1. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  2. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence. PMID:26254909

  3. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  4. Paying surgeons less has cost more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph; Derman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 mandated reductions in physician reimbursement. This reduction in payments could be envisioned to limit expenditures on 2 counts: first, individual fees would be lower, producing inherent savings. Furthermore, reducing fees should depress the incentive to work, thereby generating additional savings from reduced output. A rival point of view holds that lower fees might paradoxically lead to greater spending because surgeons compensate for per-case reductions by performing more cases. If this income-targeting hypothesis is correct, lower per-case fees leads to increased volume. Increased work output has particularly sizable economic effects in fields like orthopedic surgery because the total cost of orthopedic interventions is usually many times larger than the physician's fee (largely owing to the cost of implants). As such, increases in work volume more than negate the potential savings from lower surgeon's fees.This phenomenon was studied in the context of total knee arthroplasty. In the decade spanning 1996 to 2005, inflation-adjusted physician reimbursement decreased by approximately 5% per year, leading to a cumulative drop in reimbursement from $2847 to $1685. Nonetheless, because the number of procedures performed increased from 253,841 to 498,169 and because payments to hospitals far exceeded payments to surgeons, total expenditures for total knee arthroplasty increased dramatically: more than $7.1 billion additional was spent on hospital payments. Continuing to pay surgeons less is apt to continue to cost more. Counter to intuition, the best strategy for controlling overall spending might be higher, not lower, surgical fees.

  5. Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery: Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove ... over time. NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons determine exactly where tumors end ...

  6. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation. PMID:27055448

  7. History of Neurology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinde

    2000-01-01

    @@In 1921, the first independent department of neurology was established in Beijing. Before 1949, all over China only 12 professional doctors lectured neurology in medical colleges. Only 30 medically trained personnel were engaged in the neurological departments. The neurological departments contained roughly 200 beds. The thesis on stroke was written by Zhang Shanlei and published in 1922. Author discussed the cerebral stroke on basis of Chinese traditional medicine and European medicine. The first Textbook of Neurology in China was written by Professor Cheng Yu-lin and was published in 1939. In 1952, the Chinese Society of Neurology and Psychiatry of Chinese Medical Association was established. In 1955, the first issue of the Chinese Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry was published.

  8. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2015-06-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. Loss-of-function alleles and even complete human gene knockouts for certain genes appear to be compatible with a normal phenotype. PMID:27066541

  9. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  10. Neurology of Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psy...

  11. The neurology of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  12. Alpha thalassaemia in British people.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, D R; Ayyub, H.; Clegg, J B; Hill, A V; Nicholls, R D; Teal, H; Wainscoat, J.S. (James S.); Weatherall, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Although alpha thalassaemia is rare in north Europeans, it has been identified in British people with no known foreign ancestry. Twelve such patients were studied, of whom eight shared a distinctive molecular defect, which was clearly different from defects seen in subjects of Mediterranean or South East Asian origin. A rare but specific form of alpha thalassaemia is therefore present in the British population. In addition, two patients from families of mixed racial origin were encountered wh...

  13. 1970 British Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70 is one of Britain’s world famous national longitudinal birth cohort studies, three of which are run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London.  BCS70 follows the lives of more than 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Over the course of cohort members lives, the BCS70 has collected information on health, physical, educational and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors. Since the birth survey in 1970, there have been nine ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38 and most recently at 42. Data has been collected from a number of different sources (the midwife present at birth, parents of the cohort members, head and class teachers, school health service personnel and the cohort members themselves. The data has been collected in a variety of ways including via paper and electronic questionnaires, clinical records, medical examinations, physical measurements, tests of ability, educational assessments and diaries. The majority of BCS70 survey data can be accessed by bona fide researchers through the UK Data Service at the University of Essex.

  14. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  15. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  16. The pediatric surgeon-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackley, Sandra; Bostwick, John Michael

    2013-08-01

    Though technical aspects of surgical practice are commonly emphasized, communication is the most frequent "procedure" employed by surgeons. A good patient-physician relationship enhances the quality of surgical care by improving outcomes and patient and family satisfaction. There are general principles that can enhance communication with all children and families. Employing a developmentally sensitive approach that adjusts communication style based on a child's cognitive abilities and emotional concerns can further enhance the relationship with children of different ages. These communication skills can be learned and are improved by practice and self-reflection. PMID:23870204

  17. Happiness and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yoram; Achiron, Anat

    2009-04-01

    Happiness is an emotional state reflecting positive feelings and satisfaction with life, which, as an outcome in disease states or as an end point in clinical trials, is a neglected concept in most therapeutic areas. In neurological disease, happiness is important as it can be diminished either as a direct result of damage to neuronal tissue or as a reaction to a poor prognosis. The monitoring and maintenance of happiness and wellbeing have historically been considered to be peripheral to medicine. However, as happiness interacts with the patient's physical health, it is an important parameter to assess alongside all aspects of any given disease. Happiness provides a reliable overview of the patient's general status over and above standard parameters for quality of life, and is more wide-ranging than the narrow measures of disease activity or treatment efficacy that are the focus of most clinical trials. In many studies, happiness has been associated with health and success in most areas of life, including performance at work, sporting achievement and social functioning. For approximately a decade, previously studied aspects of psychology have been grouped under the label of positive psychology (PoP). Principles of this discipline are now being used to guide some treatments in neurological and psychiatric diseases. PoP aims to define patient wellbeing in scientific terms and to increase understanding of happiness, meaning in life, resilience and character strengths, as well as to determine how this knowledge can be applied clinically to promote health. Some evidence has emerged recently suggesting that improvements in patient status can result from interventions to improve the patient's level of happiness in diseases, including epilepsy, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Several effective approaches to increase happiness employ activities to engage and stimulate patients who might otherwise be unoccupied and isolated. In

  18. Regional futures: British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two paradigms that are the source of present-day economic development policies are described. The dominant paradigm is the expansionist world view that assumes economic growth is essentially unlimited, subject to certain constraints, and that the best way to monitor the human economy is through money flows. The steady-state or ecological world view assumes there are real constraints on material throughput and growth, and puts a significant emphasis on natural capital as a form of wealth which is distinct from economic or manufactured capital. Over the long term, each generation must receive from the previous generation at least an adequate stock of natural capital assets to ensure long-term sustainability. For every major category of consumption, such as food and energy, an ecological footprint can be assigned which represents the land needed to sustain a given pattern of consumption. For the lower mainland of British Columbia, this footprint would be about 22 times the actual land area; for the Netherlands, it would be about 15 times larger than the country itself. On a global basis, only about 1.7 hectares per capita of ecologically productive land is actually available, showing that Canadian material standards would not be sustainable on a global level. The steady-state approach to economic development would involve a local and regional approach from the bottom up, preferring small-scale labor-intensive enterprise. Trade would be limited to trading in real ecological surpluses, and value-added products would be made locally instead of shipping raw materials for processing elsewhere. 5 figs

  19. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  20. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  1. Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative d...

  2. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikant Mishra; Bhavesh Trikamji; Sandeep Singh; Parampreet Singh; Rajasekharan Nair

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian med...

  3. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  4. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  5. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia M.D. Brucki; Norberto Anísio Frota; Pedro Schestatsky; Adélia Henriques Souza; Valentina Nicole Carvalho; Maria Luiza Giraldes de Manreza; Maria Fernanda Mendes; Elizabeth Comini-Frota; Cláudia Vasconcelos; Vitor Tumas; HENRIQUE B. FERRAZ; Egberto Barbosa; Mauro Eduardo Jurno

    2015-01-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  6. The Demography of Royal Navy Surgeons: Some Views on the Process of Prosopography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H Myers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is a brief social biography and demography of British naval doctors during the nineteenth century, asking why Scottish-educated surgeons were so prominent.  Understanding the demography and changing dynamics of naval surgeons’ labor illuminates the complex relationship among the military, discrimination, and nationalism that shaped this influential labor market. This study reviews how to collect demographic information from multiple types of sources: university archives, matriculation records, digitized medical journals, and student rolls.  It also uses chi-square tests to show the significance of the demographic information collected.  The results show us the entangled relationship between database conceptualization, data collection, and data analysis.  

  7. Silas Weir Mitchell: Neurologists and Neurology during the American Civil War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, François; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With few exceptions, neurology was nonexistent in the United States until the Civil War years. From 1861 to 1865, the United States saw a bitter armed conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederate States or Confederacy), and during those years, neurology was born in the United States. In 1861, Silas Weir Mitchell, together with George Morehouse and William Keen, opened and operated the first neurological hospital in Philadelphia, with the backing of the Surgeon General William Hammond. They treated and studied many peripheral nerve diseases, which led to their making the medical world aware of several conditions, including causalgia (now known as complex regional pain syndrome) and the phantom limb phenomenon. Progress in neurology, both at that time and in subsequent years, owed a great deal to cross-fertilization from Europe. Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard exemplified this. He held multiple medical positions on both sides of the Atlantic, including a position at Harvard in 1864. His teachings, to some extent, contributed to the development of neurology in the United States. In the Confederate states, medical care was less well organized, and neurology only developed later. After the war, in 1874, Mitchell, Hammond, and a few others founded the American Neurological Association. While war influenced the development of medicine, and neurology in particular, medicine also helped to shape the outcome of the war. PMID:27035676

  8. The history of British gynaecological pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    The venerable tradition of British gynaecological pathology is honoured by brief comments on those who have pioneered work in this arena, using as the starting point the remarkable Scottish physician Dr Matthew Baillie who, with his uncles, the legendary William and John Hunter, can arguably be considered the founders of medicine in Great Britain. The impact of Baillie's great work 'The Morbid Anatomy of Some of the Most Important Parts of the Human Body' is noted. Because of the fame they achieved in working in other areas, the contributions to gynaecological pathology of Thomas Hodgkin and Richard Bright, particularly the former, are often overlooked and are noted herein as is a remarkable book on the ovary by Charles G. Ritchie, published in 1865. The middle years of the 19th century were notable because of the activities of pioneering surgeons such as Sir Spencer Wells and Lawson Tait which gradually led to a greater emphasis on pathologic examination of specimens removed at operation, as opposed to autopsy evaluation. The closing years of the 19th century and early years of the 20th century were dominated by five individuals, Alban Doran, John Bland-Sutton, Cuthbert Lockyer, Elizabeth Hurdon and John Hammond Teacher. Doran wrote an early study of tubal carcinoma and a book on that organ and the ovary. Bland-Sutton was a remarkably influential surgeon with a significant interest in pathology and also contributed a book on the ovary and fallopian tube as well as one of the early good papers on metastatic tumours to the ovary. Lockyer wrote an outstanding book on uterine fibroids and established, and funded, a museum at Charing Cross Hospital. Hurdon can be considered the first female gynaecological pathologist. She spent much of her active career in the United States working at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She co-authored a monumental book on the appendix, likely never to be equalled. Teacher worked in Glasgow for many years and was almost single-handedly responsible

  9. Auditing the British Medical Journal.

    OpenAIRE

    Channer, K S

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to audit the outcome in terms of change in practice of the published research from one volume of the British Medical Journal. All original papers and short reports from one Volume 296 of the British Medical Journal (BMJ) 1988 were read and classified into theoretical only, practical and theoretical and practical. Those papers with any practical message were reviewed by one of a panel of specialists in the subject of the paper to assess if the recommendation made ...

  10. Correct coding for the orthopedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, M Mike; Friedman, Melvin M; Beach, William

    2002-04-01

    Coding accurately is one of the main principles of a successful practice. Some changes that we will see shortly include deletion of the term "separate procedure," deletion of the term "with and/or without," deletion of the term "any method," revision of the criteria for choosing E/M levels, and 52 new and revised Hand Surgery codes. Some other changes to come will be category II and category III codes. More changes are occurring as this is written, and the best advice is to stay tuned. It is obvious to the authors that coding is mainly for reimbursement purposes. The orthopedic surgeon must remain vigilant and must not pass this task on to someone else. Ignorance of coding methods is not an excuse [2]. We must all watch carefully and speak up when necessary. In this day of decreasing reimbursement, we can all increase our revenue stream without working any harder if we code our work properly, completely, and promptly.

  11. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  12. [Music and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Gómez, M

    2007-01-01

    Music perception and output are special functions of the human brain. Investigation in this field is growing with the support of modern neuroimaging techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography). Interest in the music phenomenon and the disorders regarding its processing has been limited. Music is not just an artistic activity but a language to communicate, evoke and reinforce several emotions. Although the subject is still under debate, processing of music is independent of common language and each one uses independent circuits. One may be seriously affected and the other practically unharmed. On the other hand, there may be separate channels within the processing of music for the temporary elements (rhythm), melodic elements (pitch, timbre, and melody), memory and emotional response. The study of subjects with absolute pitch, congenital and acquired amusias, musicogenic epilepsy and musical hallucinations has greatly contributed to the knowledge of how the brain processes music. Music training involves some changes in morphology and physiology of professional musicians' brains. Stress, chronic pain and professional dystonias constitute a special field of musicians' disturbances that concerns neurological practice. Listening to and playing music may have some educational and therapeutic benefits.

  13. Neurologic Itch Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord. PMID:27578080

  14. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed. PMID:11143502

  15. Neurological mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytopathies are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by structural and functional abnormalities in mitochondria. To the best of our knowledge, there are very few studies published from India till date. Selected and confirmed fourteen cases of neurological mitochondrial cytopathies with different clinical syndromes admitted between 1997 and 2000 are being reported. There were 8 male and 6 female patients. The mean age was 24.42+/-11.18 years (range 4-40 years. Twelve patients could be categorized into well-defined syndromes, while two belonged to undefined group. In the defined syndrome categories, three patients had MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, three had MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibre myopathy, three cases had KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and three were diagnosed to be suffering from mitochondrial myopathy. In the uncategorized group, one case presented with paroxysmal kinesogenic dystonia and the other manifested with generalized chorea alone. Serum lactic acid level was significantly increased in all the patients (fasting 28.96+/-4.59 mg%, post exercise 41.02+/-4.93 mg%. Muscle biopsy was done in all cases. Succinic dehydrogenase staining of muscle tissue showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in 12 cases. Mitochondrial DNA study could be performed in one case only and it did not reveal any mutation at nucleotides 3243 and 8344. MRI brain showed multiple infarcts in MELAS, hyperintensities in putaminal areas in chorea and bilateral cerebellar atrophy in MERRF.

  16. The uses of the iPhone for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dala-Ali, Benan M; Lloyd, Mary Anne; Al-Abed, Yahya

    2011-02-01

    Mobile technology is continuously improving and it is important that all physicians are aware of its new advances. Smartphones have the potential to improve diagnostic skills and education of a surgeon. The iPhone is a popular type of smartphone in the market. This article intends to educate surgeons about its uses, functions and medical applications. The phone is an invaluable tool for the modern day surgeon. PMID:21195331

  17. Pharmacovigilance Among Surgeons and in Surgical Wards: Overlooked or Axiomatic?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Gabriel Sunil; Khan, Sohil Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    To review the status of pharmacovigilance system among surgeons and in surgical wards with recommendations. Literature search using MEDLINE, cross-reference of published data and review of World Health Organization—Pharmacovigilance transcripts. Pharmacovigilance system is still in its infancy among surgeons and in surgical wards. No major studies have been published addressing this issue, till date. Surgeons are professionals least likely to report adverse drug reactions. Moreover widespread...

  18. Work-related ocular events among Nigerian dental surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Azodo, Clement C.; Ezeja, Ejike B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Daily clinical activities in dental operatory expose dental surgeons to varied forms of ocular events. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular splashes and foreign bodies among dental surgeons in Nigeria. Methods This questionnaire-based cross-sectional of dental surgeons in Southern Nigeria was conducted between September 2010 and August 2011. The information elicited were demography, experience and type of ocular event, implicated dental proc...

  19. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG. Methods: Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology. Results: The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal. Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  20. Eduardo Martínez Alonso (1903-72): gallant surgeon who undertook special operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coni, Nicholas

    2010-02-01

    Eduardo Martínez Alonso was of Spanish and Uruguyan extraction and was born in Vigo in Galicia in 1903. Due to his father's occupation, he was educated in the UK and qualified from the University of Liverpool. He returned to Madrid to practise and during the Civil War he found himself in the Republican zone where his connections with the Royal Family brought him under suspicion. Threatened with execution, he escaped to serve as a surgeon in the Nationalist Army. Being bilingual, he was medical adviser to the British Embassy during World War II; because of his allegiance to this country and acting from humanitarian motives, he became a ringleader in a plot to smuggle fugitives from Nazi-occupied Europe across a pro-Axis Spain to safety. When the Gestapo was closing in on him, he was smuggled to the UK via Portugal. He underwent training as a potential undercover agent should Franco take Spain into the war but, when hostilities ceased, he returned to Madrid and became a leading thoracic surgeon. PMID:20207896

  1. [Rise of the wound surgeon to academic surgeon: myth or historical fact?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, D

    2000-01-01

    In contrast to modern academic surgery, in 19th century German medical care was mainly taken by non-academic barber surgeons. Only after the foundation of the German Reich (1871) the practice of surgery was made conditional on a full study of medicine. The present article follows up the moot question whether the last generation of barber surgeons succeeded in rising to academic status or if the strong tradition of surgery in barber families was brought to a complete standstill. By evaluating archival documents it can be clearly shown that the professional distance between barber surgery and academic medicine was not invincible. A considerable number of barbers and their descendents (subsequently) succeeded in studying medicine and starting a medical career. PMID:10986752

  2. British Industrial Libraries Before 1939

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Margaret R.

    1972-01-01

    British industrial firm libraries are traced from their beginnings till 1939, by which date they had spread to many branches of industry and had been recognized as an important part of the industrial and library worlds, thus establishing standard patterns of work. The origins and significance of Aslib are discussed. (27 references) (Author/NH)

  3. Young British Art / Hanno Soans

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soans, Hanno, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    1990ndate kunsti muutumisest. Inglise kunstniku Peter Daviese maalist "Kuum esimene sada" (1996), Gavin Turki vahakujuna valminud autoportreest "Pop". "Young British Art'i" uuskunstist ja Jasper Zoova installatsioonist "F1". Eri analüüsivõimalusi pakkuvatest töödest (Marko Laimre & Ene-Liis Semperi 2000. a. novembri ühisnäituse osa töid).

  4. 'Treatment of the Sportsman's groin': British Hernia Society's 2014 position statement based on the Manchester Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Sheen, Aali J; Stephenson, B. M.; Lloyd, D. M., Coates, A., Knopp, J., Oram, S., & Rowbotham, S.; Robinson, P.; Fevre, D; Paajanen, H.; de Beaux, A; Kingsnorth, A.; Gilmore, O. J.; Bennett, D; Maclennan, I; O'Dwyer, P; Sanders, D.; Kurzer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to produce a multidisciplinary consensus to determine the current position on the nomenclature, definition, diagnosis, imaging modalities and management of Sportsman's groin (SG). Methods Experts in the diagnosis and management of SG were invited to participate in a consensus conference held by the British Hernia Society in Manchester, UK on 11–12 October 2012. Experts included a physiotherapist, a musculoskeletal radiologist and surgeons with a proven track recor...

  5. Surgical treatment of neurological scoliosis using hybrid construct (lumbar transpedicular screws plus thoracic sublaminar acrylic loops)

    OpenAIRE

    La Rosa, Guido; Giglio, Giancarlo; Oggiano, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    In the nineties, most spinal surgeons supported the validity of segmental spine instrumentation, but this procedure has progressively been abandoned because difficult and with a high risk of neurological complications, in favor of the Cotrel-Dobousset (CD). The CD instrumentation is based on segmentation of curves, thus improving the angular correction and actuates sagittal profile. Sublaminar acrylic loops (Universal Clamp) shows the same resistance to stress as steel or titanium alloy subla...

  6. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. PMID:6516450

  7. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  8. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treating certain neurological disorders. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... the table that follows. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN.com Symptoms of MS The studies showed ...

  9. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  10. A newly designed ergonomic body support for surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albayrak, A.; Van Veelen, M.A.; Prins, J.F.; Snijders, C.J.; De Ridder, H.; Kazemier, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: One of the main ergonomic problems during surgical procedures is the surgeon's awkward body posture, often accompanied by repetitive movements of the upper extremities, increased muscle activity, and prolonged static head and back postures. In addition, surgeons perform surgery so concen

  11. Telementoring in education of laparoscopic surgeons: An emerging technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bogen, Moredehi Etai; Augestad, Knut Magne; Patel, Hitendra R. H.; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopy, minimally invasive and minimal access surgery with more surgeons performing these advanced procedures. We highlight in the review several key emerging technologies such as the telementoring and virtual reality simulators, that provide a solid ground for delivering surgical education to rural area and allow young surgeons a safety net and confidence while operating on a newly learned technique.

  12. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  13. Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE SURGEON GENERAL’S CALL TO ACTION TO PREVENT SKIN CANCER From the Surgeon General Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer the ... be disfiguring and even deadly. Medical treatment for skin cancer is costly for individuals, families, and the nation. ...

  14. Linear Scleroderma and Neurological Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre who presented with neurologic abnormalities before or concurrent with the dermatologic diagnosis are reported from the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

  15. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, brain tumor, acoustic neuroma (small tumors of the inner ear), and spinal ... auditory pathways in the brainstem, and detect acoustic neuromas. The patient sits in a soundproof room and ...

  16. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  17. The neurology of gluten sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Pengiran Tengah, Dayangku Siti Nur Ashikin

    2013-01-01

    Classical coeliac disease (CD) is a well-defined syndrome of small bowel villous atrophy associated with abdominal pain, malabsorption, and weight loss as a result of gluten-sensitivity, reversed rapidly by gluten exclusion diet. Disease associations include dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease and a variety of neurological disorders. This thesis aims to investigate the hypothesis of the existence of a gluten sensitive neurolog...

  18. Richard von Volkmann: surgeon and Renaissance man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R; Mubarak, Scott J

    2008-02-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19(th) century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867-1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the "antiseptic technique" to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann's contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children's fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics. PMID:18196438

  19. British Energy Operating Experience Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Energy is the major nuclear generator in the U.K. It has a market share varying between 22% and 25% of the total U.K. generation. The fleet of power stations operated by British Energy consists of one 1250 MWe Pressurised Water Reactor, six Advanced Gas Cooled reactor sites, each with two reactor units of 660 MWe, and one coal fired site with four units of 500 Mwe. In early 1999 British Energy set a strategic goal, for all its reactor units, to achieve 'World Class Performance through Cost leadership' by the end of year 2004. This would be measured against the applicable Upper Quartile performance indicators of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). Against this strategic goal six fundamental objectives were identified, one of which was to define, deploy and measure the effectiveness of a world class Operating Experience programme. British Energy has clearly re-defined its Operating Experience programme and, recognised the value of learning from Operating Experience. Commitment to the programme, and communicating the value of an effective OE programme is being clearly demonstrated by all managers throughout the organisation. Making the information easily accessible at the workplace has been achieved via the British Energy intranet, the harder step is to ensure OE is consulted before commencing an assigned task or plant evolution. Early signs of this are encouraging, but a continuous sustained effort will be required for probably the next two years. The full deployment of the OE programme is scheduled to be complete by 2004. There will however be a redefined programme identified by then to incorporate the lessons learnt and to ensure the programme is aligned with the business as it evolves. An analysis of event root causes and precursors since May 2001 will be undertaken in June 2002. These will be compared with data from previous years to ascertain the effect on the number of recurring events. The critical question, 'has this prevented recurring

  20. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  1. British dental surgery and the First World War: the treatment of facial and jaw injuries from the battlefield to the home front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, K D

    2014-11-01

    When Britain went to war in 1914, the British Expeditionary Force was deployed without a single dentist. Initially considered combatants, the only dental professionals who could serve at the Front were medically qualified dental surgeons in the Royal Army Medical Corps. In treating the traumatic facial and jaw injuries caused by trench warfare, the dental surgeons of this era earned their place on specialist surgical teams and established the principles of oral and maxillofacial surgery. This article will examine the contribution of specialist dental surgeons to the management of facial and jaw wounds in the First World War along the chain of evacuation from the battlefield to the home front, using illustrative examples from the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

  2. British Telecom and Project Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, G. H. L.; Morrow, G.

    1983-07-01

    Factors influencing the emergence of local area network (LANs) are covered along with British Telecom's involvement in Project Universe, an experiment to produce high-speed data links between several LANs in the United Kingdom with the Orbital Test Satellite (OTS). Other functions of Project Universe include measuring the network components performance, developing procedures for using the system for computer-computer and terminal-computer operations, and investigating the use of LAN satellites for business and computer communications. British Telecom has been involved with Project Universe since its inception. A standard Videotex system has been connected to the Cambridge Ring, consequently providing Videotex terminals attached to the ring access to a special Universe Prestel system. Future goals include replacing the OTS with a new satellite with a terminal operating at 8-10 Mbit/s. Block diagrams are provided.

  3. Ethical challenges in surgery as narrated by practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and female surgeons were found. They reasoned in both action and relational ethical perspectives. Surgeons focused on their relationships with patients and colleagues and their moral self in descriptions of the ethical challenges in their work. Dialogue and personal involvement were important in their relationships with patients. The surgeons emphasized the importance of open dialogue, professional recognition, and an inclusive and accepting environment between colleagues. Conclusion The surgeons are personally challenged by the existential realities of human life in their relationships with patients. They realized that ethical challenges are an inherent part of performing surgery and of life itself, and say that they have to learn to "live with" these challenges in a way that is confirmed both socially and by their inner moral self. This means accepting their personal and professional limitations, being uncertain, being fallible, and being humble. Living with the ethical challenges of surgery seems to contribute to the surgeons' confidence and vulnerability in their professional identity.

  4. [Urgent neurologic states: experience at the Neurology Clinic in Sarajevo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncarević, Nedim; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Hrnjica, Mehmed; Hećo, Suad

    2004-01-01

    There is a quite good definition of medical care for patients suffering from chronicle neurological diseases. However the neurologist role in taking care of urgent cases is substantially less determined. This paper is analyzing one year efforts of the on duty neurological team in the Out Patient Department and Emergency Division of the Neurology Department in Sarajevo. During this period the on duty neurological team examined the total of 3939 patients, out of which 1022 patients where kept for treatment. The patients where most frequently assigned to the Emergency unit for following reasons: vascular incident of the Central Nervous System(1955 patients or 50%), cerebrovascular accident represented with 1290 or 33%, and TIA of the carotid and vertebrobasilar area 544 or 14% along with hypertensive encephalopathia, 118 or 3%. This is followed by the group of the short-term disturbance of consciousness (472 or 125), out of which the consciousness crises represented 257 or 7%, and epileptic crises 215 or 5%. Following are the lower percentages of the headaches (287 or 7%), radicular painful syndrome of cervical and lumbal area (209 or 5%), vertigo (183 or 5%), neurophatia (167 or 4%), etc. The more extensive number of patients admitted at the Emergency Division where suffering from brain stroke (800 or 78%), TIA was represented by a lower number (172 or 17%). Only 50 patients had other diagnosis. The ischemic stroke represented 674 or 81% with patients suffering from the brain stroke and the hemorrhagic stroke 153 or 19%. Today, the urgent neurological conditions represent a particular area of Neurology, not only neurologists need to know but also other medical doctors, to enable the patients to be forwarded on time to the appropriate care institution. PMID:15202312

  5. Occupational neurological disorders in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  6. Reflection: The Early Career Surgeon-Scientist's Pathway to Independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie Shintani

    2016-01-01

    The surgeon-scientist offers a unique perspective as one who can arguably best comprehend clinical needs, identify areas ripe for research, and translate discoveries from bench to bedside. However, the long transition from postdoc to independent investigator can prove to be quite challenging. Surgeons have long been described as having results-oriented personalities, and so the long road to independence can be fraught with frustration at times. It requires humility in seeking scientific direction and mentorship, institutional support, and ultimately extramural funding. This reflection piece examines some hallmark steps along the pathway to independence for one otolaryngology-head and neck surgeon-scientist in her early academic career. PMID:26527611

  7. Prevention of neurological complications in correction of severe spinal deformity%重视重度脊柱畸形矫形中的神经并发症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱勇

    2014-01-01

    Spinal or neurological deifcit is one of the most severe complications in surgical correction of scoliosis, which may lead to catastrophic results. The neurological complications related to correction surgery for scoliosis, especially severe scoliosis, are now becoming the focus of spine surgeons. Since the differences exist in patient distribution, etiology and surgical procedures, the rate of neurological complications reported in previous literatures differs. The etiology of scoliosis has been proven to be a related factor for neurological complications in correction of severe scoliosis, and the patients with non-idiopathic scoliosis would take more risks than idiopathic scoliosis patients. Osteotomy, particularly 3-column osteotomy, is another risk factor for neurological complications. Due to complicated procedures in ocrrection of scoliosis, great attetion should paid to the operation plan. Meanwhile, prevention of neurological complications should be focused on and intra-operative neuro-monitoring is a necessity for any scoliosis surgery.

  8. Mealtimes in a neurological ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. BACKGROUND: A determined effort has been made to optimise the nutrition of hospitalised patients. However, the organisation of mealtimes and their relational and aesthetic aspects...... challenged by the design of the physical space and institutional structures. CONCLUSION: This study contributes to our understanding of the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. Based on this study, it can be concluded that meals were at a high risk of being served...... as a mindless task without the recognition that mealtimes are sensed with the whole body of the patient and not only by the mouth. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The importance of the mealtime environment must be acknowledged because it serves as a communicative aspect for neurological patients by letting them...

  9. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  10. Neurology of endemic skeletal fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic skeletal fluorosis is widely prevalent in India and is a major public health problem. The first ever report of endemic skeletal fluorosis and neurological manifestation was from Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh in the year 1937. Epidemiological and experimental studies in the endemic areas suggest the role of temperate climate, hard physical labor, nutritional status, presence of abnormal concentrations of trace elements like strontium, uranium, silica in water supplies, high fluoride levels in foods and presence of kidney disease in the development of skeletal fluorosis. Neurological complications of endemic skeletal fluorosis, namely radiculopathy, myelopathy or both are mechanical in nature and till date the evidence for direct neurotoxicity of fluoride is lacking. Prevention of the disease should be the aim, knowing the pathogenesis of fluorosis. Surgery has a limited role in alleviating the neurological disability and should be tailored to the individual based on the imaging findings.

  11. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  12. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Ultrasound has a well-established role in the diagnostic assessment of acute abdominal pain where some ultrasonically easily-accessible organs account for several diagnostic possibilities. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether surgeons without ultrasound experience could......, specificity and kappa-agreement of the surgeon performed ultrasound examination was 1.00 (0.77-1.00), 0.96 (0.79-0.99), 0.94 (0.3-1.00) and 0.40 (0.12-0.77), 0.97 (0.83-0.99), 0.44 (0.00-0.96); respectively. Visualization of the common bile duct was poor having 73% non-diagnostic surgeon-performed ultrasound...... examinations. CONCLUSION: Surgeons in training without pre-existing ultrasound experience and only a minimum of formal ultrasound education can perform valid and reliable ultrasound examinations of the gallbladder in patients admitted with acute abdominal pain...

  13. An Audit of the Effectiveness of Large Group Neurology Tutorials for Irish Undergraduate Medical Students

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, H

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this audit was to determine the effectiveness of large group tutorials for teaching neurology to medical students. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire rating their confidence on a ten point Likert scale in a number of domains in the undergraduate education guidelines from the Association of British Neurologists (ABN). We then arranged a series of interactive large group tutorials for the class and repeated the questionnaire one month after teaching. In the three core domains of neurological: history taking, examination and differential diagnosis, none of the students rated their confidence as nine or ten out of ten prior to teaching. This increased to 6% for history taking, 12 % in examination and 25% for differential diagnosis after eight weeks of tutorials. This audit demonstrates that in our centre, large group tutorials were an effective means of teaching, as measured by the ABN guidelines in undergraduate neurology.

  14. High Occupational Stress and Low Career Satisfaction of Korean Surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sang Hee; Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Hyung Joon; Jung, Cheol Woong; Kim, Chong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is a demanding and stressful field in Korea. Occupational stress can adversely affect the quality of care, decrease job satisfaction, and potentially increase medical errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the occupational stress and career satisfaction of Korean surgeons. We have conducted an electronic survey of 621 Korean surgeons for the occupational stress. Sixty-five questions were used to assess practical and personal characteristics and occupational stress using the ...

  15. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  16. [Andreas Vesalius, distinguished surgeon of the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1996-01-01

    The author gives here some considerations about A. Vesalius through his life and his works as a surgeon. He was the father of the anatomical revolution against Galen but was also an eminent clinician and surgeon. He was immediately able to adapt his surgical practice whenever the promising methodology was identified (see Consilia). The author concludes with a critical analysis of the Chirurgia magna in septem libros digesta attributed to A. Vesalius.

  17. Perceptions of animal physiotherapy amongst irish veterinary surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle Aoife; Horgan N Frances

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate veterinary surgeons' perceptions, knowledge and use of animal physiotherapy in the Republic of Ireland. A questionnaire was developed and sent to 200 veterinary surgeons, of which 97 were returned. Results indicated that 77 (79%) of respondents were aware of animal physiotherapists. Common sources of information included veterinary colleagues, owners and professional journals, with physiotherapists themselves and undergraduate training being l...

  18. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  19. Comprehensive risk assessment for early neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei; Feng, An-Chieh; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine risk factors for early neurologic complications (NCs) after liver transplantation from perspective of recipient, donor, and surgeon. METHODS: In all, 295 adult recipients were enrolled consecutively between August 2001 and February 2014 from a single medical center in Taiwan. Any NC in the first 30 d post-liver transplantation, and perioperative variables from multiple perspectives were collected and analyzed. The main outcome was a 30-d NC. Generalized additive models were used to detect the non-linear effect of continuous variables on outcome, and to determine cut-off values for categorizing risk. Risk factors were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In all, 288 recipients were included, of whom 142 (49.3%) experienced at least one NC, with encephalopathy being the most common 106 (73%). NCs prolonged hospital stay (35.15 ± 43.80 d vs 20.88 ± 13.58 d, P 27.6 kg/m2, Child-Pugh class C, history of preoperative hepatoencephalopathy or mental disorders, day 7 tacrolimus level > 8.9 ng/mL, and postoperative intra-abdominal infection were more likely associated with NCs. Novel risk factors for NCs were donor age < 22 or ≥ 40 years, male-to-male gender matching, graft-recipient weight ratio 0.9%-1.9%, and sequence of transplantation between 31 and 174. CONCLUSION: NCs post- liver transplantation occurs because of factors related to recipient, donor, and surgeon. Our results provide a basis of risk stratification for surgeon to minimize neurotoxic factors during transplantation. PMID:27350733

  20. A national study of burnout among American transplant surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertges Yost, W; Eshelman, A; Raoufi, M; Abouljoud, M S

    2005-03-01

    This study examines burnout in a national sample of transplant surgeons. Data analyses were conducted on a sample of 209 actively practicing transplant surgeons. Measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory, a demographic survey, and the Surgeon Coping Inventory. Burnout was reflected in 38% of surgeons scoring high on the Emotional Exhaustion dimension, whereas 27% showed high levels of Depersonalization, and 16% had low levels of Personal Accomplishment. Several significant predictors of emotional exhaustion were identified and included questioning one's career choice, giving up activities, and perceiving oneself as having limited control over the delivery of medical services (R2= 0.43). Those who perceived themselves as having a higher ability to control delivery of medical services and who felt more appreciated by patients had lower levels of depersonalization and were less likely to question their career choice (R2= 0.16). Surgeons with high personal accomplishment experienced greater professional growth opportunities, perceived their institution as supportive, felt more appreciated by patients, and were less likely to question their career (R2= 0.24). The prioritization of goals to reflect both professional and personal values accounted for a significant amount of the variance in predicting both emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment in separate regression equations. Recommendations to decrease burnout would include greater institutional support, increased opportunities for professional growth, and greater surgeon control over important services to facilitate efficient work. Coping strategies to moderate stress and burnout are also beneficial and should include prioritizing goals to reflect both professional and personal values. PMID:15848732

  1. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  2. [Cerebrolysin in pediatric neurology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A S; Pylaeva, O A

    2014-01-01

    Мany aspects of сerebrolysin treatment in a wide range of nervous system disorders in children are described. High efficacy and well tolerated therapy are revealed. These findings expand the perspectives of using сerebrolysin in pediatric neurology. PMID:24637827

  3. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  4. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Luciano de Paola; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  5. LASER THERAPY IN CHILD NEUROLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Prityko

    2012-01-01

    The current review of studies devoted to efficacy and safety of laser therapy in the treatment of neurological diseases in children is proposed. The author discusses pathophysiological background of this method of therapy, general therapeutic approaches and definite schemes of therapy in different diseases.

  6. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  7. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  8. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  9. Motivado por cirujanos Motivated by Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salazar-Vargas

    2010-12-01

    interrogate and to examine those individuals, and every gesture, every question, every maneuver they did, was jealously kept in our minds. However even at an early stage, we clearly perceived, the differences between medical branches and practitioners, and involuntarily, every one was leaning towards this or that specialty. It was during those years when 7 wonderful persons and excellent surgeons, crossed the path of my life, inspiring me to follow their steps and to embrace a surgical career. Two were classic academicians, Dr. Manuel Aguilar Bonilla and Dr. Andres Vesalio Guzman Calleja, 3 were determined, tireless and highly skilled, Dr. Longino Soto Pacheco, Dr. Claudio Orlich Carranza, y el Dr. Carlos Prada Diaz, and 2 were, although well prepared, unassuming, practical and openly friendly, Dr. Fernando Valverde Soley y el Dr. Randall Ferris Iglesias....

  10. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  11. The neurological manifestations of trauma: lessons from World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Stefanie C; Hess, Volker; Jones, Edgar

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the clinical presentation of functional disorders and the influence of social and cultural factors can be investigated through the historical case notes from mental hospitals. World War I (WWI) was a potent trigger of functional disorders with neurological or psychiatric symptoms. We analysed 100 randomly selected case files of German servicemen admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of the Charité Medical School of Berlin University during WWI and classified them according to contemporaneous and retrospective modern diagnoses. We compared the clinical presentations with accounts in the German and British medical literature of the time. Most patients obtained the contemporaneous diagnosis of 'psychopathic constitution' or hysteria reflecting the general view of German psychiatrists that not the war but an individual predisposition was the basis for the development of symptoms. The clinical picture was dominated by pseudoneurological motor or sensory symptoms as well as pseudoseizures. Some soldiers relived combat experiences in dream-like dissociative states that partly resemble modern-day post-traumatic stress disorder. Most servicemen were classified as unfit for military service but very few of them were granted compensation. Severe functional disorders of a neurological character could develop even without traumatic exposure in combat, which is of interest for the current debate on triggers of stress disorders. The high incidence of pseudoseizures accords with the psychiatric literature of the time and contrasts with accounts of war-related disorders in Britain. The tendency of German psychiatrists not to send traumatised servicemen back to active duty also distinguished between German and British practice. Our data contribute to the debate on the changing patterns of human responses to traumatic experience and their historical and social context.

  12. The Benefit of the Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Smartphone Use Among Maxillofacial Surgery Trainees and iPhone Apps for the Maxillofacial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elinor; Payne, Karl Frederick Braekkan; Ahmed, Nabeela; Goodson, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    The use of smartphones has soared among healthcare professionals in recent years, with estimated figures reporting that the majority of clinicians own and use smartphones in the workplace. Smartphones allow the clinician to carry textbooks in their pocket, write documents on the move and use email and internet to enhance productivity and clinical decision making. These advances in smartphone technology have enabled access to healthcare information for the clinician and transfer of data between team members, giving rise to the phenomenon of telemedicine. With the ability to instantly transfer clinical data to the off-site surgeon, combined with purpose-built medical apps, the smartphone is rapidly becoming an invaluable tool for the modern surgeon. Many studies have linked the benefits of smartphones and apps in other surgical specialities, but no article to date has highlighted the merits and full scope of this technology to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We report that 94 % of British maxillofacial surgery trainees own a smartphone, with 61 % owning an iPhone. 89 % of trainees questioned had downloaded medical apps and used them regularly during clinical activities. We discuss the clinical application of the smartphone in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery and review a list of useful and relevant apps for the modern maxillofacial surgeon using the iPhone as an example platform.

  13. Are shoulder surgeons any good at diagnosing rotator cuff tears using ultrasound?: A comparative analysis of surgeon vs radiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyam Muthu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasound has gained increasing popularity as an aid in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology. With the advent of portable machines, ultrasound has become accessible to clinicians. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing rotator cuff tears by a shoulder surgeon and comparing their ability to that of a musculoskeletal radiologist. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff pathology underwent preoperative ultrasonography (US. All patients were of similar demographics and pathology. The surgeon used a Sonosite Micromax portable ultrasound machine with a 10-MHz high frequency linear array transducer and the radiologist used a 9-12 MHz linear array probe on a Siemens Antares machine. Arthroscopic diagnosis was the reference standard to which ultrasound findings were compared. Results: The sensitivity in detecting full thickness tears was similar for both the surgeon (92% and the radiologist (94%. The radiologist had 100% sensitivity in diagnosing partial thickness tears, compared to 85.7% for the surgeon. The specificity for the surgeon was 94% and 85% for the radiologist. Discussion: Our study shows that the surgeons are capable of diagnosing rotator cuff tears with the use of high-resolution portable ultrasound in the outpatient setting. Conclusion: Office ultrasound, by a trained clinician, is a powerful diagnostic tool in diagnosing rotator cuff tears and can be used effectively in running one-stop shoulder clinics.

  14. The Contemporaneity of the British Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Charles Brooks

    The seeming remoteness of material studied in a British literature survey course can be frustrating for the teacher. Students may find little relevance in the story of Beowulf or the descriptions of Gulliver's voyages. However, instructors can highlight the contemporaneity of British literary texts by drawing parallels to modern times. For…

  15. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  16. The Current Canon in British Romantics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, Harriet Kramer

    1991-01-01

    Describes and reports on a survey of 164 U.S. universities to ascertain what is taught as the current canon of British Romantic literature. Asserts that the canon may now include Mary Shelley with the former standard six major male Romantic poets, indicating a significant emergence of a feminist perspective on British Romanticism in the classroom.…

  17. British and American literatures and English education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田露

    2011-01-01

    British and American literature teachings and university English the teaching isn't self-contradict,can be complement each other.Strengthen British and American literature teachings,contribute to an improvement our country English education,develop high c

  18. The Falklands War and the British Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the way the Falklands War of 1982 was reflected in the creation of British playwrights. Officially, the war was seen as a heroic act, as another glorious page in the book of British history. But for many writers it contained nothing heroic; it was just noisy brandishing of weapons and useless loss of human lives.

  19. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Bin; Wang, Yi; ZHANG Li-ying; Liu, Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, ...

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders among robotic surgeons: A questionnaire analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Robotic surgical systems offer better workplace in order to relieve surgeons from prolonged physical efforts and improve their surgical outcomes. However, robotic surgery could produce musculoskeletal disorders due to the prolonged sitting position of the operator, the fixed position of the console viewer and the movements of the limbs. Until today, no one study has been reported concerning the association between robotics and musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this work was verify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Italian robotic surgeons. Material and methods: Between July 2011 and April 2012 a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was delivered to thirty-nine Italian robotic centres. Twentytwo surgeons (56% returned the questionnaires but only seventeen questionnaires (43.5% were evaluable. Results: Seven surgeons (41.2% reported musculoskeletal disorders, by since their first use of the robot which significantly persisted during the daily surgical activity (P < 0.001. Regarding the body parts affected, musculoskeletal disorders were mainly reported in the cervical spine (29.4% and in the upper limbs (23.5%. Six surgeons (35.3% defined the robotic console as less comfortable or neither comfortable/uncomfortable with a negative influence on their surgical procedures. Conclusions: In spite of some important limitations, our data showed musculoskeletal disorders due to posture discomfort with negative impact on daily surgical activity among robotic surgeons. These aspects could be due to the lack of ergonomic seat and to the fixed position of the console viewer which could have produced an inadequate spinal posture. The evaluation of these postural factors, in particular the development of an integrated and more ergonomic chair, could further improve the comfort feeling of the surgeon at the console and probably his surgical outcomes.

  1. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  2. Social networks and neurological illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Lang, Catherine E; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-10-01

    Every patient is embedded in a social network of interpersonal connections that influence health outcomes. Neurologists routinely need to engage with a patient's family and friends due to the nature of the illness and its social sequelae. Social isolation is a potent determinant of poor health and neurobiological changes, and its effects can be comparable to those of traditional risk factors. It would seem reasonable, therefore, to map and follow the personal networks of neurology patients. This approach reveals influential people, their habits, and linkage patterns that could facilitate or limit health behaviours. Personal network information can be particularly valuable to enhance risk factor management, medication adherence, and functional recovery. Here, we propose an agenda for research and clinical practice that includes mapping the networks of patients with diverse neurological disorders, evaluating the impact of the networks on patient outcomes, and testing network interventions. PMID:27615420

  3. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  4. Nutrition in neurologically impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition, either under- or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Energy needs are difficult to define in this heterogeneous population, and there is a lack of information on what normal growth should be in these children. Non-nutritional factors may influence growth, but nutritional factors such as insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism also contribute to growth failure. Malnutrition is associated with s...

  5. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    OpenAIRE

    Biedroń, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguisti...

  6. Erythropoietin in the Neurology ICU

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Claudia; Sadrameli, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an approved drug that is used in the treatment of chronic anemia associated with chronic renal failure. In the Neuro ICU, there are two potential uses for treatment with EPO. Anemia is common in patients with acute neurological disorders and may be a cause of secondary insults. Studies of EPO to treat anemia associated with critical illness have not conclusively shown a beneficial risk/benefit ratio. The relatively small reduction in transfusion requirement with EPO in...

  7. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Moawad, Eman M. I.; Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of p...

  8. Neuronanatomy, neurology and Bayesian networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bielza Lozoya, Maria Concepcion

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian networks are data mining models with clear semantics and a sound theoretical foundation. In this keynote talk we will pinpoint a number of neuroscience problems that can be addressed using Bayesian networks. In neuroanatomy, we will show computer simulation models of dendritic trees and classification of neuron types, both based on morphological features. In neurology, we will present the search for genetic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease and the prediction of health-related qualit...

  9. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  10. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  11. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  12. Current status of biomarker research in neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Polivka, Jiri; Krakorova, Kristyna; Peterka, Marek; Topolcan, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Neurology is one of the typical disciplines where personalized medicine has been recently becoming an important part of clinical practice. In this article, the brief overview and a number of examples of the use of biomarkers and personalized medicine in neurology are described. The various issues in neurology are described in relation to the personalized medicine and diagnostic, prognostic as well as predictive blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Such neurological domains discussed in t...

  13. Italian neurology: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Federico, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This short history of the Italian Society of Neurology focuses on its founders and leading personalities. The article also considers the present and the future of Italian neurology, emphasising in particular the scientific impact of Italian neurological research on the main international journals and the activities undertaken to increase the role of neurologists.

  14. Simulation-based education and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsness, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    Education in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for a surgeon to perform at an expert level in the operating room, and beyond, must address all potential cognitive and technical performance gaps, professionalism and personal behaviors, and effective team communication. Educational strategies should also seek to replicate the stressors and distractions that might occur during a high-risk operation or critical care event. Finally, education cannot remain fixed in an apprenticeship model of "See one, do one, teach one," whereby patients are exposed to the risk of harm inherent to any learning curve. The majority of these educational goals can be achieved with the addition of simulation-based education (SBE) as a valuable adjunct to traditional training methods. This article will review relevant principles of SBE, explore currently available simulation-based educational tools for pediatric surgeons, and finally make projections for the future of SBE and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

  15. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  16. The first cataract surgeons in Latin America: 1611–1830

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wainsztein, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    We strove to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in Latin America. Probably by 1611, the Genovese oculist Francisco Drago was couching cataracts in Mexico City. The surgeon Melchor Vásquez de Valenzuela probably performed cataract couching in Lima by 1697. Juan Peré of France demonstrated cataract couching in Veracruz and Mexico City between 1779 and 1784. Juan Ablanedo of Spain performed couching in Veracruz in 1791. Cataract extraction might have been performed in Havana and Caracas by 1793 and in Mexico by 1797. The earliest contemporaneously documented cataract extractions in Latin America were performed in Guatemala City by Narciso Esparragosa in 1797. In addition to Esparragosa, surgeons born in the New World who established the academic teaching of cataract surgery included José Miguel Muñoz in Mexico and José María Vargas in Caracas. Although cataract surgery came quite early to Latin America, its availability was initially inconsistent and limited. PMID:27143845

  17. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. PMID:25912163

  18. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  19. Reporting sharp injuries among Surgeons in Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamed Mortada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and rationale of the study: Although Sharps injuries are a preventable hazard faced by medical personnel in the operating room yet it continues to be one of the hidden problems among HCP. The potential consequence of such injuries includes transmission of blood-borne pathogens with detrimental effects. Despite the advances in technology and increased awareness of medical staff, annually around 600 thousand to one million workers are affected thus considered as one of the most serious threats facing health care workers specially surgeon.Methodology: a cross sectional study of Zagazig University Hospitals surgical departments. Using a sample composed of 287 surgeons randomly chosen from different surgical departments. A questionnaire assessed in addition to personal and professional characteristics, the history of sharp injuries, types of instrument causing the injury, their post exposure prophylaxis including reporting. The results: There were total 287 surgeons participated in this study. (47% of the respondent surgeons had been exposed to at least one episode of sharp injury in the preceding 3 months and most of the exposures (68% occurred in the operation room. The injury was mainly caused during suturing (83%. The commonest devices, accused in most of the injuries were suturing needle and scalpel (74 and 59%. The majority of the surgeons (62% didn’t report the SI and it was largely explained by the majority of the sampled respondents (89% were not aware of the reporting system existing in their hospital.Conclusions: The most common reason of underreporting  in our study was the lack of awareness that all injuries must be reported.Recommendations: The observed high level of under reporting reflects the need for education on prevention. Our results can guide in planning an education program for the surgeons to increase awareness about dangers of sharp injuries and help improve the reporting strategy  and other potential

  20. Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles

  1. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns. PMID:12360083

  2. Nicotine and inflammatory neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hua PIAO; Denise CAMPAGNOLO; Carlos DAYAO; Ronald J LUKAS; Jie WU; Fu-Dong SHI

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a major health risk factor which significantly increases the incidence of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. However, there is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflamma- tory and neurodegenerative diseases. Nicotine is the main immunosuppressive constituent of cigarette smoke, which inhib-its both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Unlike cigarette smoke, nicotine is not yet considered to be a carcino-gen and may, in fact, have therapeutic potential as a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent. This review provides a synopsis summarizing the effects of nicotine on the immune system and its (nicotine) influences on various neurological diseases.

  3. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a defect in the gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Symptoms arise because of accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in multiple organs, resulting in severely reduced quality of life and premature death....... Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement......'s disease. The possible pathophysiological background will also be discussed....

  4. Retrenchment in British Universities: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of 14 British universities that underwent severe retrenchment in 1981-1984 is reported, and successful policies, procedures, philosophies, and techniques that may be applicable to institutions in many countries are outlined. (MSE)

  5. British Engineers and Africa 1875-1914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper

    the imperial diasporas, identities and networks that developed as the British engineering profession established connections on the African continent. Using a wide range of primary sources that include correspondence, diaries, technical reports, institutional minutes and periodicals, Andersen reconstructs...

  6. British Universities' Responses to Financial Reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizer, John

    1987-01-01

    The impact on nine British universities' of substantial financial reductions in 1980-81 and the policy implications for national funding agencies are examined. Implementation of institutional retrenchment plans and the role of high-level administrators are discussed. (MSE)

  7. H1N1 Message from the Acting Surgeon General

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-13

    In this podcast, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Steven Galson discusses what you can do to protect yourself from H1N1 flu.  Created: 5/13/2009 by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/13/2009.

  8. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  9. Body Dysmorphia, the Plastic Surgeon, and the Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Domeena C.

    2003-01-01

    Misperceived ugliness is called body dysmorphia or dysmorphophobia, often only diagnosed after several discontented return visits to a plastic surgeon who refers the patient for counseling--rarely welcome referrals by the patient when they are convinced the problem is physical and not psychological. Careful listening and patient acceptance are…

  10. Age is highly associated with stereo blindness among surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fergo, Charlotte; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian;

    2016-01-01

    surgeons in the field of general surgery, gynecology, and urology as these are potential users of 3D laparoscopy. METHODS: The study was conducted according to the STROBE guidelines for cross-sectional studies. Medical doctors from the department of general surgery, gynecology, and urology were recruited...

  11. Optimal Brain Surgeon on Artificial Neural Networks in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Job, Jonas Hultmann; Klyver, Katrine;

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how the procedure know as optimal brain surgeon can be used to trim and optimize artificial neural networks in nonlinear structural dynamics. Beside optimizing the neural network, and thereby minimizing computational cost in simulation, the surgery procedure can also serve as a quick...

  12. Surgeon's view of the skull base from the lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, R A

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents the surgical anatomy of the skull base and infratemporal fossa. The information has been derived from the author's own experience in surgical and cadaver dissection, standard anatomical references, and selected experience of other skull base surgeons. Because the lateral approach has become the utilitarian method of exposure, the intricate detailed anatomy is demonstrated from this view at five levels of dissection, so the surgeon may gain a practical understanding of the surgical relationship of critical structures. Consistent anatomical landmarks can be used by the surgeon in the location of these critical structures. The styloid process, sphenoidal spine, and middle meningeal artery identify the internal carotid artery as it enters the carotid canal. The bony or fibrous septum that divides the jugular foramen into neural and vascular compartments may be used to better identify nerves IX, X, and XI. The zygomatic root is useful for location of the middle fossa dura. The lateral pterygoid plate leads directly to the foramen ovale. The increased precision of dissection permitted by use of the microscope requires an increased level of knowledge of anatomical structures in this area. It is hoped that the information presented in this paper will assist surgeons in the meticulous and thorough removal of skull base tumors and in the preservation of neural and vascular structures that are presently being sacrificed.

  13. The moral reading of the British constitution

    OpenAIRE

    Lakin, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the philosophical assumptions which underpin established theories of the British constitution, paying particular attention to the influence of traditional (and sometimes outdated) theories of legal positivism. I attempt to identify, analyze and challenge these assumptions, exploring how recent developments in legal theory can inform and enrich our approach to British constitutional theory. Drawing, in particular, on the anti-positivist theory of Ronald Dworkin, I cont...

  14. Radon in British mines: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the occupational hazards experienced by non-coal miners in British mines is presented, with emphasis on the radiation hazards of radon. Topics reviewed include legislation and radiation standards, radiation monitoring methods in Britain, the geology of the Pennine range wherein the tin and fluorspar mines are located, and survey and workplace monitoring results. Lung cancer risk coefficients are derived from radon decay product data and from British epidemiology on lung cancer

  15. Two Views of the British Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Temin

    1996-01-01

    There are two views of the British Industrial Revolution in the literature today. The more traditional description, represented by the views of Ashton and Landes, sees the Industrial Revolution as a broad change in the British economy and society. This broad view of the Industrial Revolution has been challenged by Crafts and Harley who see the Industrial Revolution as a much narrower phenomenon, as the result of technical change in a few industries. This paper presents a test of these views u...

  16. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  17. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  18. Can a surgeon drill accurately at a specified angle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioschi, Valentina; Cook, Jodie; Arthurs, Gareth I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a surgeon can drill accurately a specified angle and whether surgeon experience, task repetition, drill bit size and perceived difficulty influence drilling angle accuracy. Methods The sample population consisted of final-year students (n=25), non-specialist veterinarians (n=22) and board-certified orthopaedic surgeons (n=8). Each participant drilled a hole twice in a horizontal oak plank at 30°, 45°, 60°, 80°, 85° and 90° angles with either a 2.5  or a 3.5 mm drill bit. Participants then rated the perceived difficulty to drill each angle. The true angle of each hole was measured using a digital goniometer. Results Greater drilling accuracy was achieved at angles closer to 90°. An error of ≤±4° was achieved by 84.5 per cent of participants drilling a 90° angle compared with approximately 20 per cent of participants drilling a 30–45° angle. There was no effect of surgeon experience, task repetition or drill bit size on the mean error for intended versus achieved angle. Increased perception of difficulty was associated with the more acute angles and decreased accuracy, but not experience level. Clinical significance This study shows that surgeon ability to drill accurately (within ±4° error) is limited, particularly at angles ≤60°. In situations where drill angle is critical, use of computer-assisted navigation or custom-made drill guides may be preferable. PMID:27547423

  19. Surgeons' knowledge about the costs of orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Lebur; Hadi, Saifullah; Whitwell, George

    2014-08-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate consultant surgeons' knowledge about the costs of implants for various joint surgeries. METHODS. Questionnaires were distributed to consultant orthopaedic surgeons at 2 hospitals. Respondents were asked to estimate the implant costs of any brand for low-demand and high-demand total hip replacement (THR), total knee replacement (TKR), uni-compartmental knee replacement, arthroscopy shaver blade, total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fixation, and meniscal repair. The actual cost of each implant was obtained from the manufacturer. RESULTS. 16 consultant surgeons completed the questionnaires. The respective mean estimated and actual costs for a low-demand THR implant were £1714 (range, £600-3000) and £1448 (range, £985- 2335), with an overestimation of 18.4%. The respective costs for a high-demand THR implant were £2172 (range, £600-6000) and £1737 (range, £1192-2335), with an overestimation of 25%. The respective costs for a TKR implant were £1550 (range, £600-6000) and £1316 (range, £995-1535), with an overestimation of 17.8%. The respective costs for a uni-compartmental knee replacement implant were £1040 (range, £600-2000) and £1296 (range, £698-1470), with an underestimation of 19.7%. The respective costs for an arthroscopy shaver blade were £110 (range, £75-150) and £94 (range, £80-100), with an overestimation of 16.6%. The respective costs for a total ACL fixation implant were £246 (range, £80-500) and £306 (range, £272-335), with an underestimation of 19.4%. The respective costs for a meniscal repair implant were £153 (range, £50-250) and £242 (range, £170-260), with an underestimation of 37%. CONCLUSION. The knowledge among consultant orthopaedic surgeons about implant costs was poor. To reduce implant costs, cooperation between surgeons and hospital managers and measures to increase surgeons' awareness about cost-reduction programmes are needed. PMID:25163960

  20. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  1. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  2. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Shiari, Reza

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4): 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic dis...

  3. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-01-01

    Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC), Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into de...

  4. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have v...

  5. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  6. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years.

  7. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  8. Hyponatremia in neurological diseases in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lath Rahul

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disturbance encountered in the neurological and neurosurgical intensive care units. It can present with signs and symptoms mimicking a neurological disease and can worsen the existing neurological deficits. Hyponatremia in neurological disorders is usually of the hypo-osmolar type caused either due to the Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Anti Diuretic Hormone (SIADH or Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS. It is important to distinguish between these two disorders, as the treatment of the two differ to a large extent. In SIADH, the fluid intake is restricted, whereas in CSWS the treatment involves fluid and salt replacement.

  9. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  10. The veterinary surgeon in natural disasters: Italian legislation in force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passantino, A; Di Pietro, C; Fenga, C; Passantino, M

    2003-12-01

    Law No. 225/1992 established a National Service of Civil Protection, with the important role of 'safeguarding life, goods, settlements and the environment from damage deriving from natural disasters, catastrophes and calamities' (art. 1). This law arranges civil protection as a co-ordinated system of responsibilities administrated by the state, local and public authorities, the world of science, charitable organisations, the professional orders and other institutions, and the private sector (art. 6). The President of the Republic's Decree No. 66/1981 'Regulation for the application of Law No. 996/1970, containing norms for relief and assistance to populations hit by natural disasters--Civil Protection' mentions veterinary surgeons among the people that are called upon to intervene. In fact, in natural disasters the intervention of the veterinary surgeon is of great importance. The authors examine these laws and other legislation relating to the National Service of Civil Protection. PMID:15005549

  11. The 1964 Surgeon General's report and Americans' beliefs about smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    Half a century ago, on January 11, 1964, the U.S. Surgeon General's office released a landmark report on the health consequences of smoking. That report received massive media attention and triggered a steadily growing number of federal, state, and local restrictions on the advertising, sale, and use of cigarettes. Little is known about the report's impact on American public opinion because all the timely public opinion polls that measured the report's impact were privately commissioned by the tobacco industry and were not made publicly available. A review of these polls shows that the 1964 Surgeon General's report had a large and immediate effect on Americans' beliefs that cigarettes were a cause of lung cancer and of heart disease. However, the report had less impact on public preferences for government action or on smoking rates. PMID:25862749

  12. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi;

    2015-01-01

    -Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...... qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected...

  13. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of oper...

  14. Awareness among medical fraternity regarding the role of plastic surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar; Arun Kumar Singh; Ameer Faisal; Nandini, R.

    2011-01-01

    The field of plastic surgery, while being famous for aesthetic surgery, also includes craniofacial surgery, hand surgery, burn surgery, microsurgery, reconstructive plastic surgery and paediatric plastic surgery. The magnanimous progress in these areas, though a hot topic in conferences, remains cryptic to the layman and also to generalists who are and will remain to be the most important referral source of these patients. [1] Hence, it becomes the duty of plastic surgeons themselves to sprea...

  15. A basic introduction to statistics for the orthopaedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Catherine; Van Riet, Roger; Verstreken, Frederik; Michielsen, Jef

    2012-02-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons should review the orthopaedic literature in order to keep pace with the latest insights and practices. A good understanding of basic statistical principles is of crucial importance to the ability to read articles critically, to interpret results and to arrive at correct conclusions. This paper explains some of the key concepts in statistics, including hypothesis testing, Type I and Type II errors, testing of normality, sample size and p values. PMID:22523921

  16. Intelligent noncontact surgeon-computer interface using hand gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Michael; Nowatzyk, Andreas G.; Lu, Thomas; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2008-02-01

    We present the development of advanced neural network and 3D image processing algorithms to identify hand gestures for a novel Surgeon-Computer-Interface (SCI) in the operating room. Feature extraction methods have been identified to reliably extract unique attributes and recognize dynamic hand gestures such as "Point and Click" and "Hand Waiving" features. We show an experimental demonstration of a non-linear neural network classifier that is capable of reliably recognizing 8 complex hand gesture patterns.

  17. Left-handed surgical instruments - a guide for cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Clare; Theakston, Maureen; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Kendall, Simon William Henry

    2016-08-19

    For ease of use and to aid precision, left-handed instruments are invaluable to the left-handed surgeon. Although they exist, they are not available in many surgical centres. As a result, most operating theatre staff (including many left-handers) have little knowledge of their value or even application. With specific reference to cardiac surgery, this article addresses the ways in which they differ, why they are needed and what is required - with tips on use.

  18. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  19. Sarcoidosis in a dental surgeon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Daniele

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although the causes of sarcoidosis are still unknown, past and current studies have provided evidence that this disease may be associated with occupational exposure to specific environmental agents. We describe a case of sarcoidosis in a dental surgeon with long exposure to inorganic dusts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind in the literature. Case presentation At the beginning of 2000, a 52-year-old Caucasian man, who worked as a dental surgeon, presented with shortness of breath during exercise, cough and retrosternal pain. After diagnosis of sarcoidosis, a scanning electronic microscopy with X-ray microanalysis of biopsy specimens was used in order to determine whether the disease could be traced to an occupational environmental agent. Results showed the presence of inorganic dust particles within sarcoidotic granulomas, and demonstrated that the material detected was identical to that found in a powder used by our patient for several years. Conclusions Although these results cannot be considered as definitive proof, they do however provide strong evidence that this disease may be associated with material used by dental surgeons.

  20. Why knee replacements fail in 2013: patient, surgeon, or implant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A V; Berend, K R; Adams, J B

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies of failure mechanisms leading to revision total knee replacement (TKR) performed between 1986 and 2000 determined that many failed early, with a disproportionate amount accounted for by infection and implant-associated factors including wear, loosening and instability. Since then, efforts have been made to improve implant performance and instruct surgeons in best practice. Recently our centre participated in a multi-centre evaluation of 844 revision TKRs from 2010 to 2011. The purpose was to report a detailed analysis of failure mechanisms over time and to see if failure modes have changed over the past 10 to 15 years. Aseptic loosening was the predominant mechanism of failure (31.2%), followed by instability (18.7%), infection (16.2%), polyethylene wear (10.0%), arthrofibrosis (6.9%) and malalignment (6.6%). The mean time to failure was 5.9 years (ten days to 31 years), 35.3% of all revisions occurred at less than two years, and 60.2% in the first five years. With improvements in implant and polyethylene manufacture, polyethylene wear is no longer a leading cause of failure. Early mechanisms of failure are primarily technical errors. In addition to improving implant longevity, industry and surgeons must work together to decrease these technical errors. All reports on failure of TKR contain patients with unexplained pain who not infrequently have unmet expectations. Surgeons must work to achieve realistic patient expectations pre-operatively, and therefore, improve patient satisfaction post-operatively. PMID:25381419

  1. [Erik Vio, surgeon from Rijeka at history's crossroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarich, Marinko

    2016-08-01

    The fact that many famous denizens of Rijeka belong to different nationalities confirms this city's historic multicultural image. The life story of Erik Vio (1910-1966), renowned surgeon of international reputation, reflects the fate of many displaced residents of Rijeka who left to live in exile. After graduating in Rome, Vio worked as a medical doctor in Hong Kong for almost three decades. The question is weather a surgeon from Rijeka chose to live in Hong Kong because it reminded him of his hometown? The author finds the root of this thesis in Vio's novel The Pathways of Freedom (˝Irwege der Freiheit˝, Köln 1978), a particular medical-philosophic diagnosis of the contemporary civilization's spiritual state. Rare fragments dedicated to Rijeka confirm Vio's actual detachment; faced with his own identity, but also with the others' with whom he shared his living space, a surgeon from Rijeka became a true citizen of the world and at the same time a stateless person with no roots of his own. Through the projection of Hong Kong one can detect the novel's identification backbone: writer's provocation of the ideological perspective on socio-cultural relations. By engaging in the interpretation of Vio's The Pathways of Freedom the author seeks to dissect a sociological dimension of descriptions of dual identities in border space. This leads to the issue of understanding and tolerance toward the others. PMID:27598959

  2. Perceptions of animal physiotherapy amongst irish veterinary surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle Aoife

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate veterinary surgeons' perceptions, knowledge and use of animal physiotherapy in the Republic of Ireland. A questionnaire was developed and sent to 200 veterinary surgeons, of which 97 were returned. Results indicated that 77 (79% of respondents were aware of animal physiotherapists. Common sources of information included veterinary colleagues, owners and professional journals, with physiotherapists themselves and undergraduate training being less commonly cited. Awareness of animal physiotherapy was greatest amongst those working in equine practice (χ2 = 5.7, df 1, p = 0.017; they were more knowledgeable about its techniques (t = 2.806, df 75, p = 0.006 and more likely to refer (χ2 = 48.36, df 1, p = 0.0001. Seventy-four respondents (96% thought that more research was necessary to increase the evidence base for animal physiotherapy. If this branch of physiotherapy is to develop, there needs to be increased interaction and co-operation between veterinary surgeons and chartered animal physiotherapists.

  3. Shouldice Herniorrhaphy Technique: Surgeons Need to Remember It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dervişoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hernia surgery is the second most common surgical intervention performed by general surgeons following emergent surgeries. Shouldice herniorraphy is a classical surgery which is in the high tension repair group. This technique should be known by every surgeon. Also being an alternative method, it can be a necessity in cases in which tension free methods can not be performed. In the present study we investigated the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the Shouldice herniorraphy and Lichtenstein technique with the review of the technical literature. Material and Method: We compared 75 patients who were diagnosed with inguinal hernia and treated with Lichtenstein herniorraphy with 33 patients who were treated with Shouldice herniorraphy in Samsun Bafra Public Hospital between April 2007 and May 2008. Age, sex, hernia type, anesthesia method, mean hospitalisation length, early and late post operative complications were recorded. Result: Early post operative complications were urinary retention, wound infection and hematoma. The patients under spinal anesthesia with urinary retention were treated with urinary catheterization. Superficial wound infection was treated with drainage and antibiotic threapy. Among late postoperative complications; we observed paresthesia in the thigh in one patient in the Shouldice group and relapse hernia in one patient in the Lichtenstein group. Discussion: We suggest that this surgical technique which should be known by every surgeon should be taught to new surgery attenders as an alternative technique. This technique can be an alternative method and also may be the first choice in patients in whom tension free methods can not be applicated.

  4. Teaching plastic surgeons how to be better teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert A; Armstrong, Elizabeth G

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce plastic surgeons to a theory of adult education. Most surgeons have been hired by their parent institution because of their clinical skills, and rightly so. At the same time, these same surgeons choose or are expected to be involved to varying degrees in the surgical education process with medical students, surgical residents, fellows, and allied health workers. Likewise, busy surgical residents are also expected to teach other residents and students, and yet these two groups of teachers of surgery have little or no training in the theory and practice of adult education. This article has four major sections. The first is a scenario designed to bring to mind a context and set of ideas with which the reader is already familiar. The second provides new information, Kolb's theory of adult learning and Arseneau and Rodenberg's teaching principles, and discusses their implications. The third section is designed to give the reader an opportunity to work with the new knowledge and practice possible applications, and the fourth encourages the reader to use the new knowledge in concrete ways in a real-world environment. PMID:22544100

  5. Project Muskan : Social responsibility of the plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exact statistics are not available, Indian plastic surgeons see around 7,00,000-8,00,000 burn admissions annually with around 10,00,000 cleft patients yet to be operated. In spite of this voluminous load, India does not have national health programs for the various deformities Indian plastic surgeons typically treat. As Plastic Surgeons, it is our social responsibility to treat these patients and bring ′ muskan ′ (smile in Hindi back into their lives. Project Muskan was initiated as an innovative model for targeting these patients and is probably one of its kind in the field of plastic surgery in our country. It is unique because it is a perfect collaboration of government institutions, a Non Government Organization (NGO, and cooperative sectors providing free health care at the doorstep. Identification of the patients was done with the help of the extensive milk dairy network in the state of Gujarat. Provision of transport and other facilities was done by the NGOs and quality health care provision was taken care of by the government hospital. Project Muskan started from a single village but now covers around 3000 villages and tribal areas of Gujarat. It is a system that can be easily reproducible in all hospitals and has reestablished the faith of the common man in government institutes.

  6. University students' perceptions of neurology and experiences of learning neurological physiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The education of healthcare professions students in the effective management of people experiencing neurological conditions is essential. If physiotherapy students’ are experiencing neurophobia, the fear of neurology (Jozefowicz 1994: 328) it is important to understand the underlying reasons, to inform future teaching practice. The purpose of this research was to explore physiotherapy students’ perceptions of neurology and their experiences of learning neurological physiotherapy in one UK Hig...

  7. Laparoscopic Skills and Cognitive Function are not Affected in Surgeons During a Night Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To monitor surgeons' performance and cognition during night shifts. DESIGN: Surgeons were monitored before call and on call (17-hour shift). Psychomotor performance was assessed by laparoscopic simulation and cognition by the d2 test of attention. The surgeons performed the laparoscopic...... compared with on-call values. The d2 test of attention showed significantly improved values on call compared with before call. CONCLUSION: Sleep deprivation during a 17-hour night shift did not impair surgeons' psychomotor or cognitive performance....

  8. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  9. Explaining British Policy on the Euro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Howarth

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Four overlapping analytical frameworks focusing upon domestic British politics are applied to explain the detailed development of the policy on the euro maintained by the Conservative Government then Party in opposition and the Labour Party opposition and then Government: intra-party politics; inter-party politics; public opinion and the nature of British democracy; and neo-pluralism (competing economic and other interests. This article posits that British government - and in particular Labour Government - reluctance to hold a referendum on euro membership and actively push a pro-euro policy can be best explained in terms of ideologically infused intra- (rather than inter- party politics and the realities of pluralist politics, while explanations rooted in an analysis of public opinion are less helpful.

  10. Convergence, divergence and realignment in British macroeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. COBHAM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author argues that the still frequent and simplistic distinction between Keynesians and monetarists that makes up a large part of the British popular economic debate has become seriously misleading. Changes that have taken place in British macroeconomics since the early 1970s are thus indicated and some of the theoretical and empirical factors responsible for these changes are suggested. The author presents a brief characterisation of British Keynesianism and monetarism as of late 1960s/early 1970s, arguing that there have been important elements of convergence. He proceeds to discuss some of the theoretical developments and some of the experiences of UK macroeconomic policy which have contributed to this convergence. Finally, he considers whether the labels “Keynesian” and “monetarist” continue to be relevant.

  11. Challenges in multidisciplinary cancer care among general surgeons in Canada

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    McLeod Robin S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many factors can influence the way that cancer care is delivered, including the way that evidence is packaged and disseminated, little research has evaluated how health care professionals who manage cancer patients seek and use this information to identify whether and how this could be supported. Through interviews we identified that general surgeons experience challenges in coordinating care for complex cancer patients whose management is not easily addressed by guidelines, and conducted a population-based survey of general surgeon information needs and information seeking practices to extend these findings. Methods General surgeons with privileges at acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada were mailed a questionnaire to solicit information needs (task, importance, information seeking (source, frequency of and reasons for use, key challenges and suggested solutions. Non-responders received up to three reminder packages. Significant differences among sub-groups (age, setting were examined statistically (Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney, Chi Square. Standard qualitative methods were used to thematically analyze open-ended responses. Results The response rate was 44.2% (170/385 representing all 14 health regions. System resource constraints (60.4%, comorbidities (56.4% and physiologic factors (51.8% were top-ranked issues creating information needs. Local surgical colleagues (84.6%, other local colleagues (82.2% and the Internet (81.1% were top-ranked sources of information, primarily due to familiarity and speed of access. No resources were considered to be highly applicable to patient care. Challenges were related to limitations in diagnostics and staging, operative resources, and systems to support multidisciplinary care, together accounting for 76.0% of all reported issues. Findings did not differ significantly by surgeon age or setting of care. Conclusion General surgeons appear to use a wide range of information

  12. Being a surgeon--the myth and the reality: a meta-synthesis of surgeons' perspectives about factors affecting their practice and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Orri, Massimiliano; Farges, Olivier; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Barkun, Jeffrey; Revah-Lévy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Synthesize the findings from individual qualitative studies about surgeons' account of their practice. BACKGROUND Social and contextual factors of practice influence doctors' well-being and therapeutic relationships. Little is known about surgery, but it is generally assumed that surgeons are not affected by them. METHODS We searched international publications (2000-2012) to identify relevant qualitative research exploring how surgeons talk about their practice. Meta-ethnograp...

  13. Plastic Surgeons' Opinions of Facial Surgery for Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.; Turnbull, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    One hundred plastic surgeons responded to a survey on opinions toward facial plastic surgery for individuals with Down's syndrome. Twenty-four of the surgeons had performed the surgery. Surgeons indicated appropriate circumstances for the surgery, consent requirements, degree of understanding expected of the patient, and degree of discomfort…

  14. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  15. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  16. 14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.109 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  17. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.209 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  18. 14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.309 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  19. Treatment trends in allergic rhinitis and asthma: a British ENT survey

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    Theochari Eva G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic Rhinitis is a common Ear, Nose and Throat disorder. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis are diseases with similar underlying mechanism and pathogenesis. The aim of this survey was to highlight current treatment trends for Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma. Method A questionnaire was emailed to all registered consultant members of the British Association of Otorhinolaryngologists - Head and Neck Surgeons regarding the management of patients with Allergic Rhinitis and related disorders. Results Survey response rate was 56%. The results indicate a various approach in the investigation and management of Allergic Rhinitis compatible with recommendations from the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma guidelines in collaboration with the World Health Organisation. Conclusion A combined management approach for patients with Allergic Rhinitis and concomitant Asthma may reduce medical treatment costs for these conditions and improve symptom control and quality of life.

  20. Ambient Noise Tomography of the British Isles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, H. J.; Curtis, A.; Baptie, B.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, surface wave tomography using empirical Green’s functions computed via the ambient noise interferometry method has become an established approach to lithospheric imaging problems. To date, ambient noise tomography has been successfully applied to seismometer arrays in the United States, Australia, Iceland, China, South Africa, Europe and the Tibetan Plateau. The basis of the ambient seismic interferometry method is that, by cross-correlating noise data between two seismic stations and stacking over a long enough time period, one can approximate the Green’s Function that would have been recorded at one of the stations if the other had actually been a source. Consequently, one of the main advantages of ambient noise interferometry is that traditional seismic sources such as earthquakes or ballistics are not required; therefore it is ideal for application to seismically quiescent areas such as the British Isles. The British Isles are an archipelago located adjacent to the Eurasian continental shelf in a typically intra-plate setting, formed by a complex amalgamation of several terranes. These range from Laurentian north of the Highland Boundary fault to Avalonian south of the Iapetus Suture and evidence of the regions turbulent geological past can be inferred from its lithospheric structure. Previous studies of the structure of the British Isles considered relatively few seismic stations and/or were limited to using offshore shots, quarry blasts or teleseismic earthquakes as seismic energy sources. We have applied the ambient noise tomography method to noise data recorded on approximately 100 broadband and short period seismometers, including many new stations, in the British Isles and mainland Europe. This dense coverage of the British Isles allows us to image the crust and upper mantle velocity structure with a horizontal resolution in the region of 100km across the North Sea and 30km in the mainland United Kingdom. Here we present the first

  1. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Asfandyar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6% was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9% was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7% were ready

  2. Emotional disorders in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Allan; Hosker, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, emotionalism, irritability, and apathy are common findings in the neurological rehabilitation setting and are associated with poorer outcomes. This chapter outlines the importance of detecting and attending to these disorders. The authors recommend the systematic use of self-report measures, tailored for those with cognitive or motor difficulties, in combination with interview-based assessments where suspicion of the presence of a disorder is aroused. A stepped care scheme for coordinating rehabilitation services is presented which highlights the importance of training all staff to be aware of the possibility of patients presenting with emotional disorders and the need to equip all staff with the skills to make emotional enquiries and to carry out brief interventions where indicated. Interventions should be based upon a combination of watchful waiting and optimization of clinical care followed by evidence-based brief therapies such as problem solving, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation. Antidepressant prescribing should be reserved for the more severe cases and protocols should involve a system for reviewing and time-limiting prescriptions. This chapter aims to aid those designing services to produce simple and widely understood programs that meet the needs of this inherently heterogeneous client base.

  3. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  4. Neurology of acute organophosphate poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute organophosphate (OP poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in emergency medicine and toxicological practice in some of the less-developed nations in South Asia. Traditionally, OP poisoning comes under the domain of emergency physicians, internists, intensivists, and toxicologists. However, some of the complications following OP poisoning are neurological and involve neurologists. The pathophysiological basis for the clinical manifestations of OP poisoning is inactivation of the enzyme, acetylcholinesterase at the peripheral nicotinic and muscarinic and central nervous system (CNS nerve terminals and junctions. Nicotinic manifestations occur in severe cases and late in the course; these comprise of fasciculations and neuromuscular paralysis. There is a good correlation between the electrophysiological abnormalities and the severity of the clinical manifestations. Neurophysiological abnormalities characteristic of nicotinic junctions (mainly neuromuscular junction dysfunction include: (1 single, supramaximal electrical-stimulus-induced repetitive response/s, (2 decrement-increment response to high frequency (30 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS, and (3 decremental response to high frequency (30 Hz RNS. Atropine ameliorates muscarinic manifestations. Therapeutic agents that can ameliorate nicotinic manifestations, mainly neuromuscular, are oximes. However, the evidence for this effect is inconclusive. This may be due to the fact that there are several factors that determine the therapeutic effect of oximes. These factors include: The OP compound responsible for poisoning, duration of poisoning, severity of poisoning, and route of exposure. There is also a need to study the effect of oximes on the neurophysiological abnormalities.

  5. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  6. Telemedicine in neurology: underutilized potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J; Mishra, S K; Yadav, R K

    2005-03-01

    Advances in telecommunication which started with telephone lines, FAX, integrated service digital network (ISDN) lines and now internet have provided an unprecedented opportunity for transfer of knowledge and sharing of information. The information can be used for overlapping applications in patient care, teaching and research. In medicine there is increasing utilization of telemedicine; radiology and pathology being regarded as mature specialties and emergency medicine as maturing specialties compared to other evolving specialties which include psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology and ophthalmology. Of the emergencies, status epilepticus and stroke have high potential for improving patient management. Administration of tPA was more frequent when carried out under telemedicine guidance. Telemedicine has great potential for medical education. The principles of education are in congruence with those of telemedicine and can be closely integrated in the existing medical education system. Our experience of telemedicine as a medical education tool is based on video conferencing with SCB Medical College, Cuttack. We had 30 sessions during 2001 to 2004 in which 2-3 cases were discussed in each session. The patients' details, radiological and neurophysiological findings could be successfully transmitted. These conferences improved the knowledge of participants, provided an opportunity for a second opinion as well as modified the treatment decisions in some cases. The advances in telemedicine should be utilized more extensively in neurology, especially in emergency management, epilepsy and stroke patients as well, as it may have a role in neurophysiology and movement disorders. PMID:15805651

  7. Telemedicine in neurology: Underutilized potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in telecommunication which started with telephone lines, FAX, integrated service digital network (ISDN lines and now internet have provided an unprecedented opportunity for transfer of knowledge and sharing of information. The information can be used for overlapping applications in patient care, teaching and research. In medicine there is increasing utilization of telemedicine; radiology and pathology being regarded as mature specialties and emergency medicine as maturing specialties compared to other evolving specialties which include psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology and ophthalmology. Of the emergencies, status epilepticus and stroke have high potential for improving patient management. Administration of tPA was more frequent when carried out under telemedicine guidance. Telemedicine has great potential for medical education. The principles of education are in congruence with those of telemedicine and can be closely integrated in the existing medical education system. Our experience of telemedicine as a medical education tool is based on video conferencing with SCB Medical College, Cuttack. We had 30 sessions during 2001 to 2004 in which 2-3 cases were discussed in each session. The patients′ details, radiological and neurophysiological findings could be successfully transmitted. These conferences improved the knowledge of participants, provided an opportunity for a second opinion as well as modified the treatment decisions in some cases. The advances in telemedicine should be utilized more extensively in neurology, especially in emergency management, epilepsy and stroke patients as well, as it may have a role in neurophysiology and movement disorders.

  8. CRITERIA OF BRITISH TEACHERS’ COMMUNICATION CULTURE FORMEDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Алексеевич Есипов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Communication culture formation belongs to most essential problems for pedagogical theory and practice. The level of a teacher’s communication culture influences greatly the efficiency of his professional communication with colleagues and students.The peculiarities of teachers’ communication culture formation in the British educational system are considered. Main characteristics of a communication-oriented teacher are mentioned. Criteria for specifying the level of British teachers’ communication culture formedness as well as brief description of these levels are given in this article.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-13

  9. The British Monarch——A key element in British society and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰艺

    2014-01-01

    <正>Although the British Monarch has already lost its true powe to govern the country,it is still a key element in British societ and culture for its specialty in the country.Admittedly,the British Monarch has no substantial right t nominate the cabinet and deal with some other important politica issues.What it can do is to work as a symbol in some importan ceremonies.Its power is just a form,or a symbol,and in essence

  10. The global perspective on neurology training: the World Federation of Neurology survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Andreas; Struhal, Walter; Sergay, Stephen M; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2013-11-15

    This World Federation of Neurology (WFN) study aimed to characterize the status quo of post-graduate neurology training throughout the world and enable a better orientation on global training in neurology. Basic data on training curricula and working conditions of neurology residents and neurologists in 39 countries worldwide were evaluated. Our data show considerable differences in manpower and training, but a continuous improvement within the last 10 years of observation. Worldwide a spread of interim evaluations and final examinations of different types are used. Online resources will undoubtedly profoundly change skill and knowledge acquisition and training practices in Neurology in the coming years.

  11. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all......INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...

  12. The Differences between British English and American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章继宁

    2013-01-01

    British English and American English are two varieties of English. American English derived from British English and they have many similarities and differences. British English and American English are different in pronunciation, spelling, vocabu⁃lary and customary usage/syntax, etc.

  13. British International Schools: The Deployment and Training of Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) as to the role and deployment of British international school teaching assistants. Through questionnaires and a follow up open discussion with headteachers from British international schools it was found that, due to the differing…

  14. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  15. British Writers; Modules for Teacher Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliard, Fred

    This booklet, containing eight instructional modules on works by major British writers, can be used either within a lower-level literature course for non-English majors or in a survey course for English majors. The first four modules focus on works from the early English period through the Elizabethan Age: "Beowulf,""Sir Gawain and the Green…

  16. Macro and Microenvironments at the British Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Helen

    This paper describes the storage of the 12 million items that have just been moved into the new British Library building. The specifications for the storage and environmental conditions for different types of library and archive material are explained. The varying environmental parameters for storage areas and public areas, including reading rooms…

  17. An American on a British Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    大川

    2004-01-01

    A young American entered a compartment on a British train, and discovered that all seats were occupied, including one on which a small dog was seated. To his owner, a middle-aged lady who wore a large hat, he said po-

  18. Considerations for Education Reform in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Countries around the world refer to twenty-first century education as essential to maintaining personal and national economic advantage and draw on this discourse to advocate for and embark on educational reform. This paper examines issues around education reform, particularly in British Columbia. It argues that reformers should give careful…

  19. British physics Newton's law of funding

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In Britain, fundamental physics is in a pickle ISAAC NEWTON, besides being the founder of modern physics, was also master of Britain's mint. That is a precedent which many British physicists must surely wish had become traditional. At the moment, money for physics is in short supply in Britain.

  20. The British Experience of Reform in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnes, Geraint

    1996-01-01

    The nature and impact of reforms since 1988 in British education, both compulsory and postsecondary, are examined, focusing on changes in organizational structure and financing mechanisms. The success of these changes in meeting their objectives is assessed, and unresolved issues are identified. (MSE)

  1. African Centered Knowledge: A British Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Considers the impact of African centered knowledge within the United Kingdom. Recent development of African Diaspora studies has forged links between various black Atlantic communities. The United Kingdom has experienced positive grassroots community response to the work of noted African centered scholars, yet within the British academy,…

  2. Four former British mining settlements on Spitsbergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, Frigga; Claughton, P.; Mills, C.

    2011-01-01

    The LASHIPA project participated in the recent International Polar Year to evaluate the large-scale historical exploitation of polar areas. This sub-project looks at the role of British actors in the economic and geopolitical development of the European High Arctic during the early twentieth century

  3. Earnings Returns to the British Education Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Paul J.; Fan, Wen

    2011-01-01

    We study the effects of the large expansion in British educational attainment that took place for cohorts born between 1970 and 1975. Using the Quarterly Labour Force Survey, we find that the expansion caused men to increase education by about a year on average and gain about 8% higher wages; women obtained a slightly greater increase in education…

  4. HIV Prevalence among Aboriginal British Columbians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strathdee Steffanie

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context There is considerable concern about the spread of HIV disease among Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia. Objective To estimate the number of Aboriginal British Columbians infected with HIV. Design and setting A population-based analysis of Aboriginal men and women in British Columbia, Canada from 1980 to 2001. Participants Epidemic curves were fit for gay and bisexual men, injection drug users, men and women aged 15 to 49 years and persons over 50 years of age. Main outcome measures HIV prevalence for the total Aboriginal population was modeled using the UNAIDS/WHO Estimation and Projection Package (EPP. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate potential number infected for select transmission group in 2001. Results A total of 170,025 Aboriginals resided in British Columbia in 2001, of whom 69% were 15 years and older. Of these 1,691 (range 1,479 – 1,955 men and women aged 15 years and over were living with HIV with overall prevalence ranging from 1.26% to 1.66%. The majority of the persons infected were men. Injection drug users (range 1,202 – 1,744 and gay and bisexual men (range 145, 232 contributed the greatest number of infections. Few persons infected were from low risk populations. Conclusion More than 1 in every 100 Aboriginals aged 15 years and over was living with HIV in 2001. Culturally appropriate approaches are needed to tailor effective HIV interventions to this community.

  5. Health care delivery and the training of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, L D

    1993-09-01

    Most countries have mastered the art of cost containment by global budgeting for public expenditure. It is not as yet clear whether the other option, managed care, or managed competition will accomplish cost control in America. Robert Evans, a Canadian health care expert, remains skeptical. He says, "HMO's are the future, always have been and always will be." With few exceptions, the amount spent on health care is not a function of the system but of the gross domestic product per person. Great Britain is below the line expected for expenditure, which may be due to truly impressive waiting lists. The United States is above the line, which is probably related to the overhead costs to administer the system and the strong demand by patients for prompt and highly sophisticated diagnostic measures and treatments. Canada is on the line, but no other country has subscribed to the Canadian veto on private insurance. Reform or changes are occurring in all countries and will continue to do so. For example, we are as terrified of managed care in Canada as you are of our brand of socialized insurance. We distrust practice by protocol just as you abhor waiting lists. From my perspective as a surgeon, I envision an ideal system that would cover all citizens, would maintain choice of surgeon by patients, would provide mechanisms for cost containment that would have the active and continuous participation of the medical profession, and would provide for research and development. Any alteration in health care delivery in the United States that compromises biomedical research and development will be a retrogressive, expensive step that could adversely affect the health of nations everywhere. Finally, a continuing priority of our training programs must be to ensure that the surgeon participating in this system continues to treat each patient as an individual with concern for his or her own needs.

  6. Impact of assistant surgeon on outcomes in robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Rishi; Yadav, Siddharth; Singh, Prabhjot; Dogra, Prem Nath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is believed that the outcomes of robotic surgery depends not only on the experience of the console surgeon but also the patient-side assistant. However, objective data supporting it is lacking. The aim of this study was to objectively determine change in operative outcomes with increasing experience of patient-side assistant. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 222 urologic robotic procedures performed by two teams of surgeon-assistant and split the data into two chronological halves according to date of surgery. We considered that the assistant was inexperienced in the 1st half and had become experienced by the 2nd half, and we compared mean operative time and blood loss between these two halves of his experience. Results: We observed that with increasing experience of the assistant, the mean operative time reduced from 138.06 to 124.32 min (P = 0.001) and mean blood loss decreased from 191.93 to 187.61 ml (P = 0.57). On subset analysis, a consistent trend of reduction in the mean operative time was noted for both the assistants separately and for all surgical procedures included in the analysis. Maximum reduction was noted for pyeloplasty which was the most commonly performed surgery. The mean blood loss had a varied relation to the experience of the assistant and did not reach statistical significance in either direction. Conclusions: With increasing experience of the patient-side surgeon, the mean operative time for all robotic procedures showed a consistent trend of reduction across all types of surgery with greater reduction for commonly performed procedures. PMID:27555678

  7. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered during the fourth year of medical school. A Neurologic Physical Exam (NPE score of 0.0 to 6.0 was calculated for each student based on a neurologic examination checklist completed by the SPs during the OSCE. Composite NPE scores in the control and intervention groups were compared with the unpaired t-test. Results: In the fourth year OSCE, composite NPE scores in the intervention group (3.5±1.1 were statistically significantly greater than those in the control group (2.2±1.1 (p<0.0001. Conclusions: SP sessions are an effective tool for teaching the neurologic examination. We determined that a single, structured SP session conducted as an adjunct to our traditional lectures and small groups is associated with a statistically significant improvement in student performance measured 2 years after the session.

  8. Designing Wearable Personal Assistants for Surgeons: An Egocentric Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The design of general-purpose wearable computers demands particular care for how human perception, cognition, and action work and work together. The authors propose a human body-and-mind centric (egocentric as opposed to device-centric) design framework and present initial findings from deploying...... it in the design of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons. The result is a Google Glass-based prototype system aimed at facilitating touchless interaction with x-ray images, browsing of electronic patient records (EPR) when on the move, and synchronized ad hoc remote collaboration...

  9. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup;

    2016-01-01

    , and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  10. Quality improvement 101 for surgeons: Navigating the alphabet soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santore, Matthew T; Islam, Saleem

    2015-12-01

    It is a fundamental value of the surgical profession to improve care for its patients. In the last 100 years, the principles of prospective quality improvement have started to work their way into the traditional method of retrospective case review in morbidity and mortality conference. This article summarizes the history of "improvement science" and its intersection with the field of surgery. It attempts to clarify the principles and jargon that may be new or confusing to surgeons with a different vocabulary and experience. This is done to bring the significant power and resources of improvement science to the traditional efforts to improve surgical care. PMID:26653158

  11. Improvised explosive devices and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksel, Tamer

    2005-08-01

    Improvised explosive devices have created a new class of casualties that presents a unique surgical challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The injury pattern and severity are different from those seen in conventional trauma patients. Because of battlefield circumstances, patients are sometimes delayed significantly in their transport to a trauma center, and they frequently arrive at a trauma center with hypotension, hypothermia, and acidosis. Definitive care is delayed while the hemodynamic status and life-threatening injuries are stabilized. Hospital triage protocols must be well established in advance to prepare a timely response to the mass casualty event. Proper resource use is an ever-evolving challenge for hospital staff during these times.

  12. A very British spectacle? : critical reception of the fantasy genre within contemporary British cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Rickards, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    In the period since 2001, cinema has witnessed what David Butler refers to as a ‘golden age’ of fantasy film production. The majority of fantasy films released during this time have originated from British literature, and have to some extent been produced and located within Britain, showcasing a wealth of national characters, acting talent, and landscapes on screen. Yet, despite vital revisionist work conducted on British horror, science fiction and melodrama, there remains a hesitancy to emb...

  13. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  14. Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of British-Chinese, White British and Hong Kong Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiu Man

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the self-esteem scores of 1303 children, including Chinese children from Britain and Hong Kong and white British children, using the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Finds that British Chinese have significantly higher self-esteem than the Hong Kong children, but there is little difference among white British children. (CMK)

  15. United States neurosurgery annual case type and complication trends between 2006 and 2013: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, David J; Karhade, Aditya V; Larsen, Alexandra M G; Burke, William T; Castlen, Joseph P; Smith, Timothy R

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to identify trends in the neurosurgical practice environment in the United States from 2006 to 2013 using the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database, and to determine the complication rate for spinal and cranial procedures and identify risk factors for post-operative complications across this time period. We performed a search of the American College of Surgeons-NSQIP database for all patients undergoing an operation with a surgeon whose primary specialty was neurological surgery from 2006 to 2013. Analysis of patient demographics and pre-operative co-morbidities was performed, and multivariate analysis was used to determine predictors of surgical complications. From 2006 to 2013, the percentage of spinal operations performed by neurosurgeons relative to cranial and peripheral nerve cases increased from 68.0% to 76.8% (p<0.001) according to the NSQIP database. The proportion of cranial cases during the same time period decreased from 29.7% to 21.6% (p<0.001). The overall 30-day complication rate among all 94,621 NSQIP reported patients undergoing operations with a neurosurgeon over this time period was 8.2% (5.6% for spinal operations, 16.1% for cranial operations). The overall rate decreased from 11.0% in 2006 to 7.5% in 2013 (p<0.001). Several predictors of post-operative complication were identified on multivariate analysis. PMID:27183956

  16. NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATION OF ORGANIC ACADEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of organic acid metabolism are relatively recently recognized diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms: ranging from asymptomatic, normal appearing children to death during first few days of life.In my presentation I will try to explain some of the most common clinical presentation of these disorder with stress on neurologic findings. Organic acidemia usually have three clinical manifestations Severe neonatal form, Intermittent late-onset form and chronic progressive form. Recurrent coma, The main feature of these disorders is due to accumulation of toxic metabolites in Central Nervous system with direct effect on the function, while chronic accumulation of these materials may interfere with CNS development or cerebral metabolism leading to developmental delay.Severe neonatal formsFollowing a symptom free interval of a few days from birth, poor sucking and difficult feeding appears in the newborn, followed by unexplained and progressive coma. Seizures may appear during the course of the disease and EEG may show a burst-suppression pattern. During this stage most infants have axial hypotonia with peripheral dystonia, choreoathetosis, episodic opisthotonus and some repetitive bicycling and boxing movements.Associated biochemical abnormalities including metabolic acidosis, ketonuria and hyperammonemia also is usually present. The overall short-term prognosis with recent advances in medical care is improving. But later in life acute intercurrent episodes triggered by a stress often occur, which can be occasionally fatal.bulging fontanelle and cerebral edema may mimic CNS infection in these babies.Intermittent late-onset formsRecurrent attacks of coma or lethargy with ataxia can occur in childhood or even in adolescence or adulthood. These episodes may be frequent, though in between these the child is entirely normal. These attacks are precipitated by conditions that enhance protein catabolism (trauma, infection etc

  17. Radiographic imaging of calcaneal fractures - the surgeons view point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a detailed description of calcaneal fractures, which are underestimated and neglected despite their relatively high frequency. In association with significant anatomic destruction of the calcaneus they lead to unsatisfactory results of fracture treatment. Radiographic features of a healthy calcaneal bone together with pathomechanism and radiographic attributes of most common fracture types are presented. The prognostic role of the posterior talo-calcaneal joint and extraarticular anatomy of the calcaneus are emphasized. Special attention is directed to the methods of calcaneal imaging, especially the most valuable in the authors opinion - lateral radiographic view and computed tomography. Other commonly used views: axial, antero-posterior or Broden, are also described, with explanation why they are rarely recommended. The widely used standard classification system for calcaneal fractures introduced by Sanders, based on computed tomography is presented. Correct x-ray imaging is the basis for further diagnostic workup and treatment, giving also valuable prognostic information. The orthopedic surgeon, who undertakes the difficult task of treating the broken calcaneus receives thorough information about bone damage, which helps to realize the consequences of injury and of possible negligence. According to the authors experience, problems discussed in this paper are rarely fully appreciated by radiologists and orthopedic surgeons resulting in, often, catastrophic consequences. (author)

  18. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errani, C., E-mail: costantino.errani@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P., E-mail: pietro.ruggieri@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P., E-mail: piero.picci@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine.

  19. Role of surgeons in determining outcome of histopathology specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinfenwa T Atanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the changing world of clinicopathologic practice where surgeons and pathologists are faced with increasing therapeutic demands, precise demands of each group from the other have often been reduced to blames and counter-blames. This study is thus aimed at auditing the current practice of specimen handling as a means of highlighting areas where mutual best practice is required. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 specimens and 100 separate request cards received over the 3 months were audited for: Use of fixative, adequacy of fixative used, types of specimen containers and appropriate labeling of containers. The request cards were audited for: Documentation of patients′ hospital numbers, ages, histories of disease, sites of biopsy, examination findings, investigations done, provisional diagnosis and concordance of clinical diagnosis with histopathological diagnosis. Results: About 20% of specimens were unfixed, 23.5% had inadequate fixative, 16.5% were in inappropriate containers and 32.5% were incompletely labeled respectively. In 25%, 50% and 53% of forms the age, clinical history and examination findings respectively were not documented. Provisional diagnosis was in concordance with eventual histological diagnosis in 69% of cases. Conclusion: To ensure the quality of histopathological diagnosis with minimal turnaround time, the surgeon plays a vital role by ensuring adequate and prompt fixation of tissue biopsies, put in the right container and accompanied by well labeled request cards.

  20. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863–1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of “the Chief.” Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, “You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good.” Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  1. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marvin J

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863-1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of "the Chief." Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, "You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good." Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  2. Herbal therapy: what every facial plastic surgeon must know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribitkin, E D; Boger, G

    2001-01-01

    Herbal medicine (phytomedicine) uses remedies possessing significant pharmacological activity and, consequently, potential adverse effects and drug interactions. The explosion in sales of herbal therapies has brought many products to the marketplace that do not conform to the standards of safety and efficacy that physicians and patients expect. Unfortunately, few surgeons question patients regarding their use of herbal medicines, and 70% of patients do not reveal their use of herbal medicines to their physicians and pharmacists. All surgeons should question patients about the use of the following common herbal remedies, which may increase the risk of bleeding during surgical procedures: feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, and Asian ginseng. Physicians should exercise caution in prescribing retinoids or advising skin resurfacing in patients using St John's wort, which poses a risk of photosensitivity reaction. Several herbal medicines, such as aloe vera gel, contain pharmacologically active ingredients that may aid in wound healing. Practitioners who wish to recommend herbal medicines to patients should counsel them that products labeled as supplements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration and that no guarantee of product quality can be made. PMID:11368667

  3. Mentoring during residency education: a unique challenge for the surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2006-08-01

    A mentor serves as role model, counselor, and advocate for an understudy or protégé. The art and science of mentoring have been investigated most thoroughly in the educational literature, yet there are unique situational and individual considerations in the surgical arena that may warrant special consideration. The general attributes of successful mentors are not foreign to academic surgeons but may require deliberate cultivation to optimize mentorship in the context of academic medicine. Moreover, the stages of productive mentoring may be counter to the learned adaptive behaviors and instinctive personality traits of some accomplished surgeon educators. Indeed, examples of failed mentorship are common in our medical centers and, specifically, in surgical training programs. The behavioral adaptation that supports surgical decision-making under conditions of incomplete data and unusual stress often devalues succession planning and derivation of satisfaction from the success of other members of the team. Accordingly, fostering effective mentoring relationships in academic surgery will require a concerted effort to develop appropriate behaviors conducive to the mentoring process. The personal and professional growth of our students as well as the succession planning for our specialty are dependent upon the successful creation of an environment conducive to mentoring in academic orthopaedics. PMID:16760803

  4. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zhou, Jiying; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein, we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments because of hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.

  5. Emerging Subspecialties in Neurology: Neuropalliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Maisha T.; Barrett, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Palliative medicine, as defined by World Health Organization, is the specialty that recognizes and attempts to prevent or alleviate physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering.1 Understanding the principles of palliative care should be an essential component of neurologic training, as the trajectory of many neurologic illnesses is progressive and incurable.2 Given the delicate nature of many of the conversations that neurologists have with patients at the time of diagnosis or dur...

  6. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be ...

  7. Telemedicine in Leading US Neurology Departments

    OpenAIRE

    George, Benjamin P.; Scoglio, Nicholas J.; Reminick, Jason I.; Rajan, Balaraman; Beck, Christopher A.; Seidmann, Abraham; Biglan, Kevin M.; Dorsey, E. Ray

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current practice and plans for telemedicine at leading US neurology departments. Design and Setting: An electronic survey was sent to department chairs, administrators, or faculty involved in telemedicine at 47 neurology departments representing the top 50 hospitals as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. Main Outcome Measures: Current use, size, scope, reimbursement, and perceived quality of telemedicine services. Results: A total of 32 individuals from 30 depart...

  8. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Ümit Özgür Akdemir; Lütfiye Özlem; Atay Kapucu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with e...

  9. The neurology of autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jeste, SS

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review: Neurological comorbidities in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are not only common, but they are also associated with more clinical severity. This review highlights the most recent literature on three of autism's most prevalent neurological comorbidities: motor impairment, sleep disorders and epilepsy. Recent findings: Motor impairment in ASDs manifests as both delays and deficits, with delays found in gross and fine motor domains and deficits found in praxis, coordination ...

  10. Modeling the Growth of Neurology Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hadagali, Gururaj S.; Anandhalli, Gavisiddappa

    2015-01-01

    The word ‘growth’ represents an increase in actual size, implying a change of state. In science and technology, growth may imply an increase in number of institutions, scientists, or publications, etc. The present study demonstrates the growth of neurology literature for the period 1961-2010. A total of 291,702 records were extracted from the Science Direct Database for fifty years. The Relative Growth Rate (RGR) and Doubling Time (Dt.) of neurology literature have been calculat...

  11. Neurology-the next 10 years

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, D. M.; Frisoni, G. B.; Bettegowda, C; Gokaslan, Z L; Kessler, J A; Vezzani, A.; Waxman, S G; Jarius, S.; Wildemann, B.; Weller, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in ne...

  12. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  13. Salespeople in the Surgical Suite: Relationships between Surgeons and Medical Device Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Bonnie; Pollner, Fran; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    Background Industry payments to surgeons have received public attention, but little is known about the relationships between surgeons and medical device representatives. Medical device representatives ("device reps") have become an integral part of operating room personnel. The effect of their presence on patient care deserves discussion. Study Design We conducted a qualitative, ethnographic study to explore relationships between surgeons and medical device representatives, and characterize industry involvement in the training of surgeons. We used group and individual open-ended interviews to gain insight into the beliefs, values, and perspectives of surgeons and device reps. We conducted two focus groups, one with ear, nose, and throat surgeons, and one with hospital-based attending orthopedic surgeons. We also conducted individual interviews with three former or current medical device representatives, a director of a surgical residency program at an academic medical center, and a medical assistant for a multi-physician orthopedic practice. Results While surgeons view themselves as indisputably in charge, device reps work hard to make themselves unobtrusively indispensable in order to establish and maintain influence, and to imbue the products they provide with personalized services that foster a surgeon's loyalty to the reps and their companies. Surgeons view industry-funded training opportunities as a necessary service. Device reps and some surgeons believe that reps benefit patient care, by increasing efficiency and mitigating deficiencies among operating room personnel (including the surgeons themselves). Conclusions Our study raises ethical questions about the reliance of surgeons on device reps and device companies for education and surgical assistance and practical concerns regarding existing levels of competence among OR personnel. PMID:27486992

  14. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  15. Management of the open abdomen: clinical recommendations for the trauma/acute care surgeon and general surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Luis G

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, the surgical approach to managing abdominal injuries was to assess the extent of trauma, repair any damage and close the abdomen in one definitive procedure rather than leave the abdomen open. With advances in medicine, damage control surgery using temporary abdominal closure methods is being used to manage the open abdomen (OA) when closure is not possible. Although OA management is often observed in traumatic injuries, the extension of damage control surgery concepts, in conjunction with OA, for the management of the septic patient requires that the general surgeon who is faced with these challenges has a comprehensive knowledge of this complex subject. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance to the acute care and general surgeon on the use of OA negative pressure therapy (OA-NPT; ABTHERA™ Open Abdomen Negative Pressure Therapy System, KCI, an ACELITY Company, San Antonio, TX) for OA management. A literature review of published evidence, clinical recommendations on managing the OA and a case study demonstrating OA management using OA-NPT have been included. PMID:27547961

  16. Truffle diversity (Tuber, Tuberaceae) in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berch, Shannon M; Bonito, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    To improve baseline data for the developing truffle industry in British Columbia, we compiled existing Tuber species sequences from published and unpublished studies and generated new ITS sequences for truffles belonging to Tuber collected in the province. In doing so, we obtained evidence that 13 species of Tuber occur in the province, including six introduced and seven native species, two of which are putative undescribed species. Of the native species, the Tuber anniae species complex is widely distributed in the province while Tuber beyerlei appears to be much more restricted in distribution. Four of the introduced species have commercial value (Tuber melanosporum, Tuber aestivum, Tuber brumale, and Tuber borchii) as do two of the native species (Tuber gibbosum and Tuber oregonense). Focused sampling on likely tree hosts, both hardwood and Pinaceae species, as well as in currently unexplored parts of the province seems likely to expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of Tuber species in British Columbia. PMID:27083929

  17. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  18. The parliamentary representation of British Muslims

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Shane

    2010-01-01

    Parliamentary parties in the British House of Commons tend to experience high levels of voting unity with individual MPs only occasionally dissenting from party policy. Although constituency influence has been used extensively to predict legislative behaviour in candidate-centred electoral environments, it is argued here that constituency preferences can, under certain circumstances, shape parliamentary behaviour in a strong-party, weak personal-vote, electoral environment such as the United ...

  19. Hearing care policy analysis in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Fadyeyeva, Inna

    2007-01-01

    Reduced hearing is a wide spread disability. One out of ten British Columbians estimated to suffer from a variable degree of hearing loss (CASLPA, 2005). It is the most common sensory impairment affecting 50 percent of Canadians over 65 (CHHA, 2005). The hearing loss problem is expected to progress from bad to worse due to demographic changes of the society and aging population. Hearing loss problem bears serious consequences for the affected individuals and society as a whole. This paper is ...

  20. The Differences between British and American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李进

    2012-01-01

    English is used as one of the most important languages in the world. As a result of the military, economic, scientific, political, and cultural influence, English has been used in many parts of the world, and the most prominent language in international business and science. It is used extensively as a second language and as an oflacial language in Commonwealth countries and many international organizations, and developed to many forms. This paper compares the differences between the British English and American English.

  1. Fourth Sino-British Local Government Seminar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>The 4th Sino-British Local Government Seminar jointly sponsored by the CPAFFC, the China International Friendship Cities Association, the China-EU Association and the Local Government International Bureau of the UK (LGIB) was held in Beijing on June 29, 2004. He Luli, vice-chairperson of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, attended the seminar and delivered a speech. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu made a keynote speech. Ken Bodfish,

  2. Care credits in the British pension system

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachantoni, Athina

    2009-01-01

    The paper is a brief outline of the first stage of a comparative research project in the role and adequacy of care credits in the British and German pension systems. The provision of care credits has been an essential part of pension reforms around Europe, which significantly changes the prospects of carers to accumulate adequate pension contributions through their life course. But although the policy significance of care credits is due to rise in line with an increasing demand...

  3. Peer Victimization in British Columbia Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Van Blyderveen, Sherry Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Peer victimization is an issue which has recently received considerable attention from the media, the school system, and academic literature. The present study examines a number of expected correlates, both risk factors and outcomes, of peer victimization through the use of the Adolescent Health Survey - II conducted by the McCreary Centre Society in the province of British Columbia. Approximately 25,800 youth, from grades 7 through 12, from various regions of the province completed the quest...

  4. Dystopia in British and American literature

    OpenAIRE

    GODOVANNAYA E; FLEGONTOVA A

    2016-01-01

    The article investigates dystopian fiction in British and American literature as exemplified in the books ‘Brave New world’ by Aldous Huxley and ‘451 Fahrenheit’ by Ray Bradbury. It draws the reader’s attention to the authors’ anxious attitude towards the portrayed events which can be considered to be a warning to future generations. The research mainly concentrates on common features of dystopian novels in both cultures.

  5. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all......INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  6. A critical history of British earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. W. Musson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of the study of historical British earthquakes. The publication of compendia of British earthquakes goes back as early as the late 16th Century. A boost to the study of earthquakes in Britain was given in the mid 18th Century as a result of two events occurring in London in 1750 (analogous to the general increase in earthquakes in Europe five years later after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. The 19th Century saw a number of significant studies, culminating in the work of Davison, whose book-length catalogue was published finally in 1924. After that appears a gap, until interest in the subject was renewed in the mid 1970s. The expansion of the U.K. nuclear programme in the 1980s led to a series of large-scale investigations of historical British earthquakes, all based almost completely on primary historical data and conducted to high standards. The catalogue published by BGS in 1994 is a synthesis of these studies, and presents a parametric catalogue in which historical earthquakes are assessed from intensity data points based on primary source material. Since 1994, revisions to parameters have been minor and new events discovered have been restricted to a few small events.

  7. The British Model in Britain: Failing slowly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, Britain reorganised its electricity industry to run on competitive lines. The British reforms are widely regarded as successful and the model used provides the basis for reforms of electricity industries worldwide. The main reason for this perception of success is major reductions in the real price of electricity with no reduction in service quality. This paper examines whether the reputation of the British reforms is justified. It concludes that the reputation is not justified and that serious fundamental problems are beginning to emerge. The central question is: have the British reforms resulted in the creation of efficient wholesale and retail markets? On this criterion, the reforms have failed. The wholesale market is dominated by obscure long-term contracts, privileged access to the market and self-dealing within integrated generator/retailers, leaving the spot markets with minimal liquidity and unreliable prices. The failure to develop an efficient wholesale market places the onus on consumers to impose competitive forces on electricity companies by switching regularly. Small consumers will not do this and they are paying too much for their power. For the future, there is a serious risk that the electricity industry will become a weakly regulated oligopoly with a veneer of competition

  8. British Columbia natural gas: Core market policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core market for natural gas in British Columbia is defined as all natural gas consumers in the residential, institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors not currently purchasing natural gas directly and not exempted from the core market by the British Columbia Utilities Commission (BCUC). The intent of the definition is to include all customers who must be protected by contracts which ensure long-term security of supply and stable prices. Core market customers are excluded from direct natural gas purchase and will be served by distribution utilities. A customer may apply to BCUC to leave the core market; such an application may be approved if it is demonstrated that the customer has adequate long-term natural gas supplies or alternative fuel supplies to protect him from supply interruptions. The non-core market is defined as all large industrial customers who elect to make their own natural gas supply arrangements and who can demonstrate to the BCUC sufficient long-term natural gas supply protection or alternative fuel capability to ensure security of the industry. Non-core market customers have full and open access to the competitive natural gas market. The British Columbia government will not apply its core market policy to other jurisdictions through Energy Removal Certificates

  9. Smoking cessation: the role of the foot and ankle surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, Robert M; Johnson, Adam R; Bevilacqua, Nicholas J

    2010-02-01

    Tobacco cigarette smoking causes many negative effects on the body, and it is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. These negative effects are a concern for the foot and ankle surgeon, as smoking can increase the risk of diabetes and peripheral artery disease and delay healing of surgical incisions and ulcerations of the lower extremities. Tobacco cigarette smoking can also increase the risk of avascular necrosis and delayed union and nonunions of fractures and osteotomies. Smoking cessation is an important component in the overall treatment of conditions affecting the foot and ankle. Smoking cessation can be a difficult goal to achieve, but proper education and support can help patients reach this goal. PMID:20400436

  10. Old Disease…New Location…Surgeons Be Alerted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Ashok

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus causes a zoonotic infection called Cystic Echinococcosis (CE. Surgeons meet with hydatid cysts of the liver and lungs with reasonable frequency. However hydatid cyst may appear in other parts of the body too.A 30 yrs old lady presented with a smooth slow-growing subcutaneous nodule on the anteromedial side of the right thigh with no detectable primary site in the liver or lung. The case subsequently diagnosed as hydatid cyst of muscle and radical surgery was done under coverage of anihelminthic drug.The common practice in this type of case is to do FNAC taking the lesion to be a soft tissue neoplasm. The aim of this case presentation is to make aware of the fact that in a case of diffuse non-tender swelling with history of gradual increase in size hydatid cyst also has to be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  11. [Surgeon 2.0: the challenge is on the Web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda Lozano, Ricardo; Ferrer Márquez, Manuel; García Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Alvarez García, Antonio; Reina Duarte, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Numerous articles and opinions have been published in the last few years on how the Internet is changing clinical practice. In this article we focus on describing 2 aspects that we believe are fundamental in the web 2.0 and Medicine-Surgery inter-relationship: a) web 2.0 conceptualisation and its differences with other pre-existing tools, and b) a description of some of the tools that from a medical-surgical view could be of major interest to the professionals, the patients, and interaction between both. The time has arrived to board train 2.0, where the channels of communication between the professionals, and between them and the patients, are improving disease situations daily, to improve learning through contact with other physicians and surgeons, at the same time providing an excellent resource for maintaining health and to know the disease and its treatment.

  12. Plastic surgeons and the Internet: results of a worldwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Horst; Dabernig, Jörg; Allert, Sixtus; Puchinger, Markus; Scharnagl, Erwin

    2002-11-01

    To obtain information on the use of the Internet, 3,139 survey forms were sent out to plastic surgeons throughout the world. More than 90% of the 565 respondents have access to the Internet and 85.5% use electronic mail for professional matters. They use the World Wide Web to search the literature, to read scientific articles, and to obtain information on congresses. A substantial proportion of the contributors have a positive attitude toward virtual congresses on the Internet and most would welcome a newsgroup dedicated to plastic surgery. Perceived apprehensions include secure transmission of sensitive data, slow data transmission, and the lack of structure and of an authority to control the contents of the Internet. Virtual congresses and a newsgroup on plastic surgery seem to be worthwhile future goals. Some problems pointed out in this survey have already been solved, at least partially, and possible solutions for the rest are discussed. PMID:12439012

  13. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental surgeons: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among on-job dental surgeons. Objectives: To identify the musculoskeletal disorders in terms of perception of pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons due to the rigors of dental work, to determine the prevailing working environment with particular reference to dental work station in relation to musculoskeletal disorders, and to find the association between pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons and the selected socio-demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 graduated dental surgeons having a work experience of 1 year or more, post graduates and faculty members of various specialties at Yenepoya Dental College Hospital, Mangalore. The subjects were selected randomly from the hospital and they were given closed-ended questionnaire to find out perception of pain and stiffness experienced in the past 6 months. The observation of the working environment was done by walk-through observational survey. Results: The study showed that 6.6% dental surgeons always experienced shoulder pain, while 83.3% dental surgeons sometimes experienced back pain and 70% sometimes experienced neck pain. Majority of the dental surgeons (73.3% experienced stiffness in the back and 23.3% experienced severe pain in their neck. It was observed that the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons had a significant association (P = 0.024 with the pain they experienced in their hip/thigh region. The frequency of pain experienced by the dental surgeons in the hip/thigh and knee joints also showed a significant association (P = 0.037 with the height of the dental surgeons. Conclusion: The study revealed that various socio-demographic variables contributed to the musculoskeletal disorders experienced by the dental surgeons. However, the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons vis-à-vis pain experienced in the back, wrist, and

  14. Jean Falcon (1491-1541), a great surgeon and anatomist of the 16th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkou, Maria; Skandalakis, Panagiotis; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Jean Falcon, an Aragon native, became a famous surgeon at the Faculty of Montpellier. He was a Royal physician, wealthy enough to live a luxurious life and treat influential patients. His lectures were legendary, and his works gave him fame among the surgeons' class. Of all his manuscripts stands the "Guidon", which became an anatomical surgeons' handbook, worthy of reference from the scientific community for centuries.

  15. Louisa Garrett Anderson (1873-1943), surgeon and suffragette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Jennian F

    2008-11-01

    Louisa Garrett Anderson, daughter of Britain's first woman doctor, has been largely forgotten today despite the fact that her contribution to the women's movement was as great as that of her mother. Recognized by her contemporaries as an important figure in the suffrage campaign, Anderson chose to lend her support through high-profile action, being one of the few women doctors in her generation who risked their professional as well as their personal reputation in the fight for women's rights by becoming a suffragette - in her case, even going so far as to spend a month in prison for breaking a window on a demonstration. On the outbreak of war, with only the clinical experience she had gained as outpatient surgeon in a women's hospital, Anderson established a series of women-run military hospitals where she was a Chief Surgeon. The most successful was the Endell Street Military Hospital in London, funded by the Royal Army Medical Corps and the only army hospital ever to be run and staffed entirely by women. Believing that a doctor had an obligation to take a lead in public affairs, Anderson continued campaigning for women's issues in the unlikely setting of Endell Street, ensuring that their activities remained in the public eye through constant press coverage. Anderson's achievement was that her work played no small part in expunging the stigma of the militant years in the eyes of the public and - more importantly - was largely instrumental in putting women doctors on equal terms with their male colleagues. PMID:18952990

  16. Clinical Core Competency Training for NASA Flight Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The cohort of NASA flight surgeons (FS) is a very accomplished group with varied clinical backgrounds; however, the NASA Flight Surgeon Office has identified that the extremely demanding schedule of this cohort prevents many of these physicians from practicing clinical medicine on a regular basis. In an effort to improve clinical competency, the NASA FS Office has dedicated one day a week for the FS to receive clinical training. Each week, an FS is assigned to one of five clinical settings, one being medical patient simulation. The Medical Operations Support Team (MOST) was tasked to develop curricula using medical patient simulation that would meet the clinical and operational needs of the NASA FS Office. Methods: The MOST met with the Lead FS and Training Lead FS to identify those core competencies most important to the FS cohort. The MOST presented core competency standards from the American Colleges of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine as a basis for developing the training. Results: The MOST identified those clinical areas that could be best demonstrated and taught using medical patient simulation, in particular, using high fidelity human patient simulators. Curricula are currently being developed and additional classes will be implemented to instruct the FS cohort. The curricula will incorporate several environments for instruction, including lab-based and simulated microgravity-based environments. Discussion: The response from the NASA FS cohort to the initial introductory class has been positive. As a result of this effort, the MOST has identified three types of training to meet the clinical needs of the FS Office; clinical core competency training, individual clinical refresher training, and just-in-time training (specific for post-ISS Expedition landings). The MOST is continuing to work with the FS Office to augment the clinical training for the FS cohort, including the integration of Web-based learning.

  17. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1 produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2 recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows: (1 A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities. (2 The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person. (3 The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention. (4 The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff. (5 The Task Force supports a two-tier system of

  18. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnassingbé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1 st May to 30 th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric surgeons′ directory was used to identify paediatric surgeons in the Francophone′s countries in Sub Saharan Africa. The parameters studied were number of surgeons per country, means of training, working conditions, remunerations, needs for continuous training and the research. Results: A total of 41 paediatric surgeons (68.33% responded. The average number of paediatric surgeons per country was 5. The means of training included government scholarships among 7 paediatric surgeons (17.07%, scholarship from a non-governmental organisations in 14 (34.15% and self-sponsorships in 20 (48.78%. The average salary was 450 Euros (€ (range: 120-1 400 Euros. Most of the paediatric surgeons (68.29% had internet services for continuous update courses and research. Thirty six paediatric surgeons (87.80% had no subscription to specialised scientific journals. Conclusion: The paediatric surgeon in FSSA faces many problems related to his working and living conditions that may have a negative impact on their competences.

  19. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  20. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

  1. British Energy privatisation - 18 months on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TV advertisement which launched the privatisation of British Energy in the summer of 1996 - but just how successful has that privatisation been? And who has benefited - shareholders? The nuclear industry? Our own workforce? Last year, as reported to PIME 97 that the privatisation itself had been successfully completed - following the restructuring of the UK nuclear generation industry, and the creation of British Energy, a new name in the UK - and world energy scene. In simple terms, that privatisation has certainly succeeded - our share price since privatisation has more than doubled, from 2 pounds to well over 4 ponds. Over the last year, it has consistently outperformed the UK electricity sector - particularly over the last winter; it has also out-performed the FR Share Index over the same period, and in December British Energy became one of the UK top 100 listed companies, included in the FTSE 100 having started life at around number 130. This in turn has meant that a number of high quality institutions have taken a second look at British Energy and begun to invest in us as part of a portfolio of FTSE 100 companies. Our success as a private sector company could only be built on the solid foundation of successes as a nuclear utility. Over the five years from 1992 to 1997, our output went up by 64 as Sizewell B came on line and the AGRs achieved their design load factors at last. Safety remains our top priority, and while our profitability increased, so did our safety ratings - accident frequency rates came down by 60%, and collective radiation exposure to our workforce came down 58%. As a result of all this achievement, coupled with reduction in our total workforce, our productivity went up by over 100% - surely proof that nuclear can succeed in a competitive, deregulated electricity market. For future, it has been even more important to sustain that initial success to grow and develop British Energy as a company. The results are there for all to see. In the

  2. From precocious fame to mature obscurity: David Walker (1837-1917) MD, LRCSI, surgeon and naturalist to the Fox Arctic Expedition of 1857-59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Peter; Walker, Brian M

    2012-11-01

    The Belfast-born David Walker was the 19-year-old surgeon and naturalist on the epic Fox Arctic Expedition (1857-59) that established the fate of Sir John Franklin's unsuccessful (1845) search for the North-West Passage. On return the crew were fêted as heroes and decorated, and shared in a £5000 government bounty: Walker was also received by the Queen and (in Ireland) by the Lord Lieutenant, was honoured by the principal British and Irish natural history societies and his portrait was exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery, London. This paper describes his adventurous life, including the Fox Expedition, which from 1862 was spent abroad and included time in the Cariboo gold fields, service in the United States Army, practice in a notorious Californian frontier town and, in later life, the comparative quiet of general and occupational medical practice in Portland, Oregon. Once a household name, his death went unrecorded in the British and Irish medical and lay press. PMID:23143316

  3. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson. Wilson's disease, Queen Square and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussolle, E; Trocello, J-M; Woimant, F; Lachaux, A; Quinn, N

    2013-12-01

    This historical article describes the life and work of the British physician Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson (1878-1937), who was one of the world's greatest neurologists of the first half of the 20th century. Early in his career, Wilson spent one year in Paris in 1903 where he learned from Pierre-Marie at Bicêtre Hospital. He subsequently retained uninterrupted links with French neurology. He also visited in Leipzig the German anatomist Paul Flechsig. In 1904, Wilson returned to London, where he worked for the rest of his life at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and today the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery) in Queen Square, and also at Kings' College Hospital. He wrote on 'the old motor system and the new', on disorders of motility and muscle tone, on the epilepsies, on aphasia, apraxia, tics, and pathologic laughing and crying, and most importantly on Wilson's disease. The other objective of our paper is to commemorate the centenary of Wilson's most important work published in 1912 in Brain, and also in Revue Neurologique, on an illness newly recognized and characterized by him entitled "Progressive lenticular degeneration, a familial nervous disease associated with liver cirrhosis". He analyzed 12 clinical cases, four of whom he followed himself, but also four cases previously published by others and a further two that he considered in retrospect had the same disease as he was describing. The pathological profile combined necrotic damage in the lenticular nuclei of the brain and hepatic cirrhosis. This major original work is summarized and discussed in the present paper. Wilson not only delineated what was later called hepato-lenticular degeneration and Wilson's disease, but also introduced for the first time the terms extrapyramidal syndrome and extrapyramidal system, stressing the role of the basal ganglia in motility. The present historical work emphasizes the special

  4. [Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of Lyme disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, F

    2007-01-01

    The neurological and psychiatric manifestations of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato are so numerous that Borrelia is also called the "new great imitator". Thus knowing about the multiple clinical aspects of neuroborreliosis is necessary for the clinician. We reviewed literature for "classical" neuroborreliosis such as acute meningoradiculitis or chronicle encephalomyelitis, but also for encephalitis, myelitis, polyneuritis, radiculitis and more controversial disorders such as chronic neurological disorders, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and motor neuron disease. We specified every time on which basis each disorder was attributed to Lyme disease, particularly if European or American criteria were met. Every part of the nervous system can be involved: from central to peripheral nervous system, and even muscles. In endemic areas, Lyme serology must be assessed in case of unexplained neurological or psychiatric disorder. In case of positive serology, CSF assessment with intrathecal anti-Borrelia antibody index will be more efficient to prove the diagnosis. PMID:17350199

  5. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  6. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  7. Neurological manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is more identified for its cutaneous features but its neurological manifestations have not received the focused attention. Four patients of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS with neurological manifestations were evaluated for phenotypic data. These four men were from three families and two had consanguineous parentage. The mean age at onset and presentation of neurological symptoms were 10.5 years and 19 years respectively. Patient 1 presented with bilateral optic atrophy, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy. Patient 2 had marfanoid habitus, chorea and cerebellar ataxia. Patient 3 had action and percussion myotonia, wasting and weakness of sternocleidomastoid and distal limb muscles. Patient 4 had action myotonia, mirror movements of both hands and neuropathy. MRI of brain showed right parietal polymicrogyria. Neuroaxis involvement at multiple levels in EDS may have prognostic significance.

  8. What is the essential neurological examination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine which aspects would be essential to the neurological examination (NE in a given specific situation (a patient referred with a potential neurological complaint, but the history suggests that a neurological problem is unlikely, we presented the same questionnaire used by Moore and Chalk in Canada to 19 neurologists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We considered significant aspects of NE, whose average responses were greater than or equal to 3.5: visual fields, fundoscopy, pursuit eye movements, facial muscle power testing, gait, pronator drift or rapid arm movement in upper limbs, finger-nose, tone in arms and legs, five tendon reflexes, and plantar responses. We concluded that, despite geographical and economical differences between Brazil and Canada, neurologists from both countries agree about the essential NE in the proposed scenario.

  9. British Jewish history within the framework of British history 1840 - 1995

    OpenAIRE

    Kershen, Anne

    1997-01-01

    This essay is a context statement in critical defence of my submission for the degree of Ph.D by Published Works in keeping with the requirements of MIddlesex University as laid down in the Guidance Notes dated April 1996. The underlying theme of the submission is that my published works serve to illustrate my belief that it is imperative to locate British Jewish history within the broader framework of British history. Thus, I have not limited my research and writing to one issue, event or se...

  10. Bilateral neurological deficits following unilateral minimally invasive TLIF: A review of four patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander T Nixon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF is commonly used for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The rate of postoperative neurological deficits is traditionally low. New neurological postoperative complications may be underreported. We report our infrequent rate of MI-TLIF procedures complicated by postoperative weakness. Methods: A database of 340 patients was evaluated, all of whom underwent MI-TLIF procedures performed between January 2002 and June 2012 by the senior author. We identified four cases (1.2% whose postoperative course was complicated with bilateral lower extremity weakness. We retrospectively reviewed their past medical history, operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, changes in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and pre- and postoperative neurological exams. Results: The average age of the four patients was 65.5 years(range: 62-75 years, average body mass index (BMI was 25.1 (range: 24.1-26.6, and there were three females and one male. All patients had preoperative degenerative spondylolisthesis (either grade I or grade II. All patients were placed on a Wilson frame during surgery and underwent unilateral left-sided MI-TLIF. Three out of the four patients had a past medical history significant for abdominal or pelvic surgery and one patient had factor V Leiden deficiency syndrome. Conclusions: The rate of new neurological deficits following an MI-TLIF procedure is low, as documented in this study where the rate was 1.2%. Nonetheless, acknowledgement and open discussion of this serious complication is important for surgeon education. Of interest, the specific etiology or pathophysiology behind these complications remains relatively unknown (e.g. direct neural injury, traction injury, hypoperfusion, positioning complication, and others despite there being some similarities between the patients and their perioperative courses.

  11. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  12. Neurology Case Reporting: a call for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rison Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From antiquity to present day, the act of recording and publishing our observations with patients remains essential to the art of medicine and the care of patients. Neurology is rich with case reports over the centuries. They contribute to our understanding and knowledge of disease entities, and are a cornerstone of our professional development as physicians and the care of our patients. This editorial seeks to enthuse and invigorate house staff and practicing physicians everywhere to continue the long and time-honored tradition of neurology case reporting.

  13. How to write a neurology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Neurology case reports have a long history of transmitting important medical information across many generations for the improvement of patient care. Case reports contribute much to the physician's knowledge base from which treatment hypotheses and ideas form. Elements of a modern case report, as presented in the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines, include the abstract, introduction, case presentation, discussion, conclusion, patient's perspective, and consent statement. The sections are described here, as well as the application of CARE guidelines to a published neuromuscular case report. Writing case reports offer an ideal opportunity for neurologists to publish interesting case findings and carry on the tradition of neurologic case reporting. PMID:27048575

  14. Precocious Albion: A New Interpretation of the British Industrial Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Morgan; Mokyr, Joel; Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2014-01-01

    Many explanations have been offered for the British Industrial Revolution. This article points to the importance of human capital (broadly defined) and the quality of the British labor force on the eve of the Industrial Revolution. It shows that in terms of both physical quality and mechanical skills, British workers around 1750 were at a much higher level than their continental counterparts. As a result, new inventions—no matter where they originated—were adopted earlier, faster, and on a la...

  15. 'I never faced up to being gay': sexual, religious and ethnic identities among British Indian and British Pakistani gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a comparative qualitative study of British Indian and British Pakistani gay men, all of whom self-identified as members of their religious communities. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and identity process theory. Results suggest that the intersection between sexuality and religion is more relevant to British Pakistani participants, while the intersection between sexuality and ethnicity is more relevant to British Indian participants. For British Indian participants in particular, homosexuality seems to be socially problematic, posing potential obstacles for interpersonal and intergroup relations. Conversely, for British Pakistanis, homosexuality is both socially and psychologically problematic, affecting intrapsychic as well as interpersonal levels of human interdependence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:22651130

  16. 76 FR 28308 - Compliance Policy Guide: Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination Gloves; Defects-Criteria for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... announcing the availability of Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 335.700, Surgeons' Gloves and Patient Examination.... Background FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled ``Compliance Policy Guide Sec... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 800 Compliance Policy Guide: Surgeons'...

  17. 77 FR 12845 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Surgeon General's (SG) Youth Video Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... for Surgeon General's (SG) Youth Video Contest AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announces the launch of the Surgeon General's (SG) Youth Video... contest has been designed to engage youth and young adults in developing original videos in...

  18. Transatlantic comparison of the competence of surgeons at the start of their professional career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Schijven; R.K. Reznick; O.T.J. ten Cate; T.P. Grantcharov; G. Regehr; L. Satterthwaite; A.S. Thijssen; H.M. Macrae

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although the objective in European Union and North American surgical residency programmes is similar - to train competent surgeons - residents' working hours are different. It was hypothesized that practice-ready surgeons with more working hours would perform significantly better than th

  19. Making sense of British newspaper campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the first quarter of 2013 Ghana reported 7 cases of measles; Britain reported over 900 – the second highest in the EU. Ghana had a 100% vaccination rate; in Britain most reported cases were among 10- 16 year olds in areas where vaccination had fallen to 50%. Last month the British government said it would lobby the European Commission to relax the restrictions on GM food and crops. In 2012, 270 million ha of GM crops were grown in 28 countries; in the EU only 2 such crops have been license...

  20. The Labour Party and British Republicanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth O. MORGAN

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, once solved a case by referring to “the dog that did not bark.” In the past 250 years of British history, republicanism is another dog that did not bark. This is particularly true of supposedly our most radical major political party, the Labour Party. Over the monarchy, as over constitutional matters generally, Labour’s instincts have been conservative. Even after 1997, when the party, led by Lord Irvine, has indeed embarked upon major constitutional ref...

  1. A history of British Assemblies of God

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, William K.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main historical works on Assemblies of God in Britain. The first is Donald Gee's Wind and Flame (originally published under the title The Pentecostal Movement in 1941; later revised and enlarged for publication in 1967). Gee was intimately involved in much of AoG's development not only in the British Isles but also overseas, There are, however, three things which Donald Gee fails to do and which I decided to attempt in the history which follows. First, and very properly, Gee und...

  2. Urgent discectomy: Clinical features and neurological outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Albert

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Motor deficits, sensory deficits, and cauda equina dysfunction were significantly improved immediately after urgent surgery. After 6 weeks, motor and sensory deficits were also significantly improved compared to the neurological status at discharge. Thus, we advocate immediate surgery of disc herniation in patients with acute onset of motor deficits, perineal numbness, or bladder or bowel dysfunction indicative of cauda equina syndrome.

  3. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. Astrocytes : a central element in neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Messing, Albee; Steinhäuser, Christian; Lee, Jin Moo; Parpura, Vladimir; Hol, Elly M.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  5. The neurology of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

    OpenAIRE

    Bams-Mengerink, Annemieke M; Koelman, Johannes HTM; Waterham, Hans; Barth, Peter G; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2013-01-01

    Background To describe the neurologic profiles of Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP); a peroxisomal disorder clinically characterized by skeletal abnormalities, congenital cataracts, severe growth and developmental impairments and immobility of joints. Defective plasmalogen biosynthesis is the main biochemical feature. Methods Observational study including review of clinical and biochemical abnormalities, genotype, presence of seizures and neurophysiological studies of a cohort of 16...

  6. Neuroprotective and neurological properties of Melissa officinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Víctor; Martín, Sara; Gómez-Serranillos, Maria Pilar;

    2009-01-01

    Melissa officinalis has traditionally been used due to its effects on nervous system. Both methanolic and aqueous extracts were tested for protective effects on the PC12 cell line, free radical scavenging properties and neurological activities (inhibition of MAO-A and acetylcholinesterase enzymes...

  7. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  8. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  9. Astrocytes: a central element in neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekny; M. Pekna; A. Messing; C. Steinhäuser; J.M. Lee; V. Parpura; E.M. Hol; M.V. Sofroniew; A. Verkhratsky

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  10. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  11. Surgical management of acute cholecystitis. Results of a nation-wide survey among Spanish surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Josep M; Nve, Esther; Jimeno, Jaime; Guirao, Xavier; Figueras, Joan; Arias-Díaz, Javier

    2014-10-01

    There is a wide variability in the management of acute cholecystitis. A survey among the members of the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC) analyzed the preferences of Spanish surgeons for its surgical management. The majority of the 771 responders didn't declare any subspecialty (41.6%), 21% were HPB surgeons, followed by colorectal and upper-GI specialities. Early cholecystectomy during the first admission is the preferred method of management of 92.3% of surgeons, but only 42.7% succeed in adopting this practice. The most frequent reasons for changing their preferred practice were: Patients not fit for surgery (43.6%) and lack of availability of emergency operating room (35.2%). A total of 88.9% perform surgery laparoscopically. The majority of AEC surgeons advise index admission cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis, although only half of them succeed in its actual implementation. There is room for improvement in the management of acute cholecystitis in Spanish hospitals.

  12. [The entrance to the guild chamber of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenhof, Anne; IJpma, Frank A; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    In the 17th and 18th centuries the entrance to the guild chamber of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons was located in the right corner-tower of the Waag on the Nieuwmarkt in Amsterdam. The surgeons entered their guild chamber through this door for guild meetings or to take surgical exams. The entrance also gave access to the anatomy theatre, the 'Theatrum Anatomicum', where anatomical dissections - anatomy lessons - took place. There was a bust of Hippocrates in the facade above the door, and the inscription 'Theatrum Anatomicum'. The series of 'anatomy lessons' reminds us of the famous paintings that were commissioned by the Surgeons' Guild. At the beginning of the 17th century, a skeleton was painted on the door in the gateway, and this marked the entrance to the Surgeons' Guild for almost 200 years. We examined, from a historical perspective, how the gateway to the guild chamber of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons was transformed over time. PMID:27122076

  13. Recognizing surgeon's actions during suture operations from video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Ohya, Jun; Chiba, Toshio; Xu, Rong; Yamashita, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Because of the shortage of nurses in the world, the realization of a robotic nurse that can support surgeries autonomously is very important. More specifically, the robotic nurse should be able to autonomously recognize different situations of surgeries so that the robotic nurse can pass necessary surgical tools to the medical doctors in a timely manner. This paper proposes and explores methods that can classify suture and tying actions during suture operations from the video sequence that observes the surgery scene that includes the surgeon's hands. First, the proposed method uses skin pixel detection and foreground extraction to detect the hand area. Then, interest points are randomly chosen from the hand area so that their 3D SIFT descriptors are computed. A word vocabulary is built by applying hierarchical K-means to these descriptors, and the words' frequency histogram, which corresponds to the feature space, is computed. Finally, to classify the actions, either SVM (Support Vector Machine), Nearest Neighbor rule (NN) for the feature space or a method that combines "sliding window" with NN is performed. We collect 53 suture videos and 53 tying videos to build the training set and to test the proposed method experimentally. It turns out that the NN gives higher than 90% accuracies, which are better recognition than SVM. Negative actions, which are different from either suture or tying action, are recognized with quite good accuracies, while "Sliding window" did not show significant improvements for suture and tying and cannot recognize negative actions.

  14. The Role of Plastic Surgeons in Advancing Development Global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, P Niclas; Jenny, Hillary E; Ng-Kamstra, Joshua S; Juran, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    In September 2015, the international community came together to agree on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a plan of action for people, the planet, and prosperity. Ambitious and far-reaching as they are, they are built on three keystones: the elimination of extreme poverty, fighting climate change, and a commitment to fighting injustice and inequality. Critical to the achievement of the Agenda is the global realization of access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed. The landmark report by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery estimated that between 28 and 32 percent of the global burden of disease is amenable to surgical treatment. However, as many as five billion people lack access to safe, timely, and affordable surgical care, a burden felt most severely in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Surgery, and specifically plastic surgery, should be incorporated into the international development and humanitarian agenda. As a community of care providers dedicated to the restoration of the form and function of the human body, plastics surgeons have a collective opportunity to contribute to global development, making the world more equitable and helping to reduce extreme poverty. As surgical disease comprises a significant burden of disease and surgery can be delivered in a cost-effective manner, surgery must be considered a public health priority. PMID:27579265

  15. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  16. Day-care hypospadias surgery: Single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharam V.V.S.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the results of the early discharge of children after hypospadias repair with an indwelling catheter. Materials and Methods: To facilitate early the discharge of children after hypospadias repair, the author adopted the technique of draining the indwelling urinary catheter into diapers in children undergoing this operation. Home catheter care was taught to the mother; the dressings and catheters were subsequently managed in the outpatient clinic. Results: Over a 2-year period, 43 children were managed by this technique and were sent home within 24-48 h after the operation with an indwelling catheter. Minor problems requiring outpatient visits to the surgeon occurred in nine (20% children after discharge from the hospital. All the nine children were successfully managed as outpatients and no child required rehospitalisation. The catheter remained in position for 5 days in all the children. The overall results were satisfactory with an acceptable (7% fistula rate. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the duration of the hospital stay of children after hypospadias repair without compromising on the final results.

  17. Radiation exposure to the surgeon during closed interlocking intramedullary nailing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, P.E.; Schoen, R.W. Jr.; Browner, B.D.

    1987-06-01

    During interlocking intramedullary nailing of twenty-five femoral and five tibial fractures, the primary surgeon wore both a universal film badge on the collar of the lead apron and a thermoluminescent dosimeter ring on the dominant hand to quantify the radiation that he or she received. When distal interlocking was performed, the first ring was removed and a second ring was used so that a separate recording could be made for this portion of the procedure. At the conclusion of the study, all of the recorded doses of radiation were averaged. The average amount of radiation to the head and neck during the entire procedure was 7.0 millirems of deep exposure and 8.0 millirems of shallow exposure. The average dose of radiation to the dominant hand during insertion of the intramedullary nail and the proximal interlocking screw was 13.0 millirems, while the average amount during insertion of the distal interlocking nail was 12.0 millirems. Both of these averages are well within the government guidelines for allowable exposure to radiation during one-quarter (three months) of a year. Precautions that are to be observed during this procedure are recommended.

  18. Association of Surgeons in Training Conference: Cardiff 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, G; Wild, J R L; Fitzgerald, J E F

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is a professional body and registered charity working to promote excellence in surgical training for the benefit of junior doctors and patients alike. With a membership of over 2000 surgical trainees from all ten surgical specialities, the association provides support at both regional and national levels throughout the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. Originally founded in 1976, ASiT is independent of the National Health Service (NHS), Surgical Royal Colleges, and speciality associations. The 2012 Annual Conference in Cardiff City Hall brought together nearly 700 delegates for an educational weekend programme with expert guest speakers. Clinical updates were complimented by debates on current training in surgery, and the weekend included 6 pre-conference courses covering a diverse range of topics including laparoscopic skills, surgical drawing and a masterclass in journal club. A record number of 1168 abstract submissions were received and those successful competed for 18 awards representing £3500 in trainee prizes and bursaries. As the only national surgical trainee meeting for all specialities, ASiT continues to grow and we look forward to an even larger and more successful conference next year.

  19. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  20. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective study in a neurological setup, which included data from hospital dermatology consultation request forms over a period of one year. The data included demographic profile of the patient investigation where needed, neurological diagnosis and final dermatological diagnosis. The data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 285 patients who were requested for consultation were included in the study. Face was the commonest site of involvement (19.6%. Laboratory examination of referred patients revealed abnormal blood counts in 2% cases, renal function tests in 0.7% and urine in 0.4% cases. CT scan showed abnormal findings in 65.6% patients. The most common drug used in these patients was phenytoin (29.1%. The most common dermatological diagnosis was Infection and Infestation (34.7% followed by eczema (46.6%. Drug rash was seen in 3.9% cases. Out of which one had phenytoin induced Steven Johnson syndrome. Skin biopsy was done in 5 patients. Topicals was advised in 80%. Upon discharge 10% of inpatients didn’t require any follow-up. The patients who were followed up after 4 weeks, about 48% had their symptoms resolved with topicals and oral treatment as required. About 38% required more than two follow ups due to chronic course of the diseases. Conclusions: This present study discussed about various manifestations of skin disorders in a neurological set up and emphasizes the role of dermatologist in treating skin problems both in outpatient as well as inpatient

  1. CONTEMPORARY BRITISH RESEARCHES ON SOUTH SUDAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V. MIGUNOV

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author attempts to study and analyze contemporary theories of the British scientists, related to South Sudan. The explored conceptions embrace different aspects of the process of its formation as independent state and include works on the following issues: development of legal basis for secession from parent state; formation and effective work of governmental institutions; settlement of internal social and political conflicts, especially interethnic collisions; assurance of internal political stability and security, including fight against corruption; elaboration of economic development strategy; support of local social and political structures, including NGOs; settlement of disputes and establishment of constructive relations with parent state before and after secession; exercising of pressure on the authorities of parent state and territory, claiming for independence, with a view of its secession from the parent state; interaction with third countries and international institutions; assurance of extensive international participation. The conducted analysis allows getting a basic idea about the actual progress of scientific debates on South Sudan in Britain, associate them with the British foreign policy in regard to this particular country and formulate strategy of the Western European states on assistance of new states formation.

  2. The Ruins of the British Welfare State

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    Tahl Kaminer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of Owen Hatherley’s A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain are architecture and urban development. The book addresses also some broader cultural, political and economic references, as well as personal anecdotes and memories. It includes many encounters with the remnants of the British welfare state.As an extension to his blog postings and a sequel of sorts to his previous Militant Modernism, Hatherley’s antagonist here is the semi-official architecture of New Labour, which he terms ‘pseudomodernism’: an unimaginative, inferior, and, in its own specific way, also tacky architecture of white stucco, steel and glass. He attacks the Faustian bargain of Richard Rogers and his allies with neoliberalism, a pact that produces a modernism devoid of social content, reflected by the unimaginative, speculation-driven architectural design. While Hatherley produces the promised indictment of recent British architecture, the book is, at the end of the day, primarily a eulogy to the disappearing postwar architecture he so evidently loves.

  3. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  4. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  5. Current Practice Patterns Regarding the Conduct of Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy amongst Surgeons - A Survey Study

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    LR Henry, LB Helou, NP Solomon, A Chang, SK Libutti, A Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heterogeneity of surgical care exists among surgeons regarding the conduct of thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.Aim: To identify the current patterns of technical conduct of operation amongst surgeons performing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.Methods: A survey was designed and beta-tested on five surgical oncologists for face validity and usability. The final version of this survey was constructed and disseminated using the professional version of the internet-based survey mechanism Survey Monkey and consisted of two eligibility questions and 22 questions regarding thyroidectomy/parathyroidectomy treatment patterns. The survey was disseminated electronically to American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES and American College of Surgeons (ACS members. Survey results were collected, tabulated and analyzed. Responses among groups were compared using two sample T- tests. Significant responses were subsequently analyzed in generalized linear models to ascertain if significance remained with control of covariates.Results: Of 420 initial web survey visits, 236 (56.2% surveys were completed. The majority of respondents reported being 'fellowship trained', experienced and 'high-volume' surgeons. The most common fellowship trainings were endocrine (46%, oncology (22%, head & neck (13%, or combinations of the three fellowships (14%. Most surgeons reported that they dissect the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN without using neuromonitoring. Nearly a third of respondents reported routinely using the Harmonic scalpel during the conduct of the operations. Significant differences emerged regarding operative technique according to residency training type, fellowship training, surgeon volume, and practice setting, but only those associated with residency training type and annual surgeon surgical volume remained significant within generalized linear models.Conclusion: Most surgeons who responded to this survey do not routinely

  6. British Asians, Covert Racism and Exclusion in English Professional Football

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    Daniel Kilvington

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the exclusion of British Asians from English professional football. At present, there are eight British Asians with professional contracts out of over 4,000 players. This statistic is increasingly noteworthy when we consider that, first, football is extremely popular across British Asian groups and, second, Britain is home to over 4 million British Asians (the UK’s largest minority ethnic group. Following a brief introduction as well as a discussion of racisms, the work will provide an overview of the barriers that have excluded British Asian football communities from the professional ranks. In particular, I shall discuss some of the key obstacles including overt racism, ‘all-Asian’ football structures and cultural differences. However, the focus of this paper is to explore the impact and persist-ing nature of institutional racism within football. With the aid of oral testimonies, this work shall present British Asian experiences of covert racism in the game. I shall therefore demonstrate that coaches/scouts (as gatekeepers have a tendency to stereotype and racialize British Asian footballers, thus exacerbating the British Asian football exclusion. Finally, the article will offer policy recommendations for reform. These recommendations, which have come out of primary and secondary research, aspire to challenge institutional racism and combat inequalities within the game.

  7. Problem Gambling Treatment within the British National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigbye, Jane; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    According to the latest British Gambling Prevalence Survey, there are approximately 300,000 adult problem gamblers in Great Britain. In January 2007, the "British Medical Association" published a report recommending that those experiencing gambling problems should receive treatment via the National Health Service (NHS). This study examines the…

  8. British and Finnish Baseball: International Variations on an American Pastime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emyr W.; Romar, Jan-Erik; Hartman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Both British and Finnish baseball are easy to introduce, as the specific skills involved in both sports are identical to those used in traditional baseball. If students have the skills to play traditional baseball, they have the skills to play British and Finnish baseball as well. After a brief overview of the unique rules and strategies of these…

  9. Britishness as Racist Nativism: A Case of the Unnamed "Other"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heather Jane

    2016-01-01

    The construct of Britishness, as with nationalism elsewhere in the world, although amorphous and permeable over time, continues to be used by politicians and the media as a powerful exclusionary force. Moreover in England, fundamental British values (FBV), its most recent and official incarnation, now hold particular currency in education policy…

  10. Knowledge, Character and Professionalisation in Nineteenth-Century British Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Historians have frequently referred to the British Association for the Advancement of Science as an institution that had the professionalisation of British science as its chief aim. This article seeks to complicate this picture by asking what, if any, concept of "professionalisation" would have been understood by nineteenth-century…

  11. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  12. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

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    Namit B Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1 To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2 To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics. Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%, inspired by role model teachers (63%, better quality-of-life (51% and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%. Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%, neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%, neurophobia (43% and lack of procedures (57%. Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%. 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, "role model" teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists′ efforts to shed their diagnostician′s image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student′s career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  13. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

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    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of operation, antibiotics, perioperative complications, and later, the early and late postoperative complications, infection, recurrence rates and return to normal daily activity, verbal pain scales in terms of time and postoperative pain were evaluated. Added to this form of long-term pain ones. The presence of wound infection was assessed by the presence of purulent discharge from the incision. Visual analog scale pain status of the patients was measured. Results: 587 patients underwent repair of primary inguinal hernia mesh plug. One of the patients, 439 (74% of them have adapted follow-ups. Patients%u2019 ages ranged from 18-86. Was calculated as the mean of 47±18:07. Follow-up period of the patients was found to be a minimum of 3 months, maximum 55 months. Found an average of 28.2±13.4 months. Mean duration of surgery was 35.07±4.00 min (min:22mn-max:52mn, respectively. When complication rates of patients with recurrence in 2 patients (0.5%, hematoma development (1.4% in 6 patients, the development of infection in 11 patients (2.5% and long-term groin pain in 4 patients (0.9% appeared. Discussion: In our experience, the plug-mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia repair safe, effective low recurrence and complication rates can be used.

  14. [Perioperative conflicts between anaesthesiologists and surgeons: ethics and professionalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, J-E; Attias, A; Baghdadi, H; Baumann, A; Bizouarn, P; Claudot, F; Eon, B; Fieux, F; Frot, C; Guibet Lafaye, C; Muzard, O; Nicolas-Robin, A; Orjubin, V; Otero-Lopez, M; Pelluchon, C; Pereira, J; Roussin, F; Vigué, B; Beydon, L

    2014-05-01

    In the perioperative period, several potential conflicts between anaesthetists/intensive care specialists and surgeons may exist. They are detrimental to the quality of patient care and to the well-being of the teams. They are a source of medical errors and contribute to burn-out. Patients can become the victims of such conflicts, which deserve ethical reflection. Their resolution through analysis and shared solutions is necessary. This article seeks to analyse these conflicts, taking into account their specificities and constraints. In order to understand this context, it is important to consider the specificities of each group involved and the records of such situations. Several factors can prevent these conflicts, first and foremost the patients themselves and the quality of the care that is provided. Medical deontology aims mainly at preventing and resolving these conflicts. Generally speaking, the quality approach which is increasingly applied in health care institutions (involving declarations of adverse events, morbidity/mortality reviews, benchmarking, analysis and improvement of practices, etc.) also contributes to the prevention and resolution of disagreements. The teaching of communication techniques that begins with the initial training, the evaluation of team behaviours (through simulation training for example), the respect of others' constraints, particularly when it comes to learning, as well as transparency regarding conflicts of interests, are all additional elements of conflict prevention. Lastly, conflicts may at times be caused by deviant behaviours, which must be met with a clear and uncompromising collective and institutional approach. This article concludes by offering a standardised approach for conflict resolution. PMID:24821342

  15. Action ethical dilemmas in surgery: an interview study of practicing surgeons

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    Nordam Ann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. The main finding was that surgeons experienced ethical dilemmas in deciding the right treatment in different situations. The dilemmas included starting or withholding treatment, continuing or withdrawing treatment, overtreatment, respecting the patients and meeting patients' expectations. The main focus in the narratives was on ethical dilemmas concerning the patients' well-being, treatment and care. The surgeons narrated about whether they should act according to their own convictions or according to the opinions of principal colleagues or colleagues from other departments. Handling incompetent colleagues was also seen as an ethical dilemma. Prioritization of limited resources and following social laws and regulations represented ethical dilemmas when they contradicted what the surgeons considered was in the patients' best interests. Conclusion The surgeons seemed confident in their professional role although the many ethical dilemmas they experienced in trying to meet the expectations of patients, colleagues and society also made them professionally and personally vulnerable.

  16. Why veteran orthopaedic trauma surgeons are being fired and what we can do about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Austin; Althausen, Peter L; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    The financial realities of providing trauma care to injured patients can make it difficult to produce an accurate assessment of the cumulative value orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide to healthcare and university institutions. As with many political battles in the field of medicine, physicians who have been diligently focused on providing patient care were completely unaware of the impending upheaval around them. Whether orthopaedic trauma surgeons are employed or in some type of partnership with hospitals, too often surgeons find the relationship one-sided. In order to effectively negotiate with hospitals, surgeons must demonstrate the comprehensive value they provide to their respective healthcare institutions and universities. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons make direct and indirect financial contributions to the hospital in addition to educational and community services. The sum total of these valued contributions helps fund non-revenue generating programs, provides marketing opportunities, and improves the regional and national reputation of the healthcare institution. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the value contributed to healthcare institutions by orthopaedic trauma surgeons and will serve as a blueprint for all surgeons to accurately account for and demonstrate their value to hospitals while providing efficient and compassionate care to our patients.

  17. Why veteran orthopaedic trauma surgeons are being fired and what we can do about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Austin; Althausen, Peter L; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    The financial realities of providing trauma care to injured patients can make it difficult to produce an accurate assessment of the cumulative value orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide to healthcare and university institutions. As with many political battles in the field of medicine, physicians who have been diligently focused on providing patient care were completely unaware of the impending upheaval around them. Whether orthopaedic trauma surgeons are employed or in some type of partnership with hospitals, too often surgeons find the relationship one-sided. In order to effectively negotiate with hospitals, surgeons must demonstrate the comprehensive value they provide to their respective healthcare institutions and universities. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons make direct and indirect financial contributions to the hospital in addition to educational and community services. The sum total of these valued contributions helps fund non-revenue generating programs, provides marketing opportunities, and improves the regional and national reputation of the healthcare institution. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the value contributed to healthcare institutions by orthopaedic trauma surgeons and will serve as a blueprint for all surgeons to accurately account for and demonstrate their value to hospitals while providing efficient and compassionate care to our patients. PMID:23571292

  18. Understanding the culture of antimicrobial prescribing in agriculture: a qualitative study of UK pig veterinary surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. A.; Latham, S. M.; Williams, N. J.; Dawson, S.; Donald, I. J.; Pearson, R. B.; Smith, R. F.; Pinchbeck, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals has been linked with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial populations, with consequences for animal and public health. This study explored the underpinning drivers, motivators and reasoning behind prescribing decisions made by veterinary surgeons working in the UK pig industry. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted with 21 veterinary surgeons purposively selected from all UK pig veterinary surgeons. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts. Results Ensuring optimum pig health and welfare was described as a driver for antimicrobial use by many veterinary surgeons and was considered a professional and moral obligation. Veterinary surgeons also exhibited a strong sense of social responsibility over the need to ensure that antimicrobial use was responsible. A close relationship between management practices, health and economics was evident, with improvements in management commonly identified as being potential routes to reduce antimicrobial usage; however, these were not always considered economically viable. The relationship with clients was identified as being a source of professional stress for practitioners due to pressure from farmers requesting antimicrobial prescriptions, and concern over poor compliance of antimicrobial administration by some farmers. Conclusions The drivers behind prescribing decisions by veterinary surgeons were complex and diverse. A combination of education, improving communication between veterinary surgeons and farmers, and changes in regulations, in farm management and in consumer/retailer demands may all be needed to ensure that antimicrobial prescribing is optimal and to achieve significant reductions in use. PMID:27516473

  19. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

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    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  20. The neurology of aretaeus: radix pedis neurologia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J M S

    2013-01-01

    Aretaeus (Aretaios) was a physician born in Cappadocia in about the 2nd century AD, a student of medicine and physician in Alexandria. His works are found in eight books which espoused the physiological and pathological views of the Hippocratic principles derived from the pneumatists and the eclectic schools. Though he has been called the forgotten physician, it has been said that: 'after Hippocrates no single Greek author has equalled Aretaios'. In order to give an indication of his neurological legacy, this paper offers a summary of and quotations from his principal neurological contributions: migraine, vertigo, tetanus, epilepsy, melancholia, strokes and paralysis. One of his most important discoveries was the notion that the pyramidal tract decussates.

  1. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual's molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  2. The neurology of eclampsia : some observations.

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    Chakravarty A

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen patients admitted with diagnosis of eclampsia in a large general hospital between 1996 - 1999, were analyzed. Eight patients were referred to neurologists for assessment and management. All these patients had recurrent generalized seizures. Five patients developed visual disturbance. Neuroimaging (CT and/or MRI revealed symmetrical occipital lesions in all. One patient had a large pontine lesion. Seizure control was achieved in all with intravenous phenytoin. All patients recovered fully without any residual neurological deficit and their radiological brain lesions resolved completely, in all except one case. The neurological manifestations and neuroimaging features in cases of eclampsia have been reviewed. A brief note on the pathogenesis of the cerebral lesions is included and the controversial aspect of seizure control in eclampsia highlighted.

  3. Comparison of temperament and character profiles of anesthesiologists and surgeons : a preliminary study.

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    Mitra S

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the high levels of stress in anesthesiologists and also their close working liaison with surgeons, it may be worthwhile to compare the personality profiles of these two groups of professionals. AIM: To compare the personality profiles of surgeons and anesthesiologists, using a well-standardized and validated instrument. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Survey (cross-sectional on surgeons and anesthesiologists working in several medical institutes in India. MATERIAL & METHODS: The self-report Temperament and Character Inventory, 125-item version (TCI-125 was mailed out to an incidental sample of surgeons and anesthesiologists working in medical institutes in India. Of the 200 questionnaires sent (100 to anesthesiologists and surgeons each, 93 completed responses were returned (46 anesthesiologists, 47 surgeons; return rate 46.5%. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student′s unpaired ′t′ test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean scores of anesthesiologists vis-a-vis surgeons on the various temperament dimensions were Novelty seeking: 8.6 vs. 9.2; Harm avoidance: 7.3 vs. 8.1; Reward dependence: 8.1 vs. 8.0; and Persistence: 3.0 vs. 3.1, respectively. Similar scores for the character dimensions were Self-directedness: 16.9 vs. 15.9; Cooperativeness: 17.5 vs. 16.5; and Self-transcendence: 7.0 vs. 6.7, respectively. There was no significant difference between the surgeons and anesthesiologists on any of the temperament and character variables of personality chosen for the study. CONCLUSION: Personality measures did not differ significantly between surgeons and anesthesiologists in this preliminary investigation. If replicated on a larger and more representative sample, the findings have clinical relevance to improve the working relationship between these two groups of closely working professionals.

  4. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana I Berisavac; Pavlović, Aleksandra M.; Jasna J. Zidverc Trajković; Čovičković Šternić, Nadežda M; Ljiljana G. Beslać Bumbaširević

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with l...

  5. Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarac, François; Boller, François

    2010-01-01

    The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where "everything seems to happen in Paris," and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a separate discipline since Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière Hospital obtained a chair of diseases of the nervous system in 1892, a first in the history of the academic world. The chapter shows, however, that the work of Charcot was preceded by a long evolution in medical thinking, which culminated with the introduction of experimental medicine developed by Claude Bernard and François Magendie, and by the study of aphasia by Paul Broca and its localization of language in a specific area of the brain. Many of the great neurologists of France like Duchenne de Boulogne, Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski and Pierre Marie gravitated around Charcot while others like Charles-Edward Brown-Sequard and Jules Dejerine developed their talents independently. The history of Sainte-Anne Hospital further illustrates this independence. It also shows the relation between neurology and psychiatry with Henri Ey, Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker, who collaborated with Henri Laborit in the clinical development of chlorpromazine. Sainte Anne also saw the birth of modern neuropsychology with Henry Hécaen. Jean Talairach and his group developed human stereotaxic neurosurgery and a 3-dimensional brain atlas that is used around the world. The chapter also mentions institutions (the CNRS and INSERM) that have contributed to developments partially independently from medical schools. It concludes with a presentation of schools located outside of Paris that have played a significant role in the development of neurology. Six of the most important ones are described: Montpellier, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, and

  6. Neurologic Parasitic Infections in Immigrants and Travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Kiran; Zunt, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly common in modern clinical practice and the contemporary neurologist must be aware of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and management of common travel-related infections. The authors provide an approach to patients who present with neurologic symptoms, with a history of travel to or residence in tropical and developing countries. Although many other infections are important in this demographic, they focus on three parasitic infections t...

  7. Music, neurology, andpsychology in the nineteenthcentury

    OpenAIRE

    Graziano, Amy B; Johnson, Julene K.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines connections between research in music, neurology, and psychology during the late-nineteenth century. Researchers in all three disciplines investigated how musicis processed by the brain. Psychologists and comparative musicologists, such as Carl Stumpf, thought in terms of multiple levels of sensory processing and mental representation. Early thinking about music processing can be linked to the start of Gestalt psychology. Neurologistssuch as August Knoblauch also discuss...

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  9. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings

    OpenAIRE

    Elżbieta Galińska

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic ...

  10. The chronic wound in early neurological rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Rollnik, Jens Dieter; Wolff, Brigitte; Bertomeu-Knopp, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wounds, especially decubitus ulcers, present a substantial problem in early neurological rehabilitation. Although many of these problem wounds are avoidable through appropriate nursing care (positioning techniques), a cross-sectional examination of our group of patients revealed a prevalence of chronic wounds of 9.2%. This chiefly included older (average age ca. 65 years), severely affected patients (average early-rehabilitation Barthel's total index of -208.0 (± 47.7) points), i.e., ...

  11. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Farnaz Torabian; Arvin Aghayi Nejad; Arash Akhavan Rezayat; Mehran Beiraghi Toosi; Ali Reza Attaei Nakhaie; Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged t...

  12. Neurology goes global: Opportunities in international health

    OpenAIRE

    Fleisher, Jori E.; Mateen, Farrah J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainabl...

  13. The History of Reimbursements in Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Ebied, Amr M.; Tepper, Deborah; Nguyen, Truc

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) addresses consumer protection, employer-provided insurance coverage, as well as the government’s role in providing health care access to the most vulnerable populations. Within the practice of neurology, the PPACA has the challenging goal of reconciling the needs of the growing elderly population with the financial barriers to costly yet available health care services. To bridge that gap, all health care professionals working in the field...

  14. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler; Marco Orsini; Cristiane N. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturb...

  15. Definition and Research of Internet Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    More and more scientific research shows that there is a close correlation between the Internet and brain science. This paper presents the idea of establishing the Internet neurology, which means to make a cross-contrast between the two in terms of physiology and psychology, so that a complete infrastructure system of the Internet is established, predicting the development trend of the Internet in the future as well as the brain structure and operation mechanism, and providing theoretical supp...

  16. Endoscopic evaluation of neurological dysphagic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coscarelli, S; Verrecchia, L; Coscarelli, A

    2007-01-01

    Dysphagia is a frequent finding in neurological patients and is a symptom related to the severity of the clinical picture. The swallowing impairments, in these patients, increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, that leads to death, in at least 6% of patients, within the first year. Therefore, evaluation of the swallowing status is essential in patients with dysphagia and videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) is the method of choice. It cannot be performed in all patients on account o...

  17. Hepatitis E Virus and Neurologic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kamar, Nassim; Bendall, Richard P.; Peron, Jean Marie; Cintas, Pascal; Prudhomme, Laurent; MANSUY, Jean Michel; Rostaing, Lionel; Keane, Frances; Ijaz, Samreen; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the spectrum of disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is emerging. During 2004–2009, at 2 hospitals in the United Kingdom and France, among 126 patients with locally acquired acute and chronic HEV genotype 3 infection, neurologic complications developed in 7 (5.5%): inflammatory polyradiculopathy (n = 3), Guillain-Barré syndrome (n = 1), bilateral brachial neuritis (n = 1), encephalitis (n = 1), and ataxia/proximal myopathy (n = 1). Three cases occurred in non...

  18. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  19. Neurological Complications of Ebola Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billioux, Bridgette Jeanne; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra

    2016-07-01

    Ebola virus disease is one of the deadliest pathogens known to man, with a mortality rate between 25-90% depending on the species and outbreak of Ebola. Typically, it presents with fever, headache, voluminous vomiting and diarrhea, and can progress to a hemorrhagic illness; neurologic symptoms, including meningoencephalitis, seizures, and coma, can also occur. Recently, an outbreak occurred in West Africa, affecting > 28,000 people, and killing > 11,000. Owing to the magnitude of this outbreak, and the large number (>17,000) of Ebola survivors, the medical and scientific communities are learning much more about the acute manifestations and sequelae of Ebola. A number of neurologic complications can occur after Ebola, such as seizures, memory loss, headaches, cranial nerve abnormalities, and tremor. Ebola may also persist in some immunologically privileged sites, including the central nervous system, and can rarely lead to relapse in disease. Owing to these findings, it is important that survivors are evaluated and monitored for neurologic symptoms. Much is unknown about this disease, and treatment remains largely supportive; however, with ongoing clinical and basic science, the mechanisms of how Ebola affects the central nervous system and how it persists after acute disease will hopefully become more clear, and better treatments and clinical practices for Ebola patients will be developed. PMID:27412684

  20. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  1. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC. Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation.

  2. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  3. Neurological involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Courthéoux, Patrick; Babin, Emmanuel; Bergot, Emmanuel; Touzé, Emmanuel; Pelage, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases, and multi-organ vascular dysplasia. Head and neck localizations of HHT are recurrent, frequent associated with serious complications. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and imaging patterns of neurological involvement in HHT and to discuss the role of interventional radiology in the management of HHT patients. Based on a multidisciplinary experience of twenty years at our center, we report here the different aspects of neurological involvement of HHT. Depending on the genetic type of the disease, vascular abnormalities may affect different organs. The knowledge of neurological involvement according to specific localization of HHT makes detection easier. As cerebral or spinal arteriovenous fistula may be present in patients with epistaxis or pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), radiologists should be able to detect high-risk lesions and prevent related complications. Finally, we review indications and techniques of embolization for hemorrhagic lesions and emphasize that endovascular therapies are very effective and safe in experienced hands. Head and neck imaging is commonly used for the diagnosis of HHT. Imaging plays also a key role for patient evaluation before treatment as pluridisciplinary management is needed. PMID:27059009

  4. Sparring And Neurological Function In Professional Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Stiller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury (CTBI, limited research had been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., number of years actively training for professional boxing and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237 who competed in Maryland between 2003 to 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index; CSI and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test; SDMT and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test; SRT. Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT and balance (SRT. A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety.

  5. [Neurological effects of American trypanosomyiasis: clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Prada, Diddier G; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Valderrama, Vladimir; García, Ingrid; León, Marta E; Sunnemark, Dan

    2003-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, affects not only cardiac and intestinal structures but also neurological structures. A high prevalence of T. cruzi infection occurs in Colombia, prompting the present study. First, a qualitative metaanalysis was undertaken using the PubMed database, the electronic internet engine Altavista, Colombian journals indexed by Colciencias, and three relevant textbooks. The following key words were used: Trypanosoma, Chagas disease, nervous system, spinal cord, central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, neuromuscular junction, autonomic nervous system, muscle, muscle disorders, neuromuscular disease, neuromuscular disorders, synapticopathies and dysautonomia. The documents analyzed numbered 116 and included original papers, reviews, case reports, editorials, brief communications, conferences and book chapters. At minimum, each document included data involving ELISA testing, indirect immunofluorescense, or parasitemia levels in the clinical, serological or histopathological studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies were not included because of the recent introduction of PCR as a confirmatory technique for Chagas disease in Colombia. Chagas disease affects the central, the peripheral and the autonomic nervous system in humans, although its effects on the antonomic system is most commonly investigated in Colombia. Neurological lesions must be evaluated carefully, because patients may be misdiagnosed and treated as carriers of 'idiopathic' diseases. Neurological pathologies poses a serious threat in Colombia due to the prevalence of Chagas disease. PMID:14968924

  6. Caval variations in neurologically diseased patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The import of the cavum variation and its prevalence rate in healthy individuals is still not clear, likewise in neurologically diseased patients. To evaluate the frequency and pattern of caval variations in neurologically diseased patients. The presence or absence of the cavum septum pellucidum (CSP), cavum vergae (CV), or cavum velum interpositum (CVI) was reviewed from successive cranial computerized tomography (CT) images of patients who were aged 6 months and above. Two hundred and seventeen cranial CT images were reviewed. At least a cavum variation was noted in 130 (59.9%) of the CT scan images reviewed. The CV, CVI, and CSP were noted in 86 (39.6%), 53 (24.4%), and 50 images (23%), respectively. Caval multiplicity was noted in 102 patients (47%). There was no significant difference in the rate of occurrence of cavum variations in patients with congenital brain diseases and acquired brain conditions (P = 0.484), neither was there a significant difference in the frequency of cavum variation in children aged older than 6 months compared to adults (P = 0.101). Cava variations are relatively common in neurological brain diseases. Patients with congenital brain diseases did not have a higher frequency of cava variation when compared with those that had acquired lesions. The most common type of cavum variation noted in this study was the vergae variety, while the CSP is the rarest

  7. The Renaissance and the universal surgeon: Giovanni Andrea Della Croce, a master of traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Anna; Tomba, Patrizia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-12-01

    All the medical knowledge of all time in one book, the universal and perfect manual for the Renaissance surgeon, and the man who wrote it. This paper depicts the life and works of Giovanni Andrea della Croce, a 16th Century physician and surgeon, who, endowed with true spirit of Renaissance humanism, wanted to teach and share all his medical knowledge through his opus magnum, titled "Universal Surgery Complete with All the Relevant Parts for the Optimum Surgeon". An extraordinary book which truly represents a defining moment and a founding stone for traumatology, written by a lesser known historical personality, but nonetheless the Renaissance Master of Traumatology.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRITISH WAR CORRESPONDENTS IN THE FIELD AND BRITISH MILITARY INTELLIGENCE DURING THE ANGLO-BOER WAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donal P McCrachen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article chronicles the developing relationship between the press corps on the British side and British Military Intelligence during the Anglo-Boer War, particularly during the formal and non-guerrilla phase of the conflict. The article comments on the nature and composition of both the press corps and of the military intelligence operation. In particular, the article looks at the problem issues relating to the relationship: licensing correspondents, censorship, monitoring journalists’ activities, as well as the successful attempt of the intelligence sector to bring the press into their campaign to spread pro-British propaganda. The role of the press in the saga of the attempt to make British Military Intelligence a scapegoat for British initial failures is also mentioned.

  9. Differences Between British English and American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金苹

    2015-01-01

    American English(AmE)is the form of English used in the United States.It includes all English dialects used within the United States. British English(BrE)is.the form of English used in the United Kingdom. It includes all English dialects used within the United Kingdom. Language is a part of culture, and it plays an important role in culture. Language reflects the characteristic of a nation. It not only includes the history and cultural background of a nation, but also fosters the nation ’s attitudes towards life, and ways of living and thinking of the nation. Therefore, to my point of view, the cause of language differences is basically the differences between cultures.

  10. Ocean energy sector in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Columbia's significant wave, tidal, ocean and river current resources will help to provide a clean, renewable energy source to meet the growing demand for electricity in local and North American markets. Various sites in the province are now being investigated for their energy development potential. A demonstration project located in the Race Rocks ecological reserve is producing electricity from tidal currents, while 3 other sites have received provincial funding in order to demonstrate new wave and tidal energy technologies off the coast of Vancouver Island. This guide provided an outline of the province's emerging ocean energy sector, and described the principal companies involved in developing ocean resources in the region. Details of new ocean energy projects were also provided. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  11. Wind energy sector in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Columbia (BC) possesses significant wind energy resources, and many wind energy projects are currently in the planning phase or are already under construction. Wind power policies in the province have been designed to ensure the secure and orderly development of the wind power industry. Policies in the province include a 10-year exemption from participation rents for new projects as well as a policy that has established the maximum permissible noise levels for wind farms located near residential properties. BC's wind power development plan forms part of the province's aim to become electricity self-sufficient by 2016 while ensuring that clean or renewable energy generation accounts for at least 90 per cent of total generation. This guide provided an outline of the province's wind energy sector, and provided a listing of selected wind power operators. Details of new wind power projects were also presented. 11 fig.

  12. POST - OPERATIVE NEUROLOGICAL RECOVERY PATTERN IN DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL MYELOPATHY AND RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To study the neurological recovery pattern and clinical recovery after surgical intervention in patients of degenerative cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy to know the surgical outcome, at L okmanya T ilak M unicipal M edical C ollege , Mumbai, Maharashtra . METHOD : We ca rried out prospective and retrospective observational study of 30 patients with functional disability secondary to cervical degenerative myelopathy and radiculopathy who underwent surgery for decompression of the cervical spinal cord with or without spinal stabilization. March 2012 to March 2013 were studied and followed for more than 1year. All patients were operated by a single surgeon and reviewed independently. All the patients had received appropriate conservative management before undergoing surgical intervention . Data was analysed by using appropriate software. RESULTS : The study group comprised of 27 males and 3 females aged between 36 and 75 years with a mean age of 56 years that presented with functional disability secondary to cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy. Pain and neurological examination were used as criteria at sequential follow – ups. Functional outcome was assessed using Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analogue Scale. It was found that neuro logical recovery for myelopathy by mJOA score at intervals between 15 days to 3 months was significant after which recovery was occurring but was not significant. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for 1 - 2 levels has given good results than posterior laminectomy for 3 or more levels. Cervical radiculopathy alone has good recovery results after decompression surgery than myelopathy or myelopathy with radiculopathy. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, we found that the results of surgery for cervical spon dylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are excellent. The best neurological and functional recovery is seen in patients with mild to moderate

  13. Risk of neurological diseases among survivors of electric shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Kathrine; Meersohn, Andrea; Schüz, Joachim;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between electric injuries and neurological diseases, where electric shocks may explain elevated risks for neuronal degeneration and, subsequently, neurological diseases. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on the risk of neurological diseases among people in D...

  14. Neurologic complications of dropsy : from possibility to reality.

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar S; Khurana D; Gill K.; Choudhary S; Lal V; Das C

    2000-01-01

    Epidemic dropsy, which results from the accidental ingestion of mustard oil adulterated with argemone oil, has been associated with certain neurologic symptoms. The occurrence of objective neurologic involvement has, however, precluded this illness. We report two cases, who were victims of epidemic dropsy in the recent outbreak in India and showed objective neurologic deficit in the form of brachial neuritis.

  15. Neurologic complications of dropsy : from possibility to reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar S

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemic dropsy, which results from the accidental ingestion of mustard oil adulterated with argemone oil, has been associated with certain neurologic symptoms. The occurrence of objective neurologic involvement has, however, precluded this illness. We report two cases, who were victims of epidemic dropsy in the recent outbreak in India and showed objective neurologic deficit in the form of brachial neuritis.

  16. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  17. SUSHRUTA: A GREAT SURGEON AND VISIONARY OF AYURVEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliwal Murlidhar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is described as science of life and it was recalled by Brahma as mentioned in Ayurvedic treatises. Brahma transmitted his noble knowledge to Prajapati or Daksha, later Daksha passed his legacy to Ashwins and Indra received knowledge from Aswins. As per Sushruta opinion, Indra taught Ayurveda to Dhanvantari, the surgeon of gods embodied as king Divodasa of Banaras (Kashiraja. Divodasa then transmitted medical knowledge with special reference to surgery to the wise men like Sushruta and others who approached him as pupils, out of sympathy for the suffering humanity and also in order to prolong their own life. This school of thoughts is known as Dhanvantara-Sampradaya i.e. the school of surgery. All the fellows of Sushruta and Sushruta himself composed texts on the base of the perceptions of the teacher Divodasa Dhanvantari. Sushruta composed ‘Sushruta-Samhita’ which is fully available till now and is considered the best book for Sharira. Nagarjuna redacted the Sushruta-Samhita and possibly added Uttaratantra in 5th century A.D. In 10th century Chandrata, son of Tisata did the Pathashuddhi and renewed the Sushruta-Samhita on the basis of commentary done by Jejjata.In due course of time, many commentaries in Sanskrit, Hindi and English were written which show the growing acceptance and utility of the text. Charaka-Samhita, Sushruta-Samhita and Samhitas of Vagbhata are considered as Brihat-trayee i.e. three main treatises. In Kshemakutuhala text, it is well versed that a Vaidya who has listened many more text books but not listened the Sushruta-Samhita is devoid of actual benefits and if studied many other books but not the Charaka-Samhita gets defame or criticism among Vaidyas who have studied both the Samhitas. Vagbhata says that if the texts written by seers and sages get recognition in society then except Charaka-Samhita and Sushruta-Samhita why Bhela-Samhita etc. are not studied. All these references prove the gravity of Charaka

  18. Cation Exchange Resins and colonic perforation. What surgeons need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rita Rodríguez-Luna

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Despite the low incidence of colonic complication and lethal colonic necrosis associated with the CER clinical use, the general surgeon needs a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients treated with CER and abdominal pain.

  19. Psychological and Physical Stress in Surgeons Operating in a Standard or Modern Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M.; Andersen, L.P.H.; Gögenür, Ismayil;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There have been no studies examining the effect of optimized ergonomic and technical environment on the psychological and physiological stress of the surgeon. The aim of this study was to examine whether optimized ergonomics and technical aids within a modern operating room (OR) affect...... psychological and physiological stress in experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Methods: This was a prospective case-controlled study including 10 experienced surgeons. Surgery was performed in 2 different ORs: a standard room and a modern room (OR1-suite, Karl Storz). The surgeons filled out questionnaires...... concerning physical and psychological wellbeing before and after surgery and had their heart rate variability registered during surgery. Results: Preoperative to postoperative physical strain and pain measurements revealed a systematical difference with 14 of 15 parameters favoring the modern OR. Two...

  20. Implementing an Advanced Laparoscopic Procedure by Monitoring with a Visiting Surgeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briet, Justine M.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Kenkhuis, Monique J. A.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Arts, Henriette J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the feasibility of safely implementing a total laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) in established gynecologists' practices with on-site coaching and monitoring of the learning curve by an experienced visiting surgeon. Design: Multicenter prospective feasibility and impleme

  1. Supply and demand: Will we have enough vascular surgeons by 2030?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine; Schneider, Brandon; Lajos, Paul; Marin, Michael; Faries, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The increase in prevalence of certain cardiovascular risk factors increases susceptibility to vascular disease, which may create demand for surgical intervention. In our study, data collected by the American Association of Medical Colleges Physician Specialty Databook of 2012, the United States Census Bureau, and other nationwide organizations were referenced to calculate future changes in vascular surgeon supply and prevalence of people at risk for vascular disease. In 2010, there were 2853 active vascular surgeons. By 2040, the workforce is expected to linearly rise to 3573. There will be an exponential rise in people with cardiovascular risk factors. Adding to concern, in 2030, an estimated 3333 vascular surgeons will be available for 180,000,000 people with at least one risk factor for peripheral arterial disease. The paucity of properly trained surgeons entering the workforce needs to be addressed before this shortage becomes a larger burden on healthcare providers and governmental spending. PMID:26199290

  2. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Abrahamse, Paul [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hamilton, Ann S. [Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Graff, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  3. Challenges for the cataract surgeon treating people with dementia: a qualitative study exploring anesthetic choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferis JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Mary Jefferis,1–3 Michael Patrick Clarke,1,3 John-Paul Taylor,2 Katie Rhian Brittain4 1Newcastle Eye Centre, Royal Victoria Infirmary, 2Institute for Ageing and Health, 3Institute of Neurosciences, 4Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Background: In light of the growing number of people with dementia and age-related cataract, as well as changing anesthetic practices for cataract surgery, this study aimed to explore the experiences of cataract surgeons in managing patients with dementia and making anesthetic decisions.Methods: This was a qualitative study using semistructured interviews with senior cataract surgeons from two centers in England. Fourteen surgeons were interviewed, and a thematic approach informed by grounded theory was used for the analysis.Results: Choice of anesthesia for people with dementia was a central theme arising from the data. Surgeons varied in their thresholds for using general anesthesia. Decisions about suitability for local anesthesia were limited by time constraints and generally made rapidly and based on instinct; dementia was not always apparent at the point of preassessment. Surgeons used a variety of topical, sub-Tenon’s, and sharp needle blocks for people with dementia. Surgeons discussed techniques to help patients tolerate local anesthesia, such as clear communication, a primary nurse, hand-holding, and support from an anesthetist. However, within our sample, some surgeons had had negative experiences of operating on people with dementia, where an incorrect judgment had been made that they could tolerate local anesthetic cataract surgery. Conclusion: This study highlights the differing practices of cataract surgeons when making anesthetic choices for people with dementia and the challenges they face. In order to avoid the situation of a patient with dementia becoming distressed during awake surgery, increased time at preassessment and anesthetic support

  4. History of the ISS/SIC: Robert Danis, a true general surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, Paul

    2002-10-01

    Robert Danis created his Prize in 1947 to reward a surgeon-member of the Société Internationale de Chirurgie (presently ISS-SIC), "author of the most important and personal work in connection with surgical treatment of fractures." Consequently, many people believe that Robert Danis was an orthopedic surgeon. In fact, he was a man interested in all fields of surgical activity, not only in bone and joint surgery. PMID:12205551

  5. Preoperative education for lumbar radiculopathy: A survey of US spine surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S.; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was used to study a random sample of spine surgeons in the United States. The Spinal Surgery Education Questionnaire (SSEQ) was developed based on previous related surveys and assessed for face and content validity by an expert panel. The SSEQ captured i...

  6. The patient protection and Affordable Care Act: a primer for hand surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-08-01

    The Affordable Care Act is the largest and most comprehensive overhaul of the United States health care industry since the inception of the Medicare and Medicaid. Contained within the 10 titles are a multitude of provisions that will change how hand surgeons practice medicine and how they are reimbursed. It is imperative that surgeons are equipped with the knowledge of how this law will affect all physician practices and hospitals.

  7. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  8. Psychological and physical stress among experienced and inexperienced surgeons during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail;

    2012-01-01

    : Surgical procedures are mentally and physically demanding, and stress during surgery may compromise patient safety. We investigated the impact of surgical experience on surgeons' stress levels and how perioperative sleep quality may influence surgical performance.......: Surgical procedures are mentally and physically demanding, and stress during surgery may compromise patient safety. We investigated the impact of surgical experience on surgeons' stress levels and how perioperative sleep quality may influence surgical performance....

  9. Twelve Years of Scientific Production on Medline by Latin American Spine Surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Teles, Alisson Roberto; Guarise da Silva, Pedro; Martins, Delio; Guyot, Juan Pablo; Gonzalez, Alvaro Silva; Avila, José Maria Jiménez; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the small contribution of LA in the Science Citation Index (SCI), a growing contribution by LA research to international literature has been observed in recent years. Study Design Systematic review. Purpose To evaluate the scientific contribution of Latin American (LA) Spine Surgeons in the last decade. Methods A literature search of publications by LA spinal surgeons on topics concerning the spine or spinal cord was performed using an online database; Pubmed.gov. The resul...

  10. Lexical Differences Between American English and British English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia; Zhong-qi

    2014-01-01

    With the development of society, American English and British English have significant difference.By retrospective analysis of British English and American English and the historical evolution of the development process, discusses American English and British English exist in the vocabulary of the main differences through understanding both English vocabulary differences exist, so that English learners to more easily have a certain kind of English, as well as the right to express English contains a wealth of knowledge.This paper also pointed out that the United States has its unique features English and language arts charm has been a topic of concern to the development trend of English.

  11. Delayed diagnosis of post-traumatic C7 vertebra anterior subluxation with an unusual neurological pattern: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaullah Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic subluxations are potentially devastating injuries to the axial skeleton. Of utmost priority are an expedient and timely diagnosis and realignment because of its association with spinal cord and nerve root trauma, which lead to progressive deleterious neurological deficits. A good radiological study of the occipitocervical joint and first thoracic vertebra is key to a successful early diagnosis. However, cases might still fail to be diagnosed, leading to trouble. A case of post-traumatic subluxation at the C7 vertebral level with an unusual neurological pattern is presented here. Case presentation A 35-year-old farmer from the Sindh province of Pakistan presented to our neurology department after a fall 2 months earlier and complained of lower limb pain and difficulty in walking. He had numbness in both of his lower limbs up to his umbilical region, with sparing of bladder function along with intact strength in the upper extremities bilaterally. Conclusions Our case highlights the unusual sparing of upper limbs and intact urinary continence with severe lower limb deficits in a 70% subluxation. Our case is unusual because highly detrimental effects such as quadriplegia are expected with such extreme subluxation, but our patient presented with only lower limb deficits. This case serves as a reminder to emergency medicine doctors, spine surgeons, and even radiologists (a to evaluate spine injuries by using computed tomography in trauma patients to identify artifact around a suspected injury and (b to be mindful of negative conventional radiographs.

  12. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Esmat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance.

  13. Getting back together after a break-up: Relationship advice for anatomists and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Lachman, Nirusha

    2015-10-01

    The "surgeon-anatomist" was originally a single individual who self-pursued knowledge and understanding of anatomy as the foundation for successful surgical outcomes. However, recent advances in medical education have ironically led to the separation of anatomy and surgery. This physical and emotional "divorce" of anatomists and surgeons into separate individuals has created several critical educational issues for medical and surgical educators including a general lack of anatomical knowledge in medical students and misalignment of graduate medical education procedural specialty training with the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies and now the Next Accreditation System. There are numerous opportunities for anatomists and surgeons to work together to improve educational instruction of established difficult anatomical regions, procedural training, or even develop new techniques and procedures. Similarly, anatomists with specialized training in medical education would be invaluable partners to ensure that procedural assessments align with instructional technologies for truly longitudinal curricula that starts at the medical student level, but stops at the patient outcomes of attending surgeons. This mutually beneficial relationship would be similar to multidisciplinary care teams and current surgeon and PhD/EdD partnerships. The restoration of the relationship between anatomists and surgeons would be invaluable to surgical education and remains an exciting research opportunity. PMID:26174432

  14. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids. PMID:27183958

  15. Improving hand hygiene after neurological injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Lynsay; Gibbison, Lucy; McMahon, Victoria

    Caring for hands tightened by spasticity after stroke, brain injury or other neurological conditions can be challenging for care staff. Opening and cleaning the hand, managing pressure areas, cutting nails and reducing pain becomes more complex if muscles are tight and short. Hand hygiene is key for staff but literature on patients' hand and nail care is lacking, so specialist education and care planning may be needed to help staff ensure these activities are done well. This article outlines the importance of maintaining patients' hand hygiene, explores the barriers to providing effective care and discusses how they might be overcome. PMID:26665632

  16. Fetal MRI: obstetrical and neurological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gressens, Pierre [INSERM E 9935 and Service de Neurologie Pediatrique, Hopital Robert Debre, 48 Blvd Serurier, 75019, Paris (France); Luton, Dominique [Maternity Department, Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France)

    2004-09-01

    Despite major advances in the understanding and in the genetics of several diseases of the developing brain, early prediction of the neurological prognosis of brain abnormality discovered in utero or of white matter damage discovered in a preterm neonate remains particularly difficult. Advances in prenatal diagnosis and the increased rate of survival of extremely preterm infants who are at higher risk of developing white matter damage underline the critical and urgent need for reliable predictive techniques. New imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy or functional MRI applied to the fetus represent promising tools in this perspective. (orig.)

  17. Frida Kahlo's neurological deficits and her art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrys, Valmantas

    2013-01-01

    World-famous Mexican painter Frida Kahlo is an impressive example of a professional artist whose artistic subject matter was extremely influenced by her chronic, severe illness. Many of her best-known works depict her physical and mental suffering. She was one of those very uncommon artists who dared to show their nude, sick body. This chapter describes and explains the biographical events and works of Frida Kahlo that are closely related to neurology: congenital anomaly (spina bifida), poliomyelitis, spine injury, and neuropathic pain.

  18. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birinder S Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives.

  19. STUDY ON ALCOHOL AND ITS NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akumnaro Jamir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Alcoholism is characterised by alcohol tolerance, signs and symptoms of withdrawal and continued use in spite of insidious physical or psychological consequences. Chronic alcohol abuse causes several distinct diseases affecting many organs; however, the alcohol affecting the brain is the most significant factor for maintaining this alcohol abuse. The neurological complications of alcoholism include both the peripheral and the central nervous system like the alcohol withdrawal syndrome which includes alcohol withdrawal seizures, delirium tremens, alcohol hallucinosis. The other neurological complications are the alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, alcoholic myopathy, Wernicke encephalopathy, combination of Wernicke encephalopathy with Korsakoff ’s psychosis. Not all alcoholics are alike. The degree of impairment differs from individual to individual and the aetiology of a particular disease has different origins for different people. In the current scenario, it is still a subject of active research as to what characteristic features makes certain group of alcoholics more vulnerable to brain damage. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was undertaken under the Department of General Medicine, Govt. Stanley Hospital, Chennai. The study consists of 150 patients with history of alcohol intake satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, presenting in medical OPD/wards/ICU, after proper consent were subjected to questionnaires, complete physical examination and relevant laboratory investigations as per proforma. A prospective observational study design was chosen and descriptive statistics was done for all data and suitable statistical tests of comparison for a period of 6 months. RESULTS It was found that alcohol withdrawal seizures and acute hallucinosis were the most common neurological sequelae seen. Acute hallucinosis was more prevalent in younger age group, whereas complications like alcohol polyneuropathy, Wernicke

  20. Coastal Topography—Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A seamless (bare earth and submerged) topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Anegada, British Virgin Islands,...

  1. Coastal Topography—Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic was produced for Anegada, British Virgin Islands, from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements...

  2. British scientists and the Manhattan Project: the Los Alamos years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a study of the British scientific mission to Los Alamos, New Mexico, from 1943 to 1947, and the impact it had on the early history of the atomic age. In the years following the Manhattan Project and the production of the world's first atomic explosion in 1945, the British contribution to the Project was played down or completely ignored leaving the impression that all the atomic scientists had been American. However, the two dozen or so British scientists contributed crucially to the development of the atomic bomb. First, the initial research and reports of British scientists convinced American scientists that an atomic weapons could be constructed before the likely end of hostilities. Secondly their contribution insured the bomb was available in the shortest possible time. Also, because these scientists became involved in post-war politics and in post-war development of nuclear power, they also helped forge the nuclear boundaries of the mid-twentieth century. (UK)

  3. British Columbia 3 arc-second Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second British Columbia DEM will be used to support NOAA's tsunami forecast system and for tsunami inundation modeling. This DEM covers the coastal area...

  4. Coastal Topography—Anegada, British Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII XYZ point cloud data for a portion of the environs of Anegada, British Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation...

  5. Impact of surgeon subspecialty training on surgical outcomes in open globe injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han IC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ian C Han,1 Sidharth Puri,1 Jiangxia Wang,2 Shameema Sikder1 1Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether subspecialty training of the initial treating surgeon affects visual acuity and surgical outcomes in patients with open globe injuries.Design: This study is a single-institution, retrospective case series.Methods: The charts of adult patients with open globe injuries requiring surgical repair at the Wilmer Eye Institute between July 1, 2007 and July 1, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings at presentation were recorded, and details of initial repair and follow-up surgeries were analyzed. Differences in visual acuity and surgical outcomes were compared based on subspecialty training of the initial surgeon.Results: The charts of 282 adult patients were analyzed, and 193 eyes had at least 6 months of follow-up for analysis. Eighty-six eyes (44.6% required follow-up surgery within the first year, and 39 eyes (20.2% were enucleated. Eyes initially treated by a vitreoretinal (VR surgeon were 2.3 times (P=0.003 more likely to improve by one Ocular Trauma Score (OTS visual acuity category and 1.9 times (P=0.027 more likely to have at least one more follow-up surgery at 6 months compared to eyes treated by non-VR surgeons. Patients with more anterior injuries treated by a VR surgeon were more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category compared to those treated by non-VR surgeons (P=0.004 and 0.016 for Zones I and II, respectively. There was no difference in visual acuity outcomes for eyes with posterior injuries (P=0.515 for Zone III.Conclusion: Eyes initially treated by a VR surgeon are more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category than those initially treated by a non-VR surgeon. However, patients initially treated by a VR surgeon also undergo more

  6. Wildlife Exclusion Systems for Accident Mitigation on British Columbia Highways

    OpenAIRE

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2005-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Transportation (BCMoT) has been addressing the issue of motor vehicle-related wildlife mortality on Provincial highways with wildlife exclusion fencing and related engineered structures since the 1980's. As a result, British Columbia wildlife are protected by the most extensive network of wildlife exclusion systems constructed by a transportation agency in North America. The BCMoT wildlife exclusion infrastructure consists of over 470 km of wildlife exclusion ...

  7. Submission to the British Columbia government on the Kyoto Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Business Council provided its comments concerning the Kyoto Protocol and climate change to the government of British Columbia, recommending that a clear position be established quickly on the matter. The adopted position should also be disseminated broadly to allow stake holders sufficient time to prepare for the upcoming meetings of the Joint Ministers and First Ministers. The federal government has announced that the decision on whether to ratify the Kyoto Protocol will be made before the end of 2002, and this decision will have numerous effects on the people of British Columbia, businesses, workers, and consumers alike. The Business Council of British Columbia believes that the unique interests of the province can best be protected by a proactive approach. Actions plans are being prepared by several of the other provinces and territories, who have already stated their position concerning the Kyoto Protocol. The long-term risks of climate change for British Columbia have not been determined nor have the elements of a provincial approach. The following elements should be included in British Columbia's position on the Kyoto Protocol, according to the Business Council of British Columbia: (1) a credible and cost-effective implementation plan that does not unduly burden the province and other jurisdictions must be developed before Canada decides to ratify the Protocol. British Columbia should go on the record stating it does not support the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in its present form. (2) the province should advocate for a national approach to climate change that can be achieved within a reasonable time frame, reflects the long-term nature of the problem, and is in agreement with the economic development objectives of British Columbia, (3) a plan detailing how the province intends to deal with the growth of greenhouse gas emissions should supplement and support the position of the province on the Kyoto Protocol. Consumers and business should be engaged

  8. Making of British India fictions, 1772-1823

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates British fictional representations of India in novels, plays and poetry from 1772 to 1823. Rather than simply correlating literary portrayals to shifting colonial context and binary power relationships, the project relates representations to the impact of India on British popular culture, and print capitalism’s role in defining and promulgating national identity and proto-global awareness. The study contends that the internal historical development of th...

  9. The sixth sense : synaesthesia and British aestheticism, 1860-1900

    OpenAIRE

    Poueymirou, Margaux Lynn Rosa

    2009-01-01

    “The Sixth Sense: Synaesthesia and British Aestheticism 1860-1900” is an interdisciplinary examination of the emergence of synaesthesia conceptually and rhetorically within the ‘art for art’s sake’ movement in mid-to-late Victorian Britain. Chapter One investigates Swinburne’s focal role as both theorist and literary spokesman for the nascent British Aesthetic movement. I argue that Swinburne was the first to practice what Pater meant by ‘aesthetic criticism’ and that synaesthe...

  10. British anarchism 1881-1914: reality and appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Shpayer, H.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis examines the history of British anarchism in the late Victorian and Edwardian era against the background of the movement's popular image. The prevalent image of anarchism assumed the individual to be an unscrupulous criminal and the movement to be a conspiracy intent on unleashing revolutionary violence upon the world. Such a description imparted little of the authentic pursuits and beliefs of British anarchism and proved to be one of the major obstacles ev...

  11. The Ambitious Young Woman and the Contemporary British Sports Film

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how the figure of the ambitious young woman is mediated within contemporary female-centred British sports films. The article begins by briefly outlining the relationship between postfeminism and neoliberalism and highlights the relevance of these discourses to contemporary female-centred sports films. It then goes on to explore how postfeminist, neoliberal values are mediated in the construction of the ambitious young woman through an analysis of the British film Chalet ...

  12. Small farms and climate change adaptation in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Kaleen

    2011-01-01

    Small-scale farms in British Columbia (BC) face the challenge of adapting to both positive and negative climate change impacts, while maintaining their financial viability. This study explores the issue of climate change adaptation for small-scale farmers in British Columbia using semi-structured interviews and case study analysis. Small farms frequently employ soil preservation techniques, organic methods, and grow a diversity of crops, which make them more resilient to some of the negative ...

  13. Modelling toxicity induced Neurological disorders in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benin Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders have become more common and prevalent. Cellular pathology and behavioural symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases although connected are still a mystery to solve with no complete cure available yet. Central pathways in neurodegeneration involves impaired ubiquitin-proteasome machinery, autophagy and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In the case of neurodevlopmental disorders, environmental toxins and genetic factors are main causative agents. We aim to create a toxicity induced zebrafish model of neurological disease focussing on cognition, movement and hyperactivity disorders. Zebra fish embryos at 48 hr post fertilization were treated with different doses of lead, cholesterol and acetyl choline and by 7 days post fertilization pectoral fin movement, swimming behaviour and touch response were compromised in parallel with apoptosis identified in the brain by acridine orange fluorescent staining. A marked window is observed, therefore promising for a drug screening platform. Further characterization of pathology associated protein expression and specific behavioural studies could render this as a simple promising toxic model for preclinical drug screening.

  14. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The copper metabolism disorder Wilson's disease was first defined in 1912. Wilson's disease can present with hepatic and neurological deficits, including dystonia and parkinsonism. Early-onset presentations in infancy and late-onset manifestations in adults older than 70 years of age are now well recognised. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations are increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of Wilson's disease, and results from biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that Wilson's disease might be much more common than previously estimated. Early diagnosis of Wilson's disease is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment, but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Furthermore, Wilson's disease needs to be differentiated from other conditions that also present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with Wilson's disease, such as reduced serum ceruloplasmin concentrations. Disordered copper metabolism is also associated with other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations and the late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza SHIARI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4: 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally. References1. Benseler S, Schneider R. Central nervous system vasculitisin children. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2004 Jan;16(1:43-50. 2. Benseler SM. Central nervous system vasculitis in children. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2006 Dec;8(6:442-9. 3. Mc Carthy HJ, Tizard EJ. Clinical practice: Diagnosis and management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Eur J Pediatr.2010 Jun;169(6:643-50. Epub 2009 Dec 12. 4. Robson WL, Leung AK. Henoch-Schönlein purpura. AdvPediatr. 1994;41:163-94. 5. Ostergaard JR, Storm K, Neurologic manifestations of Schönlein-Henoch purpura. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991Mar;80(3:339-42. 6. Bakkaloğlu SA, Ekim M, Tümer N, Deda G, ErdenI, Erdem T. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Nephrol. Dial Transplant. 2000 Feb;15(2:246-8. 7. Mattoo TK, al-Mutair A, al-Khatib Y, Ali A, al-SohaibaniMO. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection and Henoch-Schonlein purpura with cardiac, renal and neurological complications. Ann Trop Pediatr. 1997Dec;17(4:381-6. 8. Ha TS, Cha SH. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case with sequential magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatr Nephrol. 1996;10:634-6. 9. Saket S, Mojtahedzadeh S, Karimi A, Shiari R, ShirvaniF. Relationship between electrolyte abnormalities, ESR,CRP and platelet count with severity of Kawasaki disease.Yafteh. 2009;11(3:5-14. 10

  16. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve injury. Normal ejaculation is the result of coordinated reflex activity involving both the sympathetic and somatic nervous systems. Nerve injury can result in retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation. With retrograde ejaculation, the ejaculate is propelled into the bladder instead of out through the urethra. In mild cases this condition can be reversed by sympathomimetic medications and, in more severe cases, sperm cells can be extracted from the bladder following ejaculation. With anejaculation, the ejaculatory reflex is not activated by normal sexual stimulation. In such cases, the first choice of treatment is assisted ejaculation, preferably by penile vibratory stimulation. If vibratory stimulation is unsuccessful, then ejaculation can almost always be induced by electroejaculation. In cases where assisted ejaculation fails, sperm can be retrieved surgically from either the epididymis or from the testis. Once viable sperm cells have been obtained, these are used in assisted reproductive techniques, including intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26003259

  17. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  18. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases.

  19. Clinical applications of intravenous immunoglobulins in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R A C; Dalakas, M C; Cornblath, D R; Latov, N; Weksler, M E; Relkin, N

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used increasingly in the management of patients with neurological conditions. The efficacy and safety of IVIg treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) have been established clearly in randomized controlled trials and summarized in Cochrane systematic reviews. However, questions remain regarding the dose, timing and duration of IVIg treatment in both disorders. Reports about successful IVIg treatment in other neurological conditions exist, but its use remains investigational. IVIg has been shown to be efficacious as second-line therapy in patients with dermatomyositis and suggested to be of benefit in some patients with polymyositis. In patients with inclusion body myositis, IVIg was not shown to be effective. IVIg is also a treatment option in exacerbations of myasthenia gravis. Studies with IVIg in patients with Alzheimer's disease have reported increased plasma anti-Aβ antibody titres associated with decreased Aβ peptide levels in the cerebrospinal fluid following IVIg treatment. These changes at the molecular level were accompanied by improved cognitive function, and large-scale randomized trials are under way. PMID:19883422

  20. Neurological manifestations of Batch s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence, clinical manifestations, and laboratory features of Neuro-Behcets disease. This prospective study was carried out in the Behcets Research Clinic in Shiraz (south-west Iran) and included the patients referred from 1990-1999. The patients' clinical records, images, CSF analyses, and electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) out of 690 Behcet s patients (2.6%, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8%) were found to have neurological involvement. The mean +/- standard deviation age of these patients was 34.7 +/- 8.6 years. All fulfilled the criteria of the International Study Group of Behcet s Disease. Central nervous system involvement was more common than peripheral nervous system manifestations. Headache, weakness, tingling, and numbness were the most common symptoms. Hyperreflexia, upward plantar reflex, and somatosensory findings were the most frequent signs. Hemispheral and brainstem stroke-like syndromes and cerebral venous thrombosis were the major neurologic presentations. There were also cases of myelitic, pure meningoencephalitic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like, multiple sclerosis-like, and Guillain Barre syndromes. Neuro-Behcets disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults, chronic meningitis, intracranial hypertension, multiple sclerosis, myelopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. (author)