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Sample records for british museum natural

  1. Connecting the Senses: Natural History and the British Museum in the Stereoscopic Magazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Davidson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the connection between touch and sight by examining one of the early photographic ventures at the British Museum and efforts to mediate between popular and specialist access to the natural history collections. Part of the Victorians' fascination for natural history came from its appeal to the senses. Acknowledging the link between tactile and visual experiences as a component of intellectual discovery was an essential part of this, and the contemporary craze for stereoscopic photographs offered a chance to exploit this association. The article analyses the role of the tactile in the presentation of museum objects by addressing the 'impression' of touch - conjured optically and in the mind's eye - and compares the relative merits of the stereoscope to create the illusion of immersion for the viewer and to effectively convey the tactile qualities of the objects portrayed.

  2. British Museum paintings

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Frances Edmonds is one of a group of artists selected for the show ‘Territories’ taking place at Galerie Windkracht 13 in Den Helder, Holland this July 2012. This exhibition is curated by Sharon Beavan and Gethin Evans. The artists represented work across the boundaries of two and three-dimensional and time based form. The brief – to interrogate and explore the notion of territories. Frances will be showing several paintings from the British Museum series, based on imagery collected ...

  3. iCollections – Digitising the British and Irish Butterflies in the Natural History Museum, London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Sara; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Brooks, Stephen; Cafferty, Steve; Cane, Elisa; Carter, Victoria; Chainey, John; Crowther, Robyn; Douglas, Lyndsey; Durant, Joanna; Duffell, Liz; Hine, Adrian; Honey, Martin; Huertas, Blanca; Howard, Theresa; Huxley, Rob; Kitching, Ian; Ledger, Sophie; McLaughlin, Caitlin; Martin, Geoff; Mazzetta, Gerardo; Penn, Malcolm; Perera, Jasmin; Sadka, Mike; Scialabba, Elisabetta; Self, Angela; Siebert, Darrell J.; Sleep, Chris; Toloni, Flavia; Wing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Natural History Museum, London (NHMUK) has embarked on an ambitious programme to digitise its collections . The first phase of this programme has been to undertake a series of pilot projects that will develop the necessary workflows and infrastructure development needed to support mass digitisation of very large scientific collections. This paper presents the results of one of the pilot projects – iCollections. This project digitised all the lepidopteran specimens usually considered as butterflies, 181,545 specimens representing 89 species from the British Isles and Ireland. The data digitised includes, species name, georeferenced location, collector and collection date - the what, where, who and when of specimen data. In addition, a digital image of each specimen was taken. This paper explains the way the data were obtained and the background to the collections which made up the project. New information Specimen-level data associated with British and Irish butterfly specimens have not been available before and the iCollections project has released this valuable resource through the NHM data portal. PMID:27932915

  4. The British Museum: An Imperial Museum in a Post-Imperial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Duthie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the British Museum’s imperialist attitudes towards classical heritage. Despite considerable pressure from foreign governments, the museum has consistently refused to return art and antiquities that it acquired under the aegis of empire. It is the contention of this article that the British Museum remains an imperialist institution. The current debates over the British Museum’s collections raise profound questions about the relationship between museums and modern nation states and their nationalist claims to ancient heritage. The museum’s inflexible response to repatriation claims also encapsulates the challenges inherent in presenting empire and its legacy to contemporary, post-imperial audiences.

  5. Natural history museums and cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmer, C.; Erixon-Stanford, M.; Gardner, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Natural history museums are entering the electronic age as they increasingly use computers to build accessible and shareable databases that support research and education on a world-wide basis. Museums are exploring the Internet and other shared uses of electronic media to enhance their traditional roles in education, training, identifications, technical assistance, and collections management.

  6. Dolphins at the British Museum: Zoomorphic Calusa Sinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Davy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of everyday or “mundane” artistic expression in Native American material culture does not always take into account the idea that aesthetic design can have explicit practical as well as decorative function. This article explores this idea through objects from the Floridian archaeological collections at the British Museum.

  7. The First World War and Its Implications for Education in British Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Gaynor

    1988-01-01

    Examines how the First World War prompted British museums to change their educational functions. Discusses museums in pre-war Britain, wartime exhibitions and educational activities, the outcome of the war experience, and First World War's implications for education in museums. (GEA)

  8. The Natural Science Museum goes to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Scur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is proven the need to stimulate actions that modify the behavior of human beings in relation to nature. Schools and non-formal education spaces contribute to citizens to develop values, attitudes and responsibilities facing the environment in which they live. The non-formal educational environments provide teaching resources, teaching and different methodologies that complement the actions of formal education. Expanding its environmental education activities, the Museum of Natural Sciences of the University of Caxias do Sul, since 2013, has been developing the project "The Natural Science Museum Goes to School", in order to awaken the scientific spirit, spreading knowledge aimed at preservation of natural resources, contributing to the enrichment of science education, stimulating the development of educational activities with the support of partner schools in the region. Initially, students and teachers visit the Museum of Natural Sciences and then are developed workshops, lectures and recreational activities in schools, integrating these education spaces. Teachers also develop activities with students, integrating knowledge to partner with those seen in the classroom. Finally, this knowledge is presented through a show of open jobs to the community. During the years 2013 and 2014 the project reached about 1,100 students and by integrating museum and school was provided to these differentiated learning, where knowledge of the interrelationships between natural resources and the living beings was built in an interdisciplinary way, highlighting the museums as important teaching and learning in science sites.

  9. Science literacy and natural history museums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-10-15

    Oct 15, 2010 ... Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in ...

  10. Science literacy and natural history museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdecasas, Antonio G; Correas, Ana M

    2010-12-01

    It appears that developed countries, such as the US, the UK and Italy, are losing the race against irrationalism and arbitrary thinking in regard to nature and human interactions. The incidence of misguided beliefs and the detachment from and, in some cases, outright hostility toward science are on the rise. Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in consolidating rational and critical scientific thinking while briefly examining scientific illiteracy in developed countries. It also discusses methods to improve the involvement of natural history museums in the promotion of rational thinking, the only appropriate avenue for objective knowledge.

  11. Type specimens of Mollusca described by Col. George Montagu in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Exeter and The Natural History Museum, London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Graham Oliver

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A complete list of new molluscan taxa introduced by Col. George Montagu (1753–1815 is presented. The available type material of these taxa are itemised and illustrated. The majority are present in the Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Exeter with a smaller number in the Natural History Museum, London. The historic background of both collections is reviewed with special reference to the many non-British species spuriously introduced into Testacea Britannica and its Supplement.

  12. The Crocodile Pit of Maabdeh, Florence Nightingale, and the British Museum's Acquisition of the Harris Homers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nongbri, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Two manuscripts of the Iliad acquired in the middle of the nineteenth century by Anthony Charles Harris, the famous “Harris Homers,” are usually said to have been discovered at “the Crocodile Pit at Maabdeh.” The British Museum eventually bought both manuscripts. Yet, the details of both Harris...

  13. British Columbia natural gas: Core market policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The core market for natural gas in British Columbia is defined as all natural gas consumers in the residential, institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors not currently purchasing natural gas directly and not exempted from the core market by the British Columbia Utilities Commission (BCUC). The intent of the definition is to include all customers who must be protected by contracts which ensure long-term security of supply and stable prices. Core market customers are excluded from direct natural gas purchase and will be served by distribution utilities. A customer may apply to BCUC to leave the core market; such an application may be approved if it is demonstrated that the customer has adequate long-term natural gas supplies or alternative fuel supplies to protect him from supply interruptions. The non-core market is defined as all large industrial customers who elect to make their own natural gas supply arrangements and who can demonstrate to the BCUC sufficient long-term natural gas supply protection or alternative fuel capability to ensure security of the industry. Non-core market customers have full and open access to the competitive natural gas market. The British Columbia government will not apply its core market policy to other jurisdictions through Energy Removal Certificates

  14. Markets for British Columbia natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, D.H.; Coad, L.A.

    1990-11-01

    An evaluation is presented of the outlook for the British Columbia natural gas industry and the fundamentals underlying both the increase in activity and the longer-term outlook for the natural gas sector are examined. The basis for the analysis was the North American Regional Gas (NARG) model, to which a number of modifications were made. The level of natural gas resource assumed for northeastern British Columbia corresponds to an ultimate potential of 50 Tcf. Significant growth in production over the outlook period (1988-2007) is predicted. High rates of utilization on the Westcoast system underscore the need for significant capacity expansion if the production levels projected for the mid-1990s are to be achieved. Natural gas production is projected to be sustained at the 800 billion cubic foot level from the mid-1990s onwards, with the majority of the production growth occurring between 1992 and 1997. Significant growth in exports is projected, especially when capacity is available to move gas supplies directly into the California and Rocky Mountain regions in the US. These two transport corridors represent over half the increase in British Columbia production between 1992 and 1997. 53 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs

  15. Online Astronomy Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's largest natural history museums, is the locus of a rich array of scientific research, exhibition and educational resources through its Department of Astrophysics, its Rose Center for Earth and Space and its Hall of Meteorites. For the past decade, the Museum's National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology has leveraged these assets to create a panoply of web-based resources for students, teachers and the general public. This session will review several of these resources, including the Digital Universe (a three-dimensional mapping of the Universe); The Solar System (an online graduate course for K-12 teachers); multimedia highlighting searches for exoplanets and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays; Journey to the Stars (a DVD version of the current planetarium show); and the astronomy section of Ology (a website for children ages 7 and up). A copy of the Journey to the Stars DVD will be provided to all attendees. )

  16. Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreone, Franco; Bartolozzi, Luca; Boano, Giovanni; Boero, Ferdinando; Bologna, Marco A; Bon, Mauro; Bressi, Nicola; Capula, Massimo; Casale, Achille; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Chiozzi, Giorgio; Delfino, Massimo; Doria, Giuliano; Durante, Antonio; Ferrari, Marco; Gippoliti, Spartaco; Lanzinger, Michele; Latella, Leonardo; Maio, Nicola; Marangoni, Carla; Mazzotti, Stefano; Minelli, Alessandro; Muscio, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Paola; Pievani, Telmo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Sabella, Giorgio; Valle, Marco; Vomero, Vincenzo; Zilli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The Italian natural history museums are facing a critical situation, due to the progressive loss of scientific relevance, decreasing economic investments, and scarcity of personnel. This is extremely alarming, especially for ensuring the long-term preservation of the precious collections they host. Moreover, a commitment in fieldwork to increase scientific collections and concurrent taxonomic research are rarely considered priorities, while most of the activities are addressed to public events with political payoffs, such as exhibits, didactic meetings, expositions, and talks. This is possibly due to the absence of a national museum that would have better steered research activities and overall concepts for collection management. We here propose that Italian natural history museums collaborate to instate a "metamuseum", by establishing a reciprocal interaction network aimed at sharing budgetary and technical resources, which would assure better coordination of common long-term goals and scientific activities.

  17. Access and Ensuring Accessibility in the Regional Museum of Natural History (RMNH), Bhopal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, B.

    1999-01-01

    Identifies five types of museum accessibility: (1) physical; (2) socio-cultural; (3) economic; (4) sensory; and (5) intelligence/learning accessibility. Considers ways to coordinate museum services to ensure accessibility for potential museum patrons who are disabled. Describes various programs launched by the National Museum of Natural History in…

  18. 76 FR 14061 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science...

  19. 76 FR 9603 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... affiliation with the human remains should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature... Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from an unknown location in...

  20. 75 FR 42770 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary... Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains... disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has determined...

  1. 76 FR 9604 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... affiliation with the human remains should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature... Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were...

  2. 76 FR 9598 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Brewster County... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science...

  3. 76 FR 9606 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... affiliation with the human remains should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature... Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from an unknown location in...

  4. 76 FR 9599 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... affiliation with the human remains should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature... of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from an unknown...

  5. 76 FR 9597 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... affiliation with the human remains should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature... Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from an unknown location in...

  6. 77 FR 23504 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ...: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has completed an inventory of human remains and [[Page 23505... affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Denver Museum of Nature... human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science...

  7. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an... contact the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remain...

  8. 75 FR 5627 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human... of Indians, Oklahoma. Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that...

  9. 75 FR 23807 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human.... Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 2001 (9)-(10...

  10. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New... following sentence: Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25...

  11. 76 FR 43712 - Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American Museum of Natural History... human remains may contact the American Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human remains to...

  12. Reading Room Geographies of Late-Victorian London: The British Museum, Bloomsbury and the People’s Palace, Mile End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan David Bernstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By the 1880s, the Reading Room of the British Museum in Bloomsbury provided opportunities for networking, writing, and reading among many middle-class women including Amy Levy, Eleanor Marx, and Clementina and Constance Black. Attempting to promote a similar egalitarian space for acquiring knowledge for working-class ‘rough readers’ was Walter Besant’s People’s Palace Library in Mile End. This essay explores the library work of Constance Black [Garnett] at the People’s Palace where collisions across class reveal the challenges of East End reform in contrast to the celebration of a democratic reading room at the British Museum celebrated by Levy in her 1889 essay.

  13. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences.

  14. Science literacy and natural history museums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-10-15

    Oct 15, 2010 ... It appears that developed countries, such as the US, the UK and Italy, are losing the race against irrationalism and arbitrary thinking in regard to nature and human interactions. The incidence of misguided beliefs and the detachment from and, in some cases, outright hostility toward science are on the rise.

  15. From natural history to science: display and the transformation of American museums of science and nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Rader

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains how and why many American museums of science and nature moved away from the traditional content and methods of natural history in the period from 1930 to 1980. It explores diverse motivations for the shift from dead, stuffed displays to live, interactive exhibits, and the consequences of that shift for museums as both educational institutions and as institutions of research. Ultimately, it argues that debates over museums’ content and display strategies drew strength from and reinforced a profound transformation in the institutional history of twentieth-century American science and technology: namely, the separation of research and public education. By the late 1960s, the American museum landscape had been transformed by this development. Older natural history museums competed for visitors and resources with ‘new’ style science museums, and although both remained popular cultural institutions, neither had achieved a coherent new institutional identity because debates about the role of the museum in science continued. Thus, we suggest, in the mid-twentieth century natural history and science museums were more important in both the history of biology and the history of science’s public culture than has previously been acknowledged.

  16. Tabanidae (Diptera) of the American Museum of Natural History Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Augusto Loureiro

    2016-07-11

    A checklist of Tabanidae in the American Museum of Natural History was compiled. Over 9,000 specimens were studied. The currently accepted taxa names have been listed based on general catalogs and recent publications. Where possible, modern locality names are given and determiners of each species are provided. A total of 882 species are listed in alphabetical order; including 52 primary and 219 secondary types. The collection includes a substantial global representation of species records for this family.

  17. Les musées d’histoire naturelle de Leyde, Paris et Londres : Analyse de l’évolution et du mode d’exposition des objets de musées d’histoire naturelle jusqu’aux premières années du XIXe siècle ; comparaison entre le « 's Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke Historie » de Leyde, le Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle de Paris et le « British Museum » de Londres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, R.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the evolution and the way of exposition in museums of natural history in the 19e century till the beginning of the 20e century. The analysis is based on the development of the « Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle » of Paris, the British Museum of London, and the national

  18. The greening of the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.V. [Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The conventional roof of the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum in Chicago, Illinois was retrofitted with green roof technology. The objective was to demonstrate how green roofs can be used to manage storm water and to educate the public about the benefits of green roof gardens and green roof systems. Conventional roofs have a negative environmental impact in terms of non-point source pollution and the urban heat island effect. The greening of the Nature Museum consisted of several components designed to address reduction in storm water flow, non-point source pollution, and water conservation as it relates to the building, grounds, and immediate watershed. The two major components were: an intensive, rooftop demonstration garden and a larger, extensive green roof system. The demonstration garden, covering 2,400 square feet, was installed in the summer of 2002 with a grant from Chicago's Department of Environment and the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The extensive green roof system is part of the later phase of the development. It is expected that construction will begin in the summer of 2003. Two of the three remaining roofs of the Museum, covering approximately 15,250 square feet, are included in the project. Public education is accomplished with the use of interpretive signs and innovative exhibits. Hands-on education programs related to the project are also being planned. 2 figs.

  19. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... by the Cranes to the Denver Museum of Natural History (now Denver Museum of Nature & Science). The... Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science, in consultation with the appropriate...

  20. 78 FR 48902 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... Field Museum of Natural History has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal...

  1. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... Natural History, 1390 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, telephone (801) 581-3876, before...

  2. Industrial natural gas supply options in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Information is provided on the availability and cost of natural gas in British Columbia for use by firms interested in establishing gas-intensive industrial facilities in the province. British Columbia has an abundant supply of natural gas, originating mainly from deposits in the westernmost part of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin in the northeast part of the province. Recoverable resources in British Columbia are estimated at 1,000-1,400 billion m 3 . Over 200 producers compete to sell natural gas for both domestic and export markets. Gathering, processing, and transmission of the gas is undertaken mainly by the Westcoast Energy pipeline system, and distribution is undertaken by several distribution utilities. At present, all large industrial gas users buy their firm gas requirements directly from gas producers, often using gas marketers or brokers to assist in purchasing. Regulation of the gas industry is performed by the British Columbia Utilities Commission, which sets rules for energy supply contracts, and by the National Energy Board, which sets tolls for gathering, processing, and transporting gas. Factors affecting gas pricing are discussed, with reference to both the wellhead price and the cost of gathering, processing, and transportation. Firm gas costs for two hypothetical industrial loads in British Columbia are illustrated. Potential intensive uses of natural gas in the province are outlined, including power generation, liquefaction for export, manufacturing, production of direct reduced iron, and as petrochemical feedstocks. 5 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Albany Museum, Grahamstown

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species of the cyprinid genus Barbus form the major element of the indigenous fish fauna of the southern Cape coastal .... counts. Studies on vertebral counts in fishes (e.g. Bailey & Gosline 1955; Garside 1966) have shown that ..... Catalogue of the freshwater fishes of Mrica in the British Museum. (natural history), 2.

  4. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service..., 2013. ADDRESSES: Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT... lot of horse tack, a metal punch, 1 piece of worked wood, gunshot, two mirrors, a harness ring, an awl...

  5. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service...: Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, telephone (801... fragments, 13 pieces of horse tack, 3 saddle fragments, 1 knife sheath, 1 rifle and barrel, 1 lot of bullet...

  6. The greening of a Nature Museum : a demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, B. [Conservation Design Forum Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States)

    2003-07-01

    This presentation described the work done by Conservation Design Forum Inc. in retrofitting the conventional roof of the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum in Chicago to a green roof system. A wide range of green roof technology is on display at the demonstration garden. The 2,400 square foot green reveals a diversity of green roof systems. Four progressively thicker green roof systems were employed: wetland, extensive, semi-intensive, and intensive systems. The existing vernacular of the modern building was integrated into this retrofit project. The roof was strengthened to support an additional 40 to 90 pounds per square foot, allowing it to support a six to 18 inch thick green roof profile, as well as a diversity of vegetation for each profile. Research and education activities can be conducted at this demonstration garden. 2 figs.

  7. 78 FR 50094 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... item under the control of the Field Museum of Natural History that meets the definition of sacred... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History... Field Museum of Natural History has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal...

  8. 77 FR 25738 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Museum of Natural History that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... Museum of Natural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the...

  9. 78 FR 19305 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Museum of Natural History that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... Museum of Natural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the...

  10. 77 FR 65015 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History... Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024... after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is...

  11. 77 FR 11567 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History... with the cultural items should contact the American Museum of Natural History at the address below by... American Museum of Natural History that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C...

  12. Objects and Objectivity: The Evolution Controversy at the American Museum of Natural History, 1915-1928

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homchick, Julie

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of this essay, I examine how evolutionary theory was treated and responded to in the American Museum of Natural History's Hall of the Age of Man during the early 1900s. Specifically, I examine how the curatorial work of the museum's president, Henry Fairfield Osborn, relied on the purported use of objectivity as a means by which to…

  13. 75 FR 52013 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice...

  14. 76 FR 28067 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice...

  15. Southwest British Columbia natural gas supply and deliverability: Discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    A review is presented of energy in British Columbia, the role of natural gas, and options available to enhance gas supply security in the province's most densely populated area, the southwest. British Columbia has abundant natural gas supplies, and production exceeds domestic demand. In 1992, natural gas supplied ca 25% of total provincial end-use energy requirements, but this share is expected to rise to 30% by 2015. Although some say that the province's natural gas production and transmission system should serve only domestic needs, this would have significant negative impacts. Domestic gas supply policy allows gas consumers to contract their own supplies, but contract security is required. Provincial guidelines allow demand-side programs to compete with supply sources to ensure that the resource profile is achieved at least cost. In the southwest, natural gas demand is projected to increase from 189 PJ in 1991 to 262 PJ by 2005. Most gas supplied to this region comes from northeast British Columbia through pipelines that are generally fully contracted. Short-term deliverability can be a problem, especially in peak winter demand periods. The gas industry's contingency plans for shortages are outlined and alternatives to enhance deliverability to the southwest are assessed, including storage, expansion of the pipeline system, supply curtailment, and peaking supply contracts. Aspects of provincial natural gas planning are discussed, including security of supply and deliverability, economic and environmental impacts, consumer costs, safety, and the public interest. A least-cost option for enhancing deliverability (underground storage and an additional liquefied natural gas plant) is estimated to cost consumers $3.69/GJ over 20 years. 9 figs., 1 tab

  16. 75 FR 70027 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Brown County, IL. This notice is... the human remains was made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science professional staff in consultation... Nature & Science have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), that the human remains described above...

  17. Introducing iPads in Danish natural science museum settings: A youthful user perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    analysis of a media ethnographic study on the introduction of iPads on three Danish natural science museums − all with didactic concepts centered on user generated video-productions. Digital mobile and social media technologies have for long been associated with the promise of providing valuable and unique...... new opportunities for enhancing and supporting participatory learning experiences in museums. Recently, portable tablets have been a central focus in Danish political and learning discourse and many museums now experiment on how iPads can deliver the dissemination and experience results they have...... hopes for them to deliver. This paper discusses museums’ use of iPads from user-led perspective and, in particular, the mismatch between the call for museums to use these technologies as tools to embrace or even challenge young users’ expectations and the user experience realities. Based on my...

  18. The art and nature of health: a study of therapeutic practice in museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Gemma

    2018-02-01

    Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews at a major metropolitan art museum and botanic garden, this article considers the practical accomplishment of American museums' 'health turn' by tracing how museum staff develop therapeutic programmes for visitors with disabilities. In doing so, it considers one of medical sociology's fundamental theoretical questions - how ideologies of health order social life - in an unconventional empirical setting. Acknowledging contemporary arguments for both the relative merits and unintended consequences of this policy trend, I focus instead on the particular institutional arrangements, professional norms, and material cultures of art and nature that shape museums' therapeutic work, so as to reveal its effects. Data reveals ideological similarities, but practical differences, between museological and medical understandings of wellness. Extending a 'medical sociology of practice' to new contexts ultimately foregrounds the contingencies, and diversity, of therapeutic mechanisms and meanings, thereby broadening sociological research on healing and healthism. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  19. The tree as evolutionary icon: TREE in the Natural History Museum, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Nils Petter

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Darwin celebrations in 2009, the Natural History Museum in London unveiled TREE, the first contemporary artwork to win a permanent place in the Museum. While the artist claimed that the inspiration for TREE came from Darwin's famous notebook sketch of branching evolution, sometimes referred to as his "tree of life" drawing, this article emphasises the apparent incongruity between Darwin's sketch and the artist's design -- best explained by other, complementary sources of inspiration. In the context of the Museum's active participation in struggles over science and religion, the effect of the new artwork is contradictory. TREE celebrates Darwinian evolutionism, but it resonates with deep-rooted, mythological traditions of tree symbolism to do so. This complicates the status of the Museum space as one of disinterested, secular science, but it also contributes, with or without the intentions of the Museum's management, to consolidate two sometimes conflicting strains within the Museum's history. TREE celebrates human effort, secular science and reason -- but it also evokes long-standing mythological traditions to inspire reverence and remind us of our humble place in the world.

  20. 75 FR 9925 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: The Cleveland Museum of Natural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH, that meets the definition of a ``sacred object'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is... The Cleveland Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the...

  1. 75 FR 58425 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York... History. No known individual was identified. This individual has been identified as Native American based...

  2. Connecting health and natural history: a failed initiative at the American Museum of Natural History, 1909-1922.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie K

    2014-10-01

    In 1909, curator Charles-Edward Winslow established a department of public health in New York City's American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Winslow introduced public health as a biological science that connected human health-the modern sciences of physiology, hygiene, and urban sanitation-to the natural history of plants and animals. This was the only time an American museum created a curatorial department devoted to public health. The AMNH's Department of Public Health comprised a unique collection of live bacterial cultures-a "Living Museum"-and an innovative plan for 15 exhibits on various aspects of health. I show how Winslow, facing opposition from AMNH colleagues, gathered scientific experts and financial support, and explain the factors that made these developments seem desirable and possible. I finish with a discussion of how the Department of Public Health met an abrupt and "inglorious end" in 1922 despite the success of its collections and exhibitions.

  3. A photographic catalog of Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    A photographic catalog of all determined species of Platygastroidea, including primary types, in the National Insect Collection, National Museum of Natural History, is here made available online. Following examination of this collection we make the following taxonomic acts: Leptacis piniellaMacGown ...

  4. 75 FR 55823 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ..., New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is...; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Navajo...

  5. Nature Trails, Braille Trails, Foot Paths, Fragrance Gardens, Touch Museums for the Blind; Policy Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Foundation for the Blind, New York, NY.

    The policy statement by the American Foundation for the Blind deals with nature trails, braille trails, foot paths, fragrance gardens, and touch museums for the blind. It is stated that the foundation approves of services such as provision of tape recorded guides and planting of fragrant shrubs which would benefit all users while recognizing…

  6. Fossil Platygastroidea in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platygastroid wasps preserved in Dominican amber and oil shale from the Kishenehn formation (Montana, USA) in the National Museum of Natural History are catalogued. Compression fossils in Kishenehn oil shale yield a specimen of Fidiobia, a specimen of Telenominae, and a specimen with a Scelio-type o...

  7. Type specimens of Maastrichtian fossils in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, J.

    2002-01-01

    The type specimens of Maastrichtian invertebrate fossils from Limburg, The Netherlands, present in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, are listed. The Upper Cretaceous plant type specimens from Limburg of Miquel that were once part of the Staring collection present in the Palaeobotanical

  8. 78 FR 19299 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12395; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound... History, University of Puget Sound, has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the...

  9. Museum Education for Children with Disabilities: Development of the Nature Senses Traveling Trunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyojung; Jolley, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Since museums are cultural, educational, and social institutions, providing access to people with disabilities has increased in recent decades. This research examines the need and development process of the educational program, the Nature Senses Traveling Trunk, to serve children with Autism Spectrum disorders and visual impairments at the Lubbock…

  10. On the Ethology of Female Homo Sapiens Sapiens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Christopher

    This study is a followup to the author's earlier study of the learning differences exhibited by museum exhibit visitors and seeks to discern the effects of the pathological cultural problems identified by other researchers in a science education setting. The setting for this followup study was the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.…

  11. Communication strategy of the National Museum of Natural History ”Grigore Antipa”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Irina POPESCU

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the amplitude of the communication techniques in the public area in Western Countries and the spectacular development of publicity and public relations in this field, we find it interesting to analyze how and if this measure can be applied by Romanian public institutions and to Romanian public products. Thus, we discovered the sustained effort of the National Museum of Natural History “Grigore Antipa” (cultural nonprofit institution which delivers goods as public cultural products towards the entire nation’s population to promote itself and to communicate its activities to the public by using various techniques, both publicity and public relations, elaborating and creating exhibitions, conferences, festivals with interactive activities for the public, to involve him and transform him from a passive visitor of the museum into a participant at the cultural act. In 2003, the National Museum of Natural History “Grigore Antipa” from Bucharest began the implementation of an intense program of integrated marketing communication. The notion involves a strategic communication plan which uses more channels, addresses to various types of public and regards results achievement (cognitive, affective and behavior like – plan borrowed from the commercial area and applied in order to replace itself in the public’s mind, to achieve a larger exposure and to convince the public that, besides the scientific and educational role it plays, Antipa Museum offers also a relaxing way of spending free time. In this matter, I have analyzed the strategic and integrated communication plans of the museum, following each step, starting from research and to the result evaluation.

  12. The importance of scientific collecting and natural history museums for comparative neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2011-05-01

    The comparative study of vertebrate brains is inherently dependent upon access to a sufficient number of species and specimens to perform meaningful comparisons. Although many studies rely on compiling published information, continued specimen collection, in addition to more extensive use of existing brain collections and natural history museums, are crucial for detailed neuroanatomical comparisons across species. This review highlights the importance of collecting species through a variety of means, details a marsupial brain collection, and stresses the potential of natural history museums as a resource for comparative neuroanatomy. By taking advantage of as many of these resources as possible, researchers can rapidly increase species coverage and generate a better understanding of how the brain evolves. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. [School museums, collections, and elementary teaching of the natural sciences in late XIX century Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Susana V

    2007-01-01

    In this study we analyze the organization of natural science teaching within the Argentinian school context starting with teaching practices and material support in the late XIX century. By that time, school staff and teachers fostered modernization and nationalization of teaching by using collections with national issues and the foundation of museums within the schools. In particular, we examine the official debates over the mineralogical collections offered for sale by the naturalist Enrique de Carlés, and the "school museums" by professors Pedro Scalabrini and Guillermo Navarro. These account for the tension between searching for modern didactic materials associated with foreign models, and the importance of counting on elements that represented the country nature and industry.

  14. What can bioinformatics do for Natural History museums?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becerra, José María

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose the founding of a Natural History bioinformatics framework, which would solve one of the main problems in Natural History: data which is scattered around in many incompatible systems (not only computer systems, but also paper ones. This framework consists of computer resources (hardware and software, methodologies that ease the circulation of data, and staff expert in dealing with computers, who will develop software solutions to the problems encountered by naturalists. This system is organized in three layers: acquisition, data and analysis. Each layer is described, and an account of the elements that constitute it given.

    Se presentan las bases de una estructura bioinformática para Historia Natural, que trata de resolver uno de los principales problemas en ésta: la presencia de datos distribuidos a lo largo de muchos sistemas incompatibles entre sí (y no sólo hablamos de sistemas informáticos, sino también en papel. Esta estructura se sustenta en recursos informáticos (en sus dos vertientes: hardware y software, en metodologías que permitan la fácil circulación de los datos, y personal experto en el uso de ordenadores que se encargue de desarrollar soluciones software a los problemas que plantean los naturalistas. Este sistema estaría organizado en tres capas: de adquisición, de datos y de análisis. Cada una de estas capas se describe, indicando los elementos que la componen.

  15. Bringing dinosaurs back to life: exhibiting prehistory at the American Museum of Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieppel, Lukas

    2012-09-01

    This essay examines the exhibition of dinosaurs at the American Museum of Natural History during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Dinosaurs provide an especially illuminating lens through which to view the history of museum display practices for two reasons: they made for remarkably spectacular exhibits; and they rested on contested theories about the anatomy, life history, and behavior of long-extinct animals to which curators had no direct observational access. The American Museum sought to capitalize on the popularity of dinosaurs while mitigating the risks of mounting an overtly speculative display by fashioning them into a kind of mixed-media installation made of several elements, including fossilized bone, shellac, iron, and plaster. The resulting sculptures provided visitors with a vivid and lifelike imaginative experience. At the same time, curators, who were anxious to downplay the speculative nature of mounted dinosaurs, drew systematic attention to the material connection that tied individual pieces of fossilized bone to the actual past. Freestanding dinosaurs can therefore be read to have functioned as iconic sculptures that self-consciously advertised their indexical content.

  16. Fabricating authenticity: modeling a whale at the American Museum of Natural History, 1906-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Historians of science have in recent years become increasingly attentive to the ways in which issues of process, matter, meaning, and value combine in the fabrication of scientific objects. This essay examines the techniques that went into the construction--and authentication--of one such scientific object: a model of a blue, or "sulfur-bottom," whale manufactured at the American Museum of Natural History in 1907. In producing their model, exhibitors at the American Museum employed a patchwork of overlapping discursive, procedural, and material techniques to argue that their fabrication was as authentic--as truthful, accurate, authoritative, and morally and aesthetically worthy of display--as an exhibit containing a real, preserved cetacean. Through an examination of the archival and published traces left by these exhibitors as they built their whale, I argue that the scientific meanings of authenticity at the American Museum were neither static nor timeless, but rather were subject to constant negotiation, examination, re-evaluation, and upkeep.

  17. A catalogue of the type specimens of protozoans, invertebrates and fish in the Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, NTNU

    OpenAIRE

    Bakken, Torkild

    1999-01-01

    This catalogue gives a review of the zoological type material deposited in the Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The museum dates back to the eighteenth century but the main collections are from the twentieth century. A considerable portion of the type material originates from «The Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan da Cunha 1937-1938». The collections consist of marine organisms except for two species of Hymenoptera (Insecta).

  18. The whip spider collection (Arachnida, Amblypygi held in the Natural History Museum Vienna, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiter, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present data and remarks on the history and contents of the whip spider collection housed in the Natural History Museum of Vienna, Austria. The collection comprises a total of 167 specimens from 4 families, 10 genera and 27 species. It includes types of four species: Charinus ioanniticus (Kritscher, 1959, Damon brachialis Weygoldt, 1999, Phrynus parvulus (Pocock, 1902 and Paraphrynus mexicanus (Bilimek, 1867. Short notes on interesting objects and former curators are provided as well as an appendix with a list of species kept alive by Michael Seiter.

  19. Nature Museums: Tools for Learning about, Promoting, and Protecting the Natural Heritage of Europe. Proceedings of the Seminar Organised by the Council of Europe in Collaboration with The International Council of Museums (Strasbourg, September 27-29, 1989). Environmental Encounters Series, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    The history of museology over the last century suggests that, in general, the founding of a new natural history museum is rarely the result of planning within the cultural policy field, a situation contrary to what occurs in the history of art museums. This lack of planning with respect to natural history museums has several causes, particularly…

  20. 76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    .... Museum records indicate that their provenience is ``unknown/is possibly the Creswell burial excavated by Peterson.'' Based on museum records, the remains may have been recovered from Creswell, Lane County, OR...

  1. Approaches to Climate Literacy at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) offers a suite of courses, workshops and special events in climate change education for audiences ranging from young children to adults and utilizing both online and in-person formats. These offerings are supported by rich digital resources including video, animations and data visualizations. These efforts have the potential to raise awareness of climate change, deepen understandings and improve public discourse and decision-making on this critical issue. For adult audiences, Our Earth's Future offers participants a five-week course at AMNH that focuses on climate change science, impacts and communication, taking advantage of both AMNH expertise and exhibitry. Online versions of this course include both a ten-week course as well as three different three-week thematic courses. (The longer course is now available as a MOOC in Coursera.) These activities have been supported by a grant from IMLS. The results of independent evaluation provide insight into participant needs and how they might be addressed. For K-12 educators, the Museum's Seminars on Science program of online teacher professional development offers, in collaboration with its higher education partners, a graduate course in climate change that is authored by both an AMNH curator and leading NASA scientists. Developed with support from both NASA and NSF, the course provides a semester-equivalent introduction to climate change science for educators, including digital resources, assignments and discussions for classroom use. The results of independent evaluation will be presented. For younger audiences, the presentation will highlight resources from the AMNH Ology site; television programming conducted in partnership with HBO; Science Bulletinsvideos that include current climate change research; resources related to the GRACE mission for tracking water from space; and special event programming at the Museum on climate change. This presentation will address the

  2. Connecting Health and Natural History: A Failed Initiative at the American Museum of Natural History, 1909–1922

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In 1909, curator Charles-Edward Winslow established a department of public health in New York City’s American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Winslow introduced public health as a biological science that connected human health—the modern sciences of physiology, hygiene, and urban sanitation—to the natural history of plants and animals. This was the only time an American museum created a curatorial department devoted to public health. The AMNH’s Department of Public Health comprised a unique collection of live bacterial cultures—a “Living Museum”—and an innovative plan for 15 exhibits on various aspects of health. I show how Winslow, facing opposition from AMNH colleagues, gathered scientific experts and financial support, and explain the factors that made these developments seem desirable and possible. I finish with a discussion of how the Department of Public Health met an abrupt and “inglorious end” in 1922 despite the success of its collections and exhibitions. PMID:24205997

  3. The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education. The Benaki Museum, Athens, 17 October 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Christidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of 'The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education 'conference, third in a series of conferences organised by the Benaki Museum in partnership with the American Embassy and the British Council in Greece, was the use of technology and social media as means of transforming museum education and, sometimes, funding museum exhibitions and educational programmes. Among others, the conference aimed to discuss the use of digital applications such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter by museums in order to attract a wider audience, interpret their collections and even fund their programmes.

  4. The Nördlingen-Ries Geopark and nearby museums as a natural teaching laboratory for Geoscience students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael; Kaka, SanLinn; Kaminski, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    The hypervelocity impact of an asteroid in southern Germany around 15 million years ago not only caused an environmental catastrophe, but it also created a scenario that provides us with a world-class natural laboratory for teaching the basic Principles of Geology. The combination of museum visits and observation of rock outcrops enables the student to reinforce or rediscover the basic principles of physical and historical Geology that are presented in first- or second-year Geoscience courses. At KFUPM, our visit to the Ries Geopark begins at the Ries Crater Museum in Nördlingen, where students review knowledge learned in their Physical Geology course: the Nebular Theory, origin of the solar system, and the classification of meteorites based on real examples. Students then learn the stages of impact crater formation, shock metamorphism, and the products of impact crater formation such as tectites, impact breccia and suevite. Students also become familiar with the Mesozoic stratigraphy of Southern Germany, reviewing basic principals of stratigraphy. Visits to local outcrops reinforce the knowledge gained at the Museum. A visit to the nearby Solnhofen Museum and quarries provides insight into the nature of the late Jurassic animals that lived at the edge of the Tethys Sea, reinforcing many topics learned during their second-year Paleontology course, such as taphonomy, and the idea of a death assemblage. At the Museum of the Geosciences Department of the University of Tübingen, the students become familiar with Mesozoic ammonoids as part of their second-year Paleontology course. A visit to the Urwelt Museum and quarry in Holzmaden explores animal life during the Early Jurassic, stratigraphic principles as presented on the museum's "geological staircase", and the origin of petroleum source rocks. The museum houses spectacular examples of Early Jurassic marine reptiles. All knowledge gained in the Jurassic of southern Germany enriches the students' understanding of

  5. 78 FR 21413 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this... organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written....R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

  6. 78 FR 36243 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any... History. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal...

  7. Cenozoic Molluscan types from Java (Indonesia) in the Martin Collection (Division of Cenozoic Mollusca), National Museum of Natural History, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek Ostende, van den L.W.; Leloux, J.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    2002-01-01

    An inventory of type material in the ‘Martin Collection’ at the Division of Cenozoic Mollusca of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, The Netherlands has been made. In total 1842 lots containing over 5700 type specimens of 912 species were encountered. The status of the types is outlined.

  8. Mechanism and materialism British natural philosophy in the age of reason

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, Robert E

    1970-01-01

    Robert Schofield explores the rational elements of British experimental natural philosophy in the 18th century by tracing the influence of two opposing concepts of the nature of matter and its action-mechanism and materialism. Both concepts rested on the Newtonian interpretation of their proponents, although each developed more or less independently. By integrating the developments in all the areas of experimental natural philosophy, describing their connections and the influences of Continental science, natural theology, and to a lesser degree social and institutional changes, the author dem

  9. How a Small Natural History Museum Promotes GeoScience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damore, J.

    2004-12-01

    Established 23 years ago as a small aquarium, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center has grown to be a respected institution focused on marine education. Its recently opened Natural History Building highlights connections between marine ecology, the dynamic Washington shoreline, and the forces that shaped the region. An exhibit focal point is a hands-on Washington Geo-puzzle that demonstrates with sliding layers the tectonic forces that formed and continue to form our state. Another exhibit describes a local geologist's research concerning a seismic event 2300 years ago, evidence of which can be seen on a local beach. Last year when the Center received a grant of an AS-1 seismometer, earthquakes and plate tectonics became a natural direction to expand school programs and community involvement projects, especially with the Center's location in a seismically active part of the world. Public programs on earthquakes and tsunamis have generated strong community interest, and school programs and a youth summer camp with a seismology focus are planned. As an informal science center still actively engaged in program and exhibit design, we are eager to hear ideas from teachers and other educators on ways local museums can provide unique experiences that schools may not be able to offer. Port Townsend Marine Science Center, located in a popular state park on Washington's Olympic Peninsula is an important provider of marine and natural history education in the Puget Sound Basin. We offer classes for schools, teacher training workshops, summer camps, adult education, citizen science opportunities and many other programs.

  10. The notes from nature tool for unlocking biodiversity records from museum records through citizen science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Legacy data from natural history collections contain invaluable and irreplaceable information about biodiversity in the recent past, providing a baseline for detecting change and forecasting the future of biodiversity on a human-dominated planet. However, these data are often not available in formats that facilitate use and synthesis. New approaches are needed to enhance the rates of digitization and data quality improvement. Notes from Nature provides one such novel approach by asking citizen scientists to help with transcription tasks. The initial web-based prototype of Notes from Nature is soon widely available and was developed collaboratively by biodiversity scientists, natural history collections staff, and experts in citizen science project development, programming and visualization. This project brings together digital images representing different types of biodiversity records including ledgers , herbarium sheets and pinned insects from multiple projects and natural history collections. Experts in developing web-based citizen science applications then designed and built a platform for transcribing textual data and metadata from these images. The end product is a fully open source web transcription tool built using the latest web technologies. The platform keeps volunteers engaged by initially explaining the scientific importance of the work via a short orientation, and then providing transcription “missions” of well defined scope, along with dynamic feedback, interactivity and rewards. Transcribed records, along with record-level and process metadata, are provided back to the institutions. While the tool is being developed with new users in mind, it can serve a broad range of needs from novice to trained museum specialist. Notes from Nature has the potential to speed the rate of biodiversity data being made available to a broad community of users.

  11. The British Columbia natural gas market overview and assessment : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    The National Energy Board monitors the supply of all energy commodities in Canada along with the demand for Canadian energy commodities in domestic and export markets. This report provides an assessment of the natural gas market in British Columbia (BC) and discusses several issues facing the market. The main challenges facing the market in recent years have been rising prices, price spikes and increased price volatility. New exploration and development projects have been announced along with new gas pipeline projects that move gas to eastern markets. Industrial consumers are exploring fuel alternatives to reduce natural gas consumption. Despite these challenges, the Board believes the natural gas market in British Columbia is working well. Natural gas prices are integrated with the North American market, consumers have responded to higher prices by reducing demand, and producers have increased exploration and production. Price discovery has improved due to better pricing reporting standards and access to electronic gas trading at pricing points for BC gas. The small market size in British Columbia and the lack of storage in the Lower Mainland limit market liquidity in comparison with other major market centres. 20 figs

  12. Earthquakes: Natural Science Museum and Civil Protection of Trento to inform citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Claudia; Avanzini, Marco

    2010-05-01

    During 2009 the Natural Science Museum of Trento organized the exhibition "Attraction Earth: Earthquakes and Terrestrial Magnetism" in collaboration with the INGV (Italian National Institute of Geophysic and Volcanology). In this exhibition a particular sector has been devoted to the seismic activity and its monitoring in the Province of Trento. The purpose was to inform local people on the geological features of their territory, the monitoring activity carried out by the Civil Protection and the potential earthquake hazards, also in order to adopt a correct behaviour in case of seismic event. This sector, "The seismometric Trentino network", was organized by the Geological Service of the Trento Civil Protection and it is open till May 2010, both for general public and school students. For the latter, a particular education pack, realized by the Educational Department of the Museum and consisting of a guided tour coupled with the laboratory activity "Waves upside-down: seismology", is proposed. The whole exhibition has been also coupled with a cycle conferences targeted to adults, in which these topics have been explained by researchers and technicians of INGV and of Trento Geological Service. "The seismometric Trentino network" sector presents the daily monitoring activity of the Geological Service, that has been monitoring the seismic activity for the last 30 years, and describes the deep earth processes of the local territory, such as presence of tectonic discontinuities and their activity. It consists of display panels, a seismometer with rotating drums and a multimedia that reports the monitoring activity of the seismometric network, with real time connection to the various monitoring stations. This allows visitors to observe instantly the local seismic events recorded by each station. The seismometric network was established by the institutions of Trento Province after the earthquakes occurred in Friuli Venezia-Giulia and at Riva del Garda (1976). It started

  13. Nomenclatural notes and identification of small-eared shrews (Mammalia: genus Cryptotis) from Cobán, Guatemala, in The Natural History Museum, London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Neal

    2011-01-01

    A small series of shrews collected in Guatemala and registered in the British Museum between 1843 and 1907 includes parts of type series for three species: Corsira tropicalis Gray (1843), Sorex micrurus Tomes (1862), and Blarina tropicalis Merriam (1895). These three names are now considered equivalent, but my recent review of the specimens comprising the series indicates that they include three distinct species: Cryptotis merriami Choate (1970), Cryptotis oreoryctes Woodman (2011), and Cryptotis tropicalis (Merriam 1895). I review the taxonomic history of these specimens, provide current identifications tied directly to museum register numbers, describe how to distinguish the three species, and provide revised synonymies for these species.

  14. Voicing the Museum Artefact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Byrne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Everywhere you look or indeed listen these days, museums from the local to the national are calling on various communities to engage with their collections through the spoken word. This paper reflects on the efficacy and capacity of the human voice in translating, transforming and transposing the museum artefact and considers the voice as its own mode of translation of material culture. It focuses on two very different case studies whereby conversations in and around museum objects were generated – the 'Melanesia Project' at the British Museum and the 'Sense of Place' project in Wapping, East London. Drawing off Dell Hymes’ S-P-E-A-K-I-N-G model, I consider both the significance of these vocal engagement and intellectual challenges they set in motion for the museum. 

  15. Meaningful Learning in the Permanent Exhibition Hall of the Natural Science Museum of Universidade de Caxias do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Setti Zulian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Natural Sciences, University of Caxias do Sul, the space of non-formal education, has great potential for the development of activities related to environmental education. In the permanent exhibition room are provided information on the concept of ecosystems, flora and fauna of regional ecosystems, the interaction between them and the environmental impacts that suffer be performed. In tutoring questions occur and students are to report give opportunity knowledge they have acquired in school and in everyday experiences, adding new insights to these, thus making meaningful learning. Aiming to conserve natural resources and enhance ecosystems of Rio Grande do Sul, with the familiar design to preserve: the ecosystems of the Rio Grande do Sul - The Natural Science Museum goes to School, in partnership with the Municipal Primary School Jardelino Ramos, we elaborated a different methodology in addition to visitation. After explanations of ecosystems, various activities, including game of questions and answers on ecosystems, bingo and interactive storytelling history were under taken in accordance with the age range of students. Participated in these activities about 450 students of the partner school. The result was significant, it was noted that in later activities in school the occurrence of transferring the knowledge acquired in visits to the Natural Science Museum, through the reports and actions of students.

  16. Mars Rover Missions and Science Education: A Decade of Education and Public Outreach Using the Mars Exploration Rover Mission at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubele, J. C.; Crumpler, L. S.

    2014-07-01

    New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science exhibits and educational programming related to the MER mission reached over two million museum visitors through exhibits and over 15,000 participants in targeted educational programs.

  17. Analysis of diterpenoic compounds in natural resins applied as binders in museum objects by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Anna; Kolivoska, Viliam; Kaml, Isabella; Baatz, Wolfgang; Kenndler, Ernst

    2007-07-20

    The exudates of conifers consist mainly of diterpenoic acids of the abietane and pimarane type (abietic, neoabietic, dehydroabietic, palustric, pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric and sandaracopimaric acid) and larixol acetate. These natural resins were used as adhesives, coatings, varnishes or plasticizers in artistic and historic works since ancient times. For the purpose of conservation and restoration and for art historic examination of such museum objects the identification of the binding media used is undoubtedly of paramount importance. In the present paper, the characterization of these resins based on the pattern of their diterpenoid constituents is carried out by capillary electrophoresis. For separation a background electrolyte which has been initially introduced for the analysis of chlorinated and natural resin acids in waste water was modified and the experimental conditions were adjusted in terms of resolution and analysis time. Separation was carried out in borate buffer at pH 9.25 (ionic strength 20 mmol L(-1)) with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin as additives to increase selectivity and enhance the solubility of the analytes. With this electrophoretic system the resin acids of interest and larixol acetate--all as anionic cyclodextrin complexes--were separated within 5 min and detected at 200, 250 and 270 nm with a diode array detector. The electrophoretic patterns served for the characterisation of the relevant diterpenoic resins, balsams and copals. Sample pre-treatment was limited to sonication in methanol at 55 degrees C for 30 min. This enables the identification of the resins in mixtures with other binders like plant gums, animal glues or drying oils, even when these media are present in excess. Colophony was identified as resinous constituent of a modelling mass for gilded frames originating from the 19th century.

  18. Evolution, museums and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-11-01

    Visitors to natural history museums have an incomplete understanding of evolution. Although they are relatively knowledgeable about fossils and geological time, they have a poor understanding of natural selection. Museums in the 21st century can effectively increase public understanding of evolution through interactive displays, novel content (e.g. genomics), engaging videos and cyberexhibits that communicate to a broad spectrum of society, both within the exhibit halls as well as outside the museum.

  19. Digitalization of the exceptional building and decorative stones collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Steinwender, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Natural History Museum Vienna (NHMV) owns one of the largest building, decorative, and ornamental stones collections in Europe. This important collection dates back to the 19th century and was initiated by curator Felix Karrer after a donation of the "Union-Baugesellschaft" (Karrer, 1892). It contains rock samples used for the construction of most of the famous buildings and monuments in Vienna and in the entire Austria and surrounding countries, as well as from other famous constructions and antique (Egyptian, Greek, Roman, etc.) monuments in the world. Decorative stones that were used for the inside parts of buildings as well as artificial materials, such as stucco, tiles, and building-materials like gravel, are also part of this collection. Unfortunately, most specimens of this collection cannot be displayed at the NHMV (i.e., only 500 specimens are visible in the display Hall I) and are therefore preserved in storage rooms, and not accessible to the public. The main objective of our project of digitalization is to share our rock collection and all treasures it contains with the large majority of interested persons, and especially to provide knowledge on these rocks for people who need this information, such as people who work in cultural, architectural, scientific, and commercial fields. So far 4,500 samples from our collection have been processed with the support of the Open Up! project (Opening up the Natural History Heritage for Europeana). Our database contains all information available on these samples (including e.g., the name of the rock, locality, historic use, heritage utilization, etc.), high-quality digital photographs (with both top and bottom sides of the samples), and scanned labels (both "old" NHMV labels and other (original) labels attached to the samples). We plan to achieve the full digitalization of our unique collection within the next two years and to develop a website to provide access to the content of our database (if adequate

  20. Experiences of the museum of natural history in the integral formation of the students of forest engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmery Martínez Naranjo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Forest engineering developsthe curriculum strategies: environmental formation, based between their modes of action for evaluation and conservation in forest ecosystems, which has an irreplaceable role contributing to balance and improve the environment in general in this context where a close relationship with the Museum of Natural History is established .In this investigation the authors highlight the action plan arising from the strategy of cultural promotion of the activities of the Museum «Tranquilino Sandalio de Noda» directed to students of Forestry at the University of Pinar del Río.In the research theoretical methods were used: dialectic materialism; the historical and logical and modeling; among the techniques are the survey, in-depth interview and group interview. The results include a plan of action and the use of existing units in different rooms and teaching materials, taking as an example the birds that by their diversity have a systematic use in educational activities. These actions will increase the students' participation in museum activities and thus, cultural enrichment, their awareness and sensitivity on environmental issues will be facilitated by the appreciation of the natural heritage values that are represented there, with proposals departing from the exploration and use of the life experience of students, in which an active, transformer and autotransformer learning will be promoted.

  1. [Cathedrals to sciences or temples of knowledge? The museums of natural sciences of Cordoba, Argentina, by the end of the 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognetti, L

    2001-01-01

    The museums of Botany, Mineralogy and Zoology of the Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas were created along with a world wide phenomenon, defined by some authors as the "museum movement," in a time the basics of this movement were being restructured. Thus, this work intends to go over the building stage of the natural history museums in a peripheral domain --- Cordoba by the end of the 19th century --- in order to partially understand this transition process. The strategy is to analyze the collections and find out how and why they were gathered. Two other aspects are also relevant: the human resources and the funds these institutions were granted.

  2. New York City International Polar Weekend at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S.; Turrin, M.; Macphee, R.

    2008-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, in partnership with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Earth Institute of Columbia University and Barnard College, is featuring the International Polar Year through a New York City International Polar Weekend (NYC-IPW) in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The event showcases current polar research, polar environmental changes, history and culture during two days of family programs and activities, performances, and lectures. The goal of the NYC-IPW is to engage diverse audiences and enhance the public understanding of polar science, in particular IPY research, through close interactions with polar experts. Activities for the public include many disciplines, ranging from the physical sciences and cultural anthropology to music and art, and are presented in many forms, from lectures, panels and films to posters and play. Highlights of the NYC-IPW include: 1) A polar fair for youth and adults, showcasing scientists, artists, and educators who have worked at one or both poles and including many interactive exhibits featuring such topics as life in New York at the end of the last Ice Age, how Arctic sea ice is changing, and life on and under the ice. 2) Performances and presentations oriented towards children and families, including Inuit Throat Singers, Central Park Zoo Theater Group, and a northern lights show. 3) Lectures showcasing current IPY research and addressing such issues as the possible effects of climate change on the poles and the rest of the world, as well as polar poetry, art and film. 4) A partnership with New York City Urban Advantage program for Middle School students in the city to meet with scientists, teachers and students who had participated in polar research and travel. 5) Norwegian Consulate sponsorship of science presenters and Sami performers. The March 2007 event involved 85 presenters and volunteers from 22 institutions, and attracted ca. 3,500 visitors. Approximately 5,000 visitors attended the February 2008

  3. The museum as information space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisti...

  4. 17 January 2011 - British (Cambridge) Trustee of the London Science Museum Chair of the Management Committee of the Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences H. Covington in the LHCB underground experimental area with A. Schopper; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; throughout accompanied by R. Veness.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    17 January 2011 - British (Cambridge) Trustee of the London Science Museum Chair of the Management Committee of the Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences H. Covington in the LHCB underground experimental area with A. Schopper; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; throughout accompanied by R. Veness.

  5. Перегородчатые эмали из собрания А.В. Звенигородского и исследование Л. Пекарской «Jewellery of Princely Kiev. The Kiev hoards in the British Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Related Material» / Cloisonné enamels from the former collection Alexander Zwenigorodsky and a new book by Ljudmila Pekarska, Jewellery of Princely Kiev. The Kiev Hoards in the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Related Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pyatnitsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, a monograph long anticipated by art historians with an expertise in Old Russian and Byzantine art was published by Ljudmila Pekarska. The main subject of the monograph - the history of a hoard of jewellery found in Kiev in 1906, and as luck would have it is today divided between the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The author, however, did not limit her study to the analysis of objects from this hoard. She used an extensive amount of comparative materials from collections in many Western, Ukrainian, and Russian museums. L. Pekarska focuses mainly on the cloisonné enamels, an impressive example of exquisite medieval luxury. Welcoming the publication of this book, and being interested in the research, as well as its author, I do not envy the hard work that it would take for a person to write a scholarly review on this publication.

  6. The art of compromise: the founding of the National Gallery of British Art, 1890-1892

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Woodson-Boulton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the press played a key role in defining the Tate Gallery by facilitating a national debate about the siting, nature, and purpose of the proposed National Gallery of British Art. Art critics, politicians, journalists and a variety of newspaper editors weighed in on whether Britain should create a museum of modern art, a museum of national art, or both. The understanding of British art as quintessentially modern at the time of the founding of the Gallery meant that from the beginning the Tate Gallery was founded as both the National Gallery of British Art and a museum of modern art. The changing definition of modern art in the twentieth century, however, created fractures between these two identities that eventually led to the split between Tate Britain and Tate Modern.

  7. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  8. A Conservation Ethic and the Collecting of Animals by Institutions of Natural Heritage in the Twenty-First Century: Case Study of the Australian Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Ikin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Collecting of animals from their habitats for preservation by museums and related bodies is a core operation of such institutions. Conservation of biodiversity in the current era is a priority in the scientific agendas of museums of natural heritage in Australia and the world. Intuitively, to take animals from the wild, while engaged in scientific or other practices that are supposed to promote their ongoing survival, may appear be incompatible. The Australian Museum presents an interesting ground to consider zoological collecting by museums in the twenty-first century. Anderson and Reeves in 1994 argued that a milieu existed that undervalued native species, and that the role of natural history museums, up to as late as the mid-twentieth century, was only to make a record the faunal diversity of Australia, which would inevitably be extinct. Despite the latter, conservation of Australia’s faunal diversity is a key aspect of research programmes in Australia’s institutions of natural heritage in the current era. This paper analyses collecting of animals, a core task for institutions of natural heritage, and how this interacts with a professed “conservation ethic” in a twenty-first century Australian setting.

  9. [On natural history museums and their purpose. A lecture given by Leopold von Buch (1774-1853) in April 1838].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Björn

    2011-12-01

    A manuscript of a lecture by the Prussian geologist Leopold von Buch given at the Berlin Society of the Friends of the Humanity was discovered at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. The text is a raw version of a passionate plea for the formation of natural history collections as science places, with a partly biting humor. Based on until now unknown anecdotes about naturalists like Kaspar Maria Graf Sternberg (1761-1838) and Friedrich Wilhelm Hoeninghaus (1771-1854) Leopold von Buch argues with von Sternberg for the scientific value of natural history collections. The repeating references to the works of Goethe and an extensive addendum of various Dante translations into German are striking. The lecture manuscript complements our knowledge about the thinking of this important geologist, and provides new insights into the science policy of his time.

  10. Design of the natural ventilation system for the new San Diego Children's Museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graca, G.C. [Natural Works Inc., CA (United States); Linden, P.F. [California Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Brook, M. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    One of the unique features of the newly designed San Diego Children's museum is the solar chimney that is expected to promote buoyancy-driven flow that would come into the space through large, user-controlled roll up doors on the south facade. As part of a sustainable design choice, the proposed museum exhibition space will not have any mechanical heating or cooling systems. Indoor temperatures will be controlled using ventilation air using a variable air volume principle driven by wind and buoyancy. The ventilation system inserts fresh outside air at low levels and exhausts at higher levels achieving displacement ventilation. Particular attention was given to defining the shape of the outlet from the chimney in order to maximize wind-induced suction effects in the outlet surface. A building management system (BMS) and a control strategy were developed to optimize the performance of the building. The tools used in the analysis were a specifically designed weather analysis spreadsheet, EnergyPlus with COMIS and computational fluid dynamics. This study of the passive climate control system also involved an analysis of weather characteristics; analysis of the different glazing, chimney geometries and roof insulation; refining existing window opening geometry and positions; defining window opening control strategies. It was concluded that it is possible to improve the chimney performance by using a high level opening on the East side. Additional gains can be obtained by inserting a small opening facing North. 5 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  11. Biology and conservation of the common murre in California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia: Vol. 1, Natural history and population trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuwal, David Allen; Carter, Harry R.; Zimmerman, Tara; Orthmeyer, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the common murre (Uria aalge californica) has been recognized as a prominent indicator of marine conservation issues in California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, especially regarding oil pollution, certain fisheries, and human disturbance. To assist the effective management of the common murre and the marine environments in which they live, this summary of available information on the biology and regional status of the common murre has been sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Division of Migratory Bird Management). In Volume 1 (Chapter 1), the natural history of the common murre is summarized, drawing heavily on breeding studies from the South Farallon Islands, California, plus a host of detailed breeding studies from the North Atlantic Ocean. Population trends of the common murre are summarized in Volume 1 (Chapter 2), focusing on changes in whole-colony counts determined from aerial photographs between the late 1970s and 1995 in California, Oregon and Washington. Historical data and human impacts to murre colonies since the early nineteenth century are also summarized. Volume 2 will summarize population threats, conservation, and management.Information presented in Volume 1 has been obtained and recorded by a large number of researchers and natural historians over two centuries. From the 1960s to 1995, most work in California, Oregon, and Washington was sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Minerals Management Service, and California Department of Fish and Game. Important breeding biology studies were conducted at the South Farallon Islands (Farallon National Wildlife Refuge) by the Point Reyes Bird Observatory, in coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge). Colony surveys in California were conducted mainly by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge), U.S. Geological Survey (Western Ecological Research Center

  12. Mobile measurement of methane emissions from natural gas developments in northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Emmaline; Risk, David; Fougère, Chelsea; Lavoie, Martin; Marshall, Alex; Werring, John; Williams, James P.; Minions, Christina

    2017-10-01

    North American leaders recently committed to reducing methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, but information on current emissions from upstream oil and gas developments in Canada are lacking. This study examined the occurrence of methane plumes in an area of unconventional natural gas development in northwestern Canada. In August to September 2015 we completed almost 8000 km of vehicle-based survey campaigns on public roads dissecting oil and gas infrastructure, such as well pads and processing facilities. We surveyed six routes 3-6 times each, which brought us past over 1600 unique well pads and facilities managed by more than 50 different operators. To attribute on-road plumes to oil- and gas-related sources we used gas signatures of residual excess concentrations (anomalies above background) less than 500 m downwind from potential oil and gas emission sources. All results represent emissions greater than our minimum detection limit of 0.59 g s-1 at our average detection distance (319 m). Unlike many other oil and gas developments in the US for which methane measurements have been reported recently, the methane concentrations we measured were close to normal atmospheric levels, except inside natural gas plumes. Roughly 47 % of active wells emitted methane-rich plumes above our minimum detection limit. Multiple sites that pre-date the recent unconventional natural gas development were found to be emitting, and we observed that the majority of these older wells were associated with emissions on all survey repeats. We also observed emissions from gas processing facilities that were highly repeatable. Emission patterns in this area were best explained by infrastructure age and type. Extrapolating our results across all oil and gas infrastructure in the Montney area, we estimate that the emission sources we located (emitting at a rate > 0.59 g s-1) contribute more than 111 800 t of methane annually to the atmosphere. This value exceeds reported bottom

  13. Mobile measurement of methane emissions from natural gas developments in northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Atherton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available North American leaders recently committed to reducing methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, but information on current emissions from upstream oil and gas developments in Canada are lacking. This study examined the occurrence of methane plumes in an area of unconventional natural gas development in northwestern Canada. In August to September 2015 we completed almost 8000 km of vehicle-based survey campaigns on public roads dissecting oil and gas infrastructure, such as well pads and processing facilities. We surveyed six routes 3–6 times each, which brought us past over 1600 unique well pads and facilities managed by more than 50 different operators. To attribute on-road plumes to oil- and gas-related sources we used gas signatures of residual excess concentrations (anomalies above background less than 500 m downwind from potential oil and gas emission sources. All results represent emissions greater than our minimum detection limit of 0.59 g s−1 at our average detection distance (319 m. Unlike many other oil and gas developments in the US for which methane measurements have been reported recently, the methane concentrations we measured were close to normal atmospheric levels, except inside natural gas plumes. Roughly 47 % of active wells emitted methane-rich plumes above our minimum detection limit. Multiple sites that pre-date the recent unconventional natural gas development were found to be emitting, and we observed that the majority of these older wells were associated with emissions on all survey repeats. We also observed emissions from gas processing facilities that were highly repeatable. Emission patterns in this area were best explained by infrastructure age and type. Extrapolating our results across all oil and gas infrastructure in the Montney area, we estimate that the emission sources we located (emitting at a rate > 0.59 g s−1 contribute more than 111 800 t of methane annually to the atmosphere

  14. Our museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Our Museum was initiated in 2016. It is a five-year Danish national research and development programme comprising seven university departments at five universities and eight museum partners. The project aims to facilitate new forms of citizen engagement and inclusion by developing and studying how...... museums communicate with audiences in innovative ways. In this text the background, aims, hypothesis and organization are presented....

  15. Museum Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Virtual museums focus on a specific curriculum theme and showcase electronic museum-type collections such as artifacts, paintings, photographs, numerous databases, and Web links to resources around the world. Museums of all types include vital teaching tools that help students make discoveries and form connections with the past, present, and…

  16. The collection of type specimens of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera deposited in the Natural History Museum of Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viñolas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The type collection of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera deposited in the Natural History Museum of Barcelona, Spain, has been organised, revised and documented. It contains 430 type specimens belonging to 155 different taxa. Of note are the large number of hypogean species, the species of Cicindelidae from Asenci Codina’s collection, and the species of Harpalinae extracted from Jacques Nègre’s collection. In this paper we provide all the available information related to these type specimens. We therefore provide the following information for each taxon, species or subspecies: the original and current taxonomic status, original citation of type materials, exact transcription of original labels, and preservation condition of specimens. Moreover, the differences between original descriptions and labels are discussed. When a taxonomic change has occurred, the references that examine those changes are included at the end of the taxa description.

  17. Museums teach evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; Evans, E Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Natural history museums play a significant role in educating the general public about evolution. This article describes Explore Evolution, one of the largest evolution education projects funded by the National Science Foundation. A group of regional museums from the Midwestern United States worked with leading evolutionary scientists to create multiple permanent exhibit galleries and a curriculum book for youth. This program invites the public to experience current evolutionary research on organisms that range in size from HIV to whales. Learning research is being conducted on museum visitors to understand how they reason about evolution and to determine what influences the process of conceptual change.

  18. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 843 specimens bearing names of 820 species group taxa of Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) as of July 2011. This catalog presents a list of these holdings, which comprise 798 holotypes, 14 lectotypes, seven syntypes (30 specimens), and one neotype. In addition, we include three holotypes and 10 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found and three syntypes that were originally in this collection but are now known to be in other collections. One specimen that no longer has name-bearing status is included for the record. Forty-one of the names are new since the last type catalog. One new lectotype is designated. Suborders and families are listed as in Wilson and Reeder. Within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically. Within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, type locality, date of collection and name of collector, collector’s original number, and comments or additional information as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen serve as a condition report and will be linked to each electronic specimen record.

  19. Look Past the Stuffed Animals and Learn about the Earth: Dioramas at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The dioramas at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City provide great examples of artwork depicting locations of interest and value for teaching the Earth Sciences. When the Museum was established in 1869, it—like most institutions of that time—merely provided a taxidermy collection in cases. But as it expanded into the dozens of Halls in its multiple public buildings, curators made a deliberate effort to display the specimens with backdrops depicting the habitats where the animals were collected. Such `curatorial giants' as Frank Chapman and Carl Ackley spearheaded pioneering efforts to present displays in the curved, framed settings. The impact of these large- and small-scale artworks on the Public cannot be underestimated. Instead of just viewing the remains of a dead animal, visitors are transported around the world into a wide variety of ecosystems. With no more effort than walking from one display to the next, viewers "magically travel" to the multitude of environments across Planet Earth. The dioramas may take one from mountaintop vistas to the microsystem just a few centimeters above and below the forest floor. This presentation will provide selected examples of the artwork in AMNH dioramas. The AMNH website provides numerous videos and posts about its dioramas. I will also provide insights into the creation of more recent artwork using an online interview with Sean Murtha, the artist who created many of the Hall of Ocean Life dioramas. Predating modern technologies, including color photography, television, and computers, these dioramas are rightly described as powerful tools for nurturing scientific education and environmental awareness. These dioramas frequently are utilized to teach important Earth System Science concepts to school groups and other visitors, and examples of such lessons will be included.

  20. Learning science from museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, John H; Storksdieck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current understandings of the science learning that occurs as a consequence of visiting a free-choice learning setting like a science museum. The best available evidence indicates that if you want to understand learning at the level of individuals within the real world, learning does functionally differ depending upon the conditions, i.e., the context, under which it occurs. Hence, learning in museums is different than learning in any other setting. The contextual model of learning provides a way to organize the myriad specifics and details that give richness and authenticity to the museum learning process while still allowing a holistic picture of visitor learning. The results of a recent research investigation are used to show how this model elucidates the complex nature of science learning from museums. This study demonstrates that learning form museums can be meaningfully analyzed and described. The article concludes by stating that only by appreciating and accounting for the full complexities of the museum experience will a useful understanding of how and what visitors learn from science museums emerge.

  1. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of Innovative Science Teaching Strategies for Non-Formal Learning in a Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çil, Emine; Maccario, Nihal; Yanmaz, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Background: Museums are useful educational resources in science teaching. Teaching strategies which promote hands-on activities, student-centred learning, and rich social interaction must be designed and implemented throughout the museum visit for effective science learning. Purpose: This study aimed to design and implement innovative teaching…

  2. The Vatican museum and the organic natural products. The Raphael's frescoes and the "Last Judgment" by Nicolò and Giovanni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Nazzareno; Guiso, Marcella; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2017-05-25

    In the second half of the 90s, alongside the restoration works of the Quattrocentisti (fifteenth century painters) in the Sistine Chapel, it also carried out the restoration of the frescoes of the Stanze di Raffaello. The results of scientific investigations conducted by the Scientific Research Laboratory of the Vatican Museums, previously presented in some assays of study, are summarised and presented in this letter to the Editor for the special issue of Natural Product Research: Natural Products in Cultural Heritage.

  3. The East India Company, the Company’s Museum, and the Political Economy of Natural History in the Early Nineteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    At the turn of the nineteenth century, at its headquarters in the City of London, the Honourable East India Company established a new museum and library. By midcentury this museum would contain one of Europe’s most extensive collections of the natural history, arts, and sciences of Asia. This essay uses the early history of the company’s museum, focusing in particular on its natural history collections, to explore the material relationship between scientific practice and the imperial political economy. Much of the collections had been gathered in the wake of military campaigns, trade missions, or administrative surveys. Once specimens and reports arrived in Leadenhall Street and passed through the museum storage areas, this plunder would become the stuff of science, going on to feed the growth of disciplines, societies, and projects in Britain and beyond. In this way, the East India Company was integral to the information and communication infrastructures within which many sciences then operated. Collections-based disciplines and societies flourished in this period; their growth, it is argued, was coextensive with administrative and political economic change at institutions like the East India Company. The essay first explores the company’s practices and patterns of collecting and then considers the consequences of this accumulation for aspects of scientific practice—particularly the growth of scientific societies—in both London and Calcutta.

  4. [THE PROFESSORS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND THE SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SCIENCES OF WARSAW (1800-1832)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The National Museum of Natural History played a crucial role in the formation of Polish scientific elites in the 19th century. Many Polish students were attending in Paris natural history, botany, zoology, chemistry and mineralogy courses. The Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning was the largest scientific society and one of the most important scientific institutions in Poland. It had also an impact on the political and cultural life of the country, occupied and deprived of freedom at that time. Amongst its founders and members, could be found listeners to the lectures of Lamarck, Haüy, Vauquelin, Desfontaines, Jussieu. Moreover, seven professors of the National Museum of Natural History were elected foreign members of the Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning: Cuvier, Desfontaines, Haüy, Jussieu, Latreille, Mirbel, Vauquelin. The article analyses this choice and underlines the relationship between these scientists and Warsaw's scientists. The results of this research allow to confirm that the National Museum of Natural History was the most important foreign institution in the 19th century for Polish science, and more specifically natural sciences.

  5. Can museums survive the postmodern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Keene

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although archaeologists regard museums as vital repositories of important research materials, museum professionals take a broader view of their role in not only preserving natural and cultural heritage but also of how they could or should be presented, or interpreted, to the public. In this personal view, issues of what museums should be, or seek to be, in a postmodern world are explored.

  6. Digital Museum Collections and Social Media: Ethical Considerations of Ownership and Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Fouseki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of digital collections and digital information in the democratisation process of museums. The paper focuses on ethical and ownership issues regarding Wikipedia’s online encyclopaedia initiative to widen access to digital images and knowledge through digital media, for the wider public. The paper draws on three cases of national museums in the UK, namely the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery. The paper argues that notions of governmentality, power, authority, and control - which traditionally characterise national museums - are still dominant in digital collections. This occasionally results in tensions that revolve around the issue of ownership of digital images and digital museum objects as well as their commercial and non-commercial uses. The paper shows that recent disputes and discourse related to the use of digital images by Wikipedians (active users of Wikipedia have raised issues of authority and control not only of physical objects but also of the information and knowledge related to these objects. The paper demonstrates that the level of collaboration with Wikipedia reflects to some extent the participatory nature, philosophy, and ideology of each museum institution.

  7. Karawajew's ant type specimens (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) in the National Museum of Natural History of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Alexander V; Radchenko, Alexander G

    2016-03-30

    The collection of W.A. Karawajew is one of the richest and most famous ant collections of the World. Much of this collection consists of dry mounted specimens, including types of about 550 taxa, housed in the Shmalhausen Institute of Zoology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev). Nevertheless, we located a considerable part of Karawajew's collection, containing about 25,000 specimens in alcohol, that is preserved in the National Museum of Natural History of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev). The latter material was recently examined and we found types of 24 taxa. This type material was partly mounted, re-ordered and catalogued. In this paper we present a catalogue of these type specimens housed in the National Museum of Natural History.

  8. Sophisticated control system. Integrated power supply systems in the Munich natural history museum building ('zoologische Staatssammlung'); Mit ausgefeilter Anlagensteuerung. Energieverbundsysteme in der zoologischen Staatssammlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottitsch, Robert [Ottitsch GmbH und Co. KG, Ingenieurbuero Gebaeudetechnik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Since 1985, the 'Zoologische Staatssammlung' of Munich, one of the world's biggest natural history collection of the world, has its own museum building in the Munich district of Obermenzing. Recently, the heating and cooling system of the building was modernised. The user, owner and projecting expert cooperated in developing a heating and cooling centre with a modern control system which is characterised by high energy efficiency and a short amortisation period. (orig.)

  9. Color Degradation of Textiles with Natural Dyes and of Blue Scale Standards Exposed to White LED Lamps:Evaluation of White LED Lamps for Effectiveness as Museum Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Mie; Moriyama, Takayoshi; Toda, Masahiro; Kohmoto, Kohtaro; Saito, Masako

    White light-emitting diodes (LED) are well suited for museum lighting because they emit neither UV nor IR radiation, which damage artifacts. The color degradation of natural dyes and blue scale standards (JIS L 0841) by white LED lamps are examined, and the performance of white LED lamps for museum lighting is evaluated. Blue scale standard grades 1-6 and silk fabrics dyed with 22 types of natural dyes classified as mid to highly responsive in a CIE technical report (CIE157:2004) were exposed to five types of white LED lamps using different luminescence methods and color temperatures. Color changes were measured at each 15000 lx·hr (500 lx at fabric surface × 300 hr) interval ten times. The accumulated exposure totaled 150000 lx·hr. The data on conventional white LED lamps and previously reported white fluorescent (W) and museum fluorescent (NU) lamps was evaluated. All the white LED lamps showed lower fading rates compared with a W lamp on a blue scale grade 1. The fading rate of natural dyes in total was the same between an NU lamp (3000 K) and a white LED lamp (2869 K). However, yellow natural dyes showed higher fading rates with the white LED lamp. This tendency is due to the high power characteristic of the LED lamp around 400-500 nm, which possibly contributes to the photo-fading action on the dyes. The most faded yellow dyes were Ukon (Curcuma longa L.) and Kihada (Phellodendron amurense Rupr.), and these are frequently used in historic artifacts such as kimono, wood-block prints, and scrolls. From a conservation point of view, we need to continue research on white LED lamps for use in museum lighting.

  10. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  11. [The art cabinet and its current significance. Museum establishment of natural history in early modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfe, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For some time a hightened interest in so-called "curiosity cabinets" of the 16th to 18th century has surfaced in the historical sciences as well as in exhibitions with popular appeal, the arts and literature. Johann Laurentius Bausch was among those who assembled such a collection of natural history objects and artefacts. His curiosity cabinet was closely connected to his far more famous library and in his last will Bausch attempted to safeguard the coherence of the two. Against this background the article accentuates some of the aspects of his work from a perspective of a history of collections. One focus will thereby be on the practice of collecting as seemingly contradictory, being characterised on the one hand by the preservation of ancient knowledge as well as by scientific research based on specific objects. Another focus will be on curiosity cabinets as important platforms of exchange and means of social advancement. For the Academia Naturae Curiosorum exhibition objects and their publication were an important device of achieving recognition and protection from the Emperor's Court.

  12. Virtuelt museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Rostgaard

    2008-01-01

    I april 2008 åbnes dørene til "Virtuelt Museum". Det er et internetmuseum, som alle kan besøge ved at klikke ind på portalen www.vimu.info . På museet er der en præsentation af regionen Slesvig-Holsten - Syddanmarks historie siden 1830. Det har taget tre år at udvikle det virtuelle museum...

  13. Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) - Engaging Underrepresented Minorities in Science through High School Internships at the National Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G.; Cruz, E.; Selvans, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Smithsonian's Youth Engagement through Science (YES!) program at the National Museum of Natural History gives young people from the Washington, D.C. area the opportunity to engage in science out of school through 16-week internships. We will present the program's successful strategies and lessons learned around recruiting and engaging young people from underserved communities, and maintaining relationships that help to support their pursuit of STEM and other career paths. The YES! program connects Smithsonian collections, experts, and training with local DC youth from communities traditionally underrepresented in science careers. YES! is now in its fifth year and has directly served 122 students; demographics of alumni are 67% female, and 51% Latino, 31% African-American, 7% Asian, 5% Caucasian and 6% other. The program immerses students in science research by giving them the opportunity to work side-by-side with scientists and staff from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Gardens, and National Zoo. In addition to working on a research project, students have college preparatory courses, are trained in science communication, and apply their skills by interacting with the public on the exhibit floor.

  14. Two New Species of Bibloplectus Reitter (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae) from the Orlando Park Collection, Field Museum of Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brittany E; Carlton, Christopher E

    2018-04-10

    Two new species of Bibloplectus Reitter, 1881 are described from the Orlando Park Collection of Pselaphinae at the FMNH (Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA): Bibloplectus silvestris Owens and Carlton, new species (type locality, Urbana, IL, USA) and Bibloplectus wingi Owens and Carlton, new species (type locality, Shades State Park, IN, USA). Types of these new species were part of a series of specimens bearing unpublished Park manuscript names in both the pinned and slide collection at the FMNH. They bring the total number of species in the genus in eastern North America to twenty-three. Resolving these manuscript names adds to previous efforts to uncover elements of the hidden diversity of North American Bibloplectus from museum collections (Owens and Carlton 2016, Owens and Carlton 2017) and highlights the importance of close examination of the Orlando Park pselaphine collection as a valuable historic and taxonomic resource.

  15. An online photographic catalog of primary types of Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah J. Talamas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A photographic catalog of primary types of Platygastroidea housed in the National Insect Collection, National Museum of Natural History, is here made available online at the image database at The Ohio State University (specimage.osu.edu. Following examination of this collection we enact the following taxonomic changes: Leptacis piniella MacGown syn. n. is treated as a junior synonym of Leptacis pinicola MacGown; Sacespalus indicus Mani is transferred to Platygaster Latreille; Platygaster indica Mukerjee is given the replacement name Platygaster chaos Talamas, n. n.; Synopeas rugiceps (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Leptacis Förster; Axea atriclava (Kieffer, comb. n. is transferred from Psilanteris Kieffer; Chakra pachmarhica (Sharma, comb. n. is transferred from Paridris Kieffer; Paridris dubeyi Sharma, syn. n. is treated as a junior synonym of Chakra pachmarhica; Holoteleia indica (Mani is transferred to Opisthacantha Ashmead and given a replacement name, Opisthacantha nomados Talamas, n. n.; Psilanteris nigriclavata (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Anteris Förster; Probaryconus grenadensis (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Monoteleia Kieffer; Monoteleia syn.n. is treated as a junior synonym of Probaryconus Kieffer; Paridris karnatakensis Sharma, syn. n is treated as a junior synonym of Probaryconus cauverycus Saraswat; Probaryconus punctatus (Ashmead, comb. n. is transferred from Oxyteleia Kieffer; Triteleia bengalensis (Saraswat, comb. n. is transferred from Alloteleia Kieffer; Trimorus varius Fouts, syn. n. and Trimorus pulchricornis Fouts, syn. n. are treated as junior synonyms of Trimorus annulicornis (Ashmead; Neotypes are designated for Gryon leptocorisae (Howard, Idris seminiger (Ashmead, Telenomus graptae Howard, Telenomus persimilis Ashmead, and Telenomus rileyi Howard; lectotypes are designated for Cremastobaeus bicolor Ashmead, Oethecoctonus insularis (Ashmead, Oethecoctonus laticinctus (Ashmead and Probaryconus

  16. Zoological results of the British speleological expedition to Papua new Guinea 1975 : 7. Cavernicolous shrimps (Crustacea Decapoda, Natantia from new Ireland and the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holthuis, L.B.

    1978-01-01

    Through the kindness of Dr. P. Beron, National Natural History Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria, I was allowed to study some cavernicolous shrimps collected by him in New Ireland, while he was a member of the 1975 British Speleological Expedition to Papua New Guinea. The material proved to consist of two

  17. Review of The Museum of the World [website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Lash

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The British Museum, in partnership with the Google Cultural Institute, has developed a digital interface featuring selected objects from their collections: The Museum of the World. The mission of the project is to make knowledge and culture of the 'whole of humanity' available to all as a Museum of and for the World (MacGregor 2015. This impressive effort pushes the bounds of what digital heritage can be, but also raises important questions about the role of the museum, public interaction, and the presentation of world history. This article is a review of the digital interface: The Museum of the World.

  18. TransCanada's Alberta hub : a great market for British Columbia natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation outlined commercial gas transmission activities along TransCanada Pipelines' wholly owned regulated pipelines in western Canada, including the Alberta System and the British Columbia (BC) System. TransCanada Pipelines owns and operates 41,000 km of pipeline that transport 11.5 billion cubic feet of gas per day. TransCanada's efforts to improve Alberta System economics were described along with the services it has developed to better connect supply and improve market access. This presentation included several illustrations depicting North American gas supply and demand; frontier resources in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB); pipelines that accommodate northern gas; Alberta gas demand; and, Pacific gas demand; The integration of the Gas Transmission Northwest (GTN) System in the energy grid of western North America was also discussed. It was determined that production from the WCSB remains stable and supply from BC will remain a key growth area for the WCSB. In addition, enhancements to the Alberta Hub, facilitated by TransCanada's Nova Inventory Transfer, will provides a great market for BC gas. figs

  19. Nature Elements and Fundamental Motor Skill Development Opportunities at Five Elementary School Districts in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher; Donovan, Andrew M; Harper, Nevin J; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2017-10-24

    The majority of Canadian children are not physically active enough for healthy development. School playgrounds are a primary location to promote physical activity and motor skill practice. The benefits of children's play in nature have also been highlighted, but few studies have evaluated children's access and exposure to nature for play on school grounds. This study examined children's access to nature on school grounds and the opportunities afforded by those natural elements for motor skill practice. Extensive naturescapes (multiple nature elements in one setting) were not common, and natural elements were limited, ranging from 1.97 to 5.71 elements/school. The most common element was a forested area (26.5% of all natural elements identified). In comparison to built structures, the number of natural elements was low. Some elements differed between school districts and appeared to be related to local geography and terrain (hilly, rocky terrain, tidal flats, etc.). Our assessment showed that naturescape elements afforded opportunities for the development of some key fundamental motor skills (FMS), specifically, locomotor and stability skills, but opportunities to develop manipulative skills were limited. To maximize potential FMS development, physical literacy, and psycho-social benefits, additional elements or more comprehensive multi-element naturescapes and facilitation (social or environmental) are recommended.

  20. Nature Elements and Fundamental Motor Skill Development Opportunities at Five Elementary School Districts in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of Canadian children are not physically active enough for healthy development. School playgrounds are a primary location to promote physical activity and motor skill practice. The benefits of children’s play in nature have also been highlighted, but few studies have evaluated children’s access and exposure to nature for play on school grounds. This study examined children’s access to nature on school grounds and the opportunities afforded by those natural elements for motor skill practice. Results: Extensive naturescapes (multiple nature elements in one setting were not common, and natural elements were limited, ranging from 1.97 to 5.71 elements/school. The most common element was a forested area (26.5% of all natural elements identified. In comparison to built structures, the number of natural elements was low. Some elements differed between school districts and appeared to be related to local geography and terrain (hilly, rocky terrain, tidal flats, etc.. Our assessment showed that naturescape elements afforded opportunities for the development of some key fundamental motor skills (FMS, specifically, locomotor and stability skills, but opportunities to develop manipulative skills were limited. To maximize potential FMS development, physical literacy, and psycho-social benefits, additional elements or more comprehensive multi-element naturescapes and facilitation (social or environmental are recommended.

  1. The selection and performance of the natural zeolite clinoptilolite in British Nuclear Fuels' site ion exchange effluent plant, SIXEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, S.G.; Berghauser, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    SIXEP has been conducted by British Nuclear Fuels plc at its Sellafield reprocessing site as part of its committment to reduce radioactive discharges to the Irish Sea. An extensive development program identified the natural ion exchange mineral clinoptilolite, from a particular deposit in California now owned by Tenneco Specialty Minerals, as the most suitable for use in SIXEP to extract caesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel storage pond water. Close cooperation with the supplier in a Quality Assurance scheme ensured the supply of a fully-characterised, high grade ion exchanger. Since SIXEP commenced treating pond water on 28 May 1985, the plant has performed well, exceeding the design expectation in terms of discharge reduction and availability

  2. Risk analysis procedure for post-wildfire natural hazards in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Following a severe wildfire season in 2003, and several subsequent damaging debris flow and flood events, the British Columbia Forest Service developed a procedure for analysing risks to public safety and infrastructure from such events. At the same time, the Forest Service undertook a research program to determine the extent of post-wildfire hazards, and examine the hydrologic and geomorphic processes contributing to the hazards. The risk analysis procedure follows the Canadian Standards Association decision-making framework for risk management (which in turn is based on international standards). This has several steps: identification of risk, risk analysis and estimation, evaluation of risk tolerability, developing control or mitigation strategies, and acting on these strategies. The Forest Service procedure deals only with the first two steps. The results are passed on to authorities such as the Provincial Emergency Program and local government, who are responsible for evaluating risks, warning residents, and applying mitigation strategies if appropriate. The objective of the procedure is to identify and analyse risks to public safety and infrastructure. The procedure is loosely based on the BAER (burned area emergency response) program in the USA, with some important differences. Our procedure focuses on identifying risks and warning affected parties, not on mitigation activities such as broadcast erosion control measures. Partly this is due to limited staff and financial resources. Also, our procedure is not multi-agency, but is limited to wildfires on provincial forest land; in British Columbia about 95% of forest land is in the publicly-owned provincial forest. Each fire season, wildfires are screened by size and proximity to values at risk such as populated areas. For selected fires, when the fire is largely contained, the procedure begins with an aerial reconnaissance of the fire, and photography with a hand-held camera, which can be used to make a

  3. Levels of naturally occurring gamma radiation measured in British homes and their prediction in particular residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G.M. [University of Oxford, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom); Wakeford, R. [University of Manchester, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Athanson, M. [University of Oxford, Bodleian Library, Oxford (United Kingdom); Vincent, T.J. [University of Oxford, Childhood Cancer Research Group, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carter, E.J. [University of Worcester, Earth Heritage Trust, Geological Records Centre, Henwick Grove, Worcester (United Kingdom); McColl, N.P. [Public Health England, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Little, M.P. [National Cancer Institute, DHHS, NIH, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Gamma radiation from natural sources (including directly ionising cosmic rays) is an important component of background radiation. In the present paper, indoor measurements of naturally occurring gamma rays that were undertaken as part of the UK Childhood Cancer Study are summarised, and it is shown that these are broadly compatible with an earlier UK National Survey. The distribution of indoor gamma-ray dose rates in Great Britain is approximately normal with mean 96 nGy/h and standard deviation 23 nGy/h. Directly ionising cosmic rays contribute about one-third of the total. The expanded dataset allows a more detailed description than previously of indoor gamma-ray exposures and in particular their geographical variation. Various strategies for predicting indoor natural background gamma-ray dose rates were explored. In the first of these, a geostatistical model was fitted, which assumes an underlying geologically determined spatial variation, superimposed on which is a Gaussian stochastic process with Matern correlation structure that models the observed tendency of dose rates in neighbouring houses to correlate. In the second approach, a number of dose-rate interpolation measures were first derived, based on averages over geologically or administratively defined areas or using distance-weighted averages of measurements at nearest-neighbour points. Linear regression was then used to derive an optimal linear combination of these interpolation measures. The predictive performances of the two models were compared via cross-validation, using a randomly selected 70 % of the data to fit the models and the remaining 30 % to test them. The mean square error (MSE) of the linear-regression model was lower than that of the Gaussian-Matern model (MSE 378 and 411, respectively). The predictive performance of the two candidate models was also evaluated via simulation; the OLS model performs significantly better than the Gaussian-Matern model. (orig.)

  4. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Orders Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 612 specimens bearing names of 604 species-group taxa of Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea as of May 2016. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprising 582 holotypes; 16 lectotypes, two of which are newly designated herein; 7 syntypes (15 specimens); and 1 neotype. Included are several specimens that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections and therefore are not in the database. Thirty-seven of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these orders, Arthur J. Poole and Viola S. Schantz’s 1942 “Catalog of the Type Specimens of Mammals in the United States National Museum, Including the Biological Surveys Collection” (Bulletin of the United States National Museum, 178). One of these, Lutra iowa Goldman, 1941, was transferred to the National Museum’s Paleobiology Department collection and is mentioned only briefly in this work. Orders and families are arranged systematically following D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder’s 2005 Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, third edition, volume 1; within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically, and within each currently recognized genus, species and subspecies accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon, type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record. An addendum

  5. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: orders Didelphimorpha through Chiroptera (Excluding Rodentia) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The type collection of Recent Mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 820 specimens bearing names of 809 species-group taxa of Didelphimorphia through Chiroptera, excluding Rodentia, as of June 2014. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 788 holotypes, 26 lectotypes, 11 syntypes (22 specimens), and 4 neotypes. Included are several specimens that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and twenty-seven of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these orders, Poole and Schantz (1942). Five specimens reported in Poole and Schantz (1942) were subsequently sent to the Vertebrate Paleontology collection and are not included here. Orders and families are ordered as in Wilson and Reeder (2005); within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

  6. Technology Museums in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus......This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...

  7. Collection fund of the Slovak Mining Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labuda, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Slovak Mining Museum in Banská Sˇtiavnica belongs to museums of Slovak field activity and includes several exhibition departments: Natural history – collection of minerals and fossils in Berggericht building with 37,500 pieces. Historical – collections and exhibitions linked to specific

  8. The Sensory Garden as an Environmental Educational Activity for Social Inclusion in the Natural Sciences Museum of University of Caxias do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina de Oliveira Vons

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our daily life many details are not perceived because we mostly use the sigth perception and leave other human senses asleep. In order to encourage the awareness, balance and respect for nature by other senses, we have created the Sensory Garden as a part of Project The Museum of Natural Science Goes to School: A Proposal for Environmental Inclusive Education, which aims to assist deaf students of the Municipal School of Special Education Helen Keller of Caxias do Sul / RS on the importance of environmental preservation through educational workshops and inclusive. Deafness should not be seen as a factor that prevents interaction with various educational means. It takes students to integrate into society and can take advantage of diverse teaching methodologies, providing opportunities for them to become full citizens according to their potential. The workshop was performed with 30 students of the 5th, 6th and 7th grades. The students were initially blindfolded and in contact with aromatic plants and leaves of various textures they could interact with them by other senses rather than the sight. After the discoveries, the eyes were uncovered and students shared the sensations experienced. Using the Brazilian Sign Language they gave testimonials about the experience, making contributions starting from the previous knowledge they possessed. Then, they recognized the plants and at the end, the outstanding characteristics of each one were described and stressed the importance of their adaptations for survival in nature and its relevance to man.

  9. "Journey to the Stars": Presenting What Stars Are to Global Planetarium Audiences by Blending Astrophysical Visualizations Into a Single Immersive Production at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmart, Carter; Mac Low, M.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Kinzler, R.; Paglione, T. A. D.; Abbott, B. P.

    2010-01-01

    "Journey to the Stars" is the latest and fourth space show based on storytelling from data visualization at the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History. This twenty five minute, full dome movie production presents to planetarium audiences what the stars are, where they come from, how they vary in type and over time, and why they are important to life of Earth. Over forty scientists from around the world contributed their research to what is visualized into roughly fifteen major scenes. How this production is directed into a consolidated immersive informal science experience with learning goals is an integrative process with many inputs and concerns for scientific accuracy. The goal is a seamless merger of visualizations at varying spatial and temporal scales with acuity toward depth perception, revealing unseen phenomena, and the layering of concepts together to build an understanding of stars; to blend our common experience of them in the sky with the uncommon meaning we have come to know through science. Scripted by Louise Gikow who has worked for Children's Television Workshop, narrated by Whoopie Goldberg, and musically scored by Robert Miller, this production strives to guide audiences through challenging scientific concepts by complimenting the natural beauty the subject matter presents with understandable prose and musical grandeur. "Journey to the Stars" was produced in cooperation with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Heliophysics Division and is in release at major planetariums, worldwide.

  10. Portable technologies at the museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study...... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....

  11. Rediscovery of the 220-year-old holotype of the Banded Iguana, Brachylophus fasciatus (Brongniart, 1800) in the Paris Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineich, Ivan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Natural History Museum herpetological collection (MNHN-RA) has seven historical specimens of Brachylophus spp. collected late in the 18th and early in the 19th centuries. Brachylophus fasciatus was described in 1800 by Brongniart but its type was subsequently considered as lost and never present in MNHN-RA collections. We found that 220 year old holotype among existing collections, registered without any data, and we show that it was donated to MNHN-RA from Brongniart’s private collection after his death in 1847. It was registered in the catalogue of 1851 but without any data or reference to its type status. According to the coloration (uncommon midbody saddle-like dorsal banding pattern) and morphometric data given in its original description and in the subsequent examination of the type in 1802 by Daudin and in 1805 by Brongniart we found that lost holotype in the collections. Another MNHN-RA specimen has Horn Islands (Wallis and Futuna) as the collection location but we show that most of the collections given to MNHN-RA by its collector, Louis Arnoux, have mixed localities in the MNHN-RA catalogues. We thus conclude that the locality is wrong and that the species never inhabited those islands located west of Western Samoa and north-east of Fiji.

  12. Rediscovery of the 220-year-old holotype of the Banded Iguana, Brachylophus fasciatus (Brongniart, 1800) in the Paris Natural History Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineich, Ivan; Fisher, Robert N

    2016-07-15

    The Paris Natural History Museum herpetological collection (MNHN-RA) has seven historical specimens of Brachylophus spp. collected late in the 18th and early in the 19th centuries. Brachylophus fasciatus was described in 1800 by Brongniart but its type was subsequently considered as lost and never present in MNHN-RA collections. We found that 220 year old holotype among existing collections, registered without any data, and we show that it was donated to MNHN-RA from Brongniart's private collection after his death in 1847. It was registered in the catalogue of 1851 but without any data or reference to its type status. According to the coloration (uncommon midbody saddle-like dorsal banding pattern) and morphometric data given in its original description and in the subsequent examination of the type in 1802 by Daudin and in 1805 by Brongniart we found that lost holotype in the collections. Another MNHN-RA specimen has Horn Islands (Wallis and Futuna) as the collection location but we show that most of the collections given to MNHN-RA by its collector, Louis Arnoux, have mixed localities in the MNHN-RA catalogues. We thus conclude that the locality is wrong and that the species never inhabited those islands located west of Western Samoa and north-east of Fiji.

  13. Surface Model and Tomographic Archive of Fossil Primate and Other Mammal Holotype and Paratype Specimens of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, Pretoria, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Justin W; Olah, Angela; McCurry, Matthew R; Potze, Stephany

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century of paleontological excavation and analysis from the cave deposits of the Cradle of Humankind UNESCO World Heritage Site in northeastern South Africa underlies much of our understanding of the evolutionary history of hominins, other primates and other mammal lineages in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene of Africa. As one of few designated fossil repositories, the Plio-Pleistocene Palaeontology Section of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (DNMNH; the former Transvaal Museum) curates much of the mammalian faunas recovered from the fossil-rich deposits of major South African hominin-bearing localities, including the holotype and paratype specimens of many primate, carnivore, and other mammal species (Orders Primates, Carnivora, Artiodactyla, Eulipotyphla, Hyracoidea, Lagomorpha, Perissodactyla, and Proboscidea). Here we describe an open-access digital archive of high-resolution, full-color three-dimensional (3D) surface meshes of all 89 non-hominin holotype, paratype and significant mammalian specimens curated in the Plio-Pleistocene Section vault. Surface meshes were generated using a commercial surface scanner (Artec Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg), are provided in formats that can be opened in both open-source and commercial software, and can be readily downloaded either via an online data repository (MorphoSource) or via direct request from the DNMNH. In addition to providing surface meshes for each specimen, we also provide tomographic data (both computerized tomography [CT] and microfocus [microCT]) for a subset of these fossil specimens. This archive of the DNMNH Plio-Pleistocene collections represents the first research-quality 3D datasets of African mammal fossils to be made openly available. This simultaneously provides the paleontological community with essential baseline information (e.g., updated listing and 3D record of specimens in their current state of preservation) and serves as a single resource of high

  14. Surface Model and Tomographic Archive of Fossil Primate and Other Mammal Holotype and Paratype Specimens of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, Pretoria, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Adams

    Full Text Available Nearly a century of paleontological excavation and analysis from the cave deposits of the Cradle of Humankind UNESCO World Heritage Site in northeastern South Africa underlies much of our understanding of the evolutionary history of hominins, other primates and other mammal lineages in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene of Africa. As one of few designated fossil repositories, the Plio-Pleistocene Palaeontology Section of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History (DNMNH; the former Transvaal Museum curates much of the mammalian faunas recovered from the fossil-rich deposits of major South African hominin-bearing localities, including the holotype and paratype specimens of many primate, carnivore, and other mammal species (Orders Primates, Carnivora, Artiodactyla, Eulipotyphla, Hyracoidea, Lagomorpha, Perissodactyla, and Proboscidea. Here we describe an open-access digital archive of high-resolution, full-color three-dimensional (3D surface meshes of all 89 non-hominin holotype, paratype and significant mammalian specimens curated in the Plio-Pleistocene Section vault. Surface meshes were generated using a commercial surface scanner (Artec Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg, are provided in formats that can be opened in both open-source and commercial software, and can be readily downloaded either via an online data repository (MorphoSource or via direct request from the DNMNH. In addition to providing surface meshes for each specimen, we also provide tomographic data (both computerized tomography [CT] and microfocus [microCT] for a subset of these fossil specimens. This archive of the DNMNH Plio-Pleistocene collections represents the first research-quality 3D datasets of African mammal fossils to be made openly available. This simultaneously provides the paleontological community with essential baseline information (e.g., updated listing and 3D record of specimens in their current state of preservation and serves as a single resource of

  15. Putting teachers-to-be in the field and the lab: Hands-on research at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, P. A.; Ebel, D. S.; Harlow, G. E.; Landman, N. H.; Pagnotta, A.; Sessa, J.; Shara, M.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Webster, J. D.; Blair, D.; Shumer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is halfway through a pilot program designed to prepare Earth Science teachers for grades 7-12 in high-needs schools in New York. The program was implemented to address a critical shortage of qualified Earth Science teachers throughout the state as well as to reach student populations that traditionally have limited science exposure and hands-on learning opportunities. This Master of Arts in Teaching is unique amongst teacher preparation programs, not only in that it is housed at a world-class research museum and places the teacher candidates in a year-long teaching residency, but also in that it accepts only students with a strong background in Earth Science via a degree in geology, meteorology, oceanography, astronomy, or a related discipline. Following a year of graduate courses in science and pedagogy, as well as teaching residencies, and only months before embarking on teaching career, candidates begin a seven-week science practicum. This exercise combines field and lab work under the tutelage of AMNH science curators and postdoctoral research fellows to provide experience with the scientific process, from field work and data collection to interpretation and public presentation of results. In the science practicum, teaching candidates begin by selecting one of four topics on which to focus their research: astrophysics, experimental petrology, mineralogy, or paleontology. An introduction to lab materials, techniques, and instrumentation is followed by two weeks in the field, both upstate and in New York City, where rocks of all types are encountered and discussed. Nights are devoted to astronomical observing and data collection to supplement the geology-oriented daytime sessions. Following the trips, candidates are back at AMNH analyzing data and samples in preparation for a short, scientific-style manuscript and presentation of results in an AGU-style talk. Three research groups have already discovered potentially

  16. Comparison between virtual museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Caraceni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drawing a taxonomy of virtual museum, that can fit to represent all the known cases of virtual museum in the last years, I tried to try my meta-model of classification in two very different examples of virtual museums, to prove the validity of my taxonomical meta-model.

  17. Decontamination issues related to museum operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, E.J. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, School of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC Canada), Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Cole, D.; Jamieson, T. [Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC Canada), Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Museums in Canada have been found to possess radioactive items. The origin of the radiation can be broadly categorized as either natural (generally radioactive ores) and anthropogenic (generally luminous gauges). Radioactive ores, bearing naturally occurring uranium and thorium, can generate radiation fields many times greater than the ambient background levels. In addition, they will increase the ambient radon level and potentially generate loose contamination. Radioluminescent gauges, especially bearing radium (Ra-226), can also generate significant radiation fields. This is especially true if many gauges are located in close proximity. In addition, the radon may outgas from these gauges, and generate a loose contamination problem in enclosed spaces (such as display cases). In this paper, we discuss the specific results of radiological decontamination investigations at three museums, namely The Canadian Museum of Nature (in Aylmer) and the RCAF Memorial Museum (in Trenton) and the Quebec Air and Space Museum (in Montreal). The primary conclusion is that museums holding radioactive materials will have the requirement to be surveyed for loose contamination periodically with the potential for periodic decontamination caused by radon out-gassing, public access to displays bearing radioactive material must be restricted, and comprehensive radiation safety programs at museum facilities must be developed. (author)

  18. Enlightenment museums: universal or merely global?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O’Neill

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article tests the case set out by the 2002 Declaration, signed by many of the great museums of the world, and elaborated by Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum (BM, that these are universal institutions whose displays enable visitors ‘to see the world as one’ and hence promote a more tolerant society. I argue that while a universal museum could be invaluable in a world full of conflict and misunderstanding, the credibility of the idea is undermined by its being deployed chiefly as a defense against repatriation claims. MacGregor’s accounts of the Benin Bronzes, the Elgin/Parthenon Marbles and the Rosetta Stone are examined as to whether they provide historical, ethical or epistemological support for the idea of the universal museum. I review the current display practices of ‘universal museums’ and argue that they are as likely to confirm prejudice as to promote tolerance. I conclude with an alternative view of what a universal museum might be – one which is open about the conflicted histories of some objects, which acknowledges historical context as well as aesthetics, explores violent as well as peaceful cultural encounters and reveals the Imperial as well as the Enlightenment history of collections.

  19. A new body mass estimation of Brachiosaurus brancai Janensch, 1914 mounted and exhibited at the Museum of Natural History (Berlin, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-C. Gunga

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Body mass and surface areas are important in several aspects for an organism living today. Therefore, mass and surface determinations for extinct dinosaurs could be important for paleo-biological aspects as well. Based on photogrammetrical measurement the body mass and body surface area of the Late Jurassic Brachiosaurus brancai Janensch, 1914 from Tendaguru (East Africa, a skeleton mounted and exhibited at the Museum of Natural History in Berlin (Germany, has been re-evaluated. We determined for a slim type of 3D reconstruction of Brachiosaurus brancai a total volume of 47.9 m3 which represents, assuming a mean tissue density of 0.8 kg per 1,000 cm3, a total body mass of 38,000 kg. The volume distributions from the head to the tail were as follows: 0.2 m3 for the head, neck 7.3 m3, fore limbs 2.9 m3, hind limbs 2.6 m3, thoracic-abdominal cavity 32.4 m3, tail 2.2 m3. The total body surface area was calculated to be 119.1 m2, specifically 1.5 m2 for the head, 26 m2 neck, fore limbs 18.8 m2, hind limbs 16.4 m2, 44.2 m2 thoracic-abdominal cavity, and finally the tail 12.2 m2. Finally, allometric equations were used to estimate presumable organ sizes of this extinct dinosaur and to test whether their dimensions really fit into the thoracic and abdominal cavity of Brachiosaurus brancai if a slim body shape of this sauropod is assumed. doi:10.1002/mmng.200700011

  20. British passports

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that from 01/01/2009, the passport section of the British Consulate will move from Geneva to Paris. This change is part of a global initiative to rationalize passport services and reduce administrative costs while ensuring that the quality of the service remains high. The aim is to issue new passports within 10 working days of receiving applications (excluding transit time). From 1st January 2009 passport applications should be sent by courier or registered post directly to: British Consulate General BP111-08 75363 Paris CEDEX 08 France For further information please refer to: http://ukinswitzerland.fco.gov.uk/en/passports/passport-move/

  1. Real/Life: New British Art and the Reception of Contemporary British Art in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajiya Kenji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the ways in which the exhibition Real/Life: New British Art was conceived and received in Japan, where contemporary British art has been shown since the 1960s. Taking place at five museums in the country between 1998 and 1999, the exhibition aimed to showhow British artists in the 1990s struggled with realities, internal and external, but its response was not as satisfactory as was expected. The essay examines the exhibition as a turning point for the transformation of exhibition culture in Japan from nationally themed exhibitions to showcases of contemporary art in the global context.

  2. Using the Saliency-Based Model to Design a Digital Archaeological Game to Motivate Players' Intention to Visit the Digital Archives of Taiwan's Natural Science Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Pei-Hsin; Huang, Yao-Tien; Cheng, Hao-Yueh; Lee, Chih-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Museums in Taiwan have developed various digital archives, but few people have visited these digital archives. Therefore, this study designed a digital archaeology game for high school students to play. Based on the concept of "learning for playing" (i.e., players who want to win will study more), the digital archaeology game contest…

  3. Study Of Museum Institutional Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Rohanda

    2016-11-01

    development of information and library science, particularly institution of information in addition to the library. Second, it provides an overview of the governance of the museum in government institutions. Third, the scope of study is limited to institutional management of museums in government institutions, thus there is a need for the development of studies on institutional management of museums for other types of museums, such as museums that are managed by private or personal institutions. Keywords: Gawitra, information institution, management, museum.

  4. Evolution of contemporary museum architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Bilous, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the development of museum architecture from the formation of the classic building architecture to the establishment of the contemporary museum architecture. Changes in the museum building architecture and displaying principles have been analysed. The 19th century was defined by the emergence of a vast number of museums serving through present as examples of the contemporary museum architecture. New styles are tried in the museum architecture alo...

  5. Distinguishing between natural and aquaculture-derived sediment concentrations of heavy metals in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, T.F.; Petersen, S.A.; Levings, C.D.; Martin, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Marine sediment samples were collected in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia, to assess the use of a geochemical normalization technique in the identification of a chemical tracer of aquaculture waste material. Zinc and copper were suggested as tracers of feed pellets, while copper was considered an indicator of anti-foulant agents used on netpen systems. The sediment samples were analyzed for carbon, nitrogen, organic matter, water, trace-element, and free sulfide concentrations, and sediment grain-size distribution. Sediment texture analysis revealed a wide range of substrate types from sand to silty loam categories. Strong relationships between sediment texture, sediment porosity, and organic content were observed across both near-field and far-field stations. Excess zinc and copper sediment concentrations, identified using a lithium-normalization technique, were restricted to near-field sampling stations (0 and 30 m from netpen systems). The relationships between these metal tracers and organic content and sulfur concentrations were explored to account for variations in sediment concentrations of zinc and copper

  6. Organization and value of archival documents of the Spanish Institute of Entomology (historical archive of National Museum of Natural Sciences, Spanish National Research Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osuna Arias, María Cruz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the work carried out for organizing the archival collection of the defunct Spanish Institute of Entomology, attached to the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC. This work has been used as a pilot project for implementing the standard classification scheme for CSIC’s historical archives. All the work was carried out in collaboration between researchers and documentation professionals, from the standpoint of the research project to which it belongs and with the intention of making the results available for the scientific community as required. The physical preservation of the documents was improved and their description was included in the automated catalog of the CSIC Libraries and Archives Network. This collection is part of the archives of the National Museum of Natural History (MNCN and can be consulted through the CSIC archive catalog.El presente artículo tiene el propósito de ofrecer una síntesis del trabajo de organización realizado sobre el fondo documental del extinto Instituto Español de Entomología (IEE del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC cuyo tratamiento ha constituido el proyecto piloto para la aplicación del cuadro de clasificación normalizado para los Archivos Históricos del CSIC. Toda la labor ha sido llevada a cabo por investigadores y profesionales de la documentación, desde la perspectiva del proyecto de investigación donde se enmarca y con la intención de ofrecer el resultado al servicio de la comunidad científica que lo requiera. El proyecto ha incluido la mejora de la conservación física de la documentación y la descripción en el catálogo automatizado de la Red de Bibliotecas y Archivos del CSIC. El fondo forma parte del Archivo del Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN y su consulta puede realizarse a través del catálogo de Archivos del CSIC.

  7. Crozier's penguin: An object history of maritime and museum science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Diarmid A

    2018-03-01

    In November 1843 John Cassidy, curator in the Belfast Museum received, perhaps rather dolefully, a collection of bird skins. The Museum was barely managing to cope with the constant flow of donations from the 'four quarters of the globe'. But the gift of bird skins could not be ignored. Sent by Captain Francis Crozier, recently returned from the British Antarctic Expedition, the bequest contained 150 species of Southern Ocean birds, including the remains of two immature 'great penguins'. Taking the one surviving specimen as a focal point, this paper compares and contrasts the ways in which Aptenodytes forsteri, or the emperor penguin, was differently scripted on board ship and in the museum. The lively interpretations and close encounters with emperor penguins on the ice and on board the two naval bomb vessels are set alongside the more constrained meanings and fleeting attention given to them in a metropolitan and a provincial museum. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Corporate Training in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  9. Museum Insel Hombroich

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesner, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;......Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;...

  10. Boekbespreking MUSEUM VROLIK, Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huistra, Hieke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31622149X

    2014-01-01

    Medisch erfgoed is niet altijd even toegankelijk, maar aan het Amsterdamse Museum Vrolik zal dat niet liggen. In de afgelopen jaren gaf het museum een publieksboek uit met prachtige foto’s van de collectie; schreef conservator Laurens de Rooy een boek over de Amsterdamse anatoom Lodewijk Bolk

  11. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  12. Knight at the Museum: Learning History with Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan S.; Levine, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an approach that teachers can use to strengthen students' ability to make sense of the past at museums. Specifically, we propose a photography exercise to help students to learn from museums and to view museums critically, weighing both the objective realities and subjective interpretations offered by museums. To get the most…

  13. Conference Proceedings: Photography and Britishness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Willcock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The video-recordings presented here were made at the conference Photography and Britishness, held at the Yale Center for British Art on November 4 – 5, 2016. The conference was the result of a collaboration between the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, and the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino—three research institutions that have a converging interest in British art. The conference sought to investigate the various ways in which notions of “Britishness” have been communicated, inflected, and contested through the photographic image. It was not a conference about the history of photography in Britain, or about British photography. Rather, it sought to consider the nature of the relationship between photography and Britishness: the notion that photography can capture images of Britishness, at the same time that our sense of what Britishness constitutes is produced by the photographic image. A key question for the conference was whether Britishness can have a photographic referent—or whether it is itself an effect of representation. Speakers at the conference approached these questions from a wide range of perspectives and focusing on a diverse number of photographic materials—from family albums and studio portraits to advertisements, reportage, and aerial photography—which demonstrated the complexities and instabilities not only of the term Britishness, but also of the medium of photography. The conference was opened with an introduction by John Tagg. The videos included here are presented in the order they were delivered.

  14. British Industries Collaborative Exponential Programme. Vol. I. Introduction: Exponential experiments on rods and tubes of natural uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-03-01

    The experimental techniques used in the performance of exponential buckling measurements are described. The results are given of buckling measurements on a wide range of graphite lattices in which the fuel elements consisted of rods or tubes of natural uranium metal. The observed buckling values are correlated with theory. (author)

  15. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Harker, Richard J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE) in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM) in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In ex...

  16. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  17. The effects of natural and anthropogenic habitats on pollinator communities in oak-savannah fragments on Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Julie Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation of natural habitat can lead to loss of species but landscapes surrounding habitat fragments may provide resources and so promote species diversity. I examined the role of the surrounding landscape – Douglas-fir forest and urban residential areas – on pollinator communities in oak-savannah fragments. Bees in fragments surrounded by forest were larger, and body size increased with increased availability of early-blooming, native flowering plants. Small-bodied, mid to late-season b...

  18. Tradition and Technology. A Magnet School-Museum Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Michael; Judd, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Presents a case study of an educational partnership between an Albuquerque magnet elementary school and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Descriptions of the school and museum are provided as well as the program's goals, current activities and products, outcomes, and future directions. The Proyecto Futuro program, a multiyear…

  19. George Peabody and the Peabody Museum of Salem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Franklin

    1994-01-01

    The gifts of George Peabody, self-made millionaire and educational philanthropist, made possible the Peabody Museum of Salem. The article details the life of Peabody, then explains how he created the museum to promote science, detailing its maritime history, natural history, and ethnology departments. (SM)

  20. Museum-University Collaborations to Enhance Evaluation Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Visscher, Nick

    2015-01-01

    For museums interested in making audience research and evaluation an integral part of their operations, looking to local universities--and the expertise their faculty and students bring--can be a natural starting point. These partnerships can be mutually beneficial, giving students valuable real world experience while providing museums with…

  1. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  2. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws inspiration from Edward Said's orientalism, and examines how the three National Museums of Singapore - the Singapore History Museum, the Singapore Art Museum and the Asian Civilizations Museums - are orientalized. The process is mediated through the museums' close links to tourism...... a destination's uniqueness and attractiveness. Besides reviewing Said's orientalism, this paper visits criticisms of the theory, within the context of the orientalization process of museums in Singapore.Keywords: orientalism, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore History Museum, Asian Civilizations Museum, Singapore...

  3. Welcome to Garbage Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Introduces the Children's Garbage Museum in southwestern Connecticut and provides pictures as well as descriptions of exhibits. Suggests two activities to heighten students' awareness of recycling and composting and recommends reading materials. (MOK)

  4. Paleontological museums and geoethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Manni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Paleontological museums should adopt a code of ethics in order to carry out restorations and to set-up exhibits without any falsification. Indeed, alterations can often be voluntary because an exhibit needs to be ‘beautiful’, ‘realistic’ or ‘charming’ for the public. Therefore, the reconstructed parts are painted and then ‘soiled’ artfully to look more realistic. An incomplete skeleton might be completed by reconstructing the missing bones, or by adding casts of other bones. Sometimes skeletons are ‘created’, by assembling together bones from several specimens of the same species. Therefore, the museum staff should also inform visitors if a specimen has undergone such tampering, because otherwise each visitor is convinced that they have seen a ‘true’ fossil. So all museum staff should be trained not only in the techniques of museums, but also in the ethics of restoration and installation.

  5. Det medialiserede museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    to a cultural-political and museological focus on digital dissemination, in which user experience, interactivity, and participation are central concepts. The article argues that the different forms of communication, representation, and reception offered by digital media, together with the interactive and social...... possibilities for action they facilitate for their users, contribute to a transformation of the museum as an institution. It is concluded that the relationship between museum, collection, and users has undergone a number of changes caused by the intervention of the media and that the traditional social act......Over the past two decades, digital technologies have gained a greater and more important role in communication and dissemination of knowledge by museums. This article argues that the digitization of museum communication can be viewed as a result of a mediatization process that is connected...

  6. Another New Museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    With the transformation of urban governance into a mode of entrepreneurialism, museums have become prominent and privileged sites for reshaping cities as attractive places for cultural and artistic consumption. Using an ethnographic field study, the authors investigate how the logic of the creative...... city is at work in the planning of a new art museum in a medium-sized Swiss city. The analysis shows how the entrepreneurial rationale is contested and re-appropriated through the use of classic and situational modes to organize this cultural institution. The ways of imagining the museum are described...... as the effects of these three modes of ordering – entrepreneurial, classic, and situational – as well as their hybridization. The authors conclude that by attending to the multiple layers of urban life, which unfold in and around museums, we can imagine other ‘new museums’ than those of the entrepreneurial city....

  7. Climate Museum and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  8. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  9. "Not a Museum Town"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    ) articulation of quaintness bridge the theoretical and the empirical in this paper. Empirical material from three Danish cases connects the authenticity discourse to a recurring turn of phrase used by respondents, the ‘museum town.’ A‘museum town’ epitomized a place absent of life. In this manner being...... authentic required a working fleet, which carried deeper implications for transformation of fishing communities....

  10. Natural zeolites filling amygdales and veins in basalts from the British Tertiary Igneous Province on the Isle of Skye, Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana J M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Natural zeolites filling amygdales and veins in tertiary basaltic host rocks on the Isle of Skye (NW Scotland have been studied in some detail by transmitted light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques . The zeolites and associated minerals so identified in order of their relative time of formation from early to late were nontronite, amorphous silica phases, carbonate phases, chabazite, phillipsite, wairakite, thomsonite, analcime, natrolite and stilbite-type minerals . Zeolite formation in the Skye basalts began with low Si/Al ratio Na zeolites and a gradual increase in Ca content and Si/Al ratio, ending up as Ca zeolites . They were probably formed as a consequence of late-stage hydrothermal activity, although, locally, contact metamorphism may control the process of zeolite formation

    RESUMEN

    Las zeolitas naturales como relleno en amígdalas y venas que ocurren en rocas basálticas Terciarias de la Isla de Skye (NW Escocia han sido estudiadas en detalle por técnicas de microscopía de luz transmitida, microscopía electrónica de barrido y difracción de rayos X. Las zeolitas y los minerales asociados identificados, en orden de su tiempo relativo de formación, son nontronita, fases de sílice amorfa, carbonatos, chabazita, filipsita, wairakita, thomsonita, analcima, natrolita y minerales tipo estilbita. La formación de zeolitas en los basaltos de Skye comenzó con una zeolita rica en Na de baja relación Si/Al y con el aumento gradual en el contenido de Ca y Si/Al, terminó con una zeolita rica en Ca Estas probablemente se formaron como consecuencia de una actividad hidrotermal tardía, aunque localmente un metamorfismo de contacto pudo controlar el proceso de formación de las zeolitas

  11. Making Sense of Things: Constructing Aesthetic Experience in Museum Gardens and Galleries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Mangione

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of museum behaviour in sociology often examine how external environments shape organizational practice. Through an ethnographic study, this article considers programmes for visitors with disabilities at a major metropolitan art museum and botanical garden to ask how ‘sensory conventions’ vary across museums, and with what effects. I trace how museum staff construct the aesthetic experience of art and nature differently to shape how visitors use their senses, and which senses they use, when interacting with museum collections. Examining aesthetic meanings across different kinds of museums reveals these institutions’ differing local cultures and how such cultures affect visitor experience. In particular, aesthetic practices across museums facilitate varying opportunities for perception, and interactions that may privilege particular embodied capacities. Key words: art museums; botanical gardens; aesthetics; senses; disability

  12. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish adaptations to deep sea, through the exploration of a fictional story, based on historical data and based on the work of the King that served as a guiding script for all the subsequent tasks. In both museums, students had access to: historical collections of organisms, oceanographic biological sampling instruments, fish gears and ships. They could also observe the characteristics and adaptations of diverse fish species characteristic of deep sea. The present study aimed to analyse the impact of these activities on students' scientific knowledge, on their understanding of the nature of science and on the development of transversal skills. All students considered the project very popular. The results obtained suggest that the activity promoted not only the understanding of scientific concepts, but also stimulated the development of knowledge about science itself and the construction of scientific knowledge, stressing the relevance of creating activities informed by the history of science. As a final remark we suggest that the partnership between elementary schools and museums should be seen as an educational project, in which the teacher has to assume a key mediating role between the school and the museums.

  13. EMDialog: bringing information visualization into the museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Uta; Schmidt, Holly; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2008-01-01

    Digital information displays are becoming more common in public spaces such as museums, galleries, and libraries. However, the public nature of these locations requires special considerations concerning the design of information visualization in terms of visual representations and interaction techniques. We discuss the potential for, and challenges of, information visualization in the museum context based on our practical experience with EMDialog, an interactive information presentation that was part of the Emily Carr exhibition at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary. EMDialog visualizes the diverse and multi-faceted discourse about this Canadian artist with the goal to both inform and provoke discussion. It provides a visual environment that allows for exploration of the interplay between two integrated visualizations, one for information access along temporal, and the other along contextual dimensions. We describe the results of an observational study we conducted at the museum that revealed the different ways visitors approached and interacted with EMDialog, as well as how they perceived this form of information presentation in the museum context. Our results include the need to present information in a manner sufficiently attractive to draw attention and the importance of rewarding passive observation as well as both short- and longer term information exploration.

  14. Imaginary museums: What mainstream museums can learn from them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Morris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The world is full of museums that don’t exist fully in three dimensions – museums described in words or drawn on paper; museum catalogues; museums on the web. There are also many museums that are the creation of artists, novelists and poets, and so have a strong thread of imagination running through them. The latter cast an interesting light on ‘real’ museums and compel us to ask: What is it that the metaphor of a museum enables writers and artists to say? The question is doubly interesting because there is a long history of these 'imaginary’ museums created by artists. This paper suggests that there are five qualities of museums that writers and artists tune into: the power of objects to take us back in time; the apparent ‘alive-ness’ of objects; the power of collections (which is different to the power of individual objects; the ability of museums to shape the world and tell us stories about it; and the role of museums as powerful metaphors through which we can talk about loss, fear and yearnings for the past. So writers and artists find museums powerfully imaginative places; but then so do visitors. Visitor research shows that visitors come to museums ready to use their imaginations. So my question is: Do ‘real’ museums do enough to work with the visitors’ imaginations? Or, to put it another way, Do enough museums think that the visitors’ imagination – and indeed their own - is relevant to the museum experience? It should be. It is.

  15. The Development of Informal Learning and Museum Pedagogy in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tišliar, Pavol

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of the history and the current orientation of informal learning in museums, museum pedagogy. This is the result of a lengthy process over the last two centuries, which became particularly intensive from the 1960s, in which museums looked for deeper ways to communicate with visitors, starting from basic presentation…

  16. Sur deux Cynoglossus de la collection ichthyologique du Zoölogisch Museum, Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanaud, Paul

    1951-01-01

    Sous le nom de Cynoglossus xiphoideus Günther, la collection ichthyologique du Zoölogisch Museum, Amsterdam possède 2 spécimens dont l’un est originaire de Shanghaï et l’autre, de la mer de Timor. Le spécimen de Shanghaï a été cédé au Zoölogisch Museum (sans doute à titre d’échange) par le British

  17. INFORMATION AT MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alek Tarkowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses both the legal and factual problems related to the necessity of implementing the provisions of the Act on the reuse of public sector information (PSI of 25 February 2016. The authors highlight the inaccuracies in the way the statutory provisions have been formulated, and which require urgent intervention by legislators due to their doubtful interpretation and the conflict of the Act’s provisions on reuse with those of other acts, in particular the Act on museums. They also identify the discrepancies between how museums currently share their collections and the requirements set by the Act on the reuse of PSI. Individual practical problems are discussed in separate parts of the text. The aim of the article is not to settle the doubts concerning the Act on reuse of PSI, nor to decide what museums should do in that matter, but rather to draw attention to possible ways of interpreting the provisions and the related problems.

  18. Walking the Museum - Performing the Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thobo-Carlsen, M.

    2016-01-01

    and corporeal practices, where affectivity is enacted and social relations may be transformed. The article examines how the participatory design of Riverbed produces affects that are inherently performative, relational and political. The article analyses how the visitors are affected and moved by the exhibition......The article examines the performative aspects of the exhibition Olafur Eliasson: Riverbed (2014) in order to qualify and evaluate participatory modes of curating, doing research, and learning from art in museums. The article develops a theoretical approach to exhibitions as spaces for social...

  19. More than science: family learning in a Mexican science museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño-Garzón, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    Latin American audiences living in their countries of origin are poorly understood as museum learners due to the scarcity of research in this field. Through a case study approach, I investigate and report on the ways of learning of 20 Mexican family groups. In particular, I examine the influence of the Mexican sociocultural context on the participant family members' learning outcomes from a Mexican science museum. Conducted in Universum Museo de las Ciencias, a science museum located in Mexico City, this research study is based on the premise that understanding the role of the sociocultural elements of learning is essential to understanding the nature of learning in museums. The cognitive and social outcomes of the participants are discussed in the light of the sociocultural elements that define Mexicans as museum learners.

  20. SEMIOTIC MODELS IN MUSEUM COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plokhotnyuk Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a way of formalizing the description of various types of relations between the elements of museum communication based on the semiotic approach and the concepts introduced by F. de Saussure, C.S. Pierce and C.W. Morris. Semiotic models can be used to explain the specifics of museum communication for museum studies and as a methodological basis for developing various versions of databases or other software for museum affairs.

  1. Nine Unpublished Texts in the Collection of the British Museum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alivernini, Sergio

    -, č. 1 (2017) E-ISSN 1540-8760 Institutional support: RVO:68378009 Keywords : Sumerian * Ur III * administrative texts Subject RIV: AB - History OBOR OECD: History (history of science and technology to be 6.3, history of specific sciences to be under the respective headings) https://cdli.ucla.edu/files/publications/cdlb2017_001. pdf

  2. Museos escolares, colecciones y la enseñanza elemental de las ciencias naturales en la Argentina de fines del siglo XIX School museums, collections, and elementary teaching of the natural sciences in late XIX century Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana V. García

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analiza la organización de la enseñanza de las ciencias naturales en el contexto escolar argentino a partir de las prácticas de enseñanza y los soportes materiales que se promovieron a fines del siglo XIX. En esa época, funcionarios escolares y profesores fomentaron la modernización y nacionalización de la enseñanza a partir del uso de colecciones con ejemplares del territorio nacional y la formación de museos en las escuelas. En particular, se examinan los debates oficiales sobre las colecciones mineralógicas ofrecidas en venta por el naturalista Enrique de Carlés y los "museos escolares" de los profesores Pedro Scalabrini y Guillermo Navarro que dan cuenta de las tensiones entre procurar materiales didácticos modernos, asociados a los modelos extranjeros, y la importancia de contar con elementos representativos de la naturaleza e industria nacional.In this study we analyze the organization of natural science teaching within the Argentinian school context starting with teaching practices and material support in the late XIX century. By that time, school staff and teachers fostered modernization and nationalization of teaching by using collections with national issues and the foundation of museums within the schools. In particular, we examine the official debates over the mineralogical collections offered for sale by the naturalist Enrique de Carlés, and the "school museums" by professors Pedro Scalabrini and Guillermo Navarro. These account for the tension between searching for modern didactic materials associated with foreign models, and the importance of counting on elements that represented the country nature and industry.

  3. [Medicine and its museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi Cremades, N

    1998-11-01

    There are described in this article the historical patrimonies belonging to five museums of Cordoba city, Argentina: the Museo de anatomia, which was named after Pedro Ara, notable Spanish Anatomist; the Museo de Anatomia Patologica; the Museo de Historia de la Medicina, created by Prof. Enrique P. Aznarez; the Museo "Obispo Salguero" of the Hospital San Roque; and the Museo Historico del Hospital Nacional de Clinicas, declared national historic monument. All these museums have a rich historic hoard, reflecting one of the important cultural aspects of this province.

  4. Is Museum Education "Rocket Science"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragotto, Erin; Minerva, Christine; Nichols, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The field of museum education has advanced and adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of audiences as determined by new research, national policy, and international events. Educators from Chicago's Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum provide insight into a (somewhat) typical museum education department, especially geared for readers…

  5. Anarchy in the UK: Detailed genetic analysis of worker reproduction in a naturally occurring British anarchistic honeybee, Apis mellifera, colony using DNA microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châline, N; Ratnieks, F L W; Burke, T

    2002-09-01

    Anarchistic behaviour is a very rare phenotype of honeybee colonies. In an anarchistic colony, many workers' sons are reared in the presence of the queen. Anarchy has previously been described in only two Australian colonies. Here we report on a first detailed genetic analysis of a British anarchistic colony. Male pupae were present in great abundance above the queen excluder, which was clearly indicative of extensive worker reproduction and is the hallmark of anarchy. Seventeen microsatellite loci were used to analyse these male pupae, allowing us to address whether all the males were indeed workers' sons, and how many worker patrilines and individual workers produced them. In the sample, 95 of 96 of the males were definitely workers' sons. Given that approximately 1% of workers' sons were genetically indistinguishable from queen's sons, this suggests that workers do not move any queen-laid eggs between the part of the colony where the queen is present to the area above the queen excluder which the queen cannot enter. The colony had 16 patrilines, with an effective number of patrilines of 9.85. The 75 males that could be assigned with certainty to a patriline came from 7 patrilines, with an effective number of 4.21. They were the offspring of at least 19 workers. This is in contrast to the two previously studied Australian naturally occurring anarchist colonies, in which most of the workers' sons were offspring of one patriline. The high number of patrilines producing males leads to a low mean relatedness between laying workers and males of the colony. We discuss the importance of studying such colonies in the understanding of worker policing and its evolution.

  6. [The passing eye: museums, public education, and the visualization of scientific evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Irina

    2005-01-01

    In this examination of certain issues related to the history of museums. An emphasis on the functions and missions entrusted to museums does not necessarily reflect the power museums have to create habits or shape meanings. To the contrary, this may reflect the actual fragility of museums and their need to resort to rhetoric to attract governmental favors and funds. Therefore, concentrating on the monumental, representative, or metaphorical aspects of museums obscures the history of these institutions and of their consolidated practices, there by naturalizing the separation between research space and public space and leaving the historian to play the role of an uninitiated observer of the 'cathedrals of science'.

  7. Virtual Museum Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Dominic; Eddisford, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines children's and adults' attitudes to virtual representations of museum objects. Drawing on empirical research data gained from two web-based digital learning environments. The paper explores the characteristics of on-line learning activities that move children from a sense of wonder into meaningful engagement with objects and…

  8. The Talking Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  9. An Infrastructure Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    This article invites teachers to let their students' imaginations soar as they become part of a team that will design a whole new kind of living technological museum, a facility that celebrates the world of infrastructure. In this activity, a new two-story building will be built, occupying a vacant corner parcel of land, approximately 150…

  10. Myths, Mummies and Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Greek mythology, Egyptian mummies, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City are the focus of a one-semester course given at the Sea Girt (New Jersey) Elementary School. It is an interdisciplinary program wherein students (grade 8) study ancient civilizations and do projects related to their studies. (KC)

  11. Moving Museum Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Shelley Kruger

    2011-01-01

    As Howard Gardner persuasively argued, movement, or kinesthetics, can be a powerful educational tool and one to which some learners are particularly attuned. Museums, however, are typically places that discourage movement (don't run, don't jump, watch out for the artifacts). This makes incorporating kinesthetic learning challenging. This article…

  12. Museums, Environments, Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and

  13. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  14. Informational Value of Museum Web Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kravchyna, Victoria; Hastings, Sam

    2002-01-01

    What information are virtual visitors looking for on museum Web sites? This paper is a first step in a larger investigation into the informational value of museum Web sites. Scholars, teachers, students, museums staff, and museum visitors are the main categories of visitors examined in this study. Questions were asked of these museum audiences about their use of museum Web sites, museum databases, and other aspects of virtual visits.

  15. Museum Libraries and Their Contributions to Museum Information Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neslihan Mollaoğlu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Museum Libraries is a kind of special library owing to the fact that it gives ser­vice to the environment of the museum and improves the collection related to the specialization of the museum that they connected to. Museums going toward the service approach based on knowledge from the service approach based on object enlarged the museum libraries' service areas. This article deals with museum libraries as one of the elements that completes the museum information area and aims to question the contributions that they could make by introducing its functions and determine the status over the selected examples. In this context, 7 museum libraries from abroad and 11 museum libraries in the  country are investigated in the field of their infrastructural conditions and services that they present to their users. It is concluded that the activity areas of the museum libraries are connected to the approach of the museology that they adopt and its conditions are determined in the direction of the management departments that they linked with

  16. The Goals of Science Museums in the Eyes of Museum Pedagogical Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaby, Neta; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Tishler, Chagit E.

    2016-01-01

    Today, science is a major part of Western culture. One advantage of informal learning environments is that they are (potentially) open to a wide range of populations with varying levels of interest and knowledge. Because of their informal nature, documenting learning has proven challenging. Studies that assess learning in museums, therefore, must…

  17. Sharī`a and ‘natural justice’: the implementation of Islamic criminal law in British India and colonial Nigeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.; Christmann, A.; Hartung, J.-P.

    2009-01-01

    Whenever colonial powers took over Muslim territory, sharī`a criminal law was abolished and replaced by Western style penal codes, modified to fit the colonial situation. There are, however, two exceptions: British India (until 1861) and colonial Nigeria until independence. Here sharī`a criminal law

  18. Experience our Planet - EPO Opportunities in a Museum Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science interpretation is more than giving your audience facts and figures. It is about relate Earth sciences to something within the personality or experience of your audience. It is about revelation based on information rather than just give away information per se. And: The chief aim of interpretation is not instruction but provocation. A great environment for Earth and Space science communication is a museum. Whether it is an art gallery, a technology exhibition or a national park's visitor center doesn't matter. Everywhere, Earth science interpretation is possible and sometimes even more successful in unsuspected locations than in natural history museums. Earth and Space sciences just started to use the potential which lies within museum environments. A historic view on Earth sciences and natural hazard research can be given in art galleries. The technology used in research can be showcased and - sometimes - even tested in science centers and technology museums. National Parks provide the best opportunity to actually experience the dynamic planet Earth live. Furthermore, museums do offer a great venue for educational programs. Just recently, the German Research and Development Program GEOTECHNOLOGIEN, together with the Germany's Geounion and the Institute for Advanced Sustainable Studies initiated a network of research institutions and museums called GeoED. Within this network, scientists and educationists as well as teachers will find an environment to create and enhance educational programs in Earth and Space science. Therefore, museums do not only provide the venue, but also the frame for sustainable Earth and Space science interpretation. This talk aims towards giving an insight view on how to conduct interpretive programs in museums, how to utilize the treasures and possibilities provided by museums and national parks and to encourage scientists to go to these places for face-to-face Earth science interpretation.

  19. Looking from above: saying and doing in the history museums of Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa González de Oleaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available What functions might the history museum fulfill in the twenty-first century? How could this powerful ideological device, so closely linked in its origins to the nation-state and neo-colonial expansion, be changed into an instrument of multicultural citizenship? In some Latin American museums, new historical subjects and audio-visual media have been incorporated into the exhibits. But, is that enough? We do not believe so, because things are said in a museum, but things are also done while speaking: reality is ordered, evaluated and hierarchized, so that a certain way of conceiving and being in the world is conveyed. Therefore, making the museum suitable to the new needs of the community demands changes not only in what is said, but also in the way it is said. It serves little to incorporate new social subjects (the native peoples of Latin America, for example if this inclusion results from a pejorative conception of these communities, which is just what happens in the Museum of America in Madrid, where the Spanish appear as masters of the word while the indigenous people are represented by ceramic vessels. If, in the accounts of the museums, the part continues to be taken for the whole by essentializing and naturalizing the difference, then those other social subjects must appear to be merely a historical afterthought. It seems to us that the performative dimension of the discourse in the museum is a very important aspect at the moment its function in the new global society is evaluated. We propose two objectives for new museums: serving the purposes of multicultural coexistence, and being spaces where the subjects may examine their social situation. In order to do this, we have analyzed the setup of three museums: a colonial museum (the Museum of America in Madrid, a national museum (the National Historical Museum in Buenos Aires, and an ethnic museum (the Mennonite Jacob Unger Museum in the Paraguayan Chaco.

  20. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...... and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...

  1. Libraries, Archives, Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Serrai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During the ancient period, Libraries, Archives and Museums had the same name, because they were the home of the Muses, but over the centuries, the three institutions have diversified. The museums display individual specimens; libraries and archives predominantly preserve and offer library objects and documents. While the manuscripts are kept, generally, in individual pieces, the books, after the invention of printing, exist in multiple copies, but there is no general bibliographic map to find specificity, duplication, or deficiencies. The digitization of works and editions of the past aggravates the problems of organization and bibliographic mapping, because it provides the sources of consultation and indexing, but ignores the imposing mass of written materials that represented the documentary basin of different ages, and who they are scattered in towns and historic European libraries.

  2. RESOURCE CENTRE AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ciunl ictlt.P cnnipc;. Material from other museums. Worksheets, activity books, guides, pamp~lets and other educational material from museums 1n Southern. Africa and overseas are kept in the museum education section of the Resource Centre. General infonnation on museums and museum technology are also collected.

  3. Objects or Narratives. Archaeological Exhibitions in Serbia: Foundations of Museum Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Cvjetićanin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although every local museum or parts of national museums keep archaeological finds, museums in general play a very limited role on the archaeological scene, often being passive and marginalized. Well-grounded investigation into the archaeological objects kept in museum collections and, above all, the public domain of museums, the nature of collections and exhibitions, both permanent and occasional, have not been adequately recognized, discussed or considered. In spite of the fact that museum exhibitions legitimize the dominant social and political norms of the present, museums remain marginalized, separated from the currents of various pertinent disciplines, and not prepared for the necessary changes. Archaeological theory, shaping the archaeological practice of museums as well, is not understood as its constituent part, and the interpretive context in which exhibitions are created, contents and nature of interpretation are not considered. The analysis of the exhibitions of the National Museum in Belgrade, being the paradigm of museum archaeology in Serbia up to the middle of the 20th century, has shown that the culture-historical approach, the idea of continuity and dynamic artistic presentations of alienated past have marked this public presence of museums. The Museum has developed from the storage space and knowledge presentation, over exhibition space to an ideal museum, dominated by estheticized expositions, establishing various official representations of the past. The changes in the theory of museology, somewhat coinciding with the changes in archaeological theory, have posed a new challenge to museum archaeology, that may be defined in short as the need for the new interpretation of the past.

  4. Museum audio description

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Cláudia Susana Nunes

    2011-01-01

    Audio description for the blind and visually impaired has been around since people have described what is seen. Throughout time, it has evolved and developed within different media, starting with reality and daily life, moving into the cinema and television, then across other performing arts, museums and art galleries, and public places. Thus, academics and entertainment providers have developed a growing interest for audio description, especially in what concerns the best methods and strateg...

  5. The "total" museum, a tool for social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagensberg, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Science museums encourage not only scientific knowledge and methodology, but also people's opinion about scientific issues. This has been the main concern of Barcelona's Museo de Ciência de la Fundación "la Caixa" throughout its twenty years of existence. According to the author of the present article, the goals of "total museology" comply with the new trend some museums have been following. So that this new trend becomes more sound and widespread, it is necessary to create new concepts for museology. The first science museums were natural history and tools and machinery museums, which displayed artifacts in glass cases to visitors. Their mission was also that of preserving collections for the use of scientists. Science museums of today display real phenomena and provide visitors' interaction with them. Whatever the topic it focus, a science museums is "concentrated reality" either of objects or phenomena. This is probably the main distinctive feature of museology and of other forms of scientific communication. For teachers and lecturers, words are the basic element of communication, for books and magazines, the written language. There are no films without images, as there is no radio with sounds. In a museum, there are no restrictions as to the use of stimulation, models, graphic images or new technology, but just as accessories to reality, never as reality itself.

  6. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  7. Informal adult education and museum andragogics in the context of the history of modern museums in Ukraine (review historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kutsaeva

    2016-08-01

    the audience. There is no clear understanding of the problem’s thesaurus. The participation in the international action «Days of Adult Education» is minimal, therefore the museums still cannot be called adult education providers. However, it is still possible to identify and to characterize certain significant stages of the formation of the andragogics, informal museums adult education, historiography’s indexes names, draft law documents and practice activity centres’ compilation. There exists the mutual dependence and connection between museum andragogics, which is in the process of institutionalization, and pedagogy, sociology and other sciences about man, its interdisciplinary nature.

  8. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  9. Relevant Repositories of Public Knowledge? Libraries, Museums and Archives in "The Information Age"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, Bob; Wilson, Kerry; Bryson, Jared

    2005-01-01

    In a project funded by the AHRB, researchers at the University of Sheffield used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to examine the perceived contemporary relevance of archives, libraries and museums. The research sought to discern how far the British people value access to these established repositories of public…

  10. Museums as Spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattrup, Lise; Lejsgaard Christensen, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums.......Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums....

  11. Artefacts, biology and bias in museum collection research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Whaanga, Hemi; Trewick, Steve A

    2012-07-01

    Museum collections are increasingly subjected to scientific scrutiny, including molecular, isotopic and trace-element analyses. Recent advances have extended analyses from natural history specimens to historical artefacts. We highlight three areas of concern that can influence interpretation of data derived from museum collections: sampling issues associated with museum collection use, methods of analysis, and the value of cross-referencing data with historical documents and data sets. We use a case study that focuses on kiwi (Apteryx spp.) feather samples from valuable 19th century Māori cloaks in New Zealand to show how sampling and analysis challenges need to be minimized by careful design. We argue that aligning historical records with scientific data generated from museum collections significantly improves data interpretation.

  12. THE INTERPLAY OF MUSEUM DISCOURSE AND POPULAR CULTURE: HOW, WHEN AND WHERE HISTORY COMES ALIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Lukić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Museum as an institution has been, throughout history, inevitably connected with ideology, involved in establishing and shaping of cultural memory, and crea-tion and affirmation of collective identities, based on scientific knowledge and interpretation of the past. Nowadays, other, more effective media are involved in those processes, e.g. film, which is examined in the paper as such a medium. Also, museums and media have been used for spreading different prejudices and stereotypes – some of our identities are often based on such preju-dices, either about our own or somebody else’s past or present. Nevertheless, museum as an institution has an aura of highest authority, based on scientific knowledge and legitimized by museum collections. Museum is seen as trustworthy, unbiased and objective. Such privileged status of museums is argued and contested, and the complexities of museum discourse are traced through critical analysis of the current policy of the American Museum of Natural History in New York and this muse-um’s participation in the production of a movie Night at the Museum (2006. As part of a “global village,” museum visitors are impacted by certain stereotypical images circulating within and outside of museums, which are a dense package of ideas (rooted in science, folklore, ide-ology, politics, etc. that thrive in cultural memory and collective imagination. These are constructed and circu-lated as commonsense or consensus narratives, en-trenched in the minds of the public, and they can take hold persistently against current scientific opinions. Mass media images that museum visitors bring with them to the museum are inevitably shaping their inter-pretations of exhibitions. What happens then, when a museum gets involved with Hollywood industry? What are the consequences of such an interaction? This pa-per’s aim is to shed some light on those consequences in the particular case of the AMNH.

  13. Still Invisible? Women artists in British public collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Montfort

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Does women's work in British public collections receive curatorial care and scholarly attention? And if or when it does not—when it lingers on the darkest racks of museums stores, collected for a posterity it will never achieve—how has this happened, and why? Or should we be especially concerned about the display of women’s work in public collections, in an age of digital images and online archives?

  14. The cost of a visit to the museum: Analysis of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Author of the article “The cost of a visit to the museum: Analysis of a survey” analyzes the results of a survey of visitors conducted from July 26 to August 15, 2012 at three national museums – the National Museum of Ethnography and Natural History, the National Museum of Fine Arts, and the National Museum of History of Moldova, as well as at the Natural and Cultural Reserve “Old Orhei” and the Pushkin House Museum in Chisinau. There has been used a questionnaire consisting of 12 questions. After analyzing the social status and occupation of the respondents, after determination of the reason for visiting the museum, systematization of data on the degree of satisfaction and the views on the entrance fees, the authors of the study concluded that these five museums’ visitors willing to pay for access to the museum from 13 to 28 MDL, but only if this visit can meet their informational and emotional needs. The public requires a high standard of information, a lot of respect from museum staff, a certain atmosphere of relaxation and a treatment that satisfies all expectations. Regardless of social class, occupation, age, way of perceiving the museum institution, and the level of satisfaction, all respondents consider that the price of the entrance ticket should be increased. The survey results show that the museums do not attract tourist groups, indicating that the organizers of tours do not include museums in tourist routes. The authors consider that research to the public should be on the agenda of each museum in order to discover the needs and wishes of their visitors and to meet these requirements as best as possible.

  15. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  16. Paleontological museums and geoethics

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Manni

    2012-01-01

    Paleontological museums should adopt a code of ethics in order to carry out restorations and to set-up exhibits without any falsification. Indeed, alterations can often be voluntary because an exhibit needs to be ‘beautiful’, ‘realistic’ or ‘charming’ for the public. Therefore, the reconstructed parts are painted and then ‘soiled’ artfully to look more realistic. An incomplete skeleton might be completed by reconstructing the missing bones, or by adding casts of other bones. Sometimes skeleto...

  17. National Museum of Military History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nicolaides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractions such as military history museums which exhibit a wide range of important historical artefacts are fundamental sub-elements in any tourism systems, and yet their study suffers from lack of theoretical depth. Military history is an integral element of the history of any nation and countless varieties of tourists both local and international, visit military museums whenever the opportunity presents itself because museums are generally stimulating places of interest. This article focuses predominantly on international tourists visiting the Ditsong National Museum of Military History. In addition to the interest that such museums generate, they play a key role as the organizational foundation stones of modernity. It is via their many interesting exhibits that museums enlighten us about the past that intrinsically highlights its distance from the present era. Museums also selectively reconstitute aspects of history and in so doing alienate many artefacts from their original context and yet manage to impart deep understanding of events that shaped the modern world. Museums of all types thus impart knowledge and have a wide range of tales to tell concerning the many and diverse assortments of objects they hold. National pride is an obvious reason for having a military museum where the comprehensive display of military equipment is exceptionally unique while exhibition halls also offer an educational narrative of a nation’s history. What is also of interest to many visitors is the type of research that is carried out in a multiplicity of ways. The huge global growth in tourism in recent years has contributed to many museums radically altering their exhibits in both content and manner of exhibition. This is significant given the reciprocal impact that museums and tourism have on one another. The attractions in museums are regarded by many to be central to the tourism process and these are very often the main reason for many tourists visiting

  18. Use of major ion and stable isotope geochemistry to delineate natural and anthropogenic sources of nitrate and sulfate in the Kettle River Basin, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Leslie; Hutcheon, Ian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2015-11-01

    The Kettle River Basin in South central British Columbia (Canada) is under increasing anthropogenic pressures affecting both water quantity and quality of surface waters and aquifers. We investigated water quality and sources and processes influencing NO3- and SO42- in the Kettle River Basin using a combination of chemical and isotopic techniques. The dominant water type in the Kettle River Basin is Ca-HCO3 with surface waters having total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations of Kettle River Basin. The presented data will serve as an excellent baseline against which future impacts can be assessed.

  19. Cultural mediation in museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  20. British Columbia : an alternative design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostergaard, P.

    2003-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation outlined the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines' approach to the electricity market. A brief overview of the electric system in the province was provided, examining capacity (primarily hydro based) and the utility sector with its public ownership. In British Columbia, 80 per cent of the electricity is generated by British Columbia Hydro (BC Hydro). The rates are based on cost of service. British Columbia's market is western North America. A comparison of monthly bills for several large cities, both Canadian and American, was displayed. The market reviews conducted in 1995, 1998, and 2002 were reviewed and the major recommendations discussed. The author identified the opportunities in the province, discussing natural gas and coal for electricity production, resource potential, demand, and private sector capacity. The challenges facing the province are: cost effective development of resources to meet energy demand; aging infrastructure, high reliability requirements and economic growth; evolving electricity market structure in the United States; and, monopoly. The transmission system was reviewed with reference to trade with the Pacific Northwest, flexibility and storage. The energy plan objectives for the future were presented, including low rates and public ownership, secure and reliable supply, more private sector opportunities, and environmental responsibility. The alternative market structure includes regulated market characteristics, access to trade, and customer focus. figs

  1. Absent Histories and Absent Images: Photographs, Museums and the Colonial Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Edwards

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on research in a range of UK museums, this paper explores the visibility and invisibility of the photographic legacy of colonial relations and the representation of the colonial past in museum galleries. It explores the conditions of the ‘invisibility’ and ‘disavowal’ of the colonial past in the historical narrative developed by museums, and the anxieties that cluster around such narratives in a postcolonial and multicultural society. The paper argues that the photographic legacy of the colonial past offers a way into those histories, but it is one that can only be realized through the critical engagement with photographs themselves and the work they might be made to do in museums. As an example, it examines the active and complex role of photographs played in the galleries of the British Empire and Commonwealth Museum, Bristol. It concludes that the failure of museums to integrate colonial pasts into their narratives has worked against the wider liberal agendas to which museums subscribe, and that photographic invisibility is both a symptom of and metaphor for the ‘invisibility’ of the colonial past.

  2. MoRE Museum. Ceci n’est pas un musée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Modena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article wants to discuss the nature of MoRE - a Museum of refused and unrealized art projects considering how and why it has been defined a museum, and the modalities through which it is inscribed in the current debate about museology. Doing so, I will try to analyze and consider a range of issues and themes that characterize the artistic research and the practice of contemporary criticism on visual arts, starting from the elements and activities that are considered essential to define an institution as a "museum", and are sanctioned by the ICOM - International Council of Museums [Seoul 2004] definition.

  3. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  4. Migration, Socially Engaged Museum Theme, and Why Slovenian Museums Successfully Avoid it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Perko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last year, the refugee crisis has turned into a human tragedy, in many ways resembling that of World War Two. The Mediterranean Sea, the highly praised Mare Nostrum, has become a horrifying collective tomb for countless people. Another consequence of war is also the destruction of historical urban centres, monuments, and other cultural heritage in so-called crisis areas – a destruction which has reached unfathomable proportions. Museums all across the world have actively responded to society’s needs. Their goal has been to encourage an open dialogue in our society, as well as alleviate fear of the unknown, and reduce the tide of hatred before it reaches world-shattering proportions. During the refugee crisis, it has become apparent that an intersocietal dialogue is both a necessity and a definitive imperative; without it, the society of the future cannot possibly be assured. Modern society has given museums the role of being a credible medium with a mission to communicate heritage contents. By using a metaphorical and metonymic language museums have an extraordinary social power and represent a bridge between science and modern society, between societies of the past and present, between the elites and marginal groups. The museum reformers of the second half of the 20th century were of the opinion that, despite many reorganizations, museums cannot serve the needs of modern society. This was the reason a new museology emerged that substantiates museums as a socially responsible institution. It equips that institution with specific theoretical knowledge that enables the conversion of heritage into a socially relevant communication of a nonverbal nature. The article theoretically argues for modern museum concepts and, using them, contemplates social responsibility in the inner workings of Slovenian museums. Contemporary museums or post-museums are institutions that carry out active social tasks. An engaged manner brings along social

  5. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  6. The Hybrid Museum: Hybrid Economies of Meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2013-01-01

    this article shows that there are two different museum mindsets where the second mindset leans towards participatory practices. It is shown how a museum can support a hybrid economy of meaning that builds on both a user generated economy of meaning and an institutional economy of meaning and adds value to both....... Such a museum is referred to as a hybrid museum....

  7. Pedagogy and Practice in Museum Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    How best might museums harness the interactive capabilities of online environments to provide active teaching and learning experiences for diverse learners and communities? How can museums engage learners in ways that encourage them to visit the museum in person and/or further explore online resources? What should be the role of the museum in…

  8. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  9. The Practicum Course Model: Embracing the Museum-University Culture Clash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Jennifer P.

    2016-01-01

    Museums and universities have natural connections. Yet with few exceptions, collaborations between them segregate each partner to its traditional sphere of activity. This article presents a practicum course model that blurs and overlaps the distinctive roles of the museum and university in productive and mutually beneficial ways. In particular,…

  10. Pedagogical Museum of Lamego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto DE JESUS ALMEIDA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pedagogical Museum of Lamego opened to the public in May 2014 and aims to be a space dedicated to the study of the school memory, because studying the past allows to know the different educational realities that have shaped the educational systems, over the times. The work of collecting, cataloging and exhibiting the collections found in other schools and donated by individuals have the particularity of being of the school culture. In this article, we intend to reflect on the particularities of the museology of education and its impact over neighbor communities and local development. Its composition, organization and dissemination represent the matrix of the history of education local and regional.

  11. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what a...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand.......This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...

  12. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    common good of the community. On the other hand, it is considered from the so called “three bottom” approach as also corporations and business companies have approached it. In a so called “three bottom” approach, museums’ pursuit for environmental, economic and social sustainability is related...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  13. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  14. DESIGNING A CONTEMPORARY ANATOMY MUSEUM: ANATOMISTS’ PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh. G. Kamath; Biswabina. Ray; Shakuntala R. Pai; Ramakrishna Avadhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: A research study was conducted in sixteen anatomy museums across India. Aim: The aim of the study is to have an integrated approach while designing a museum. Objective: The objective is to stress on the need to have a holistic approach while designing a museum so that that the museum is well planned and organised and has a huge sectional diversity that spans all aspects related to anatomy. Materials and Methods: All the museums were studied using a planned proforma that...

  15. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  16. KAZIMIERZ MALINOWSKI – MUSEUM PROFESSIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Radecki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Year 2017 marks the 110th birthday anniversary and 40th anniversary of the death of Kazimierz Malinowski. June 2016 marked half a century since he re-took the post of Director of the National Museum in Poznań. The circumstances in question require us to remember an individual who was of great merit to Polish museology and to the National Museum in Poznań. The title of this text paraphrases the title of an article by Kazimierz Malinowski Michał Walicki - museum professional, published in the “Muzealnictwo” magazine and devoted to a renowned art historian and researcher on Gothic art in Poland. Walicki is less known as a museum professional and even less as a mentor to Malinowski himself. However, if one attempted to determine the whole range of the activity of the latter using one word only, the term “museum professional”, rather disregarded today, seems to be the most capacious and adequate. It reminds about Malinowski in some of the most significant aspects of his activity, including the one as: 1/ a museum professional in the strict sense, but also a practician working in a museum and taking part in the life of this environment in the broadest meaning, 2/ a propagator of the social role of museums as institutions open to the general public, 3/ the long-term Director of the National Museum in Poznań, a visionary and a curator of the institution’s new programme. Malinowski was one of a few of the most important figures of the post-war museology in Poland. Today, he is almost entirely forgotten. Almost total absence of this name in today’s museum circles also results from an unsatisfactory state of research into his professional biography. Nevertheless, Malinowski’s activity, even only in the field of museology, as his second major field of activity was conservation, is still to be meticulously analysed. Therefore, many opinions presented below should be treated as suggestions and hypotheses, still to be further verified, given

  17. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse......Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  18. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  19. Affordances and distributed cognition in museum exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; May, Michael; Marandino, Martha

    2014-01-01

    consistent framework. Here, we invoke the notions of affordance and distributed cognition to explain in a coherent way how visitors interact with exhibits and exhibit spaces and make meaning from those interactions, and we exemplify our points using observations of twelve visitors to exhibits at a natural...... history museum. We show how differences in exhibit characteristics give rise to differences in the interpretive strategies used by visitors in their meaning-making process, and conclude by discussing how the notions of affordance and distributed cognition can be used in an exhibit design perspective....

  20. For British eyes only?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, L.

    1993-01-01

    Americans are learning about the history of their own nuclear weapons program from British documents released under the 30-year rule. In January, the British government released papers related to the 1958-61 U.S.-Soviet moratorium on nuclear testing and the resumption of U.S. testing in 1962. According to Solly Zuckerman, chief scientific advisor to the British Defense Ministry at the time, the United Kingdom had not appreciated that the nuclear weapons experts of the U.S. and U.S.S.R. used the two-and-a-half-year moratorium to plan the largest program of tests these countries carried out

  1. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...... and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...... that can be compared at a general level. Concrete examples will be used to discuss general issues such as the adaptive borders of lobby spaces and the counteracting effects of design. We suggest that the preliminary categorization provided here can form a foundation for further studies resulting...

  2. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  3. Marine Sediment-Derived Streptomyces Bacteria from British Columbia, Canada Are a Promising Microbiota Resource for the Discovery of Antimicrobial Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Williams, David E.; Wang, Xiao Ling; Centko, Ryan; Chen, Jessie; Andersen, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Representatives of the genus Streptomyces from terrestrial sources have been the focus of intensive research for the last four decades because of their prolific production of chemically diverse and biologically important compounds. However, metabolite research from this ecological niche had declined significantly in the past years because of the rediscovery of the same bioactive compounds and redundancy of the sample strains. More recently, a new picture has begun to emerge in which marine-derived Streptomyces bacteria have become the latest hot spot as new source for unique and biologically active compounds. Here, we investigated the marine sediments collected in the temperate cold waters from British Columbia, Canada as a valuable source for new groups of marine-derived Streptomyces with antimicrobial activities. We performed culture dependent isolation from 49 marine sediments samples and obtained 186 Streptomyces isolates, 47 of which exhibited antimicrobial activities. Phylogenetic analyses of the active isolates resulted in the identification of four different clusters of bioactive Streptomyces including a cluster with isolates that appear to represent novel species. Moreover, we explored whether these marine-derived Streptomyces produce new secondary metabolites with antimicrobial properties. Chemical analyses revealed structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including four new antibacterial novobiocin analogues. We conducted structure-activity relationships (SAR) studies of these novobiocin analogues against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this study, we revealed the importance of carbamoyl and OMe moieties at positions 3” and 4” of novobiose as well as the hydrogen substituent at position 5 of hydroxybenzoate ring for the anti-MRSA activity. Changes in the substituents at these positions dramatically impede or completely eliminate the inhibitory activity of novobiocins against MRSA. PMID:24130838

  4. Marine sediment-derived Streptomyces bacteria from British Columbia, Canada are a promising microbiota resource for the discovery of antimicrobial natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralyn S Dalisay

    Full Text Available Representatives of the genus Streptomyces from terrestrial sources have been the focus of intensive research for the last four decades because of their prolific production of chemically diverse and biologically important compounds. However, metabolite research from this ecological niche had declined significantly in the past years because of the rediscovery of the same bioactive compounds and redundancy of the sample strains. More recently, a new picture has begun to emerge in which marine-derived Streptomyces bacteria have become the latest hot spot as new source for unique and biologically active compounds. Here, we investigated the marine sediments collected in the temperate cold waters from British Columbia, Canada as a valuable source for new groups of marine-derived Streptomyces with antimicrobial activities. We performed culture dependent isolation from 49 marine sediments samples and obtained 186 Streptomyces isolates, 47 of which exhibited antimicrobial activities. Phylogenetic analyses of the active isolates resulted in the identification of four different clusters of bioactive Streptomyces including a cluster with isolates that appear to represent novel species. Moreover, we explored whether these marine-derived Streptomyces produce new secondary metabolites with antimicrobial properties. Chemical analyses revealed structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including four new antibacterial novobiocin analogues. We conducted structure-activity relationships (SAR studies of these novobiocin analogues against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In this study, we revealed the importance of carbamoyl and OMe moieties at positions 3" and 4" of novobiose as well as the hydrogen substituent at position 5 of hydroxybenzoate ring for the anti-MRSA activity. Changes in the substituents at these positions dramatically impede or completely eliminate the inhibitory activity of novobiocins against MRSA.

  5. Preservation of museum treasures; Museumschatten met zorg bewaard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijsse, P.M.D. [Wolter en Dros, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    1999-10-01

    In 1998 the new National Natural History Museum (NNM), known as Naturalis, in Leiden, Netherlands, was opened. Attention is paid to the applied indoor climate systems, in particular for the tower where the collections of animals, stones, minerals and fossils are stored under strict climate conditions.

  6. Belatedly hatching ornithology collections at the National Museum of Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigwart, J.D.; Callaghan, E.; Colla, A.; Dyke, G.J.; McCaffrey, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, summary details are presented for the ornithological collections of the National Museum of Ireland (Natural History) (NMINH). To date, new cataloguing efforts in collaboration with University College Dublin have documented close to 10,000 non-passerine bird skins and taxidermy

  7. Mapping Invitations to Participate: An Investigation in Museum Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Elsa Lenz

    2016-01-01

    This a/r/tographic inquiry delves into questions about participatory art museum practice, specifically seeking to understand the nature of invitations to participate. Utilising drawings, writing and mapping of embodied participation, questions of how individuals are invited to participate in various locations and how these invitations inform the…

  8. Cultures of Experimental Practice--An Approach in a Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, Peter; Muller, Falk

    2002-01-01

    Describes generations and experiences of an exhibition presented in Spring 1998 at the Oldenburg Museum of Natural History and Pre-History. Discusses the thematic leitmotiv of this exhibition which was to present experiments from the history of physics as a cultural activity. Describes how reconstructions of historical experimental set-ups were…

  9. Museums as spaces and times for learning and social participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A museum is valued according to its collections, communication and knowledge exchange with visitors (Primo, 1999. Museums should be in dialogue with the public, contributing to their development (Skramstad, 2004 and collective memory (Wertsch, 2004. Social interactions and working in participants’ zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1934/1962 play an important role in non-formal learning opportunities that take place at museums. The National Museum of Natural History and Science (Lisbon University offers weekly holiday programmes for children and teenagers, aiming at developing scientific literacy in intercultural and inclusive spaces and times, facilitating knowledge appropriation and social participation. We studied these programmes, assuming an interpretive approach (Denzin, 2002 and developing an intrinsic case study (Stake, 1995. The main participants were these children and teenagers, their parents, and museum educational agents. Data collecting instruments included observation, interviews, questionnaires, children and teenagers’ protocols and tasks inspired in projective techniques. Data treatment and analysis was based on a narrative content analysis (Clandinin & Connelly, 1998 from which inductive categories emerged (Hamido & César, 2009. Some examples illuminate participants’ expectancies, their engagement in activities, and the contributions of social interactions and non-formal education to the development of scientific literacy.

  10. Keien van helden. De maanstenen van Museum Boerhaave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad Maas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rocks of Heroes. The Moon Rocks of Museum Boerhaave After both the first successful manned moon landing in 1969 (Apollo 11 and the last one in 1972 (Apollo 17 the United States authorities donated small samples of moon rocks to the heads of state of other countries. However, not all of these samples were kept in a careful manner; quite a few even disappeared. I argue that this can partly be explained through cultural differences and misunderstandings between the United States and other countries about the nature and recognition of heroic achievements. This article's point of departure is the fate of the samples that were given to the then Dutch head of state, Queen Juliana. In turn, she donated these to the Dutch National Museum for the History of Science and Medicine (now: Museum Boerhaave, where they have been held in storage ever since, instead of being put on display.

  11. Museums as a venue for public health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2013-12-01

    Big Food: Health, Culture, and the Evolution of Eating broke numerous records for museum attendance, highlighting the public's appetite for public health. During its 10-month run at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, more than 120 000 visitors attended Big Food, including 25 000 students through the museum's public education program, an increase of 30% more than the average student attendance in the past decade. Big Food cost approximately $100 000 to build, comprising printed panels and objects, installation displays (e.g., custom-built cases to house such objects as sugar-sweetened beverages and healthy and diseased organs), temporary walls, video monitors, food products, and more. At less than $1 per visitor, this provided extraordinary public health value.

  12. Museums and Virtual Museums in Europe: Reaching expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Pescarin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of the domain known as “Virtual Museums”, as it appears after the four year project V-MUST.NET. It aims at describing the shift we are assisting in the museum perception and management, including how virtual museums are and can be integrated in exhibits, highlighting positive and negative elements. Visitors and curators expectations and possible answers are described, also referred to the “Keys To Rome” international exhibit example. It finally proposes new possible researches directions.

  13. [Three views from overseas: the museum as a setting for educational outreach in the sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praet, Michel; Davallion, Jean; Jacobi, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    During their first visit to Brazil, in 2001, Michel Van Praet, Jean Davallon, and Daniel Jacobi - French researchers in the field of museology - discussed the complex nature of the museum experience. Professor Van Praet underscores the unique character of natural history museums and offers an evaluation of his work as head of the restoration project at Paris's Grande Gallery of Evolution, inaugurated in 1994. Professor Davallon discusses the contribution of semiotics and reception theory in analyzing how an exhibit communicates and how meaning is constructed within it. Dr. Jacobi defines some characteristics of the dissemination of science at museums and points to problems encountered in achieving this end.

  14. The Effect of Protection Statuses on Protection-Use Balance: The Case of Zelve Open Air Museum (Nevşehir/Avanos)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNGÖR, Şenay

    2016-01-01

    Cappadocia, which is one of Turkey’s most important destinations by virtue of its natural, historical and cultural features, houses unique places within it. Having been declared an open air museum taking into account its natural structure and archaeological heritage, Zelve is one of the two open air museums in the region. Zelve Open Air Museum, which is a UNESCO World Heritage and situated within Goreme National Park, is at the same time a natural and archaeological site. These protection sta...

  15. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  16. Museum libraries: how digitization can enhance the value of the museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the museum library to enhance the understanding of the museum collection and the role of museum objects as cultural documents. For many reasons, this role is only partially fulfilled, if at all. This is because in practice the library and its museum are insufficiently

  17. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, Alice; Frankel, Susan; Goldman, Elizabeth; Streitburger, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation's museums. Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to…

  18. Modifying Memory: Selectively Enhancing and Updating Personal Memories for a Museum Tour by Reactivating Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Jacques, Peggy L.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Memory can be modified when reactivated, but little is known about how the properties and extent of reactivation can selectively affect subsequent memory. We developed a novel museum paradigm to directly investigate reactivation-induced plasticity for personal memories. Participants reactivated memories triggered by photos taken from a camera they wore during a museum tour and made relatedness judgments on novel photos taken from a different tour of the same museum. Subsequent recognition memory for events at the museum was better for memories that were highly reactivated (i.e., the retrieval cues during reactivation matched the encoding experience) than for memories that were reactivated at a lower level (i.e., the retrieval cues during reactivation mismatched the encoding experience), but reactivation also increased false recognition of photographs depicting stops that were not experienced during the museum tour. Reactivation thus enables memories to be selectively enhanced and distorted via updating, thereby supporting the dynamic and flexible nature of memory. PMID:23406611

  19. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  20. Fundraising Opportunities for Science and Technology Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Borin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the possibilities of private funding for a special kind of museums: science museums and technology centers. In the last years the economic crisis has impacted on the cultural sector, decreasing the public resources traditionally allocated to museums and arts and heritage in general. That has forced art professionals to develop alternative strategies to get the necessary financial support for museum’s activities. Although the crisis has affected also priva...

  1. Physics in the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  2. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  3. Accessibility Techniques for Museum Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anable, Susan; Alonzo, Adam

    Like other public institutions, museums strive to make their facilities accessible to people with disabilities, yet these same patrons may be hindered in their use of museum Web sites by electronic accessibility barriers. This presentation demonstrates that access was a primary design factor in the Virtual Museum Tour, part of the Web site of The…

  4. Design and Analysis of Virtual Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falquet, Gilles; Guyot, Jacques; Nerima, Luka; Park, Seongbin

    Using the same data, which could come from local databases or external sources, such as the Web, virtual museum designers can build different hyperspaces. It is possible that visitors would find some of them more useful than others. Virtual museums designers should be equipped with a tool by which various hyperspaces for virtual museums can be…

  5. Research and exhibition in a museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feen, van der P.J.

    1949-01-01

    If you ask the layman: “What is a museum?”, he will answer. “A museum is a display of objects, that have an aesthetic value or scientific interest; the scope of a museum is to improve the taste of the visitor, is to give him, by visual means, aesthetic or intellectual enjoyment, to satisfy his

  6. Beyond regress: museum records management in Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although museums are information centres, it has been observed that they do not have records manage- ment procedures, systems and programmes in place. The situation owes its existence to the absence of rec- ords managers in museums and a negative attitude towards records management issues by museum practi-.

  7. Presencing Culture: Ethnology Museums, Objects, and Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, William; Mungur, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Ethnology museums are pedagogical. As educators attempting to make sense of how museums teach about the world, the authors of this article are especially interested in how ethnology museums curate otherness through objects, texts, and spaces, and how these combine to present a narrative of others. Ellsworth has referred to this as the…

  8. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  9. A Unifying Curriculum for Museum-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povis, Kaleen E.

    2011-01-01

    There are over two dozen schools in the United States with the word "museum" in their names. However, the philosophy and pedagogy that tie these schools together is unclear. A consistent definition, criteria for classification, and a unifying curriculum to guide museum- schools is lacking. Yet, museum-schools continue to open across the country.…

  10. Beyond regress: museum records management in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although museums are information centres, it has been observed that they do not have records management procedures, systems and programmes in place. The situation owes its existence to the absence of records managers in museums and a negative attitude towards records management issues by museum ...

  11. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  12. A Study of Interactives in Virginia Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Museums have an important role to both educate the public and also to preserve museum objects for the future. These two responsibilities often conflict with one another. Museums continuously struggle in deciding what objects in their collection must be placed in permanent storage as opposed to being on display and being used to educate the public.…

  13. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection on...

  14. Shakespearean Intertexts and European Identities in Contemporary Black British Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Valdivieso, Sofía

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the presence of William Shakespeare as intertext in three recent novels by black British writers which deploy the work of the Bard as they explore British and European identities. Caryl Phillips's "The Nature of Blood" recreates an Othello-like figure who in early Modern Venice struggles to come to terms with his…

  15. the relationship between british war correspondents in the field

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lenovo

    This article chronicles the developing relationship between the press corps on the British side and British Military Intelligence during the Anglo-Boer War, particularly during the formal and non-guerrilla phase of the conflict. The article comments on the nature and composition of both the press corps and of the military.

  16. British Defense Policy: A New Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-14

    by the 15th century. It was soon to be followed by the discovery of the New World, Newfoundland fishing areas, and sea routes to the Far East during... Zanzibar , Borneo, Tanganyika, 65 Uganda, Mauritus, Malaya and Korea. 13 Defense spending actually reflected the ambitious nature of the British pursuit of

  17. Spitsbergen - Imperialists beyond the British Empire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, Frigga; Hacquebord, Louwrens

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the relationship between Spitsbergen in the European High Arctic and the global British Empire in the first quarter of the twentieth century. Spitsbergen was an uninhabited no man's land and comprised an unknown quantity of natural resources. The concepts of geopolitics and New

  18. The Museum of New Mexico and energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    There are unique indoor conditioning and energy management challenges in museums. In Santa Fe, the Museum of New Mexico (MNM) is located in a unique climate and must stay within utility expenditure limits allocated through the State government budget process, while handling valuable collections with specific environmental requirements. Adequate humidity for indoor exhibitions is the top priority for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Energy management systems (EMS) implemented by the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) in two MNM exhibition facilities avoid energy costs, but must be maintained regularly. Energy savings goals must yield priority in favor of maintaining proper indoor conditions. MNM is one of six Divisions within the State of New Mexico's Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA). The mission of OCA is to foster, preserve, and protect current and past expressions of culture and the arts, which are determined to be in the best interests of New Mexico. As a part of their mission, OCA is well-known for excellence in cultural collections, through MNM. MNM is comprised of the Museum of Fine Arts Museum of Southwest History Museum of International Folk Art Laboratory of Anthropology Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. There are eight separate physical facilities that house these operations, including administration. Behind the scenes, there are operational costs that must be managed carefully; the costs of heating, cooling, arid lighting the buildings that MNM uses are a part of this. EMNRD has assisted OCA in meeting its mission through the expertise of the Energy Conservation and Management Division (ECMD). ECMD is designated by the Governor as the State Energy Manager agency

  19. An Experiment in Museum Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Marguerite

    Various lesson plans for museum instruction were tested on fifth grade children of fair and high intelligence in an attempt to improve upon the "accepted method" of teaching, which was thought to be better suited to the child of low intelligence than to his abler classmates. The lesson plans tested were: (1) the accepted method…

  20. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter

    ethnographic museums to reconsider the relation between the front-stage and back-stage handling of objects. The paper will draw on observations from my ongoing research project on the role of objects in contemporary ethnographic exhibitions, and from reflections on an exhibition-in-the-making at Moesgård...

  1. Museum Archives: Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Catherine

    1983-01-01

    Brief history of American art institutions and records documenting their activities describes archival practices at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which was founded in 1805. Major principles of archival arrangement (provenance, original order) and research requests are noted. Draft guidelines for museum archives and nine references are…

  2. A Day at the Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Joy Alter

    2009-01-01

    The school field trip, once a supporting player in a well-rounded education, is slowly becoming endangered. Widespread budget cuts have made happily anticipated class trips to museums, zoos, and other cultural destinations increasingly scarce. A librarian may be able to rescue the field trip from extinction by transforming the school building into…

  3. Air Pollution in Museum Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main air pollutants relevant for preservation of cultural heritage objects. Air pollutants may originate from outdoor or indoor sources. Indoor sources include the emission of corrosive vapors from construction materials used for museum display settings. Air pollution may...

  4. Neue Lycaeniden des Leiderner Museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fruhstorfer, H.

    1916-01-01

    Einige Exemplare aus der Lycaena cleotas Guér.-Gruppe des Leidener Museums veranlassten mich das Material meiner Sammlung und meine Übersicht übe die Formen der Gattung Luthrodes, Iris 1915, pp. 47-49, nochmals nachzuprüfen. Bei dieser Gelegenheit fand ich, dass die unbedeutende Chilades laius Cram,

  5. Extraordinary fossils reveal the nature of Cambrian life: a commentary on Whittington (1975) 'The enigmatic animal Opabinia regalis, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale, British Columbia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek E G

    2015-04-19

    Harry Whittington's 1975 monograph on Opabinia was the first to highlight how some of the Burgess Shale animals differ markedly from those that populate today's oceans. Categorized by Stephen J. Gould as a 'weird wonder' (Wonderful life, 1989) Opabinia, together with other unusual Burgess Shale fossils, stimulated ongoing debates about the early evolution of the major animal groups and the nature of the Cambrian explosion. The subsequent discovery of a number of other exceptionally preserved fossil faunas of Cambrian and early Ordovician age has significantly augmented the information available on this critical interval in the history of life. Although Opabinia initially defied assignment to any group of modern animals, it is now interpreted as lying below anomalocaridids on the stem leading to the living arthropods. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  6. Extraordinary fossils reveal the nature of Cambrian life: a commentary on Whittington (1975) ‘The enigmatic animal Opabinia regalis, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale, British Columbia’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Harry Whittington's 1975 monograph on Opabinia was the first to highlight how some of the Burgess Shale animals differ markedly from those that populate today's oceans. Categorized by Stephen J. Gould as a ‘weird wonder’ (Wonderful life, 1989) Opabinia, together with other unusual Burgess Shale fossils, stimulated ongoing debates about the early evolution of the major animal groups and the nature of the Cambrian explosion. The subsequent discovery of a number of other exceptionally preserved fossil faunas of Cambrian and early Ordovician age has significantly augmented the information available on this critical interval in the history of life. Although Opabinia initially defied assignment to any group of modern animals, it is now interpreted as lying below anomalocaridids on the stem leading to the living arthropods. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750235

  7. Chronocentrism and British criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Criminologists display a largely unexamined propensity to ignore writings that are more than fifteen or so years old, with evident consequences for the public presentation and validation of expert knowledge. A citation study was combined with detailed observations from British criminologists to ascertain quite how that disavowal of the past was accomplished.

  8. Love British books 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Armenia is celebrating the 500th anniversary of the first printed Armenian book and the declaration of Yerevan as World Book Capital 2012 by UNESCO. Within the framework of festive events, the House of Artists Union hosted the exhibition 'Love British books' otrgnaised by the RA Ministry of Culture, together with the University of Northampton (UK).

  9. Geological collections of the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum (Leiden, The Netherlands): cultural heritage of the geosciences and mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler Prins, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    The role played by the geological collections of the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, the National Museum of Natural History, in documenting the developments in the Earth sciences in The Netherlands and abroad is discussed, as well as the influence exercised by the mining industry and former Dutch

  10. Analisa Minat Wisata Museum Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Solihat

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum is a collection of historical objects as evidence that should be known by the public, especially the new generation as a study of the history. In Bandung there are a number of museums including the Geology Museum, Asian-African Museum, Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Museum, Post Museum, Sri Baduga Museum, and Barli Museum. All six of the museum managed by the government and private parties. Until now the interest of tourists who come to the city of Bandung is just shopping, dining and tours of the city, it is not significant to the interests wisatawa education at the museum in the city of Bandung. Since 2014 Bandung many improvements done in various places, such as parks, Square Bandung, street like Braga as one of the attractions of the past, Dago, including the Asian-African region serve as a place Asian-African Conference ke- 50, it is one of the magnets increase the tourists to visit the city of Bandung. Increasing the tourists should have a great potential for the government of Bandung in increasing interest in the visit to the museum as a means of travel and history education. The purpose of this study was to identify how big tourist interest in visiting Bandung museums. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative method, while respondents in this study is that Bandung tourists, which is in the area of shopping area, culinary tours, and city tours. The results showed that the interest  Bandung tourists is very low in visiting the museum in the Bandung city.  Keyword : Tourism, Consumer Interest, Museum Tours

  11. [Proceedings of the VII international symposium 'Cultural heritage in geosciences, mining and metallurgy : libraries, archives, museums' : "Museums and their collections" held at the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum Leiden (The Netherlands), 19-23 May, 2003 / Cor F. Winkler Prins and Stephen K. Donovan (editors)]: The VII International Symposium 'Cultural Heritage in Geosciences' at Leiden: welcoming address

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiden, van der W.G.

    2004-01-01

    Naturalis, the National Museum of Natural History, is very proud of hosting this important symposium. The organizers made a right choice by selecting our museum for this expert meeting because our geological collections are famous. The collections (zoological, palaeontological and geological) are

  12. Norwegian supply of goods and services to the British offshore sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, M.; Noedland, S.I.

    1991-02-01

    Representatives from ten Norwegian companies in the offshore supplies industry were interviewed to explore the opportunities and barriers they had experienced in their effort to enter the British offshore sector. The interviews revealed that there are mainly four reasons why British sector is regarded as a favorable market: British sector is a natural homemarket, buyers operate both on the British and the Norwegian sector, the British sector can be a ''door-opener'' to the rest of the English speaking world, and finally the British sector is a market of considerable size. The companies had mainly encountered three types of barriers: British culture/communication problems, heavy competition from British suppliers, and protectionism. The report is concluded by summarizing what we believe are the critical success factors for entering the British sector. Directions for further research are also given

  13. [ANATOMICAL PREPARATIONS IN MUSEUMS A SPECIAL CATEGORY OF CULTURAL HERITAGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monza, Francesca; Licata, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The international debate on the issue of human remains in museums and on the ethical issues related to their exhibition stimulates reflection on the Italian anatomical collections and on their preparations. A definition of human remains or of anatomical preparation does not exist in the Italian legislation. The anatomical specimens in museums are protected by the laws of Cultural Heritage as part of public collections, but their status is not well defined. By their nature of human material they would in fact be considered as a special category of Cultural Heritage. Because they are part of a cadaver they can be regarded as res nullius, but since treated with special techniques they could also change their meaning and being considered a species nova. Finally, it reflects on the possibility of creating a museum in Italy composed by new anatomical preparations. The article outline the contours of a museological issue that deserves to be investigated in order to better identify the anatomical preparations and their management in museums.

  14. The Virtual Museum for Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Meteorites play a fundamental role in education and outreach, as these samples of extraterrestrial materials are very valuable tools to promote the public's interest in Astronomy and Planetary Sciences. Thus, for instance, meteorite exhibitions reveal the interest and fascination of students, educators and even researchers for these peculiar rocks and how these can provide information to explain many fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of our Solar System. However, despite the efforts of private collectors, museums and other institutions to organize meteorite exhibitions, the reach of these is usually limited. But this issue can be addressed thanks to new technologies related to the Internet. In fact we can take advantage of HTML and related technologies to overcome local boundaries and open the possibility of offering these exhibitions for a global audience. With this aim a Virtual Museum for Meteorites has been created and a description of this web-based tool is given here.

  15. Museum professionals meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, CERN organised a day of meetings attended by professionals from French and Swiss science museums. The poster for the Einstein exhibition that will open in Bern on 16 June 2005. Around thirty professionals from science museums, as well as representatives of France's Office de Coopération et d'Information Muséographiques (OCIM) and the Suisse Romande Réseau Science et Cité, congregated at CERN on 10th February with the purpose, among other things, of exchanging ideas and information on proposed exhibitions for the World Year of Physics. "We thought that it would be a good idea to start the World Year of Physics with a meeting at CERN that could provide inspiration for future exhibitions", explains Emma Sanders, Head of the Visits Service and Microcosm. Many scientific museums are trying to improve the way they cover contemporary science, and CERN is an ideal place to observe science in the making. Other goals of the meeting were to strengthen links between French and...

  16. Archaeology, museums and virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Pujol

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the idea that the virtual archaeological reconstructions seen in museums cannot be considered Virtual Reality (VR as they are based on an artistic conception of the discipline. The cause is to be found in the origins of Archaeology, which began in the 18th century and was closely linked to the History of Art. In the era of New Technologies, this concept has become both the cause and the consequence: determining the characteristics of VR from within the discipline, whilst simultaneously reinforcing the virtual reconstructions.To assess the relationship between VR and Archaeology, we must first establish a definition of Virtual Reality. Subsequently, we can take a brief look at the history so as to be able to understand the evolution of Archaeology and museums. This leads us to the analysis of some examples of VR in museums, from which we can gain conclusions on the current use of VR. Finally, we look at the possibilities for VR in terms of publicising Archaeology.

  17. The Museum as 'Dream Space': Psychology and Aesthetic Response in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mills

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the relationship between aesthetics and psychology through the idea of the museum as a ‘dream space’ in George Eliot’s 'Middlemarch.' It' 'begins with a discussion of Charles Dickens’s Amy Dorrit and Hilda in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 'The Marble Faun', two women who, like Dorothea Brooke, dream their way around Italian museums and the fragment-rich spaces of Rome. Pregnant moments of female subjectivity take place in museum spaces characterised by their oneiric qualities. Such fictional depictions extend Sheldon Annis’s notion of the museum as ‘dream space’, taking account of a variety of sleep states associated with the museum that include mesmeric trance and double consciousness. 'Middlemarch,' in particular, draws on contemporary psychological accounts of such phenomena developed by John Addington Symonds, Enaeas Sweetland Dallas and Frances Power Cobbe. Eliot’s depiction of Dorothea’s responses to the museum of Rome engages with theories of consciousness and debates about the nature of spontaneous, individual will. In 'Middlemarch' the creative potential of the unconscious mind is explored through the idea of the museum as a dream space.

  18. Insider view on contemporary Serbian museology and museum practices: Museums in Serbia - the commenced journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđan Radović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the Collection of papers (almanac edited by Dr. Ljiljana Gavrilovic (Ethnographic Institute, SASA and MA Marko Stojanovic (Ethnographic Museum, Belgrade, Museums in Serbia: The commenced journey, Beograd 2008

  19. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    and history museums. There is considerable potential in the development of experiences and in the communication of information customized to visitors in the museum apart from personally held information devices. The paper will present background research for developing solutions to a new media museum......The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...... primarily appeal to a strong individualised experience where the visitor views a PDA or similar, rather than experience the atmosphere and interaction of the room. In this context, there are several examples from practice and in the research literature of IT-systems for science centres, art museums...

  20. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  1. Marble Busts and Fish Fossils. The Catalog of the Museum of naturalia and artificialia at the University of Padua (1797).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The historical catalogs of the museum collections contain a wealth of information for historians seeking to reconstruct their contents, how they were displayed and the ways in which they were used. This paper will present the complete transcription of a draft catalog that was prepared in 1797 for the Museum of Natural History and Antiquities of the University of Padua. Conserved in the university's Museum of Geology and Paleontology, the catalog was the first to be compiled of the museum, which was established in 1733 thanks to the donation by Antonio Vallisneri Jr. of his father Antonio Vallisneri Sr.'s collection of antiquities and natural history. The catalog was compiled by the custodian of the museum, the herbalist and amateur naturalist Bartolomeo Fabris. It is of great interest because it provides a record of the number and nature of the pieces conserved in the museum at a time when natural history and archeology collections were still undivided. It also provides indications as to how such collections were arranged for display in the public halls of a university at the end of the eighteenth century. Based on this catalog, with additional information drawn from other manuscript and published sources and museum catalogs from the 1830s conserved in various institutes at the University of Padua, it is possible to reconstruct the contents and layout of a significant late 18th-century natural history collection.

  2. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from international...... research in museums and interaction design. We argue that play and mobility provide museums with ready-made structures and concepts which help them plan for visitor learning....

  3. Transmedial Museum Experiences: the case of Moesgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajares Tosca, Susana

    2016-01-01

    This article’s aim is to elucidate the uncertain ontological status of the transmedial museum experience, which I define as the aesthetic encounter of a user with the complex object that is the conjunction of historical artefact, informative label and fictional stories on different media platforms....... I combine a theoretical mapping of the concept of the transmedial museum experience with a case study of three transmedial exhibitions hosted by the Moesgaard Museum in Aarhus, Denmark....

  4. Occupational health and safety in medical museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhorpe, R N

    2008-07-01

    Medical museum collections provide challenges in occupational health and safety that do not become apparent in many other collections. During the recent development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, these challenges were addressed, following the guidelines of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations of the State of Victoria. This paper details these regulations and their necessary application in this specialist museum.

  5. A study of a museum-school partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojton, Mary Ann

    Partnerships between museums and schools never have been more important than they are today. Schools, especially urban schools, are facing challenges, including low student achievement and difficulty obtaining funding. Partners can help schools overcome these challenges by sharing educational and financial resources. Nearly 11,000 American museums spend more than $1 billion annually to provide over 18 million instructional hours for k-12 educational programs such as professional development for teachers, guided field trips, and staff visits to schools. Museums would seem like natural partners for challenged urban schools. Yet museums and schools struggle to establish and maintain effective partnerships. This study examined a partnership between a science center and an urban elementary school to provide additional knowledge and resources for those in the field to overcome these challenges in order to create relationships that help students. Using qualitative methods with interpretive descriptive purposes (Erickson, 1986; Glesne, 1999; Lincoln & Guba, 2000), the research design is based on several methods of data collection, including face-to-face, semi-structured interviews; observations; written text; and field notes. Participants in this study included students, parents, teachers, school administrators and museum educators. In addition, adult representatives of community organizations were interviewed to determine the impact of the partnership on the community. The study found that an effective partnership will have four basic elements: mutual goals, communication plan, key leader support, planning and research, and four interpersonal elements: personal responsibility, honesty, communication at the intimate level, and trust. Partners may have difficulty developing these to their fullest extent due to time limitations. No partnership is perfect. By creating strong interpersonal relationships, partners can mitigate challenges caused by limited basic elements and

  6. Museums and the Representation of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Winter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Museums are the cathedrals of the twenty-first century, in that they have filled the void left by the conventional churches as a site in which mixed populations of different faiths or no faith at all, of different origins and beliefs, confront and meditate on sacred themes – sacrifice, death, mourning, evil, brotherhood, dignity, transcendence.1 War not only belongs in museums; war dominates museum space in much of the public representation of history and will continue to do so. That being so, it is the task of war museums to persuade visitors to pose the question: how can war be represented? While there is no adequate answer to this question, museum professionals must try to answer it anyway with a large dose of humility. By avoiding the didactic mode, that is, that they know the answer and will present it to the visitors, they can perform a major public service. By admitting the magnitude of the problems inherent in trying to represent war, and through it, trying to represent the pain of others, museum directors and designers fulfil a critical social task. Knowing about war is the business of an informed citizenship, and museums are those sites where moral questions are posed, questions inevitably raised about war, questions about sacrifice, suffering, brotherhood, courage, love, recovery, transcendence. Museums enable visitors to pose these enduring questions, by converting war time into museum space.

  7. A rationale for a museum of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The museum of health is a place that presents health science and human body and any other subjects that can affect human health. In this museum visitors can learn the mechanisms and functions of human body and learn how to protect and take care of their bodies. They can also learn several diseases and their consequences on human body and how to fight against them. This museum is a big step for improvement of general society health level by increasing society’s health knowledge. In this article structure, departments and also benefits of the health museum are evaluated.

  8. What are museums for? - Revisiting “Museums in a Troubled World”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Janes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on the present situation in the Nordic museum scene, entailing economic pressures and restructuring, this article introduces the thoughts and ideas of Canadian museum expert and author, Robert R. Janes, to put things in perspective. After revisiting the 2009 book “Museums in a Troubled W...

  9. Practitioners and Practices in Museum Education: The Case of Three Jewish Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Yaara Shteinhart

    2011-01-01

    As Jewish museums are witnessing a rapid numerical rise in the United States and beyond, the professional and academic literature on Jewish museum education lags behind. This dissertation is aimed to help narrow this gap by examining how the education departments of Jewish museums in the United States conceptualize, promote, and conduct programs…

  10. ‘The Rhino Horn on Display Has Been Replaced by a Replica’: Museum Security in Finland and England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Grove

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums are an integral part of the cultural life of societies. As well as having intangible value, many collections may also have considerable financial value and present a temptation to thieves. Furthermore, threats exist from accidents, natural disasters, and vandalism, among many other risks that have to be taken into account when building up museums security measures. In recent years, high-profile art thefts from museums and even, regrettably, acts of terror have drawn attention to the vulnerability of museum institutions as sites of crime and catastrophe. In particular, balancing visitor enjoyment and accessibility of the exhibits with security can be difficult for many. Despite awareness of these concerns, museums security remains to date under-represented in museological discourses, perhaps in part because of its perceived pragmatic nature. Another reason may be the difficulty of discussing in a meaningful way information that is often confidential and sensitive. In this paper, based on research carried out in Finland and England, we aim to analyse some of the key issues for museums security, which, whilst observed in northern European settings, also have relevance for museums globally. We set this discussion against the backdrop of ethical considerations and present our methodology for gathering the data and for discussing our results in a way which is both sensitive to confidentiality issues and still of use to the wider security, museums, and cultural heritage sectors.

  11. Critical Culture: Environmental Adult Education in Public Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lorraine; Clover, Darlene E.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores how museums, as educational and cultural institutions, can become agents of socioecological transformation. The ideas of critical museum studies and environmental adult education are reviewed, and three examples of environmental adult education in museums are discussed.

  12. Irish Sea: British radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Aongus

    1985-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) have recently taken the decision to invest several hundred million pounds in reducing the discharges from the Sellafield reprocessing plant into the Irish Sea. This report outlines the history of the plant and its operation up to the present day and its plans for the future. The attitude of the Irish regulatory authorities and of the public to the radioactive discharges is presented and the incidence of Downs Syndrome and certain specific cancer types on both sides of the Irish Sea is discussed

  13. An early (1850) 'handwritten' shell exchange catalogue of the Leiden Museum, with notes on the collectors Rethaan Macaré and Tischbein

    OpenAIRE

    Bruggen, van, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    A ‘handwritten’ (lithographed) shell exchange catalogue of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden (The Netherlands), dated 1850 and containing 864 nominal taxa (861 molluscs and 3 brachiopods), is discussed in the context of the history of the museum. This catalogue must have been distributed in a limited edition to shell collectors interested in the exchange of specimens. Among the exchange partners of the museum were the well-known 19th century Dutch collector Lady (later Dowager) F...

  14. How Can Museum Exhibits Enhance Earthquake and Tsunami Hazard Resiliency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Creating a natural disaster-ready community requires interoperating scientific, technical, and social systems. In addition to the technical elements that need to be in place, communities and individuals need to be prepared to react when a natural hazard event occurs. Natural hazard awareness and preparedness training and education often takes place through informal learning at science centers and formal k-12 education programs as well as through awareness raising via strategically placed informational tsunami warning signs and placards. Museums and science centers are influential in raising science literacy within a community, however can science centers enhance earthquake and tsunami resiliency by providing hazard science content and preparedness exhibits? Museum docents and informal educators are uniquely situated within the community. They are transmitters and translators of science information to broad audiences. Through interaction with the public, docents are well positioned to be informants of the knowledge beliefs, and feelings of science center visitors. They themselves are life-long learners, both constantly learning from the museum content around them and sharing this content with visitors. They are also members of a community where they live. In-depth interviews with museum informal educators and docents were conducted at a science center in coastal Pacific Northwest. This region has a potential to be struck by a great 9+ Mw earthquake and subsequent tsunami. During the interviews, docents described how they applied learning from natural hazard exhibits at a science visitor center to their daily lives. During the individual interviews, the museum docents described their awareness (knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors) of natural hazards where they live and work, the feelings evoked as they learned about their hazard vulnerability, the extent to which they applied this learning and awareness to their lives, such as creating an evacuation plan, whether

  15. Colonial museology and the Buddhist chronicles of Sri Lanka: agency and negotiation in the development of the palm-leaf manuscript collection at the Colombo Museum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sweet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The roles of colonial museums in South Asia have been understood in terms of the dissemination of museology within the British Empire. This has often underplayed the participation of local intellectuals in the formation of museum collections, and thus has not recognized their agency in the creation of knowledge and of longstanding cultural assets. This article addresses this in part through an historical case study of the development of the palm-leaf manuscript collection at the Colombo Museum in nineteenth century Ceylon. The article focuses on the relationships between Government aims, local intellectuals and the Buddhist clergy. I argue that colonial museology and collecting activity in Ceylon ought to be understood as a negotiated process and a number of reasons for this are discussed. This article contributes to an area of museological research that is exploring the roles of indigenous actors in colonial collecting and museum practice in South Asia and broader geographical contexts.

  16. Personalized Museum Experience: The Rijksmuseum Use Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Aroyo (Lora); R. Brussee; L. Rutledge (Lloyd); P. Gorgels; N. Stash; Y. Wang (Yanjing); J. Trant; D. Bearman

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes ongoing work exploring aspects of personalized access to and presentation of virtual museum collections. The project demonstrator illustrates an interactive approach to collecting data about museum visitors in terms of their interests in and preferences about

  17. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  18. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  19. Insights on a Museum's Distance Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Lynda

    2011-01-01

    In 1995 the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Education Department embarked on an experiment to see how videoconferencing technology could benefit educational programming. Since then it has blossomed into a robust full-time program that has become an important asset to both the Education Department and the museum as a whole. This article describes the…

  20. DIY Platform for Innovative Small Museum Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvi, L.; Vermeeren, A.P.O.S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a unique approach to designing museum experiences for small museums. This approach entails methods for end users and stakeholders to collaboratively design experiences without the direct involvement of design professionals, and a platform for embodying the required design

  1. Young people’s own museum views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortensen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning-making practi......Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning......-making practices adds theoretical and empirical depth to existing research and practice, we apply semantic categorization, speech-act theory, and cognitive linguistics as analytical tools. Our results demonstrate that respondents’ most prevalent semantic categories are ‘exciting,’ ‘educative,’ and ‘boring.......’ Their responses fall into two main types: assertive speech acts providing factual descriptions and expressive speech acts providing more evaluative judgments. In general, young Danes make sense of museums along three different routes. One group wants museums that expand and challenge prior perceptions...

  2. Multicultural University Education and Museum Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, G. F.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The specifics of the educational process in the museum are revealed. The experience of using the multicultural educational space of the museum for developing non-humanitarian directions of the university of general cultural competencies is expounded. The emphasis is on the formation of the ability to tolerate social, ethnic, confessional and cultural differences.

  3. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  4. Raising private investment funds for museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Tsjalle; Dolfsma, W.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors propose the notion of an "arts fund", a publicly traded investment fund for the purpose of acquiring increasingly costly art works to be displayed in museums. Public as well as private museums stand to benefit greatly from such an approach to financially supporting the arts. A

  5. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  6. Contemporary art museum and cultural mediation

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca Martina

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the role and importance of mediation activities with the audiences of the museums of contemporary art. The Italian experience face a growing interest and a wide variety of projects and proposals as well as considerable difficulties in identifying innovative ways of management of the museums' educational departments in accordance with the objectives and cultural policies of the institutions.

  7. Litteraturen og forfatteren på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels Dichov

    2016-01-01

    to the digital society and virtual representation. The role and strength of the author/writer and the importance of place and space in the mediation of literature are enhanced as distinctive for these kinds of museums. It is concluded that the ongoing growth of literary museums is both a result of and an answer......The article discusses the connection between literature and museum and the role of museums for the preservation and engagement with literary heritage. Based on an overview of research in the field and a discussion of definitions, distinctions, typology, and current forms of institutions, new...... developments in literary theory, i.e. new book history and the literary studies’ theories of geographic place, but also concepts of materiality, presence, performance and literary scenes, are brought in to explain different connections between literature and the museum and the supposedly dialectic relation...

  8. [Museums, science, and education: new challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Maria Esther; Cazelli, Sibele; Alves, Fátima

    2005-01-01

    The article discusses how the social role of science museums is shaped by scientific and technological endeavor, society's demands, and educational issues, above all in negotiations with a museum's audiences. The text also analyzes the trajectory taken by Brazil's science museums in their process of consolidation and the changes current society has imposed on these institutes. Communication has become the center of the discussion on museum culture, particularly in that it adjusts the educational aspect according to the conception of social practices, which are deemed fundamental resources. Lastly, the article examines the incorporation of the ideas of 'risk' and 'uncertainty', produced by science, into this new way of thinking about museums, which values the public and the communication processes.

  9. Museum Ullen Sentalu dalam Perspektif Seni Budaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doro Daniwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Museum merupakan tempat yang sering tidak bisa dilewatkan oleh wisatawan guna memuaskan rasa ingin tahu tentang keunikan dari sebuah kota tujuan wisata. Museum juga sering dikunjungi oleh baik para ilmuwan maupun para akademisi yang melakukan studi/riset/kajian tentang hal-hal yang memiliki nilai-nilai keunikan historis, arkeologis, estetis dan termasuk semua hal yang bernuansa memorabilia dan nostalgia. Ullen Sentalu merupakan museum yang agak unik karena di samping lokasinya yang agak jauh dari hingar bingar kesibukan kota, namun keberadaannya merupakan kebutuhan seni budaya perkotaan. Keunikan dari museum ini terletak pada nilai koleksi artefak-artefaknya yang menghadirkan khusus tentang benda-benda kewanitaan yang bernuansa warisan budaya monarki Mataram Lama yang berbeda dengan koleksi museum lainnya di tanah air.   Museum is a place where tourists are unable to easily neglect for satisfying their curiousity about the uniqueness found in the tourism destination cities.The museum is also commonly visited by artists, academicians, and scientists for their research and studies of variety subjects which discuss the values of historical, archeological, and aesthetic uniqueness, and any subjects that are concerned with those of memorabilia and nostalgic evidence. Ullen Sentalu museum is rather unique when we see the location in the ’remote’ area which is far from the frenetic bustle of the city yet its existence constitutes the needs of urban culture. The uniqueness of this museum lies on the value of artefacts collections which particularly bring the feminine objects nuenced the cultural heritage of the Old Mataram monarchy which are completely different from other museum collections in the country.

  10. Parent-Child Conversations about Evolution in the Context of an Interactive Museum Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtulman, Andrew; Checa, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The theory of evolution by natural selection has revolutionized the biological sciences yet remains confusing and controversial to the public at large. This study explored how a particular segment of the public--visitors to a natural history museum--reason about evolution in the context of an interactive cladogram, or evolutionary tree. The…

  11. From museum cases to the classroom: Emerging opportunities for specimen-based education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural history collections are one of the most powerful resources available for documenting the effects of changing environmental conditions on global biodiversity. Worldwide, more than 1.5 billion specimens are contained in natural history museums. These materials, collected over vast temporal and...

  12. Technology and the museum culture (Technika v muzejní kultuře

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Nekuža

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the purposes of this paper, I define technology as the society‘s constantly deve-loping activity focusing on manufacturing processes and related conditions. As such, techno-logy has always closely followed the society‘s development in general and the broadening of its scientific horizons in particular and it has always been inexorably tied to philosophy. The documentation of technology in a museum environment must be viewed as a part of the scien-tific effort which must be very well documented. Museums of technology emerged gradually as the society‘s interest in technology in general deepened in the Age of Discovery and the subsequent Industrial Evolution. In the historic lands of the Czech crown, the emergence of museums in general and technology museums is tied to the nationalist revival and the related expansion of education to a wider share of the population which is reflected in their nature and scope. The period of 1989 then sees a wider proliferation of technology museums to such extent that while a basic typology of such museums can be established, there are institutions of this type which are very difficult to classify and label.

  13. DIGITAL WORKFLOWS FOR RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE MUSEUM AFFANDI - A CASE STUDY IN CHALLENGING CIRCUMSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Herbig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate restoration of architectural heritage needs a careful and comprehensive documentation of the existing structures, which even elaborates, if the function of the building needs special attention, like in museums. In a collaborative project between the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and two universities in Austria (TU Wien and the Danube University Krems a restoration and adaptation concept of the Affandi Museum in Yogyakarta is currently in progress. It provides a perfect case study for the development of a workflow to combine data from a building survey, architectural research, indoor climate measurements and the documentation of artwork in a challenging environment, from hot and humid tropical climate to continuous threads by natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The Affandi Museum houses the collection of Affandi, who is considered to be Indonesia's foremost Expressionist painter and partly designed and constructed the museum by himself. With the spirit of the artist still perceptible in the complex the Affandi Museum is an important part of the Indonesian cultural heritage. Thus its preservation takes special attention and adds to the complexity of the development of a monitoring and maintenance concept. This paper describes the ongoing development of an approach to a workflow from the measurement and research of the objects, both architectural and artwork, to the semantically enriched BIM Model as the base for a sustainable monitoring tool for the Affandi Museum.

  14. Digital Workflows for Restoration and Management of the Museum Affandi - a Case Study in Challenging Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, U.; Styhler-Aydın, G.; Grandits, D.; Stampfer, L.; Pont, U.; Mayer, I.

    2017-08-01

    The appropriate restoration of architectural heritage needs a careful and comprehensive documentation of the existing structures, which even elaborates, if the function of the building needs special attention, like in museums. In a collaborative project between the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and two universities in Austria (TU Wien and the Danube University Krems) a restoration and adaptation concept of the Affandi Museum in Yogyakarta is currently in progress. It provides a perfect case study for the development of a workflow to combine data from a building survey, architectural research, indoor climate measurements and the documentation of artwork in a challenging environment, from hot and humid tropical climate to continuous threads by natural hazards like earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. The Affandi Museum houses the collection of Affandi, who is considered to be Indonesia's foremost Expressionist painter and partly designed and constructed the museum by himself. With the spirit of the artist still perceptible in the complex the Affandi Museum is an important part of the Indonesian cultural heritage. Thus its preservation takes special attention and adds to the complexity of the development of a monitoring and maintenance concept. This paper describes the ongoing development of an approach to a workflow from the measurement and research of the objects, both architectural and artwork, to the semantically enriched BIM Model as the base for a sustainable monitoring tool for the Affandi Museum.

  15. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Baum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and the L.A. Riots of 1991, with references to other cultural catastrophes. While these projects are different, they are not opposed; both museums locate the American perspective of events and their meanings at the forefront. American holocaust museums seem to challenge spaces between memory and its direction, vision and revision. Within the gruesome context of holocaust portrayal, interrogate the valences of memory’s play and expose American holocaust museums as theatres of pornographic memory. The seduction of feeling does not invite change so much as purgation, what Aristotle identified as catharsis — an emotional and physical release, unfortunately replicating the seductive techniques used by Goebbels for the glorification of Hitler. Through manipulation of viewers as automatic audiences, these museums function as centres for pathos I question the policy and polity of presenting genocide as an entertainment leading to catharsis, recognizing that the final act of purgation is all too easily negation.

  16. Virtual Science Museums as Learning Environments: Interaction for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfinger, Becky

    1998-01-01

    Explores the use of Web virtual science museums in the classroom. Discusses the educational advantages of using virtual museums for both students and teacher. Qualitative research shows that virtual museum visits can have comparable educational value to actual science-museum field trips. Lists and examines sites which support classroom…

  17. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  18. The Onomastic Octopus. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Activities and information needs in museums and a project undertaken by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum to develop systematic solutions to problems in cataloging museum collections are described. Museum activities are grouped in three categories: (1) initial--acquisition, accession, registration, identification, and restoration; (2)…

  19. Museum Information System of Serbia recent approach to database modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilović, Goran

    2007-01-01

    The paper offers an illustration of the main parameters for museum database projection (case study of Integrated Museum Information System of Serbia). The simple case of museum data model development and implementation was described. The main aim is to present the advantages of ORM (Object Role Modeling) methodology by using Microsoft Visio as an eligible programmed support in formalization of museum business rules.

  20. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  1. Graduate Museum Studies Curricula: Meeting the Needs of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William Frank

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how graduate museum studies programs are meeting the current and anticipated future needs of the museum profession. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge and skills most emphasized in graduate museum studies curricula and those most valued by leading museum practitioners. A total…

  2. Museums And Young People: The Heritage Of Pride | Onyebinama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the origin of museum, its brief history in Nigeria , its meaning, types, need for museums and the relationship between museums and libraries. It specifically addresses the issue of young people and museum which is the heritage of their pride. The paper also discusses factors/problems which may ...

  3. The Flipped Museum: Leveraging Technology to Deepen Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Michelle H.; Kotecki, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The Flipped Museum is an innovative model in which high school students engage in online learning before and after a museum experience at the North Carolina Museum of Art. This model, inspired by the "flipped classroom," inverts the delivery and application of knowledge in a museum setting. Beginning with an overview of the pedagogical…

  4. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of a museum. 1180.2 Section 1180.2... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Definitions and Eligibility § 1180.2 Definition of a museum. For the purpose of this part: (a) Museum means a public or private nonprofit...

  5. The Expectations of the Visually Impaired University Students from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyurgan, Serap

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what the visually impaired students already know about museums, how museums contribute to their learning and what those students expect to gain from their visits to the museums in Turkey and thus, to enable them to have more valuable experiences. For this purpose, a visit to the Museum of Anatolian…

  6. Provincial land use planning in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, W.

    1998-01-01

    The efforts being made to include Aboriginal communities in land use planning in British Columbia are discussed. British Columbia is in the midst of historic changes with respect to land and resource allocation, use and management. Historic trends in land use allocation and management are contrasted with land use planning and resource management of today. The impact of provincial government moves to double park space within the province, and the Protected Areas Strategy initiative will have on the natural gas and petroleum industry is discussed. New efforts being made to include First Nations directly in land use planning discussions in ways that do not prejudice treaty negotiations, are reviewed. Creation of a new Oil and Gas Commission in the Fort St. John area, is cited as the most recent example of the interconnections between First Nations communities and other public and industry stakeholders in land use planning in the province

  7. Museums & Mermaids: Bringing Climate Literacy to the Party

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillinger, D.

    2014-12-01

    If science is for everyone, then it needs to be taught in environments that are welcoming to people who may not feel at home in a traditional classroom. A team of scientists and educators at the American Museum of Natural History have developed a new course, Our Earth's Future, which prepares participants to contribute intelligently and fluently to informal "cocktail party" conversations about climate and climate change. The course, taught after hours at the museum, culminates in an actual cocktail party in one of the museum's halls where participants can practice their skills. Participants' knowledge of climate change and attitudes towards climate change were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed before and after the two five-week course sessions.Climate literacy can also be included in existing events that are not obviously science-focused. Venues such as festivals, galleries, and underground art parties may be willing to broaden their definition of culture to include science - but only if they are asked. Given the increase in public discourse around the topic of climate change, there is an opportunity to reach people who wouldn't attend a formal science lecture, but might attend a film screening or a fundraiser that had some scientific content. Qualitative audience assessments done after the annual "Mermaid Lagoon," a fundraiser for ocean related causes that includes a scientific segment along with dance and theatrical performances, show increased enthusiasm and support for climate science when it is presented in a relevant, fun, and non-intimidating manner.

  8. A sustainable storage solution for the Science Museum Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leskard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Museums in recent years have sought ways to reduce the environmental impact of their operations. One approach has been to look at ways to cut back on the energy required to stabilise storage conditions, particularly relative humidity, through passive moisture control rather than mechanical systems of heating and air conditioning. To this end the Science Museum Group employed hemp in the form of hemp-lime concrete, to construct a new storage facility for its collections, drawing on research into the buffering ability of hygroscopic natural building materials. The objective was to reduce energy use, to decrease reliance on mechanical systems and to produce very stable levels of relative humidity, in order to ensure the preservation of significant heritage collections. Although a prototype, to date, this building has performed as anticipated despite some initial construction snags and mechanical system malfunctions. The results encourage further investigation into hygroscopic construction materials to design even more energy-saving ways of providing stable storage conditions for museums.

  9. Creation and typology definition of the museum on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2010-06-01

    Through advancing new technology, perspective of museum institution and museum profession is changed. The content analysis and analyze of used terminology by online users will show us which term is the most used between frequently used terms such are: online, electronic, Web, Internet, digital, virtual and cyber museums. This scientific paper suggests that online users don't differ mentioned terms while they search for museums on Web. Using the appropriate 'prefix" in order to better describe the typology of a museum on the Web is the first step in designing the future of the museums and certainly encourages serious approach in to the study of the new museum "entities".

  10. An early 'handwritten' shell exchange catalogue of the Leiden Museum, with notes on the collectors Rethaan Macaré and Tischbein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    2013-01-01

    A ‘handwritten’ (lithographed) shell exchange catalogue of the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden (The Netherlands), dated 1850 and containing 864 nominal taxa (861 molluscs and 3 brachiopods), is discussed in the context of the history of the museum. This catalogue must have been

  11. The Scan4Reco Virtual Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Tsita; Anastasios Drosou; Anastasia Karageorgopoulou; Dimitrios Tzovaras

    2017-01-01

    The EuroVR conference, organized by the EuroVR Association, hosted the Scna4Reco Virtual Museum to its Demo track from 12th to 14th of December, at the Laval Virtual Center. Professionals and Researchers from Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality (VR/AR/MR) field had the opportunity to interact with the Virtual Museum, share ideas and give feedback. The audience was enthusiast by the possibilities of such museum, while testing navigation system and manipulating 3D scanned objec...

  12. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    promotion in the city-state. The tourism authorities in Singapore have found that the city destination has become too modern and western for many tourists, and the destination has embarked on a campaign to make Singapore more oriental. The creation of the museums is one strategy to orientalize Singapore......; these museums assert different layers of Singapore's oriental identities. Each museum appropriates the tourist orientalist imagination in different ways. This paper argues that the orientalist imagination can be understood as a set of knowledge resources for the construction of local identities to enhance...

  13. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  14. The Kassák Museum: the museum of the Hungarian avant-garde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Sasvári

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kassák Museum is the only site in Hungary which devotes its research to the historical avant-garde. It defines itself as the contemporary museum of the Hungarian avant-garde, and as such, has a broad-based approach to the subject, from the points of view of several academic fields and contemporary art. The Museum addresses the contradictions and tensions that arise when researching and presenting the avant-garde in a museum setting. It simultaneously applies both historical and contemporary viewpoints in presenting its theme. Exhibitions based on historical research also involve the work of contemporary artists, just as the work of contemporary artists exhibited in the Museum reflects on Kassák’s oeuvre and issues of historical modernism and the avant-garde. The Museum examines the issues of the Hungarian avant-garde from an international perspective and through interdisciplinary research.

  15. [The personal context of a museum experience: similarities and differences between science and art museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Adriana Mortara

    2005-01-01

    The article focuses on the development of research that illuminates not only the socioeconomic profiles of museum visitors and non-visitors but also their cultural habits, general entertainment interests, and their perceptions of art, science, and other topics addressed at these institutes. The more we know about a visitor's personal context, the more we can enhance his or her museum experience, thereby encouraging further museum visits during which his or her expectations, wishes, and needs will be more fully met. The article also focuses on how local culture plays an important part in shaping both personal context as well as each museum experience. Some examples are provided from the literature, above all concerning studies in Brazil and the contributions that research at art museums may have for science museums.

  16. New initiatives in the Netherlands Open Air Museum: how an early open air museum keeps up with the times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands Open Air Museum in Arnhem is one of the oldest open air museums of Europe. From the 1990s the staff has been engaged in an intense process of fundamentally changing the museum. The major step was to redefine the museum’s institutional identity. We believed that a good museum not only

  17. Museum as a space of relaying the cultural memory. Researching of Jewish modern museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprunchuk Oleksandra Pavlivna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the phenomenon of the museum as an important institution of saving and relaying the collective memory of nation, as the semantic space that has reinterpreted the historical heritage through the prism of the modern worldview foundations. This role of the museum institution and its actuality for society was visually researched through the analysis of projects of the Jewish modern museums that put the Holocaust in the centre of their attention.

  18. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Arta Moro Sundjaja; Ford Lumban Gaol; Sri Bramantoro Abdinagoro; Bahtiar S. Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebo...

  19. British Nuclear Fuels (Warrington)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, D.; Cryer, B.; Bellotti, D.

    1992-01-01

    This adjournment debate is about British Nuclear Fuels plc and the 750 redundancies due to take place by the mid-1990s at BNFL, Risley. The debate was instigated by the Member of Parliament for Warrington, the constituency in which BNFL, Risley is situated. Other members pointed out that other industries, such as the textile industry are also suffering job losses due to the recession. However the MP for Warrington argued that the recent restructuring of BNFL restricted the financial flexibility of BNFL so that the benefits of contracts won for THORP at Sellafield could not help BNFL, Risley. The debate became more generally about training, apprentices and employment opportunities. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Energy explained the position as he saw it and said BNFL may be able to offer more help to its apprentices. Long- term employment prospects at BNFL are dependent on the future of the nuclear industry in general. The debate lasted about half an hour and is reported verbatim. (U.K)

  20. 1970 British Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70 is one of Britain’s world famous national longitudinal birth cohort studies, three of which are run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London.  BCS70 follows the lives of more than 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Over the course of cohort members lives, the BCS70 has collected information on health, physical, educational and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors. Since the birth survey in 1970, there have been nine ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38 and most recently at 42. Data has been collected from a number of different sources (the midwife present at birth, parents of the cohort members, head and class teachers, school health service personnel and the cohort members themselves. The data has been collected in a variety of ways including via paper and electronic questionnaires, clinical records, medical examinations, physical measurements, tests of ability, educational assessments and diaries. The majority of BCS70 survey data can be accessed by bona fide researchers through the UK Data Service at the University of Essex.

  1. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Moro Sundjaja

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebook group managed by museums or communities. Based on the demographic profile of respondent, the researchers discover that the respondents are highly educated, work as employees or student, and allocate more than Rp500.000,00 per month for traveling expense. Based on social media behavior of the respondents, the respondents are active using Facebook and not aware of the presence of museum in social media. The respondents require museum information, social interaction, and entertainment on Facebook fan page of the museum. Therefore, museum managers must maintain the content quality and perceived usefulness in delivering the information through Facebook. The involvement of cultural community can help people to get honest information about museum through credible opinion from the respondents.

  2. Clothing Benefits Sought: The Case of British Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syadiyah Abdul Shukor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore British Muslims’ clothing benefits sought. Qualitative research was conducted through interviews to explore British Muslims’ clothing consumption. Following this, quantitative research was undertaken by means of a web based survey questionnaire with 30 items referring to clothing benefits sought. The usable questionnaire consisted of 222 respondents. Data analysis includes descriptive analysis, reliability and exploratory factor analysis. Six factors derived underpinned the clothing benefits sought among British Muslim consumers: “self congruity”, “social status”, “modesty”, “conformity”, “uniqueness” and “personal identity”. This study is the first one to explore clothing benefits sought among Muslim consumers in particular in the UK. This research was exploratory in nature and employed a non probability sampling method. The study provides a useful source of information, which can be used by UK high street fashion retailer regarding clothing benefits sought among British Muslim consumers in the UK.

  3. D Visualization for Virtual Museum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamantzari, M.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  4. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    museums have looked at sustainability inasmuch industries or commercial businesses and have adopted ‘sustainability charts’ as a tool to green-wash their policies and try to provide a different cultural offer. Their approach has been ‘three-bottom’ and has focused on the economic, environmental and social...... aspects this value brings in management. However, art museums have left beside the analysis of sustainability in regards to their cultural policies and internal managerial organization. Though European museums have proposed sustainability strategies in the collection management (brand franchising......, disposal of the collection, networks and partnerships with museums and business companies), they have not considered yet the chance to revise their bone structure inspired by sustainability principles and approaches. This shift in perspective may change the processes the artworks are documented...

  5. A Checklist of Legal Considerations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Stephen E.

    1980-01-01

    A checklist for museum compliance with federal, state, and local laws covers administrative organization, general endowment and restricted funds, trustees, staffing and employment practices, volunteers, acquisition and disposition, exhibition programs, visitors and membership, auxiliary activities, building, and miscellaneous regulations. (MSE)

  6. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  7. 3D VISUALIZATION FOR VIRTUAL MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skamantzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  8. The Lenin Museum in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinenskii, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    New developments in the work practices of school Lenin halls and museums are observed. Emphasis is increasingly on the integration of these centers for ideological and political indoctrination and the educational process. (KM)

  9. The Caryatids in the New Acropolis Museum: Out of Sight, Out of Light, Out of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Beresford

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the display of the iconic Caryatids in the New Acropolis Museum has been seriously compromised by the overriding desire amongst Greek politicians and heritage professionals to use the museum to reinforce their long-standing request for the return of the Parthenon Marbles. In designing a museum geared primarily to achieving the repatriation of the sculptures taken from the largest of the temples on the Athenian Acropolis, the museum’s architect has ensured that these marbles were presented within sight of their former monumental home, exhibited in a manner that imitates the architectural layout of the Parthenon, while the large windows of the museum allow vast amounts of natural light to illuminate the marbles. By contrast, the five Caryatids that remain in Athens have been treated with considerably less respect for such restitutionist sensibilities. Displayed within the concrete heart of the museum, lacking views of the outside world, let alone to the Acropolis, and with limited access to direct natural light, the marble women are positioned with no consideration for their original alignment. The important functional role of the Caryatids as integral structural elements within the architecture of the Erechtheum is also poorly represented in the manner of their current museological display in Athens.

  10. Voices in (and around the Museum: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Holt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The voice already plays an important role in contemporary art. This introductory paper summarises a series of four sessions in which speakers explored the place of the voice in the museum context. It became clear that the voice not only offered richness in interpretation of and response to other museum artefacts but was itself an artefact meriting conservation  and interpretation.

  11. Instruction and Delight: Some Observations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    This paper assesses the work of artist-creator Walt Disney as a model for museum educators to draw the public into its work. Disney Land and Disney World are viewed as monuments of U.S. life and imagination, a living museum that attracts 40 million U.S. visitors per year. The paper describes what should be a partnership among the image-making,…

  12. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  13. [Theater in Brazilian science museums and centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leonardo Maciel; Marandino, Martha

    2015-12-01

    This qualitative research, based on a descriptive and exploratory study, examines how theater is used as a science communication strategy by Brazilian science museums and centers. Data was collected through a survey emailed to 24 Brazilian institutions identified as science museums and centers. Content analysis was performed, using cross-sectional thematic analysis. It was found that respondents' activities could be classified as approaching theater as an educational support.

  14. The Otolith Group’s “Monuments to Dead Television.” Independent Cinema and the Migrant Experience in Europe between Television and the Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ferrara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available “Monument to dead television” is the expression the British collective The Otolith Group uses to define its activity of recuperating long-lost quality films, and re-screening them in contemporary art museums and gallery spaces. What these films share is a cinematic vocation and a complex approach to the question of memory and migration in Europe, and to the role of images as testimonies or documents. This essay explores The Otolith Group’s interest in such forgotten archives of modern television in order to unearth their significance for contemporary museums today.

  15. War of the British Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercau, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    The 1982 Falklands War was shrouded in symbolism, bringing to the fore divergent conceptions of Britishness, kinship, and belonging. This article casts light on the persistent purchase of the idea of Greater Britain long after the end of empire, addressing a case that would normally be deemed...... outside its spatial and temporal boundaries. By highlighting the inherent contradictions of this transnational bond, the South Atlantic conflict had a profound effect on an underexposed British community with a lingering attachment to a “British world”: the Anglo-Argentines. As they found themselves...... wedged between two irreconcilable identities, divisions threatened to derail this already enfeebled grouping. Yet leaders of the community, presuming a common Britishness with the Falkland Islanders and Britons in the United Kingdom, sought to intervene in the conflict by reaching out to both...

  16. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  17. The first book museums in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  18. MEMORY AS A MUSEUM PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Kregar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current public discourse memory is among the most common words, concepts, and contents of a multiplicity of meanings, connotations and contexts. Besides personal memory, the interpretations of our past and consequently our present often include refer-ences of collective and historical memory. This termi-nology is particularly popular with politicians and pub-licists striving for a more colourful vocabulary, who often use the fore mentioned terms as synonyms. Scien-tific and professional circles are more conscientious at differentiating these terms, as their research focuses on studying the past and, consequently, on the role of memory or on the very process of remembering. Howev-er, within this corpus certain differences in the termi-nology and different views on the types and forms of memory do exist. In this paper, rather than psychologi-cal and sociological theories (by Maurice Halbwachs and others we focus on how we, historians, look on the vari-ous forms of memory, especially those historians who study (still "alive" 20th century. And who in their work, let it be research, teaching, or, like in my case - work in a museum, rely on both, individual memories and collec-tive memory to shape the historical memory of a com-munity or society. Although greater terminological clari-ty in this regard would be more than welcome, it is most important that we correctly identify the different forms and types of memory and its components and that we use them appropriately in our work - that is in research, understanding and interpreting our past or our history. Even more so because they often intertwine with each other, overlap, complement, and transform from one to another, or, sometimes even exclude each other. There-fore it is often difficult to clearly distinguish one from another and to deal with them separately. Historians working in the Museum of Recent History Celje are faced with these issues and problems on a daily basis; many specific

  19. Something unique: The Museum for Biodiversity in Panama City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Guzmán Verri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new Museum for Biodiversity in Panama City is our starting point to interrogate contemporary forms of articulation between the natural sciences, architecture, and the city. This article aims to analyze the project as a set of three powers: Gehry Partners’ architecture, Bruce Mau Design Office’s environmental graphics, and the Smithsonian Institute for Tropical Research’s scientific content in conjunction with the University of Panama. It also hopes to demonstrate part of Central America’s strategy, which is to singularize the local in the global.

  20. Collaborative Inquiry at a Children's Museum: Benefits for Student Learning, Museum Outcomes, and Faculty Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia Hrusa; Sparks, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This case study recounts a collaborative service-learning project involving a children's museum, a university faculty member, and undergraduate students. Students worked with the museum to conduct a visitor study examining community reactions to a new exhibit designed to promote children's health and nutrition. At the same time, students learned…

  1. "In and against the Museum": The Contested Spaces of Museum Education for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Sotiria

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on museum and gallery education for adults in Dundee, Scotland. Dundee has recently experienced a shift from being mainly working class to an educational, cultural and tourist centre. Hence, an interesting field for the examination of the educational policies and practices of the city museums/galleries and the different fashions…

  2. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to its community. MFA grants situate projects within a framework of meeting three strategic goals: engaging…

  3. In Search of Museum Professional Knowledge Base: Mapping the Professional Knowledge Debate onto Museum Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Museum professionalism remains an unexplored area in museum studies, particularly with regard to what is arguably the core generic question of a "sui generis" professional knowledge base, and its necessary and sufficient conditions. The need to examine this question becomes all the more important with the increasing expansion of the…

  4. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  5. Race, history, and black British jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Toynbee, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the history of black British jazz across five moments from 1920 to the present. It also makes a theoretical argument about the nature of race and its connection both with music and belonging to the nation. Race is indeed a musical-discursive construction, as has been argued in the literature about culture and ethnicity over the last thirty years or so. But it is a social structure too, and the contradictions that result are key to understanding the race-music relationship.

  6. [Harmful biological agents at museum workposts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skóra, Justyna; Zduniak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata; Rembisz, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of microbiological contamination of air and surfaces in museum premises with various collection specificities. In addition, the criteria for selecting indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts are proposed. The analysis of microbial contamination was carried out in 14 museum premises (storehouses, restoration workshops, exhibition hall). Microbiological air purity was measured with a MAS-100 Eco Air Sampler. Surface samples were collected using contact plates RODAC Envirocheck. Biochemical API tests were used to identify bacteria and yeasts. Fungi were diagnosed with taxonomic keys, based on macro- and microscopic mycelia assessment. The levels of microbiological contamination in museums varied and ranged from 2.1 x 10(2) to 7.0 x 10(3) cfu/m3 in the air and from 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.7 x 10(4) cfu/100 cm2 on surfaces. The dominant microorganisms were fungi, which accounted respectively for 18-98% and 23-100% of all isolates from tested sites and surfaces. It was found that the amount of fungi in the indoor air of the Museum of Archeology and Ethnography and the Museum of Independence Traditions equaled respectively 4.2 x 10(2) cfu/m3 and 1.4 x 10(4) cfu/m3, which means that they exceeded the recommended reference value of 2.0 x 10(2) cfu/m3. Having analyzed the frequency of strain isolation, the source of microorganisms and the hazard to human health, 10 fungal species were isolated, which may be regarded as indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts. They are: Aspergillus (A. niger, A. versicolor), Cladosporium (C. herbarum, C. macrocarpum), Penicillium (P. carneum, P. digitatum, P. italicum, P. paneum, P. polonicum), Rhizopus nigricans.

  7. British-Zionist Military Cooperation in Palestine, 1917-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen M. Saleh

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the British military and security formula in Palestine was the smooth establishment of the Jewish national home with minimum costs of lives and money. However, this British pro-Zionist policy created a continuous security problem, and opened the door to all possibilities of Palestinian revolts and uprisings of both national and religious nature. The British were very active in disarming the Arabs and adopted stringent measures to crush their uprisings and revolts. But, they turned a blind eye to the Jewish arms smuggling and Jewish military organizations, especially, the Hagana, which later became the backbone of the Israeli Army. During Palestinian uprisings of 1920, 1921 and 1929 against the Zionists, most of the Palestinian casualties were inflicted by the British forces despite the fact that the Palestinians avoided attacking the British. The British-Zionist cooperation reached its peak during the Palestinian revolt of 1936-1939, and took different forms, including allowing the Jews to establish a military force of twenty two thousand men under the pretext of protecting the Jewish community.

  8. Learning at Workstations in Two Different Environments: A Museum and a Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Heike; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-01-01

    Our study compared the learning and motivational outcome of one educational approach in two different learning environments, a natural science museum and a classroom, drawing on studies about the effects of field trips on students' learning and motivation. The educational intervention consisted of an introduction phase in the classroom and…

  9. 77 FR 23497 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Benton County Historical Society and Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... the cultural items meet the definition of sacred objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated... County Historical Society and Museum, Philomath, OR, that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25... of Albany, the largest private collection of natural history specimens, Indian relics, and...

  10. Museum of Comparative Zoology Library--The Agassiz Library: Harvard University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Eva S.; Regen, Shari S.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the Museum of Comparative Zoology Library reflects the union between the nineteenth century natural history values of Louis Agassiz and the twentieth century library and information science methodology. Special collections, records, cataloging and classification, serials and their classification, policies, services, and procedures are…

  11. Energy efficiency in new museum build: THEpUBLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, G.; Yuen, C. H. N.; Zanchetta, M.; D'Cruz, P.

    2006-12-01

    The project MUSEUMS, awarded the Thermie Grant from the European Commission, has applied and tested new and innovative technologies for optimizing energy efficiency and sustainability in nine retrofitted and new museum buildings in Europe. The project will significantly contribute to the acceptance of innovative and renewable technologies in public buildings by demonstrating that retrofitted and new museum buildings can fully meet architectural, functional, comfort, control and safety requirements as well as achieve total energy savings of over 35% and reduce CO2 emissions by over 50%. THEpUBLIC will be a stunning and modern flagship building containing six storeys, with a total area of 11,000Âm2 of galleries for exhibitions, digital art and hands-on displays. In addition, there will be workspaces, creative spaces, retail opportunities, restaurant facilities, public areas, conference rooms and other multi-function spaces. Initiated by Jubilee Arts, the THEpUBLIC, designed by Alsop Architects, will introduce and engage its 400,000 expected visitors in the principles of energy and the environment through a display of art, education, technology and entertainment in the centre of West Bromwich, Sandwell. It will serve as a catalyst for urban regeneration within Sandwell.Battle McCarthy's key environmental design solutions for THEpUBLIC include natural daylighting, mixed-mode ventilation system with operable windows, low energy and maintenance cost systems, potential for integrating renewable energy collection systems, borehole water systems for cooling and water supply, an intelligent facade system with external shading and natural ventilation and night cooling systems.

  12. Teaching and Learning Scientific Literacy and Citizenship in Partnership with Schools and Science Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry; Quistgaard, Nana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring together research on learning and teaching in science – especially for scientific literacy and citizenship – with new insights into museum didactics in order to inform innovative ways of creating museum exhibits and visits and develop new ways of linking formal...... learning in relation to the questions of why young people should learn science and what kind of science they should learn. We touch upon issues of scientific literacy and citizenship, dialogical processes, the nature of science, and inquiry-based teaching among others. Secondly, we relate our reflections...

  13. Submission to the British Columbia government on the Kyoto Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    The Business Council provided its comments concerning the Kyoto Protocol and climate change to the government of British Columbia, recommending that a clear position be established quickly on the matter. The adopted position should also be disseminated broadly to allow stake holders sufficient time to prepare for the upcoming meetings of the Joint Ministers and First Ministers. The federal government has announced that the decision on whether to ratify the Kyoto Protocol will be made before the end of 2002, and this decision will have numerous effects on the people of British Columbia, businesses, workers, and consumers alike. The Business Council of British Columbia believes that the unique interests of the province can best be protected by a proactive approach. Actions plans are being prepared by several of the other provinces and territories, who have already stated their position concerning the Kyoto Protocol. The long-term risks of climate change for British Columbia have not been determined nor have the elements of a provincial approach. The following elements should be included in British Columbia's position on the Kyoto Protocol, according to the Business Council of British Columbia: (1) a credible and cost-effective implementation plan that does not unduly burden the province and other jurisdictions must be developed before Canada decides to ratify the Protocol. British Columbia should go on the record stating it does not support the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in its present form. (2) the province should advocate for a national approach to climate change that can be achieved within a reasonable time frame, reflects the long-term nature of the problem, and is in agreement with the economic development objectives of British Columbia, (3) a plan detailing how the province intends to deal with the growth of greenhouse gas emissions should supplement and support the position of the province on the Kyoto Protocol. Consumers and business should be engaged

  14. Hun vil invitere kulturens frække lillesøster på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackinney-Valentin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Interview with director of Denmark's Design Museum, Bodil Busk Laursen about the plans for opening a Danish fashion museum.......Interview with director of Denmark's Design Museum, Bodil Busk Laursen about the plans for opening a Danish fashion museum....

  15. Inhibiting the deterioration of plasticized poly (vinyl chloride)-a museum perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    materials in museums. Environments included a closed flask, freezer, with silica gel, activated carbon and Ageless ® oxygen absorber, at high relative humidity, on glass and in polyethylene bags. In addition, two naturally aged ‘objects’, also plasticized with DEHP and exhibiting deterioration, were......Plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) has been one of the most economically and technically important synthetic materials since the 1950s . Proportions of plasticizer in commercial PVC formulations range from 15% to 50% by weight. Examples of these various formulations are present in many...... international museum collections, in the form of protective clothing and footwear, inflatable furniture, cable insulation, toys, medical tubing and sculpture. Most plasticized PVC formulations are designed to function for less than 10 years; this is a concern to museums where all collections should be preserved...

  16.  A matter of motivation: Designing engaging interactive technologies for museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    and motivation when designing the digital museum installations. Our conceptualization of motives and motivation is based on Cultural-Historical Theory and especially the work of Vygotsky (1982) and Hedegaard (2002) as these perspectives capture the dynamics of motivation as it develops in context.......We explore the concepts of motivation and motives in relation to inform the design of digital interactive technologies for museum exhibitions. A central issue for museums is to create strong links between the subject matter knowledge and the everyday life of the children. Pursuing such an agenda...... spaces are more successful than others in spurring this engagement. We suggest that digital technology can potentially support this “double move” in which subject matter knowledge is naturally integrated into the children’s everyday life if designers take into consideration the hierarchy of motives...

  17. Interactive spatial multimedia for communication of art in the physical museum space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of three spatial multimedia techniques for communication of art in the physical museum space. In contrast to the widespread use of computers in cultural heritage and natural science museums, it is generally a challenge to introduce technology in art museums...... without disturbing the art works. This has usually been limited to individual audio guides. In our case we strive to achieve holistic and social experiences with seamless transitions between art experience and communication related to the artworks. To reach a holistic experience with minimal disturbance...... of the artworks we apply three spatial multimedia techniques where the only interaction device needed is the human body. The three techniques are: 1) spatially bounded audio; 2) floor-based multimedia; 3) multimedia interior. The paper describes the application of these techniques for communication of information...

  18. Future pest status of an insect pest in museums, Attagenus smirnovi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Åkerlund, Monika; Grøntoft, Terje

    2012-01-01

    The brown carpet beetle Attagenus smirnovi, Zhantiev 1973 (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) is an important pest of objects of organic origin in museums of cultural and natural history in Europe. Future climate changes are expected to lead to increasing temperatures, which will affect the pest status...... in museums and collections in Scandinavia due to this pest will increase as climate changes come into effect....... was consumed in the greatest amounts: 169 mg of wool was consumed in three months by 30 A. smirnovi larvae. The expected future climate changes in Scandinavia are assumed to lead to higher temperatures in museums and stores where climate is not regulated. Updated data on the present distribution of A. smirnovi...

  19. Embodied discourse in the bourgeois museum: performative spaces at the Ordrupgaard collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Kjærboe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a suburb just north of Copenhagen is Ordrupgaard. At the inauguration in 1918, it was arguably the best collection of impressionism open to the public outside France and the USA. This paper has two goals: First, to reconstruct and analyze the important yet little known original exhibition ensemble at Ordrupgaard, and second, to develop a view of the bourgeois art exhibition as a performative ritual. Building on ideas of exhibition narratives and visitor involvement derived from diverse work done within museology and museum studies, the paper proposes a close examination of how collective memory and performative embodiment drive exhibition experience. From this, Ordrupgaard emerges as an early example of a museum that offers its audience the possibility of a pleasurable enactment of middle class identity within a setting encompassing nature, art and architecture. The case of a small collection museum therefore reveals important mechanics at work within a potentially much larger field of institutions.

  20. BIOGRAPHY: ALL LIVES OF (FORMER MUSEUM OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Vasiljević

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With "life history of things" approach, devel-oped by archeologists and anthropologists, as museolo-gists and heritologists we can identify meaning trans-formations of the same thing, from its creating till today. This "biography" approach suggests thing’s unforeseea-ble semantic potential. So, museum object is not just evidence of certain past, but it potentially testifies about all its pasts, i.e. realities. This premise is recognized as a starting point for insight and analysis of different memory cultures and its transformations through the thing’s "life", and for developing a fusion between herit-age theory and museology, memory culture and bio-graphical approach to things. We can identify presences and absences in collective memory and its ever changing interrelation, organized or spontaneous, with personal memory and memory of other groups, like family. Thus, (former museum object is potential testimony of its museum sojourn, professional, social and political con-texts of acquisition, interpretation, presentation and, at last, putting away in boxes, or of its shifting to another institution. These premises are examined on example of entirety of former museum objects from, now closed, Museum of Illegal Partisan Printing Offices in Belgrade, Serbia

  1. Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investment in the building maintenance aspect is massive throughout the world. In most of the countries, it signifies approximately 50% of the entire revenue of the construction industry. The value of buildings depends on the eminence of the maintenance invested in them. Maintenance management engages obtaining utmost advantage from the investment made on the maintenance activities. At the moment, maintenance in buildings in Malaysia is on the increase in spite of size, category, location, and ownership. This study focuses on Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum, which consists of two case studies in Penang State Museum and Art Gallery, Malaysia and Museum of Perak, Malaysia. The aim of this study is to propose methods to improve the maintenance management system for heritage museum. From the results, the common problem occurs during the implementation for the maintenance of each building is the budget for the maintenance and worker’s skill. The department of each museum must have their own maintenance unit to keep an eye on the maintenance activities for their buildings in order to improve the maintenance management system in their building.

  2. Raising awareness about soil diversity: The Education Programme of the Earth Sciences Museum Alexis Dorofeef, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, C.

    2012-04-01

    they learned at the museum, as well as many of the students that did their practical's at the museum do. As a side result, the Soil Education Program triggered the broadening of the museum themes into three main conceptual lines: Earth's dynamics, Natural resources: use and environmental impacts and, Soils: know to conserve. Today the Museum is spreading its knowledge about soil throughout the region, by means of temporary expositions and educational activities. Despite its achievements, the Museum still faces the challenge to broaden its action, reaching different and wider publics, making both the idea of visiting a museum and the knowledge about soils more popular.

  3. Museum Literacies and Adolescents Using Multiple Forms of Texts "On Their Own"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakle, A. Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, museum literacies are examined. Data collected during a qualitative study of adolescents in out-of-school and in-school groups in a museum demonstrate how participants used museum literacies. Resources for teachers' uses of museum literacies are described and provided, including museum podcasts, virtual museum Internet sites, and…

  4. 77 FR 39269 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ..., Proposed Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database: MuseumsCount.gov AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library... database of museums for use by museums, museum professionals, IMLS, policy makers, researchers, and the... subject of this notice, would establish a comprehensive, reliable database about the size, distribution...

  5. Museum Institutions in Monuments - Positive and Negative Aspects of Adaptation: The New Amber Museum and Museum of Science in Gdansk, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Ksenia

    2017-10-01

    The issue of the creation and location of new museums is a current topic. The decision of where and how to create new museum facilities will impact successful function in the future. Museums are either located in newly designed buildings or in existing buildings. In general, existing buildings adapted for museum use are either formally under conservational protection or not. With regard to museum location in preserved monuments, the author notes that the true impact on authentic monumental building structure still needs intense research. The adaptation of the Great Mill and St. Catherine’s Church - two preserved medieval objects located in the historical city center of Gdansk - provide case studies to investigate positive and negative aspects. In both cases, the author carried out architectural projects for the functional purposes of museums: The New Amber Museum and Museum of Science. The author concludes that mutual benefits of adaptation result from: the financial means of the museum institution to invest long-term; the institutional respect of the museum towards heritage, which translates into respect for conservational protection; and the competitive advantage created by the monumental features of the building and the privileged location in a well-established, branded space. Negative aspects result from: space limitations of monuments that disable the museum from extending its exposition and thus prevent institutional development; the overly restrictive requirements of restoration that take priority over the museum mission; and the lack of technically functional space required for contemporary museum technologies, which forces unconventional engineering solutions that are more expensive than the location of the museum in a newly constructed building.

  6. Virtual museum of manuscripts in teaching humanitarian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нина Леонидовна Панина

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author examines existing forms of representation of the book in museum's online resources and proposes a new approach for virtual museum of the manuscript, specifically focused on the educational purposes.

  7. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  8. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  9. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years the possibilities for engaging in dialogue and participation with museum visitors have been greatly improved by developments in digital technologies. Throughout the world museums are experimenting with inclusive and participatory digital projects that can enhance the museum...... visitor experience. Many of these projects are unique and creative in their use of cutting edge technology, and in their search for finding new ways to reach differentiated groups of users. However, building on insights from user studies at a Danish digital museum installation, this paper also suggests...... insights from communication and design theory with conceptual models for scaffolding the museum visitor experience, this paper uses a Danish digital museum case called the WALL created by the Museum of Copenhagen to consider the special implications of designing technology for museum visitor interaction...

  10. Towards an Integrative Approach to Interactive Museum Installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, C.A.; van der Vaart, M.; Addison, A.C.; Guidi, G.; De Luca, L.; Pescarin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Museum visits are quickly becoming more personalized and interactive with the help of technology. However, the introduction of technology could also result in drawing attention away from museum collections towards (technological) interpretation devices. How does the introduction of technology into

  11. THE MUSEUM: A PARTNER IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUC.ATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Museum resources are generally underutil ised by educational establishments, not least of all by environmental educators. Some museum activities are explained and ... What is their true mission in society? There are many descriptions of the ...

  12. The Museum Library in the United States: A Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David; Fearnley, Henry D.

    1976-01-01

    A statistical survey was made of the general condition and problems of the museum library, using a questionnaire sent to a random sample of 856 historical, art, science, and other museum libraries. (Author)

  13. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q1

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the first quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  14. Poaching Museum Collections using Digital 3D Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Younan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creative engagement with digital 3D models of museum artefacts and gives insight into new uses of museum collections enabled by digital scanning, editing and 3D printing technologies. Digital 3D models of museum artefacts are malleable and increasingly easy to use. Additionally, freely available 3D software has made 3D scanning, editing and manufacturing possible for non-specialists. These technologies allow users to create new artworks through the creation and transformation of digital replicas of museum artefacts. Examples of creative works, taken from two case studies that involve the creative use of digital reproductions of museum artefacts are presented in this paper. These projects are illustrative of a larger trend: the digital ‘poaching’ of heritage artefacts. This paper examines how digital 3D technologies can foster creative forms of museum engagement, democratise access to museum collections and engage users with personal forms of museum experience.

  15. Improving the Work of the School Lenin Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafannikova, G. P.

    1970-01-01

    A number of exemplary compositions and uses of School Lenin Museums are mentioned in this article which brings out the important function of these museums in the political-ideological education of youth. (JB)

  16. Expansion of museums in Central Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagodzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents reflections on the specificity of collections and museums of contemporary art in Central Europe and considers a possibility of creating a regional alternative for the West. The analysis is conducted in the context of the expansionist policy of contemporary museums – notably the Louvre, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Hermitage – whose numerous new development projects gave rise to a number of dilemmas in the museological world. The author discusses global "museum brands" that invest in Central Europe and addresses the possible profits of the expansion of such "concerns" for culture in the region, as well as emphasises the potential of the region itself, which may be used for its development without the avail of the internationally renowned collectors' names.

  17. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  18. [BIRTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUMS OF MODENA BETWEEN XVIII AND XIX CENTURY. THE OBSTETRIC MUSEUM, THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUM, THE ETHNOGRAPHIC ANTHROPOLOGIC MUSEUM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The interest for the study of Anatomy in Modena was particularly developed since the second half of eighteenth century, when the Duke Francesco III of Este promoted the reformation of the University and Antonio Scarpa was called from Padua to teach Anatomy. Scarpa promoted the building of the Anatomical Theatre, near the Grande Spedale, that was inaugurated in 1776. On the same year, the School of Obstetrics opened and determined the constitution of a first Cabinet or Obstetric Museum in a room next to the Theatre. After the Restoration, between 1817 and 1818, the Archduke Francesco IV of Austria Este promoted the realization of an Anatomical Museum: a big organized room in a new floor built on the Theatre. Two more rooms were added in, 1839 and a fourth one in 1853, under the direction of Paolo Gaddi. Furthermore Gaddi's interest for ethnographic studies determined the opening of the Ethnographic Anthropological Museum in 1866.

  19. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people......’s learning with portable tablets matches the intentions of the museums. By applying media and information literacy (MIL) components as analytical dimensions, a pattern of discrepancies between young people’s expectations, their actual learning and the museums’ approaches to framing such learning...... is identified. It is argued that, paradoxically, museums’ decisions to innovate by introducing new technologies, such as portable tablets, and new pedagogies to support them conflict with many young people’s traditional ideas of museums and learning. The assessment of the implications of museums’ integration...

  20. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  1. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  2. Unchained Interests: American-British-Dutch-Australian Command 1942

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Ms. O-16 struck a British sea mine , four sea miles off the Malayan coast. As a result the submarine broke in two parts and sank, killing its crew...The Netherlands East Indies possessed an impressive array of base ores, tin, rubber, tin, bauxite , quinine, and oil.21 The exploitative nature of

  3. The UK and British Gas: Any future for Norwegian gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungles, P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with the UK natural gas market and the future for Norwegian gas in the UK. The role of the British Gas in the domestic and European markets is discussed. Topics are: The UK gas supply market; the UK upstream gas market and the Interconnector; the European market, competition and deregulation; the prospects for Norwegian gas

  4. Individual risk. A compilation of recent British data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grist, D.R.

    1978-08-01

    A compilation of data is presented on individual risk obtained from recent British population and mortality statistics. Risk data presented include: risk of death, as a function of age, due to several important natural causes and due to accidents and violence; risk of death as a function of location of accident; and risk of death from various accidental causes. (author)

  5. Perancangan Interior Museum Film Indonesia Di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Limantoro, Lim Renawati

    2013-01-01

    Surabaya is a city with a thriving cultural variety with a pluralistic society where people in Surabaya is more modern that easy to accept new things that developed in the community. Museum is a public place so that the necessary interior educative and informative and can be used as a sports-themed Indonesian films. The purpose of designing the interior of the film museum in Surabaya this is a venue to preserve Indonesian films and give knowledge to the people of Surabaya on the world of cine...

  6. Multimedia Database at National Museum of Ethnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Shigeharu

    This paper describes the information management system at National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka, Japan. This museum is a kind of research center for cultural anthropology, and has many computer systems such as IBM 3090, VAX11/780, Fujitu M340R, etc. With these computers, distributed multimedia databases are constructed in which not only bibliographic data but also artifact image, slide image, book page image, etc. are stored. The number of data is now about 1.3 million items. These data can be retrieved and displayed on the multimedia workstation which has several displays.

  7. Young people’s own museum views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortensen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    -making practices adds theoretical and empirical depth to existing research and practice, we apply semantic categorization, speech-act theory, and cognitive linguistics as analytical tools. Our results demonstrate that respondents’ most prevalent semantic categories are ‘exciting,’ ‘educative,’ and ‘boring.......’ Their responses fall into two main types: assertive speech acts providing factual descriptions and expressive speech acts providing more evaluative judgments. In general, young Danes make sense of museums along three different routes. One group wants museums that expand and challenge prior perceptions...

  8. A history of Edinburgh's medical museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, S J

    2016-09-01

    Edinburgh has a wealth of medical collections, thanks not only to its role in the Enlightenment and the diaspora of graduates from the large medical school, but also to recent developments in medical heritage. Concentrating on the collections of the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Department and Surgeons' Hall Museums at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, this paper charts the complex and connected histories of the material culture of anatomy, pathology and surgery in the city. What roles did museums play, from their 18th century origins to their 21st century resurgence, and who used them?

  9. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  10. Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  11. 'Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  12. Renewable energy sources in museum buildings; Museen entdecken die Erneuerbaren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claus, Juergen

    2009-11-17

    For several decades now, museums have been key elements in making cities with failing economies more attractive. Museum architecture has reached a high aesthetic and architectural level. Now, the museums of the world are discovering renewable energy sources. SONNE WIND and WAeRME presents some recent projects. (orig./AKb)

  13. guest editorial/gasskrywersrubriek museums in the service of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    within the 'freeze frame' of the museum, would but that students should also be taken into the environ- ment to experience objects within the whole context of everything around then. Jhus, museums around the country are adopting the attitude, education by mu seums, not merely in museums. Broadly stated, the goal of a.

  14. Going Virtual to Engage a Global Museum Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Created at the dawn of the social networking era, the International Museum of Women (IMOW) is an online museum that has consistently harnessed online technology in the service of its mission. Recognizing that online technology is evolving and ever changing, the museum must be flexible, adapting delivery of its content to the tools available at…

  15. Hanging in the Louvre: Virtual Museums in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiuti, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the power of technology is its ability to transform instruction by breaking down geographical and logistical barriers; while not replacing actual museums, virtual museums contribute by bringing their collections to students. Outlines a project in which students create their own virtual museum. Includes Web addresses for virtual…

  16. Practical Partnerships: Strengthening the Museum-School Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Bryna; Hornby, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights two separate museum partnerships involving "The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art" in Tennessee, with high school students and undergraduate art education majors from The University of Memphis. An overview of the partnership is offered along with recommendations for museum educators who would like to create…

  17. SSL Adoption by Museums: Survey Results, Analysis, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Druzik, J. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey of the museum community regarding conversions to SSL in museums. Responses provided real-world insight into how LEDs are being incorporated into museums, and what successes and hurdles have been encountered in the process.

  18. Constructing Spatial Meaning: Spatial Affordances in Museum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Jean D.; Peponis, John

    2010-01-01

    Informal education in museums is structured through movement in space. This article summarizes a range of research that examines the role of spatial layout in shaping the ways in which visitors explore, engage, and understand museums and museum exhibitions. It is demonstrated that behavior patterns are systematically linked to spatial…

  19. Designerly Learning: Workshops for Schools at the Design Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents qualitative research recently undertaken by the Head of Learning at the Design Museum. The research explores how learning in the museum's workshop programme for schools is conceptualised by the museum educators who devise and teach on the programme. The study is framed by an epistemological stance of social constructionism, in…

  20. Museum Superheroes: The Role of Play in Young Children's Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in an art museum. Reflecting upon a kindergarten field trip to the Warhol Museum in which children's play was the centerpiece of the museum experience, the author examines what early childhood theorists have written about the value of play in young children's lives. She shows how the Warhol's program for…

  1. Museum Data Bank Research Report: The Yogi and the Registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the problems involved in assigning descriptors to works of art for online museum catalogs. The topics covered include the subjectivity of the analysis of art, factors that affect the cataloging of museum collections, and the online systems developed by various museums. (17 references) (CLB)

  2. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  3. Reculturing Museums: Working toward Diversity in Informal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Doris; Lombana, Judith

    2013-01-01

    In this article we argue for "reculturing" museums, starting with the ways that museum educators are professionally developed, focusing, in particular, on working with diverse visitors. By "reculturing" we mean shifting the core values and practices of a museum community, starting with its education practices. The aim of…

  4. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  5. The Conference in the Moscow Kremlin State Museums “Historical Weapons in Museums and Private Collections”

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey P. Orlenko

    2017-01-01

    In November 2016 in the Moscow Kremlin State Historical and Cultural Museum and Heritage Site in the framework of events dedicated to the 210th anniversary of the Armoury Chamber museum, an international conference “Historical weapons in museums and private collections”. This scientific forum continued the tradition of conferences held in the Moscow Kremlin Museums in 1999-2007. The participants of this forum discussed a number of priority topics for the studies of the weapon collection h...

  6. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  7. Young British Art / Hanno Soans

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soans, Hanno, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    1990ndate kunsti muutumisest. Inglise kunstniku Peter Daviese maalist "Kuum esimene sada" (1996), Gavin Turki vahakujuna valminud autoportreest "Pop". "Young British Art'i" uuskunstist ja Jasper Zoova installatsioonist "F1". Eri analüüsivõimalusi pakkuvatest töödest (Marko Laimre & Ene-Liis Semperi 2000. a. novembri ühisnäituse osa töid).

  8. Nuclear power in British politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the subject of nuclear power in British politics in 1986. The policies of the major political parties towards nuclear power are briefly outlined, along with public attitudes to nuclear energy, Chernobyl, and the rise of the anti-nuclear campaigners. (UK)

  9. REVISITING COLONIAL BEHAVIOUR IN FRENCH ALGERIA AND BRITISH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELKACEM BELMEKKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The British and the French differed in both the approach and method adopted in governing their overseas subjects during their colonial enterprise in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This had a tremendous impact on the psyche of the colonized and was a determinant factor in shaping the nature of the relationship between the colonizers and colonized before and after independence. Therefore, this paper seeks to juxtapose the colonial behaviour of two colonial powers, French and British, in two major colonies, Algeria and India.

  10. Slovene Ethnographic Museum Web Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Špiček

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:Are you interested in the night view of Ljubljana or in the view on the Ljubljana skyscraper in the 30- ies of the 20th century? What did Cerknica look like in that time? What did a typical alpine house look like? What beds were used fifty years ago? Are you a sports fan interested in the training of Yugoslav athletic team in 1953? Is it true that Anton Codelli and his colleague Leo Poljanec set up the first wireless telegraph station for the company Telefunken in the West African German colony of Togo? What is a Palm Sunday bundle? Is a duel between a woman of Carinthia and Carniola really painted on a wooden bee hive panel? What on earth is an object called »roš«? What chimneys were built on the roofs of the Artiže village? The answers to these unusual questions can be found on the SEM (Slovene Ethnographic Museum website. The SEM documentation comprises numerous collections of photographs which are of interest to ethnologists as well as to the general public. To facilitate the access to them SEM bought the first scanner and started to scan individual photos in 1997. In 2007 SEM continued with systematic digitisation of the most frequently used collections of photos. In 2009 the activities were continued (partly in cooperation with external partners and we joined the Athena EU project. In order to be promoted the entire collections were published on the SEM website and made accessible to a broad audience. The MINOK software enabling the creation of html catalogues was used. As static catalogues were unsuitable for inclusion on the website, a new application using dynamic html was designed to create the gallery view of museum objects and photos, photo slide show, keyword filter, geolocation filter, display of geolocation on a map, and to offer the possibility of advanced searching. The Galerist software was designed by an external partner. It enables html catalogue import, sorting and editing XML files; it is possible to

  11. Archival and museum curatorship challenges for RK and M preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Heritage institutions, such as national archives, libraries, museums and monuments, face numerous challenges to their durability: political and geopolitical hazards (such as armed conflicts), natural hazards (such as floods), economic and social hazards (such as censorship and book burning) and everyday hazards (such as small-scale fires). For those running heritage institutions it is difficult to anticipate and adapt to these threats. However, a number of successful strategies to meet them and develop resilience have been formulated at the international (e.g. 1954 Hague Convention protecting heritage in times of war), national (e.g. guidelines to protect heritage sites from natural disasters) and local levels. Local communities and associations of heritage professionals appear to be of particular importance for contributing to the resilience and survival of these institutions

  12. Museums and Twitter: An Exploratory Qualitative Study of How Museums Use Twitter for Audience Development and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Mark; Thirunarayanan, M.; Ferris, Elizabeth C.; Pabon, Lizette C.; Paul, Natalie; Berger, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    Museums are competing with a vast variety of Internet-based information delivery sites to keep the public interested in their institutions. To keep pace Museums are increasingly turning to the use of Web 2.0 tools to draw in the public and maintain a standing as cultural and educational leaders. Several museums have started using Twitter. This…

  13. Citizen Science as a Tool for Augmenting Museum Collection Data from Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakota M. Spear

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Museum collections are critical to contemporary biological research, but museum acquisitions have declined in recent decades, hampering researchers' ability to use collections to assess species responses to habitat modification, urbanization, and global climate change. Citizen science may be a key method to bolster museum collections data, particularly from urban regions, where ongoing data collection is critical to our understanding of ecosystem dynamics in a highly modified and variable landscape. In this study, we compare data collected as part of the citizen-science project Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California (RASCals, hosted on the platform iNaturalist (www.inaturalist.org, to data in the VertNet database (www.vertnet.org, which houses millions of museum collection records from over 250 natural-history collections, for four focal species, including a native lizard of conservation concern that has declined with urbanization, a native lizard that is widespread in urban areas, and two invasive aquatic species. We compared numbers of VertNet records over time to modern RASCals records, and the number of records collected from urban, suburban, and protected areas from both databases. For all species, citizen-science records were generated much more rapidly than museum records. For three of our four focal species, RASCals participants over 27 months documented from 70 to 750% more records than were added to the VertNet database after 1990. For the urban-tolerant southern alligator lizard, RASCals participants collected nearly 45 times more modern urban records than are contained in the VertNet database. For all other species, the majority of RASCals records were collected within suburban or other highly modified landscapes, demonstrating the value of citizen science for collecting data within urban and suburban ecosystems. As new museum acquisitions decline, citizen-science projects like RASCals may become critical to the maintenance

  14. British Energy - nuclear power in the private sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.

    1997-01-01

    The first four months of the operation of British Energy as a privatised nuclear utility are briefly reviewed. Operational and financial performance have been good as exemplified by the figures for power output and financial return. Freedom from government control means that the options open to the company are much wider but the need to meet the expectations of shareholders is a major consideration. Added to this, the competitive nature of the electricity industry means that the cost reduction is important, though this cannot be at the expense of safety. Shareholder expectations make the funding of new nuclear power stations unrealistic at present. Increasingly, however, markets are opening up in the maintenance of existing plant and the decommissioning of older plant. The British Energy Group also has considerable expertise in the design, operation and management of power stations and of acting in a competitive energy market that could be exported. British Energy's International Division is in place to develop this potential. (UK)

  15. The Development of a Virtual Dinosaur Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Wernhuar; Liou, Hsin-Hun

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the network and virtual reality technologies for developing a virtual dinosaur museum, which provides a Web-learning environment for students of all ages and the general public to know more about dinosaurs. We first investigate the method for building the 3D dynamic models of dinosaurs, and then describe…

  16. Creative Inspiration for Preschoolers from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkkö, Marja-Leena; Aerila, Juli-Anna; Grönman, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the learning outcomes of preschool children produced through visits to an historic house museum environment. The new Finnish preschool curriculum identifies the importance of arts-based approaches for children and that these approaches should be closely aligned to experiential and holistic education. The aim of the research…

  17. Museums and Adults Learning: Perspectives from Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Alan, Ed.; Stannett, Annette, Ed.

    This book contains 28 papers presenting perspectives from Europe on museums and adult learning. The papers, each of which is devoted to a specific country, examine topics such as the following: further education and inservice training; programs for unemployed individuals; lectures and open days; elderly visitors; immigrants; refugees; disabled…

  18. Preservation management for libraries, archives and museums

    CERN Document Server

    Gorman, G E

    2006-01-01

    Memory institutions such as libraries, archives, galleries and museums all share pressing concerns about preserving heritage. This book charts the diversity of preservation management in the contemporary information landscape, and offers guidance on preservation methods for the sustainability of collections from a range of international experts.

  19. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. At the same time we know very little of how remote access users interact with the collections and their motivations for visiting. This talk will present results from...

  20. The Antelopes in the Leyden Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1901-01-01

    The larger in size the animals are the more difficult their comparative study is; 1° as there hardly is any possibility to find all materials together in a given collection, 2° because no Museum in the world is large enough to possess sufficient large series of all known species of a given group,

  1. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  2. A Mobile Music Museum Experience for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Helleberg; Knudsen, Aske Sønderby; Wilmot, Thomas Michael

    2015-01-01

    An interactive music instrument museum experience for children of 10-12 years is presented. Equipped with tablet devices, the children are sent on a treasure hunt where participants have to identify musical instruments by listening to samples; when the right instrument is located, a challenge...

  3. Environmental monitoring in four European museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; Van Grieken, Rene; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Sturaro, Giovanni; Valentino, Antonio; Bernardi, Adriana; Blades, Nigel; Shooter, David; Gysels, Kristin; Deutsch, Felix; Wieser, Monika; Kim, Oliver; Ulrych, Ursula

    In a European multidisciplinary research project concerning environmental diagnostics, museums have been selected, having different climate and pollution conditions, i.e.: Correr Museum, Venice (Italy); Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Austria); Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp (Belgium); Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich (UK). Some field tests investigated the microclimate, the gaseous and particulate air pollution and the biological contamination to suggest mitigative techniques that may reduce the potential for damage in the long run. Potential risk factors are generated by imbalance in temperature and humidity, generated by heating, air conditioning or ventilating system (HVAC), or the building structures, exchange of outside air, or large visitor numbers. HVAC may also enhance indoor gaseous pollution. Plants and carpets represent potential niches for bacterial colonisation. Pollutants and particles have been recognised having partly external and partly internal origin. Tourism has a direct negative impact, i.e. transport of external particles, release of heat, vapour and CO 2, as well as generation of turbulence, which increases the deposition rate of particulate matter. However, the main problem is that the microclimate has been planned for the well being of visitors during only the visiting time, disregarding the needs of conservation that requires a constant climate by day and by night. In some of these cases, better environmental niches have been obtained with the help of showcases. In other cases, showcases worsened the situation, especially when incandescent lamps were put inside.

  4. New inscriptions in the Bodrum Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isager, Signe

    2014-01-01

    This article presents two hitherto unknown Hellenistic inscriptions, both of which are fragmentary. They are inscribed on two sides of a stone which is now in the Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Bodrum (inv. no. 6651) but probably originated from the area of Mylasa. Both inscriptions concern...

  5. The Museum-ship "Abdon Calderon"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W. Mitiukov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals the reconstruction of the career of the Ecuadorian tug "Abdon Calderon," which is now a museum-ship. It is shown that the ship had a significant impact on the naval history of Ecuador. But the role of the ship in the battle in the strait Jambeli in 1941 clearly exaggerated.

  6. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yanjing); N. Stash; L. Aroyo (Lora); P. Gorgels; L. Rutledge (Lloyd); G. Schreiber (Guus)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how

  7. Museums and Development in Africa | Akpomuvie | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theme of this paper is centred on museums as veritable tools fornational unity and development in Africa. It argued ratherdispassionately that after several decades of economic development inAfrica, it is clear that cultural parameters and processes are as important aseconomic aspects of the evolution of African ...

  8. Museum makes room for the Big Bang

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinnell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    "Heather Pinnell discovers that a small exhibition about the Large Hadron Collider scored very highly for its impact." The museum has plans to add a spark chamber into the gallery to show that the experiments done at CERM are safe. (2/3 page)

  9. Understanding the Inarticulateness of Museum Visitors' Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is based on a study of museum visitors' experience of paintings: in particular, the experience of adult non-art specialists. Phenomenology, a form of inquiry that seeks to articulate lived experience, provided the philosophical and methodological framework for the study. Descriptions and themes relating to the ...

  10. The Ethics of Evaluation in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    2015-01-01

    Ethics in research and evaluation has a long standing history, one steeped with legal and moral implications. This article addresses the technicalities of ethics in evaluation as well as highlights the importance for museum educators to prioritize adopting such practices. While understanding the myriad of ethical concerns and best practices can be…

  11. Prague: The City Is the Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the city. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the city from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)

  12. Prepositions in American and British English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, Dieter; Weber, Christel

    1989-01-01

    Compares the distribution of prepositions in American and British English. Two machine-readable one million word Corpora, the Brown Corpus of American English and the Lob Corpus of British are used as a basis of comparison. (Author/OD)

  13. [Educational research and the production of knowledge at science museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandino, Martha

    2005-01-01

    The article examines the processes by which scientific knowledge is socialized, based on the concepts of museographical/didactical transposition and recontextualization within the realm of science museums. Ways of producing knowledge in museums are analyzed, alongside a discussion of the potential challenges and possibilities involved when applying these concepts to research on dissemination and education in a museum setting. Some considerations are advanced on how these may contribute to the development of pedagogical practice in museums. The processes by which scientific knowledge is transformed for the purpose of educating and disseminating knowledge do not merely simplify ideas and concepts, since new knowledge is constructed inside the realm of museum culture.

  14. Authentication at a small museum: the kindness of strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Douglas K. S.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last twenty years, I have served as curator and director of several small and medium size museums including the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama; the San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and most recently, the Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, Massachusetts. The largest budget approached three million dollars, minute in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the National Gallery. Our resources were limited and the demands of building maintenance, programs, acquisitions and conservation far outstripped the amount of money available to be spent. Each museum housed between five and thirty thousand art works and generally speaking the collections were eclectic. It is not unusual at these city museums to find extraordinary oddities ranging from the finest Wedgwood collection in the world in Birmingham to the most extensive group of Latin American folk art objects to be found anywhere in San Antonio. Each year museums of comparable size are offered thousands of art works on all shapes and sizes form all periods and cultures. Only rarely does the staff have the expertise to evaluate and determine the authenticity of the eclectic group of objects both in the collection and being offered. With few curators and in many cases even fewer local experts to call upon, the museum professional must be both bold and creative.

  15. Europe, Blurred: Migration, Margins and the Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Poehls

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available More and more museums all over Europe are discovering migration as a topic for exhibitions. These exhibitions on migration question notions of objectivity or of European universalism. This article looks at a broad range of recent exhibitions and museums that address the topic of migration. Taking into consideration their varying scope and institutional context, this text argues that exhibitions on migration tell several stories at once: Firstly, they present stories of migration in a certain city, region or nation, and within a particular period of time. For this purpose, curators make extensive use of maps – with the peculiar effect that these maps blur what seems to be the clear-cut entity of reference of the museum itself or the exhibition. To a stronger degree than other phenomena that turn into museal topics, 'migration' unveils the constructed character of geographic or political entities such as the nation or the European Union. It shows how, hidden below the norm of settledness, mobilities are and have always been omnipresent in and fundamental for European societies. Secondly and related to this, exhibitions on migration add a new chapter to the meta-narrative of museums: implicitly, they challenge the relevance of the nation - specifically, of both the historical idea that initiated the invention of the public museum (cf. e.g. Bennett 1999 and the political fundament of European integration today. They provoke questions of settledness, citizenship, or contemporary globalisation phenomena that are equally implicitly put on display. The consequent effect is a blurring of the concept of the nationstate. Finally, migration as a museal topic conveys a view on how the institution of the ‘museum’ relates to such a fuzzy thing as mobility, thus provoking questions for further research.

  16. Characterization of winter airborne particles at Emperor Qin's Terra-cotta Museum, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tafeng, E-mail: hutafeng@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, 710075 (China); Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Lee, Shuncheng [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Cao, Junji [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, 710075 (China); Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G. [SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, 710075 (China); Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert of Research Institute, Reno (United States); Ho, Kinfai; Ho, Wingkei [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Rong, Bo [Emperor Qin' s Terra-cotta Warriors and Horses Museum, Xi' an (China); An, Zhisheng [SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, 710075 (China)

    2009-10-01

    Daytime and nighttime total suspended particulate matters (TSP) were collected inside and outside Emperor Qin's Terra-cotta Museum, the most popular on-site museum in China, in winter 2008. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of visitors to indoor airborne particles in two display halls with different architectural and ventilating conditions, including Exhibition Hall and Pit No.1. Morphological and elemental analyses of 7-day individual particle samples were performed with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). Particle mass concentrations in Exhibition Hall and Pit No.1 were in a range of 54.7-291.7 {mu}g m{sup -3} and 95.3-285.4 {mu}g m{sup -3} with maximum diameters of 17.5 {mu}m and 26.0 {mu}m, respectively. In most sampling days, daytime/nighttime particle mass ratios in Exhibition Hall (1.30-3.12) were higher than those in Pit No.1 (0.96-2.59), indicating more contribution of the tourist flow in Exhibition Hall than in Pit No. 1. The maximum of particle size distributions were in a range of 0.5-1.0 {mu}m, with the highest abundance (43.4%) occurred in Exhibition Hall at night. The majority of airborne particles at the Museum was composed of soil dust, S-containing particles, and low-Z particles like soot aggregate and biogenic particles. Both size distributions and particle types were found to be associated with visitor numbers in Exhibition Hall and with natural ventilation in Pit No.1. No significant influence of visitors on indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) was found in either display halls. Those baseline data on the nature of the airborne particles inside the Museum can be incorporated into the maintenance criteria, display management, and ventilation strategy by conservators of the museum.

  17. Characterization of winter airborne particles at Emperor Qin's Terra-cotta Museum, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tafeng; Lee, Shuncheng; Cao, Junji; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Ho, Kinfai; Ho, Wingkei; Rong, Bo; An, Zhisheng

    2009-01-01

    Daytime and nighttime total suspended particulate matters (TSP) were collected inside and outside Emperor Qin's Terra-cotta Museum, the most popular on-site museum in China, in winter 2008. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of visitors to indoor airborne particles in two display halls with different architectural and ventilating conditions, including Exhibition Hall and Pit No.1. Morphological and elemental analyses of 7-day individual particle samples were performed with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). Particle mass concentrations in Exhibition Hall and Pit No.1 were in a range of 54.7-291.7 μg m -3 and 95.3-285.4 μg m -3 with maximum diameters of 17.5 μm and 26.0 μm, respectively. In most sampling days, daytime/nighttime particle mass ratios in Exhibition Hall (1.30-3.12) were higher than those in Pit No.1 (0.96-2.59), indicating more contribution of the tourist flow in Exhibition Hall than in Pit No. 1. The maximum of particle size distributions were in a range of 0.5-1.0 μm, with the highest abundance (43.4%) occurred in Exhibition Hall at night. The majority of airborne particles at the Museum was composed of soil dust, S-containing particles, and low-Z particles like soot aggregate and biogenic particles. Both size distributions and particle types were found to be associated with visitor numbers in Exhibition Hall and with natural ventilation in Pit No.1. No significant influence of visitors on indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) was found in either display halls. Those baseline data on the nature of the airborne particles inside the Museum can be incorporated into the maintenance criteria, display management, and ventilation strategy by conservators of the museum.

  18. The role of medical museums in contemporary medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreez, Yehia M A-H; Willems, Luuk N A; Wells, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great advances in information technology and web-based learning that are currently at play in every level of medical training. Some medical schools have abandoned their museums while others have gradually given away their museums' contents to devote former museum space to new classrooms, lecture halls, and laboratories. These trends have accelerated as medical school enrollment has increased and as increasing interest in biological and biomedical research activities have caused medical schools to convert museum space into research facilities. A few medical schools, however, have considered the contents of their museums as irreplaceable resources for modern medicine and medical education and the space these occupy as great environments for independent and self-directed learning. Consequently, some medical schools have updated their medical museums and equipped them with new technologies. The Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center in The Netherlands and the Medical Museum of Kawasaki Medical School in Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan, are two examples of such upgraded museums. Student surveys at Leiden University have indicated that all students (100%) found audio-guided museum tours to be useful for learning and majorities of them found guided tours to be clinically relevant (87%). However, 69% of students felt that museum visits should be optional rather than compulsory within the medical training curriculum.

  19. Assessment of arsenic surface contamination in a museum anthropology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribovich, Andrey; Lacey, Steven; Franke, John; Hinkamp, David

    2013-02-01

    To assess potential arsenic (As) contamination of work surfaces to improve upon the control strategy at an anthropology department in a large natural history museum. Work practices were observed and control strategy reviewed to inform an occupational hygiene assessment strategy utilizing surface wipe sampling. A total of 35 sampling targets were identified, focusing on surfaces that receive high touch traffic, including workstations, artifact transport carts, and elevator buttons. Arsenic sampling and analysis were performed using reference method Occupational Safety and Health Administration ID-125G. Four of the sampling areas returned detectable levels of As, ranging from 0.052 to 0.350 μg/100 cm. Workplace observations and wipe sampling data enabled the development of recommendations to help to further reduce potential occupational exposure to As. Continuous reduction of surface contamination is prudent for known human carcinogens.

  20. Type material of Cicadellinae (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae of the Museum für Naturkunde, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro W. Lozada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 65 type species of Cicadellinae (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae are reported from the collections of the Museum für Naturkunde, Universität Humboldt, Berlin, Germany, described by Signoret, Breddin, Schmidt, Jacobi, Schröder, Burmeister and Emmrich. The species of Melichar have not been included because Wilson & Takiya (2007 reported them as present in the Hungarian Natural History Museum.