WorldWideScience

Sample records for bringing medical discoveries

  1. Discovery of medically significant lantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Clare; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2009-03-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens such as staphylococci and enterococci in the hospital setting has long being recognized as a serious clinical problem. Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of many nosocomial infections from minor skin abscesses to serious, potentially life threatening diseases such as bone and soft tissue intra-surgical infections, sepsis and invasive endocarditis, while enterococci are responsible for nosocomial bacteraemia, surgical wound infections and endocarditis. The most infamous drug-resistant forms of these include MRSA (methicillin resistant S. aureus), VISA (vancomycin insensitive S. aureus), hVISA (heterogenous vancomycin insensitive S. aureus) and VRE (vancomycin resistant S. aureus). While enhanced hygiene awareness is essential to any solution, the identification of effective novel antimicrobial compounds remains a major goal in eradicating these and other infections caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. In recent years a class of antimicrobial peptides, the Lantibiotics, have been the focus of an ever increasing level of attention. This interest has been prompted by an enhanced appreciation of the mode of action of these peptides (including, in many cases, the ability to bind lipid II) and their frequently high levels of antimicrobial activity. Here we review lantibiotic-related issues in drug discovery, outline the strategies that have been employed to identify these peptides and summarize the use of bioengineering to generate enhanced forms of these peptides as well as the application of the associated biological machinery to generate novel forms of existing pharmaceutical compounds. In so doing we highlight how some, or all, of these approaches have the potential to result in the development of clinically important drugs. PMID:19275538

  2. Causal discovery from medical textual data.

    OpenAIRE

    Mani, S.; Cooper, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    Medical records usually incorporate investigative reports, historical notes, patient encounters or discharge summaries as textual data. This study focused on learning causal relationships from intensive care unit (ICU) discharge summaries of 1611 patients. Identification of the causal factors of clinical conditions and outcomes can help us formulate better management, prevention and control strategies for the improvement of health care. For causal discovery we applied the Local Causal Discove...

  3. Bringing the best of medical librarianship to the patient team

    OpenAIRE

    Shearer, Barbara S.; Seymour, Anne; Capitani, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    This article introduces a series of articles examining the state of the medical library profession as practiced in the clinical context. It is widely understood that many changes across the spectrum of medical librarianship practice have been brought about by both technological advances and economic realities. These changes have created strains felt by many in the profession. Discussions of evolving roles for medical librarians that have gone on for years have taken on a new sense of urgency,...

  4. Memantic: A Medical Knowledge Discovery Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Yavlinsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system that constructs and maintains an up-to-date co-occurrence network of medical concepts based on continuously mining the latest biomedical literature. Users can explore this network visually via a concise online interface to quickly discover important and novel relationships between medical entities. This enables users to rapidly gain contextual understanding of their medical topics of interest, and we believe this constitutes a significant user experience improvement over c...

  5. Study on knowledge discovery in traditional Chinese medical case records

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, You-Hua; ZHENG, PEI-YONG

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Traditional Chinese medical case records in the previous dynasties are vital to the development of traditional Chinese medical theory, but the tremendous amount of data are far beyond a person's ability for comprehension. According to information science, traditional Chinese medical case record data are complicated and intricate experiential data. New technology and methods are needed to solve this difficulty. Knowledge discovery technology plays an important role in analyzing data ...

  6. An Antique Microscope Slide Brings the Thrill of Discovery into a Contemporary Biology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of a Victorian-era microscope slide titled "Grouped Flower Seeds" began an investigation into the scientific and historical background of the antique slide to develop its usefulness as a multidisciplinary tool for PowerPoint presentations usable in contemporary biology classrooms, particularly large-enrollment sections. The resultant…

  7. Medical imaging was boosted by the discovery of artificial radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article draws the history of medical imaging since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1934. The author reviews the PET (positron emission tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) technologies and presents the recent progress in neuro-sciences that have been made possible by using these 2 technologies. Brain imaging has allowed to show: - the impact of emotions on logical mental processes and on mental performances, - the management of memory in the brain of talented quick reckoners, - the degeneration of neurons, and - the link between autism and the presence of structural and functional anomalies in the brain. (A.C.)

  8. Medical data mining: knowledge discovery in a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, J C; Lobach, D F; Goodwin, L K; Hales, J W; Hage, M L; Hammond, W E

    1997-01-01

    Clinical databases have accumulated large quantities of information about patients and their medical conditions. Relationships and patterns within this data could provide new medical knowledge. Unfortunately, few methodologies have been developed and applied to discover this hidden knowledge. In this study, the techniques of data mining (also known as Knowledge Discovery in Databases) were used to search for relationships in a large clinical database. Specifically, data accumulated on 3,902 obstetrical patients were evaluated for factors potentially contributing to preterm birth using exploratory factor analysis. Three factors were identified by the investigators for further exploration. This paper describes the processes involved in mining a clinical database including data warehousing, data query and cleaning, and data analysis. PMID:9357597

  9. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1962, NIGMS has been funding the research of scientists who make advances in our understanding of fundamental life processes. Today, NIGMS funds more than 4,000 scientists who bring discovery to life. In the course ...

  10. Catalysts for better health care. Medical tissue banks bring multiple benefits to countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For millions of injured and disabled people around the world, the treatment brings a new quality of life. Called tissue grafting or transplantation, it relies on the use of sterilized bone, skin, and other tissues to heal serious injuries, wounds, and sickness. Prime beneficiaries include severe burn victims, and men, women, and children suffering from crippling diseases, birth defects, and blindness. Long applied in plastic and orthopaedic surgery, tissue grafting once relied only on using a patient's own tissues, known as an autograft. But now tissues from human or animal donors (allograft) are used for transplantation. This new form of tissue grafting has made big strides over the past decade. An expanding number of facilities today prepare the valuable tissues to the high-quality standards demanded in medical care. Dozens of such new tissue banks have opened in Asia, Latin America, Europe, and North America. A productive channel of progress has been an IAEA-supported technical cooperation programme. Through it, experts have worked together behind the scenes to help national health authorities establish tissue banks, train associated staff, and develop standards and regulatory guides. The IAEA accordingly has gained more experience and success than any other international organization in supporting the establishment of tissue banks for medical use in developing countries. Increasingly for quality and cost reasons, the technology of irradiation is used to sterilize tissues for medical care. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation channels, assists national atomic energy authorities to safely and productively employ radiation technology. An interregional programme on radiation and tissue banking, initiated over a decade ago, today extends to 30 countries

  11. Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents It ... 50th anniversary of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), known to many as NIH's "basic research ...

  12. DOES DIFFERENT STAGES OF MEDICAL EDUCATION WILL BRING CHANGES IN ATTITUDE TOWARDS RURAL HEALTH SERVICES?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep,; Suresh M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To know attitude for rural health service in students of different stages of medical education like undergraduate (third year MBBS students) , internship doing student and post graduates students. MATERIALS & METHOD : The present cross sectional study was conducted at Governement Medical C ollege , Nagpur in month of august to November 2014 in predesigned and pretested proform. The proforma includes information about parents regarding...

  13. Teaching English to the medical profession. Developing communication skills and bringing humanities to medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan McFarland

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a personal account of teaching English for medical purposes (EMP, explaining my interest in helping health professionals in Majorca improve their English. My main aim has been to enable them to communicate both orally at medical conferences and in written form for journals. The article explains how the teaching has been a twofold experience, with the professionals explaining their different specialities, while I have provided them with the necessary linguistic tools. Presentations have been integral to this, with humanities in medicine being a theme underlying the entire approach. The article concludes with a small section on the future of English in a medical context. ------------------------------------------------------- Enseñar inglés a los médicos: desarrollo de las habilidades de comunicación y acercamiento de las humanidades a la medicina. Este es un relato personal de mi experiencia en la enseñanza de inglés con fines médicos (IFM, en el que explico mi interés en ayudar a los profesionales sanitarios de Mallorca a mejorar su nivel de inglés. Mi objetivo principal ha sido capacitarlos para que pudieran comunicarse verbalmente en conferencias médicas y por escrito en las publicaciones correspondientes. Doy cuenta en él de la dualidad de la experiencia adquirida durante la enseñanza, en la que los profesionales explicaban sus distintas especializaciones mientras yo les proporcionaba las herramientas lingüísticas necesarias. Las presentaciones han sido un elemento crítico del proceso, y las humanidades médicas un tema subyacente al enfoque integral del proyecto. El artículo finaliza con una pequeña sección acerca del futuro del inglés en el contexto médico.

  14. Bringing the Medical Literature to Physicians: Self-Service Computerized Bibliographic Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Underhill, Lisa H.; Bleich, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    Seven years ago physicians at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston began doing their own searches of the medical literature. They used PaperChase, a computer program written especially for end users rather than for search librarians. The data base was initially limited to the journals shelved in the library of the Beth Israel Hospital, but it has since been expanded to include the entire MEDLINE collection of the National Library of Medicine—nearly 5 million references published in 3,400 biomed...

  15. Theodore E. Woodward Award: spare me the PowerPoint and bring back the medical textbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick S

    2007-01-01

    A tutorial for 4(th) year medical students revealed absent long-term retention of microbiology and infectious disease facts taught during the 2(nd) year. Students were suffering from the Ziegarnik effect, the loss of memory after completion of a task. PowerPoint lectures and PowerPoint notes combined with multiple-choice questions may have encouraged this outcome; this teaching format was also associated with minimal use of the course textbook. During the subsequent year, active learning techniques, Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) and Peer Instruction (PI) were used, and instructors specifically taught from the textbook. Essays and short answer questions were combined with multiple-choice questions to encourage understanding and recall. Performance on the National Board Shelf exam improved from the 59(th) percentile (2002-2004) to the 83(rd) percentile (2005), and textbook use increased from 1.6% to 79%. This experience demonstrates that strategies incorporating active learning and textbook use correlate with striking improvement in medical student performance. PMID:18528495

  16. DOES DIFFERENT STAGES OF MEDICAL EDUCATION WILL BRING CHANGES IN ATTITUDE TOWARDS RURAL HEALTH SERVICES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To know attitude for rural health service in students of different stages of medical education like undergraduate (third year MBBS students , internship doing student and post graduates students. MATERIALS & METHOD : The present cross sectional study was conducted at Governement Medical C ollege , Nagpur in month of august to November 2014 in predesigned and pretested proform. The proforma includes information about parents regarding socioeconomic status their occupation literacy status a nd also information regarding willingness to work in rural health services and different reasons for not giving health services to rural areas like political unstable area , no entertainments , no future , not having better leaving conditions , no proper educa tion for their kids etc . Informed consent was taken prior to inclusion into the study . Three different medical educating students i.e 69 % (99 third MBBS students , 54% (Interns 87 students and 47% (61 postgraduates students. RESULTS: Undergraduate stude nt and in interns female students are more than male students and they are71 (72 % and 50(57% respectively. Most of the study participants are residing in urban areas i.e. 63 (63.6% undergraduates , 58(66.7% interns and 49(80.3% students in postgraduat es are having urban is the place of residence. 54(76% female students from undergraduates and 32 (64% female students from interns and 15(68.1% female students from postgraduates are willing to serve for rural health. female undergraduates students (88. 7%accepted rural area is unstable to work when compared with male undergraduates (42.9% and this difference found to be statistically significant (p=0.001.Majority of female undergraduates(69% accepted that there is no personal safety in rural areas as compared with male undergraduates(17.9%.This difference also found to be significant (p=0.001.Isolation and remoteness of the location of health facility was accepted by most of the female

  17. Community-oriented medical education: bringing perspectives to curriculum planners in Damascus University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashash, Mayssoon

    2013-01-01

    The varying health needs in Syria because of the trend of increasing communicable and noncommunicable diseases necessitate new curricula for all health professions schools in which community health needs, socio-cultural aspects of health and disease can be emphasized. There is a need to produce more primary level healthcare professionals who are trained to apply the principles, policies and strategies of the World Health Organization and achieve better health for all. A new perspective in the Faculty of Dentistry in Damascus University has been suggested and is presented here. Graduates generally are not well prepared to provide primary level healthcare in the community. Community-oriented medical education (COME) can produce health-oriented professionals who are equipped with broad skills and able to work for health promotion, disease prevention, and cure. Health orientation is one of the most radical features of COME, wherein the curriculum is appropriate to learners' future practice in the community. Community orientation enables students to become more people focused so that they can work towards people's self-empowerment, change people's attitudes and behaviors, and improve their self-awareness and esteem. This viewpoint addresses the importance of redesigning the dental curriculum and the need to implement COME in Damascus University. It is proposed as an example of changes needed in all health professions schools in Syria. The call to redesign the curricula to serve the health needs of the Syrian population will be difficult to achieve but is vital. Improving our understanding of the concept of COME and having all sectors of government and society commit to it will make the transition possible and will make the COME a reality. PMID:24200737

  18. Discovery, Development, and Adoption of Medications to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder: Goals for the Phases of Medications Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litten, Raye Z; Falk, Daniel E; Ryan, Megan L; Fertig, Joanne B

    2016-07-01

    For more than 25 years, advances have been made in developing medications to treat alcohol use disorder (AUD), highlighted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of naltrexone (oral and long-acting) and acamprosate. Despite this progress, more work remains to be done in this area because these medications, although effective for some people, do not work for everyone. A high priority for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol is to put into place a solid infrastructure to aid in the development of medications that are more effective than those currently available and with few side effects. Medication development, especially for a disorder as complex as AUD, is challenging and involves multiple phases, including discovery of "druggable" targets, preclinical studies, human clinical trials, and the adoption and implementation of the new medication into mainstream medicine. A successful medications development program requires clearly established goals for each phase to ensure that a candidate compound is not trapped in one particular phase, a condition known as "the valley of death." In this article, the phases of medication development are described as they apply to AUD, and specific goals of each phase are identified for the next decade. In addition, several important crosscutting themes are outlined for each phase, all of which are essential for advancing medications development. These include identifying and validating screening models and druggable targets, making use of precision medicine, and establishing partnerships among key stakeholders. Our goal in writing this article is to provide a guide on medications development that will aid the alcohol research community in planning, testing, and developing medications for AUD. PMID:27184259

  19. The feasibility of using 'bring your own device' (BYOD) technology for electronic data capture in multicentre medical audit and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, M C; Bauchmuller, K; Miller, D; Rosser, J H; Shuker, K; Wrench, I; Wilson, P; Mills, G H

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audit and research projects demand robust, efficient systems for accurate data collection, handling and analysis. We utilised a multiplatform 'bring your own device' (BYOD) electronic data collection app to capture observational audit data on theatre efficiency across seven hospital Trusts in South Yorkshire in June-August 2013. None of the participating hospitals had a dedicated information governance policy for bring your own device. Data were collected by 17 investigators for 392 individual theatre lists, capturing 14,148 individual data points, 12, 852 (91%) of which were transmitted to a central database on the day of collection without any loss of data. BYOD technology enabled accurate collection of a large volume of secure data across multiple NHS organisations over a short period of time. Bring your own device technology provides a method for collecting real-time audit, research and quality improvement data within healthcare systems without compromising patient data protection. PMID:26526934

  20. Knowledge discovery in medical systems using differential diagnosis, LAMSTAR & k-NN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, Rahul; Carvalho, Rebeck; Tripathy, Amiya Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Medical data is an ever-growing source of information generated from the hospitals in the form of patient records. When mined properly the information hidden in these records is a huge resource bank for medical research. As of now, this data is mostly used only for clinical work. This data often contains hidden patterns and relationships, that can lead to better diagnosis, better medicines, better treatment and overall, a platform to better understand the mechanisms governing almost all aspects of the medical domain. Unfortunately, discovery of these hidden patterns and relationships often goes unexploited. However there is on-going research in medical diagnosis which can predict the diseases of the heart, lungs and various tumours based on the past data collected from the patients.They are mostly limited to domain specific systems that predict diseases restricted to their area of operation like heart, brain and various other domains. These are not applicable to the whole medical dataset. The system proposed in this paper uses this vast storage of information so that diagnosis based on this historical data can be made. It focuses on computing the probability of occurrence of a particular ailment from the medical data by mining it using a unique algorithm which increases accuracy of such diagnosis by combining the key points of Neural Networks, Large Memory Storage and Retrieval (LAMSTAR), k-NN and Differential Diagnosis all integrated into one single algorithm. The system uses a Service-Oriented Architecture wherein the system components of diagnosis, information portal and other miscellaneous services are provided.This algorithm can be used in solving a few common problems that are encountered in automated diagnosis these days, which include: diagnosis of multiple diseases showing similar symptoms, diagnosis of a person suffering from multiple diseases, receiving faster and more accurate second opinion and faster identification of trends present in the medical

  1. Action Experience and Action Discovery in Medicated Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednark, Jeffery G.; Reynolds, John N. J.; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that markedly affects voluntary action. While regular dopamine treatment can help restore motor function, dopamine also influences cognitive portions of the action system. Previous studies have demonstrated that dopamine medication boosts action-effect associations, which are crucial for the discovery of new voluntary actions. In the present study, we investigated whether neural processes involved in the discovery of new actions are altered in PD participants on regular dopamine treatment, compared to healthy age-matched controls. We recorded brain electroencephalography (EEG) activity while PD patients and age-matched controls performed action discovery (AD) and action control tasks. We found that the novelty P3, a component normally present when there is uncertainty about the occurrence of the sensory effect, was enhanced in PD patients. However, AD was maintained in PD patients, and the novelty P3 demonstrated normal learning-related reductions. Crucially, we found that in PD patients the causal association between an action and its resulting sensory outcome did not modulate the amplitude of the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP), an EEG component sensitive to the association between an action and its resulting effect. Collectively, these preliminary results suggest that the formation of long-term action-outcome representations may be maintained in PD patients on regular dopamine treatment, but the initial experience of action-effect association may be affected.

  2. "What Brings Him Here Today?": Medical Problem Presentation Involving Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Olga; Heritage, John; Yin, Larry; Maynard, Douglas W.; Bauman, Margaret L.

    2016-01-01

    Conversation and discourse analyses were used to examine medical problem presentation in pediatric care. Healthcare visits involving children with ASD and typically developing children were analyzed. We examined how children's communicative and epistemic capabilities, and their opportunities to be socialized into a competent patient role are…

  3. Combining knowledge discovery from databases (KDD) and case-based reasoning (CBR) to support diagnosis of medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranieri, Andrew; Yearwood, John; Pham, Binh

    1999-07-01

    The development of data warehouses for the storage and analysis of very large corpora of medical image data represents a significant trend in health care and research. Amongst other benefits, the trend toward warehousing enables the use of techniques for automatically discovering knowledge from large and distributed databases. In this paper, we present an application design for knowledge discovery from databases (KDD) techniques that enhance the performance of the problem solving strategy known as case- based reasoning (CBR) for the diagnosis of radiological images. The problem of diagnosing the abnormality of the cervical spine is used to illustrate the method. The design of a case-based medical image diagnostic support system has three essential characteristics. The first is a case representation that comprises textual descriptions of the image, visual features that are known to be useful for indexing images, and additional visual features to be discovered by data mining many existing images. The second characteristic of the approach presented here involves the development of a case base that comprises an optimal number and distribution of cases. The third characteristic involves the automatic discovery, using KDD techniques, of adaptation knowledge to enhance the performance of the case based reasoner. Together, the three characteristics of our approach can overcome real time efficiency obstacles that otherwise mitigate against the use of CBR to the domain of medical image analysis.

  4. Medical imaging was boosted by the discovery of artificial radioactivity; L'imagerie medicale revelee par la radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demarthon, F.; Dupuy-Maury, F.; Donnars, O

    2002-08-01

    This article draws the history of medical imaging since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1934. The author reviews the PET (positron emission tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) technologies and presents the recent progress in neuro-sciences that have been made possible by using these 2 technologies. Brain imaging has allowed to show: - the impact of emotions on logical mental processes and on mental performances, - the management of memory in the brain of talented quick reckoners, - the degeneration of neurons, and - the link between autism and the presence of structural and functional anomalies in the brain. (A.C.)

  5. Machine Learning Methods for Knowledge Discovery in Medical Data on Atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Serrano, J.I.; Tomečková, Marie; Zvárová, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2006), s. 6-33. ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : knowledge discovery * supervised machine learning * biomedical data mining * risk factors of atherosclerosis Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  6. Knowledge Discovery in Medical Mining by using Genetic Algorithms and Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivathsa, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Medical Data mining could be thought of as the search for relationships and patterns within the medical data, which facilitates the acquisition of useful knowledge for effective medical diagnosis. Consequently, the predictability of disease will become more effective and the early detection of disease certainly facilitates an increased exposure to required patient care with focused treatment, economic feasibility and improved cure rates. So, the present investigation is carried on medical data(PIMA) using DM and GA based Neural Network technique and the results predict that the methodology is not only reliable but also helps in furthering the scope of the subject.

  7. Bringing minds together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, John

    2011-01-01

    Boston Scientific founder John Abele has been party to his share of groundbreaking innovations over the years. But the revolutionary advances in medical science that these breakthroughs brought about were not the efforts of one firm alone, let alone one inventor. Abele tells two fascinating stories of collaboration--one about Jack Whitehead's upending of hospitals' blood and urine testing procedures and the other about Andreas Gruentzig's success in bringing balloon catheterization into the cardiology mainstream. Both Whitehead and Gruentzig spearheaded the emergence of entirely new fields, bringing together scientist-customers to voluntarily develop standards, training programs, new business models, and even a specialized language to describe their new field. The process of collaboration, Abete says, is fraught with contradictions and subtlety. It takes consummate leadership skills to persuade others to spend countless hours solving important problems in partnership with people they don't necessarily like. Moreover, managing egos so that each person's commitment, energy, and creativity is unleashed in a way that doesn't disadvantage others requires an impresario personality. Finally, true authenticity--something that few people can project--is critical for earning customers' trust and convincing them that their valuable contributions won't be used for anything other than moving the technology forward. PMID:21800473

  8. Discovery of a 210 -fiber texture in medical-grade metastable beta titanium wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Song; Schaffer, Jeremy E.; Ren, Yang; Daymond, Mark R.

    2015-04-01

    The texture and phase evolution of metastable beta-III Ti alloy wires, produced in a medical-grade wire-processing facility, are examined via synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The texture development in the beta-phase was interpreted by a simple viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling approach. Both the stress-induced martensite and stress-induced omega phase transformations are observed during the early stage of cold deformation. The < 1 1 0 >(beta) texture is gradually replaced by the < 2 1 0 >(beta) texture at cold work levels above 50% total area reduction or equivalently 0.70 axial true strain. Formation of the < 2 1 0 >(beta)-fiber from the combined activity of {1 1 2} and {3 3 2} twinning plus conventional slip is observed and may not directly depend upon the stress-induced phase per se. According to the VPSC model, similar texture should occur in other metastable beta-Ti alloys subjected to similar wire processing. These data should help inform process-structure-function towards better wire design in titanium-based medical devices. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  9. Discovery and Development of Synthetic and Natural Biomaterials for Protein Therapeutics and Medical Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Andrew J.

    Controlling nonspecific protein interactions is important for applications from medical devices to protein therapeutics. The presented work is a compilation of efforts aimed at using zwitterionic (ionic yet charge neutral) polymers to modify and stabilize the surface of sensitive biomedical and biological materials. Traditionally, when modifying the surface of a material, the stability of the underlying substrate. The materials modified in this dissertation are unique due to their unconventional amorphous characteristics which provide additional challenges. These are poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) rubber, and proteins. These materials may seem dissimilar, but both have amorphous surfaces, that do not respond well to chemical modification. PDMS is a biomaterial extensively used in medical device manufacturing, but experiences unacceptably high levels of non-specific protein fouling when used with biological samples. To reduce protein fouling, surface modification is often needed. Unfortunately conventional surface modification methods, such as Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings, do not work for PDMS due to its amorphous state. Herein, we demonstrate how a superhydrophilic zwitterionic material, poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), can provide a highly stable nonfouling coating with long term stability due to the sharp the contrast in hydrophobicity between pCBMA and PDMS. Biological materials, such as proteins, also require stabilization to improve shelf life, circulation time, and bioactivity. Conjugation of proteins with PEG is often used to increase protein stability, but has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here we have shown that pCBMA conjugation improves stability in a similar fashion to PEG, but also retains, or even improves, binding affinity due to enhanced protein-substrate hydrophobic interactions. Recognizing that pCBMA chemically resembles the combination of lysine (K) and glutamic acid (E) amino acids, we have shown how zwitterionic

  10. ‘What Brings Him Here Today?’: Medical Problem Presentation Involving Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Olga; Heritage, John; Yin, Larry; Maynard, Douglas W; Bauman, Margaret L

    2016-02-01

    Conversation and discourse analyses were used to examine medical problem presentation in pediatric care.Healthcare visits involving children with ASD and typically developing children were analyzed. We examined how children’s communicative and epistemic capabilities, and their opportunities to be socialized into a competent patient role are interactionally achieved. We found that medical problem presentation is designed to contain a ‘pre-visit’ account of the interactional and epistemic work that children and caregivers carry out at home to identify the child’s health problems; and that the intersubjective accessibility of children’s experiences that becomes disrupted by ASD presents a dilemma to all participants in the visit. The article examines interactional roots of unmet healthcare needs and foregone medical care of people with ASD. PMID:26463739

  11. Bringing focus to entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Skelton (Tim); J.J.P. Jansen (Justin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFostering entrepreneurship has long been a core part of the RSM ethos. But a new centre bringing together some key players promises to take this philosophy to a new and even more successful level.

  12. 2011 Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award Honors Prof.TU You-you for the Discovery of Artemisinin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award honors a scientist who discovered artemisinin and its utility for treating malaria.Prof.TU You-you (China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences,Beijing) transformed an ancient Chinese healing method into the most powerful antimalarial medicine currently available that has saved millions of lives across the globe,especially in the developing world.

  13. Medical Journals-The interface between discovery and practice%医学杂志——沟通探索与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey Drazen; 王耀丽; 张子强; 白春学

    2009-01-01

    Medical journals exist at the interface between discovery of new knowledge and the clinical practice of medicine. The purpose of journals is to keep physicians and physician-scientists abreast of advances in their field. How to make medical papers published and achieve the level of the highest academic standards is a very complicated process. This article reviews New England Journal on the type of paper, review process, received process,the evaluation process and so on. A better understanding of these process, might lead to better arrangement and publication of your medical paper.%医学杂志是联系医学前沿知识和临床实践的桥梁,是医学科研工作者获得本专业前沿知识和展示成果的主要渠道.如何让医学论文在高影响因子杂志上发表,向公众展示科研工作者的研究成果,是一个非常复杂的过程.本文就如何在新英格兰杂志上发表论文,从论文类型、杂志动态、投稿流程和评审过程等方面进行简要综述.

  14. Bringing "indigenous" ownership back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    policies thrive again, this time disguised in terms such as ‘empowerment’, but just as politicised as in the 1970s. Zambia is at the heart of this development. In the light of liberalisation, booming commodity prices and the increasing importance of Chinese investors, this article seeks to further our...... understanding of how processes of exclusion interact with domestic politics in Zambia. It argues that the Citizens Economic Empowerment Commission, a new institution to bring ownership back to Zambians, builds on a long tradition of nationalist policies in Zambia, while its actual work is strictly related to...

  15. Bring Your Own Device

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Rodrigo; Adami, Fovad

    2012-01-01

    Detta examensarbete har genomförts i samarbete med Sourcecom Svenska AB. Sourcecom Svenska AB arbetar med kommunikationslösningar inom IT-kommunikation, IT-säkerhet och telefoni. Examensarbetet går ut på att undersöka konceptet Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) och föreslå olika lösningar beroende på företagets informationssäkerhetskrav. För att förstå konceptet BYOD behövs först en inblick i hur ett policybaserat system fungerar. Rapporten undersöker och förklarar tre olika Network Access Control...

  16. Discovery of a 〈2 1 0〉-fiber texture in medical-grade metastable beta titanium wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The texture and phase evolution of metastable β-III Ti alloy wires, produced in a medical-grade wire-processing facility, are examined via synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The texture development in the β-phase was interpreted by a simple viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling approach. Both the stress-induced martensite and stress-induced omega phase transformations are observed during the early stage of cold deformation. The 〈1 1 0〉β texture is gradually replaced by the 〈2 1 0〉β texture at cold work levels above 50% total area reduction or equivalently 0.70 axial true strain. Formation of the 〈2 1 0〉β-fiber from the combined activity of {1 1 2} and {3 3 2} twinning plus conventional slip is observed and may not directly depend upon the stress-induced phase per se. According to the VPSC model, similar texture should occur in other metastable β-Ti alloys subjected to similar wire processing. These data should help inform process–structure–function towards better wire design in titanium-based medical devices

  17. Bringing up Gender: Academic Abjection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2014-01-01

    The principal questions raised in this article are: what does it mean to bring up the topic of gender in a space where it is not known, and how can this moment of bringing up gender--or not bringing it up--be conceptualised? The article departs from the thoughts and questions that were provoked by an interview conducted with a Gender Studies…

  18. Bringing up TRANSCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a transportation tracking system (designated TRANSCOM) developed under the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) in response to three institutional concerns about shipments of large quantities of radioactive materials: routing, prenotification, and emergency response. This tracking system consists of a geographical location system, a system for communicating with the vehicle operator while en route, and an information management system that appropriately distributes shipment information to DOE headquarters, field offices, and key state officials. This paper presents the development, testing, and demonstration efforts undertaken to bring the prototype system to a fully operational status. The LORAN-C locating system has proved to be acceptable as a geographical location system for TRANSCOM equipped vehicles. The satellite communications technology employed has demonstrated timely radio transmission regarding location and communication with the vehicle operator. This paper also discusses the interim developmental TRANSCOM Control Center, the Oak Ridge Operations TRANSCOM Control Center, software, hardware, operational issues, and the tracking of a WIPP TRUPACT-II demonstration trailer

  19. Bringing Gravity to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  20. Bringing physics to life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    `I'm doing a physics that is pulling me towards it.' `I like the course being more up to date.' `You learn the physics but you also think ``well I actually see a point in knowing this physics''.' `This course presents physics in a more interesting way as it focuses on practical activity and applications of physics.' `The industrial visit gives students the opportunity to look for science in action.' These are just some of the comments from students and teachers piloting the new Salters Horners Advanced Physics course (SHAP). Contexts and applications drive the course, providing interest and motivation for students and alerting them to some of the many career areas that involve physics. For example, the operation of a CD player leads to a study of waves and superposition; archaeological surveying and analysis brings in d.c. circuitry and x-ray diffraction; consideration of safety in rail transport involves learning about mechanics and electromagnetism. The course is produced by a team directed from the University of York and funded by a consortium of industrial and charitable sponsors. It is examined by Edexcel and support materials are published by Heinemann. The pilot, involving some 50 centres, began in September 1998 with the new subject core and the AS qualification intermediate between GCSE and the full A-level standard. The course has been fully approved by QCA, and from September 2000 it will be open to all. For comprehensive information about SHAP, visit the project's website: www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/salters/physics . Pilot materials for students, teachers and technicians are available from Heinemann. They will be re-edited and published in full colour for September 2000. Members of the team will attend the annual ASE meeting in Leeds this month; there will be a talk and a hands-on workshop where student activities can be sampled. Materials will be on view at the University of York stand. In addition, Edexcel and the York team are running a series of

  1. A discovery solution from Ebsco

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Michavila, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    EBSCO offers complementary access tools to gain greater value from the discovery solution: a customizable, versatile knowledgebase and listing service that enhances discovery, brings more visibility to the library’s collection, get users to specific content, and makes it easier for librarians to manage e-resources. It is an effective tool for end users who may gather information by browsing (journal lists, TOC, etc.), alerting (journal alerts, RSS) or known-item searching.

  2. Bringing Reading Research to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Margaret G., Ed.; Kucan, Linda, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This book brings together some of the world's foremost literacy scholars to discuss how research influences what teachers actually do in the classroom. Chapters describe the current state of knowledge about such key topics as decoding, vocabulary, comprehension, digital literacies, reading disabilities, and reading reform. At the same time, the…

  3. Techniques to Bring Up Mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us More COPD: Lifestyle Management Avoiding Infections Breathing Retraining Techniques to Bring Up Mucus Exercises Giving Up Smoking ... mucus is allowed to collect in the airways, breathing may become difficult and infection may occur. Techniques to remove mucus are often done after using ...

  4. Bringing science to the people

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an opinion editorial piece about the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). It describes the active role that the ISHS takes in bringing scientific information to people throughout the world. The society holds periodic symposia on 10 different crops and 14 different cross-co...

  5. Bringing Globalization into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Nancy Carter

    2006-01-01

    Some of the most effective resources for bringing the concept of globalization into the classroom is through the personal and professional experiences of the classroom teacher, the personal experiences of students from diverse cultures, the inclusion of curriculum activities with a global context, and the involvement of guest speakers with global…

  6. Academic Medical Product Development: An Emerging Alliance of Technology Transfer Organizations and the CTSA

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-01-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related invention...

  7. Higgs Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    via first principle lattice simulations with encouraging results. The new findings show that the recent naive claims made about new strong dynamics at the electroweak scale being disfavoured by the discovery of a not-so-heavy composite Higgs are unwarranted. I will then introduce the more speculative......I discuss the impact of the discovery of a Higgs-like state on composite dynamics starting by critically examining the reasons in favour of either an elementary or composite nature of this state. Accepting the standard model interpretation I re-address the standard model vacuum stability within a...... has been challenged by the discovery of a not-so-heavy Higgs-like state. I will therefore review the recent discovery \\cite{Foadi:2012bb} that the standard model top-induced radiative corrections naturally reduce the intrinsic non-perturbative mass of the composite Higgs state towards the desired...

  8. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    There is a large literature that investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate new information (price discovery analysis). We extend this concept to the stochastic volatility process and investigate how markets contribute to the efficient stochastic volatility whi...

  9. Bringing nursing to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. PMID:19731893

  10. BYOD: Bring your own disaster

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever heard of “BYOD”? No, it is not a pop band. Try again. It is short for “Bring Your Own Device” (the French use “AVEC” -  “Apporter Votre Equipement personnel de Communication”) and describes an option long since offered at CERN: the possibility to bring along your personal laptop, smartphone or PDA, use it on CERN premises and connect it to the CERN office network. But hold on. As practical as it is, there is also a dark side.   The primary advantage, of course, is having a digital work environment tuned to your needs and preferences. It allows you to continue working at home. Similarly, you always have your music, address books and bookmarks with you. However, as valuable as this is, it is also a responsibility. Laptop theft is happening - outside CERN but also on site. In France, 30% of stolen laptops were stolen out of cars or homes, and 10% during travel. At CERN, on average one ...

  11. Bringing Technology into Physics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettlili, Nouredine

    2009-05-01

    Through our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University, we have been supporting a number of school districts in Northeast Alabama to improve the teaching of physics at the high school level. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. The main aim of project IMPACTSEED is to help teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama Course of Study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of program. In this presentation, we want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to physics classrooms. We have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms, most notably through a series of make-and-take technology workshops that were developed over several years of research. In turn, when the teachers assign these make-an-take projects to their students, the students will be able to see first-hand---by doing, rather than being told---that physics is not a dry, abstract subject. We found this approach to be particularly effective in heightening the students' interest in math and science.

  12. Beyond Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Sassmannshausen, Sean Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we explore four alternatives to the dominant discovery view of entrepreneurship; the development view, the construction view, the evolutionary view, and the Neo-Austrian view. We outline the main critique points of the discovery presented in these four alternatives, as well as their...... central concepts and conceptualization of the entrepreneurial function. On this basis we discuss three central themes that cut across the four alternatives: process, uncertainty, and agency. These themes provide new foci for entrepreneurship research and can help to generate new research questions and...

  13. Launching the "Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration"

    OpenAIRE

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration was created to provide, for the first time, a unified forum to consider all factors that affect scientific practice and scientific discovery – with an emphasis on the changing face of contemporary biomedical science. In this endeavor we are bringing together three different groups of scholars: a) laboratory investigators, who make the discoveries that are the currency of the scientific enterprise; b) computer science and informatics invest...

  14. Discovery Mondays

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Many people don't realise quite how much is going on at CERN. Would you like to gain first-hand knowledge of CERN's scientific and technological activities and their many applications? Try out some experiments for yourself, or pick the brains of the people in charge? If so, then the «Lundis Découverte» or Discovery Mondays, will be right up your street. Starting on May 5th, on every first Monday of the month you will be introduced to a different facet of the Laboratory. CERN staff, non-scientists, and members of the general public, everyone is welcome. So tell your friends and neighbours and make sure you don't miss this opportunity to satisfy your curiosity and enjoy yourself at the same time. You won't have to listen to a lecture, as the idea is to have open exchange with the expert in question and for each subject to be illustrated with experiments and demonstrations. There's no need to book, as Microcosm, CERN's interactive museum, will be open non-stop from 7.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On the first Discovery M...

  15. The discovery of radioactivity: the centenary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade of the nineteenth century, a number of fundamental discoveries of outstanding importance were made unexpectedly which marked the beginning of a new era in physics. A cascade of spectacular discoveries began with the announcement of the discovery of x-rays by Roentgen followed by the discoveries, in quick succession, of radioactivity by Becquerel, of Zeeman effect, of electron by J.J. Thomson, and of polonium and radium by the Curies. Both x-rays and radioactivity have wide applications in scientific, medical and industrial fields and have made outstanding contribution to the advancement of human knowledge and welfare. Radioactivity is well known and no other discovery in the field of physics or chemistry has had a more profound effect on our fundamental knowledge of nature. Present article, on the occasion of the centenary of the discovery of radioactivity, makes an attempt to describe some glimpses of the history of radioactivity. (author). 59 refs

  16. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing ... are very similar genetically. They also share many lifestyle factors: low rates of childhood obesity, large family ...

  17. Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk Health Capsules Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last Paralyzed Men Regain Movement Featured Website: Mental Health Topics Past Issues Most Viewed May 2014 Print RSS Find us on Facebook External link, please review our exit ...

  18. Healthy Family 2009: Bringing in Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Bringing in Baby Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... Down syndrome and other common genetic disorders, inherited family conditions, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, or disorders ...

  19. Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) to Education

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph M. Woodside; Shahram Amiri

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to reduce costs and increase worker satisfaction, many businesses have implemented a concept known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT). Similarly, many school districts are beginning to implement BYOT policies and programs to improve educational learning opportunities for students who have a wide variety of technology devices. BYOT allow districts with limited budgets enable usage of technology while improving student engagement. This paper explore...

  20. Trends in Modern Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Jörg; Herrling, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Drugs discovered by the pharmaceutical industry over the past 100 years have dramatically changed the practice of medicine and impacted on many aspects of our culture. For many years, drug discovery was a target- and mechanism-agnostic approach that was based on ethnobotanical knowledge often fueled by serendipity. With the advent of modern molecular biology methods and based on knowledge of the human genome, drug discovery has now largely changed into a hypothesis-driven target-based approach, a development which was paralleled by significant environmental changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Laboratories became increasingly computerized and automated, and geographically dispersed research sites are now more and more clustered into large centers to capture technological and biological synergies. Today, academia, the regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry all contribute to drug discovery, and, in order to translate the basic science into new medical treatments for unmet medical needs, pharmaceutical companies have to have a critical mass of excellent scientists working in many therapeutic fields, disciplines, and technologies. The imperative for the pharmaceutical industry to discover breakthrough medicines is matched by the increasing numbers of first-in-class drugs approved in recent years and reflects the impact of modern drug discovery approaches, technologies, and genomics. PMID:26330257

  1. Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT to Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce costs and increase worker satisfaction, many businesses have implemented a concept known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD or Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT. Similarly, many school districts are beginning to implement BYOT policies and programs to improve educational learning opportunities for students who have a wide variety of technology devices. BYOT allow districts with limited budgets enable usage of technology while improving student engagement. This paper explores the technology devices, and educational implications of policies, device management, security and included components.

  2. Frontier Fields: A Cost-Effective Approach to Bringing Authentic Science to the Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B.; Summers, F.; Ryer, H.

    2015-11-01

    For more than two decades, the Hubble EPO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community and the public, and to engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based, curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, and professional development workshops. The main underpinnings of the program's infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. The Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community in a cost-effective way. Frontier Fields observations and results have been, and will continue to be, embedded into existing product lines and professional development offerings. We also are leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog.

  3. Context-Aware Service Discovery in Heterogeneous Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Raverdy, Pierre-Guillaume; Issarny, Valérie

    2005-01-01

    Pervasive environments bring new challenges for service management, as clients have to handle large collections of services offered by concurrent networks at their location, as well as services on networks in known remote locations. To enable service discovery in such service-rich environments, we introduce the Multi-protocol Service Discovery (MSD) platform that interacts with existing SD protocols and extend their service descriptions with context information. Service information and discov...

  4. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  5. DNA Barcoding Investigations Bring Biology to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how DNA barcoding investigations bring biology to life. Biologists recognize the power of DNA barcoding not just to teach biology through connections to the real world but also to immerse students in the exciting process of science. As an investigator in the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller University in New…

  6. Talent Show Brings Changsha Fame and Fortune

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Super Girl, a TV singing contest,became famous nationwide almost overnight. The show brought Hunan Satellite TV over 100 million yuan(US$12.5 million) last year and is estimated to bring 200 million yuan (US$25 million) of advertising sales to the TV station this year.

  7. Digitizing Brings New Life to Video Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2008-01-01

    Talk of mass digitization generally brings to mind large-scale projects to scan huge collections of books. The Google Library Print project, the Open Content Alliance, and others have taken on incredibly ambitious projects to digitize enormous numbers of books in some of the world's biggest libraries. Digitization of book collections stands to…

  8. Bringing together the best in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    Voss, Georgina

    2006-01-01

    With the planned formation of a "European Institute of Technology" announced last week, the EU hopes to bring European innovation and knowledge back into the global picture. The institute, which is planned to be built by 2010, will aim to compete and even rival like institutes in Janpan and the United States (1½ page)

  9. Commercializing medical technology

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Kevin J.; Lieberman, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880’s, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical i...

  10. La Vida: Bringing Biblical Teachings to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenschain, Rich; Larmor, Jackie

    1996-01-01

    Adventure programs at Gordon College (Massachusetts), a small Christian liberal arts college, attempt to promote student growth through adventure, community, and solitude; help Christian students develop an experience-based understanding of Biblical teachings they grew up with; and provide opportunities for self-discovery and spiritual experience.…

  11. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  12. Virtual Waterless Port:" BRING THE PORT FORWARD"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Siyuan

    2009-01-01

    @@ To deal with the crisis,the central government of China carried out"ten major industries stimulating programme",which includes logistics and information industry.Lifting the development of logistics and information industry to a level of national strategy,it shows that the central governments is paying great attention to construct modern logistics service system,cut the costs and improve efficiency,bringing an opportunity for Chinese logistics industry.

  13. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Albert; Segerink, Loes

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the re

  14. Celebration of the radium and polonium discovery as a promotion of nuclear energy in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radium and polonium discovery centennial was inaugurated in April 1997. The first event was a Polish-French show of scientific documentary movies on the uses of ionizing radiation and nuclear power. A symposium Radiation - History and Modern Times was organized in spring 1997. Many other interesting events were held throughout 1997. Warsaw hosted an interesting exhibition 'From the Radium Needle to the Medical Accelerators'. A seminar and an exhibition on Radiation Technique in Environmental Protection were organized in cooperation with the IAEA. The Council for Atomic Energy initiated and conducted a workshop on Radioactivity - Risk and Hope. The Polish Academy of Science and the Society of Nuclear Medicine organised a symposium on Polonium and Radium Discovery Impact on Medicine, Radiation Protection and Medical Industry. The National Atomic Energy was the initiator of film shows held for school youth, which turned out to be a great success. The youngsters, mainly from schools bearing the name of Marie Curie, had an opportunity to see films about the great scientist and her discoveries, and on the very phenomenon of radiation. They also had a chance to visit Maria research reactor in the Institute of Atomic Energy in Swierk. Now, at the beginning of February 1998, a three-day scientific session is being held in Warsaw, to commemorate the radium and polonium discovery. Many other events will take place in the coming months. In particular, June 1998, an international conference on Nuclear Physics Close to the Barriers will be held. Another conference, closing the centennial sponsored by UNESCO will focus on the Scientific and Philosophical Consequences of Discovery of Plutonium and Radium, Benefits and Threats to Mankind. Public opinion polls, similar to those conducted in 1996, are planned for spring 1998. The 1996 polls, conducted 10 years after the Chernobyl accident, showed that the majority of Poles feared ionizing radiation and opposed the nuclear power

  15. Using Multimedia to Bring Science News to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, C.; Stein, B.; Lorditch, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Creative partnerships between scientists and journalists open new opportunities to bring the excitement of scientific discoveries to wider audiences. Research tells us that the majority of the general public now gets more science and technology news from the Internet than from TV sources (2014 NSF Science and Engineering Indicators). In order to reach these audiences news organizations must embrace multiple forms of multimedia. We will review recent research on how the new multimedia landscape is changing the way that science news is consumed and how news organizations are changing the way they deliver news. News programs like Inside Science, and other examples of new partnerships that deliver research news to journalists, teachers, students, and the general public will be examined. We will describe examples of successful collaborations including an article by a former Newsweek science reporter entitled "My 1975 'Cooling World' Story Doesn't Make Today's Climate Scientists Wrong," which got reprinted in Slate, RealClearScience, and mentioned in Factcheck.org and USA Today.

  16. Computational drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-sheng OU-YANG; Jun-yan LU; Xiang-qian KONG; Zhong-jie LIANG; Cheng LUO; Hualiang JIANG

    2012-01-01

    Computational drug discovery is an effective strategy for accelerating and economizing drug discovery and development process.Because of the dramatic increase in the availability of biological macromolecule and small molecule information,the applicability of computational drug discovery has been extended and broadly applied to nearly every stage in the drug discovery and development workflow,including target identification and validation,lead discovery and optimization and preclinical tests.Over the past decades,computational drug discovery methods such as molecular docking,pharmacophore modeling and mapping,de novo design,molecular similarity calculation and sequence-based virtual screening have been greatly improved.In this review,we present an overview of these important computational methods,platforms and successful applications in this field.

  17. Reliable knowledge discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Honghua; Smirnov, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Knowledge Discovery focuses on theory, methods, and techniques for RKDD, a new sub-field of KDD. It studies the theory and methods to assure the reliability and trustworthiness of discovered knowledge and to maintain the stability and consistency of knowledge discovery processes. RKDD has a broad spectrum of applications, especially in critical domains like medicine, finance, and military. Reliable Knowledge Discovery also presents methods and techniques for designing robust knowledge-discovery processes. Approaches to assessing the reliability of the discovered knowledge are introduc

  18. Discovery of Invariants through Automated Theory Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Llano, Maria Teresa; Pease, Alison; 10.4204/EPTCS.55.1

    2011-01-01

    Refinement is a powerful mechanism for mastering the complexities that arise when formally modelling systems. Refinement also brings with it additional proof obligations -- requiring a developer to discover properties relating to their design decisions. With the goal of reducing this burden, we have investigated how a general purpose theory formation tool, HR, can be used to automate the discovery of such properties within the context of Event-B. Here we develop a heuristic approach to the automatic discovery of invariants and report upon a series of experiments that we undertook in order to evaluate our approach. The set of heuristics developed provides systematic guidance in tailoring HR for a given Event-B development. These heuristics are based upon proof-failure analysis, and have given rise to some promising results.

  19. Bring your own device -strategia Lahden ammattikorkeakoulussa

    OpenAIRE

    Hänninen, Jasmi

    2015-01-01

    Bring your own device -strategia (BYOD) tarkoittaa käytäntöä, jossa oppilaiden on tarkoitus tuoda oma laitteensa kouluun käyttääkseen sitä opinnoissaan. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia, mitä BYOD tarkoittaa sekä miten sitä käytetään kouluympäristössä. Työssä myös selvitettiin, mitä BYOD:iin liittyviä asioita Lahden ammattikorkeakoulun täytyy huomioida siihen siirryttäessä. Opinnäytetyö on toteutettu toimeksiantona Päijät-Hämeen koulutuskonsernin Tietohallintopalveluille. Opinnä...

  20. Trying Al Qaeda: Bringing Terrorists to Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T. Bell

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were attacked, the United States embarked on a mission to bring those responsible for the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 to justice. A tremendous effort ensued to find and capture the individuals who were responsible or associated with these events. Many of the individuals who were captured have remained imprisoned for an indefinite amount of time due to the political debate regarding what is the most appropriate venue to try suspecgts arrested and charged with acts of terrorism. The choices come down to trial either by a trial by a Military Commission or a U.S. Federal District Court. There are unique challenges for effective prosecution in both venues. Which venue the Obama Administration will deem appropriate to try the terrorists captured by the former administration remains uncertain at this point in time.

  1. Bringing Pulsed Laser Welding into Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, some research and develop-ment activities within pulsed laser welding technology at the Tech-nical University of Denmark will be described. The laser group at the Insti-tute for Manufacturing Technology has nearly 20 years of experience in laser materials process-ing. Inter......-nationally the group is mostly known for its contri-butions to the development of the laser cutting process, but further it has been active within laser welding, both in assisting industry in bringing laser welding into production in several cases and in performing fundamental R & D. In this paper some research...... activities concerning the weldability of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels for mass production industry applying industrial lasers for fine welding will be described. Studies on hot cracking sensitivity of high alloyed austenitic stainless steel applying both ND-YAG-lasers and CO2-lasers has been...

  2. Applying genetics in inflammatory disease drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Biswas, Shameek; Frederiksen, Klaus Stensgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking work in genetics has identified thousands of small-effect genetic variants throughout the genome that are associated with almost all major diseases. These genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often proposed as a source of future medical breakthroughs. However, with sev...... alongside existing drug discovery methods. Our aim is to evaluate human genetic confidence as a rationale for drug target selection....... several notable exceptions, the journey from a small-effect genetic variant to a functional drug has proven arduous, and few examples of actual contributions to drug discovery exist. Here, we discuss novel approaches of overcoming this hurdle by using instead public genetics resources as a pragmatic guide...

  3. Decades of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    For the past two-and-a-half decades, the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy has been at the forefront of scientific discovery. Over 100 important discoveries supported by the Office of Science are represented in this document.

  4. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  5. Higgs Discovery Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS & CMS Experiments Celebrate the 2nd Anniversary of the Discovery of the Higgs boson. Here, are some images of the path from LHC startup to Nobel Prize, featuring a musical composition by Roger Zare, performed by the Donald Sinta Quartet, called “LHC”. Happy Discovery Day!

  6. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... womb (uterus). There are different types of medical abortions: Therapeutic medical abortion is done because the woman has ... Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion

  7. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  8. Bringing Drumsticks to Funerals. Jamming as Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinck, Lars

    2012-01-01

    improvised music itself are inseparable and interdependant. Learning to jam is argued to be situated in the social practice of jamming, thus prototypically presenting learning to be analyzed as improvised development of practice per se. A discussion of the findings' potential for developing teaching...... musical practices such as jam session is characterized by the iterative discovery of new action possibilities in pursuing a collectively negotiated 'common third': the good music. The study further argues that the musicians’ perpetually changing participation in the jam practice and the development of the......This ethnographically inspired field study employs social practice theory in analyzing New Orleans jazz and funk musicians' jamming as learning. Through analysis of participant observation and qualitative interviews the study argues that the musicians' participation in collectively improvised...

  9. Bringing Seismological Research into the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    One of the primary goals of educational seismology programs is to bring inquiry-based research to the middle- and high-school classroom setting. Although it is often stated as a long-term goal of science outreach programs, in practice there are many barriers to research in the school setting, among them increasing emphasis on test-oriented training, decreasing interest and participation in science fairs, limited teacher confidence and experience for mentoring research, insufficient student preparedness for research projects, and the short term of university involvement (typically limited to brief one-day encounters). For the past three+ years we have tried to address these issues through a focused outreach program we have called the PEPP Research Fellows Program. This is treated as an honors program in which high school teachers in our group nominate students with interests in science careers. These students are invited to participate in the program, and those who elect to take part participate in a one-day education and training session in the fall. Rather than leave research projects completely open, we direct the students at toward one of two specific, group-oriented projects (in our case, one focusing on local recordings of mining explosions, and a second on teleseismic body-wave analysis), but we encourage them to act as independent researchers and follow topics of interest. The students then work on seismic data from the local educational network or from the IRIS facilities. Following several months of informal interaction with teachers and students (email, web conferencing, etc.), we bring the students and teachers to our university for a weekend research symposium in the spring. Students present their work in oral or poster form and prizes are given for the best papers. Projects range from highly local projects (records of seismic noise at school X) to larger-scale regional projects (analysis of teleseismic P-wave delays at PEPP network stations) From 20 to

  10. Worldwide Discoveries Help People Everywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Worldwide Discoveries Help People Everywhere Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... shows examples of discoveries and their impact. Diseases Discoveries The Benefits for All Americans Huntington's Disease Venezuela— ...

  11. Poster power brings together electronics community

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    An 'Electronics at CERN' poster session was displayed on the mezzanine in building 500 for two days from 30 November. The display consisted of 20 posters and brought together a wide range of electronic projects designed and assembled by CERN teams and other collaborators involved in the building of the LHC. This was the first time this event had been held. As its organiser John Evans (IT/DES) explained, 'the idea came from the experience of attending conferences outside CERN, where you may find projects from CERN you didn't know about. It's nice to bring them together so we can all benefit from the efforts made.' The work on show spanned different departments and experiments, ranging from microelectronics to equipment designed for giant magnets. The invited audience was equally broad and included engineers, physicists as well as the electronics community at CERN. An informal gathering of all the exhibitors also offered an opportunity to view and discuss the work over a cup of coffee. 'The poster session acts...

  12. Bringing science to the policy table

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    “They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation shall not lift up sword against nation. Neither shall they learn war anymore." So says Isaiah 2:4, as transcribed on the famous wall in Ralph Bunche park, just the other side of 1st Avenue from the UN’s New York headquarters, where we held a celebration of our 60th anniversary year on Monday 20 October. I used the quotation in my opening address, since it is such a perfect fit to the theme of 60 years of science for peace and development.   The event was organised with the United Nations Economic and Social Council, ECOSOC, in the framework of CERN’s observer status at the UN, and although focused on CERN, its aim was broader. Presentations used CERN as an example to bring out the vital importance of science in general to the themes of peace and development. The event was presided over by Martin Sajdik, President of ECOSOC, and we were privileged to have presentat...

  13. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  14. Toxins and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. PMID:25448391

  15. Leadership and Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Goethals, George R

    2009-01-01

    This book, a collection of essays from scholars across disciplines, explores leadership of discovery, probing the guided and collaborative exploration and interpretation of the experience of our inner thoughts and feelings, and of our external worlds

  16. Fateful discovery almost forgotten

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    "The discovery of the fission of uranium exactly half a century ago is at risk of passing unremarked because of the general ambivalence towards the consequences of this development. Can that be wise?" (4 pages)

  17. Discovery Driven Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august......Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august...

  18. Higgs Discovery before LHC?

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarelli, Giorgio; Collaboration, for the CDF; The D0 Collaboration

    2001-01-01

    The proposed Run IIb of the Tevatron Collider will provide 15 fb-1 worth of ppbar data at c.o.m energy of 2 TeV per experiment by year 2007. We review the plans of the Tevatron accelerator complex upgrade and the plans for the upgrades of the experiments to match this challenge. Perspectives for the discovery of an Higgs particle are reviewed and the concrete possibility of a 5 sigmas discovery for a low mass Higgs are discussed.

  19. Discovery in a World of Mashups

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T. A.; Ritschel, B.; Hourcle, J. A.; Moon, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    When the first digital information was stored electronically, discovery of what existed was through file names and the organization of the file system. With the advent of networks, digital information was shared on a wider scale, but discovery remained based on file and folder names. With a growing number of information sources, named based discovery quickly became ineffective. The keyword based search engine was one of the first types of a mashup in the world of Web 1.0. Embedded links from one document to another with prescribed relationships between files and the world of Web 2.0 was formed. Search engines like Google used the links to improve search results and a worldwide mashup was formed. While a vast improvement, the need for semantic (meaning rich) discovery was clear, especially for the discovery of scientific data. In response, every science discipline defined schemas to describe their type of data. Some core schemas where shared, but most schemas are custom tailored even though they share many common concepts. As with the networking of information sources, science increasingly relies on data from multiple disciplines. So there is a need to bring together multiple sources of semantically rich information. We explore how harvesting, conceptual mapping, facet based search engines, search term promotion, and style sheets can be combined to create the next generation of mashups in the emerging world of Web 3.0. We use NASA's Planetary Data System and NASA's Heliophysics Data Environment to illustrate how to create a multi-discipline mash-up.

  20. Stress and mental health among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Backović Dušan V.; Maksimović Miloš; Davidović Dragana; Ilić-Živojinović Jelena; Stevanović Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in...

  1. Bringing Science out of the Lab into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Science is moving more rapidly than ever; one groundbreaking discovery chases the next at an incredible speed. School teachers have trouble keeping up with the pace, and many pupils call science classes "boring". Today, Europe's major research organisations launch Science in School, the first international, multidisciplinary journal for innovative science teaching, to provide a platform for communication between science teachers, practising scientists and other stakeholders in science education. ESO PR Photo 12/06 ESO PR Photo 12/06 First Issue! "Science is becoming increasingly international and interdisciplinary," says Eleanor Hayes, editor of the journal. "The most exciting development of the day may happen anywhere in any field: students may suddenly want to talk about a discovery on Mars, a medical breakthrough or a natural disaster. On such days it would be a shame not to put the textbooks aside and to capitalise on that curiosity." Published by EIROforum, a partnership between Europe's seven largest intergovernmental research organisations, Science in School will bridge the gap between the worlds of research and schools. One extremely powerful tool to achieve this is the journal's web-based discussion forum that will establish a direct dialogue between science teachers and researchers across national and subject boundaries. Science in School will appear quarterly online and in print and will feature news about the latest scientific discoveries, teaching materials, interviews with inspiring teachers and scientists, reviews of books, films and websites, suggestions for class trips, training opportunities and many other useful resources for science teachers. Contributors to the first issue include the world-renowned neurologist and author Oliver Sachs, and scientists and teachers from nine countries. "We urgently need to engage young people in science. This is why the research community and the European Commission are committed to outreach and education

  2. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine you’re at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (You’ve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your home’s energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise™ Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers’ behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100

  3. A Decade of Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a fascinating account of some of the most significant scientific discoveries and technological innovations coming out of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories. This remarkable book illustrates how the men and women of the National Laboratories are keeping us on the cutting edge. Though few Americans are familiar with the scope and scale of the work conducted at these National Laboratories, their research is literally changing our lives and bettering our planet. The book describes the scientific discoveries and technological advancements "in recognition of the men and women working in DOE's seventeen national laboratories across the country." Through highly vivid and accessible stories, this book details recent breakthroughs in three critical areas: 1) Energy and Environment, 2) National Security and 3) Life and Physical Science. The book illustrates how this government-funded research has resulted in more energy-efficient buildings; new, cleaner alternative fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; safer, more efficient, nuclear power plants; improved responses to disease outbreaks; more secure and streamlined airport security; more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases; and astonishing discoveries that are altering our understanding of the universe and enabling scientific breakthroughs in fields such as nanotechnology and particle physics. Specifically, it contains 37 stories. A Decade of Discovery is truly a recent history of discovery - and a fascinating look at what the next decade holds.

  4. Physics instrumentation for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Nobel Physics Prize, awarded in 1901, went to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays in 1895. This, and the most recent physics Nobel, to Georges Charpak last year for his detector developments, span several generations of applied science. As well as helping to launch the science of atomic physics, Röntgen's discovery also marked the dawn of a medical science - radiography - using beams of various kinds to image what otherwise cannot be seen. Ever since, physicists and radiologists have worked hand in hand to improve imaging techniques and widen their medical applications

  5. From the Moon: Bringing Space Science to Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, C. J.; Hall, C.; Joyner, E.; Meyer, H. M.; M3 Science; E/PO Team

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Apollo missions held a place in the mindset of many Americans - we dared to go someplace where humans had never set foot, a place unknown and beyond our imaginations. These early NASA missions and discoveries resulted in an enhanced public understanding of the Moon. Now, with the human element so far removed from space exploration, students must rely on textbooks, TV's, and computers to build their understanding of our Moon. However, NASA educational materials about the Moon are stale and out-of-date. In addition, they do not effectively address 21st Century Skills, an essential for today's classrooms. Here, we present a three-part model for developing opportunities in lunar science education professional development that is replicable and sustainable and integrates NASA mission-derived data (e.g., Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)/Chandrayaan-1). I) With the return of high resolution/high spatial data from M3/Chandrayaan-1, we can now better explore and understand the compositional variations on the lunar surface. Data and analysis techniques from the imaging spectrometer are incorporated into the M3 Educator's Guide: Seeing the Moon in a New Light. The guide includes an array of activities and lessons to help educators and students understand how NASA is currently exploring the Moon. The guide integrates NASA maps and data into the interactive lessons, bringing the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into the classroom. II) Utilizing the M3 Educator's Guide as well as educational activities from more current NASA lunar missions, we offer two sustained professional development opportunities for educators to explore the Moon through interactive and creative strategies. 1) Geology of the Moon, an online course offered through Montana State University's National Teacher Enhancement Network, is a 3-credit graduate course. 2) Fly Me to the Moon, offered through the College of Charleston's Office of Professional Development in Education, is a two

  6. Knowledge Discovery from Biomedical Ontologies in Cross Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feichen; Lee, Yugyung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there is an increasing demand for sharing and integration of medical data in biomedical research. In order to improve a health care system, it is required to support the integration of data by facilitating semantic interoperability systems and practices. Semantic interoperability is difficult to achieve in these systems as the conceptual models underlying datasets are not fully exploited. In this paper, we propose a semantic framework, called Medical Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (MedKDD), that aims to build a topic hierarchy and serve the semantic interoperability between different ontologies. For the purpose, we fully focus on the discovery of semantic patterns about the association of relations in the heterogeneous information network representing different types of objects and relationships in multiple biological ontologies and the creation of a topic hierarchy through the analysis of the discovered patterns. These patterns are used to cluster heterogeneous information networks into a set of smaller topic graphs in a hierarchical manner and then to conduct cross domain knowledge discovery from the multiple biological ontologies. Thus, patterns made a greater contribution in the knowledge discovery across multiple ontologies. We have demonstrated the cross domain knowledge discovery in the MedKDD framework using a case study with 9 primary biological ontologies from Bio2RDF and compared it with the cross domain query processing approach, namely SLAP. We have confirmed the effectiveness of the MedKDD framework in knowledge discovery from multiple medical ontologies. PMID:27548262

  7. Medical marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized ...

  8. Bring out your codes! Bring out your codes! (Increasing Software Visibility and Re-use)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A.; Berriman, B.; Brunner, R.; Burger, D.; DuPrie, K.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mann, R.; Mink, J.; Sandin, C.; Shortridge, K.; Teuben, P.

    2013-10-01

    Progress is being made in code discoverability and preservation, but as discussed at ADASS XXI, many codes still remain hidden from public view. With the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) now indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the introduction of a new journal, Astronomy & Computing, focused on astrophysics software, and the increasing success of education efforts such as Software Carpentry and SciCoder, the community has the opportunity to set a higher standard for its science by encouraging the release of software for examination and possible reuse. We assembled representatives of the community to present issues inhibiting code release and sought suggestions for tackling these factors. The session began with brief statements by panelists; the floor was then opened for discussion and ideas. Comments covered a diverse range of related topics and points of view, with apparent support for the propositions that algorithms should be readily available, code used to produce published scientific results should be made available, and there should be discovery mechanisms to allow these to be found easily. With increased use of resources such as GitHub (for code availability), ASCL (for code discovery), and a stated strong preference from the new journal Astronomy & Computing for code release, we expect to see additional progress over the next few years.

  9. Beacons of discovery the worldwide science of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA)

    2011-01-01

    To discover what our world is made of and how it works at the most fundamental level is the challenge of particle physics. The tools of particle physics—experiments at particle accelerators and underground laboratories, together with observations of space—bring opportunities for discovery never before within reach. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world collaborate to design, build and use unique detectors and accelerators to explore the fundamental physics of matter, energy, space and time. Together, in a common world-wide program of discovery, they provide a deep understanding of the world around us and countless benefits to society. Beacons of Discovery presents a vision of the global science of particle physics at the dawn of a new light on the mystery and beauty of the universe.

  10. Evaluating ten discoveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-02-01

    Mexico's state company, Pemex, announces 10 significant oil and gas discoveries in the states of Tamaulipas and Chiapas. Most promising finds are a new oil province in S. Mexico and a deeper pool strike at the offshore Arenque field. The latter seems to point to the existence of an attractive reefal trend extending on shore toward the State of Nuevo Leon.

  11. Discovery of TUG-770

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Steffen V F; Urban, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1 or GPR40) enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and currently attracts high interest as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We here report the discovery of a highly potent FFA1 agonist with favorable physicochemical...

  12. Mental and Medical sciences today

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Rowland; Ion G. Motofei

    2014-01-01

    Journal of Mind and Medical Sciences is designed as a free online, open access, interdisciplinary and peer-reviewed journal. The JMMS mission is to address ideas and issues related to mind and medicine, publishing scientific review and empirical papers regarding mental and medical health and disease. Our goal is to stimulate constructive debates among scholars, researchers, physicians, scientists and health professionals with respect to the latest discoveries and trends in the field. The jour...

  13. Data Warehouse Discovery Framework: The Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanowicz, Cas

    The cost of building an Enterprise Data Warehouse Environment runs usually in millions of dollars and takes years to complete. The cost, as big as it is, is not the primary problem for a given corporation. The risk that all money allocated for planning, design and implementation of the Data Warehouse and Business Intelligence Environment may not bring the result expected, fare out way the cost of entire effort [2,10]. The combination of the two above factors is the main reason that Data Warehouse/Business Intelligence is often single most expensive and most risky IT endeavor for companies [13]. That situation was the main author's inspiration behind founding of Infobright Corp and later on the concept of Data Warehouse Discovery Framework.

  14. COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158852.html COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment Study may help pinpoint ... will progress, a discovery they believe could improve COPD treatment. Their research might help doctors determine which ...

  15. COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158852.html COPD Discovery Might Improve Treatment Study may help pinpoint ... will progress, a discovery they believe could improve COPD treatment. Their research might help doctors determine which ...

  16. Creating A Guided- discovery Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田枫

    2005-01-01

    In a guided - discovery lesson, students sequentially uncover layers of mathematical information one step at a time and learn new mathematics. We have identified eight critical steps necessary in developing a successful guided- discovery lesson.

  17. Bring your own device (BYOD) to work trend report

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to Work examines the emerging BYOD (Bring Your Own Device to work) trend in corporate IT. BYOD is the practice of employees bringing personally-owned mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets, laptops) to the workplace, and using those devices to access company resources such as email, file servers, and databases. BYOD presents unique challenges in data privacy, confidentiality, security, productivity, and acceptable use that must be met proactively by information security professionals. This report provides solid background on the practice, original res

  18. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects of the medications on your hearing and balance systems. The team will discuss with you how these side effects will affect your quality of life. What are the effects I may notice from ... speech is affected. Balance problems can also occur as a result of ...

  19. Clinical research and the development of medical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Elliott M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research plays a central role in the development of medical therapeutics, but the current system is estimated to take 10-15 years from initial discovery to regulatory approval, at a cost of approximately US$1 billion. Contrast the paths by which 2 anticoagulant options for atrial fibrillation were discovered and ultimately established as treatment options in clinical medicine. Warfarin was discovered by serendipity and compared with placebo in relatively small trials; this was associated with a low cost of development. The new oral anticoagulants were synthesized to provide highly specific, targeted inhibition of critical steps in the coagulation system. They were compared with warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolic events in large, phase 3 trials; this resulted in very expensive development programs. Neither of these paths is desirable for future development of therapeutics. We need to focus on innovative approaches at the preclinical level (systems approach, greater use of inducible pluripotent stem cells, use of novel bioengineering platforms) and clinical trial level (adaptive design, greater use of new and emerging technology). Focusing on disruptive innovations for development of medical therapeutics has the potential to bring us closer to the goal of precision medicine where safer, more effective treatments are discovered in a more efficient system. PMID:24837573

  20. Discovery with FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  1. Fateful discovery almost forgotten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the discovery of the fission of uranium, which took place fifty years ago. A description is given of the work of Meitner and Frisch in interpreting the Fermi data on the bombardment of uranium nuclei with neutrons, i.e. proposing fission. The historical events associated with the development and exploitation of uranium fission are described, including the Manhattan Project, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Shippingport, and Chernobyl. (U.K.)

  2. Opportunistic Adaptation Knowledge Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Badra, Fadi; Cordier, Amélie; Lieber, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com International audience Adaptation has long been considered as the Achilles' heel of case-based reasoning since it requires some domain-specific knowledge that is difficult to acquire. In this paper, two strategies are combined in order to reduce the knowledge engineering cost induced by the adaptation knowledge (CA) acquisition task: CA is learned from the case base by the means of knowledge discovery techniques, and the CA a...

  3. Discovery as a process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1994-05-01

    The three great myths, which form a sort of triumvirate of misunderstanding, are the Eureka! myth, the hypothesis myth, and the measurement myth. These myths are prevalent among scientists as well as among observers of science. The Eureka! myth asserts that discovery occurs as a flash of insight, and as such is not subject to investigation. This leads to the perception that discovery or deriving a hypothesis is a moment or event rather than a process. Events are singular and not subject to description. The hypothesis myth asserts that proper science is motivated by testing hypotheses, and that if something is not experimentally testable then it is not scientific. This myth leads to absurd posturing by some workers conducting empirical descriptive studies, who dress up their study with a ``hypothesis`` to obtain funding or get it published. Methods papers are often rejected because they do not address a specific scientific problem. The fact is that many of the great breakthroughs in silence involve methods and not hypotheses or arise from largely descriptive studies. Those captured by this myth also try to block funding for those developing methods. The third myth is the measurement myth, which holds that determining what to measure is straightforward, so one doesn`t need a lot of introspection to do science. As one ecologist put it to me ``Don`t give me any of that philosophy junk, just let me out in the field. I know what to measure.`` These myths lead to difficulties for scientists who must face peer review to obtain funding and to get published. These myths also inhibit the study of science as a process. Finally, these myths inhibit creativity and suppress innovation. In this paper I first explore these myths in more detail and then propose a new model of discovery that opens the supposedly miraculous process of discovery to doser scrutiny.

  4. Climate Change May Bring More Tainted Shellfish to Northern Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160300.html Climate Change May Bring More Tainted Shellfish to Northern Seas ... must be monitored "in the light of ongoing climate change, especially in coastal areas most heavily affected by ...

  5. Dubna at Play Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The small town of Dubna brings together the advantages of urban and country lifestyles. Dubna people spend a large part of their time outdoors taking part in all kind of sports or simply enjoying the beautiful surroundings.

  6. Dubna at Play Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Document Server

    1997-01-01

    The small town of Dubna brings together the advantages of urban and country lifestyles. Dubna people spend a large part of their time outdoors taking part in all kind of sports or simply enjoying the beautiful surroundings.

  7. Major Ups and Downs: Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Major Ups and Downs Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings Most people feel happy ... Strike Out Stroke Wise Choices Links Dealing with Bipolar Disorder If you have bipolar disorder, get treatment and ...

  8. Bringing History Home. Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural Arena

    OpenAIRE

    Legêne, S.

    2011-01-01

    Bringing History Home: Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural ArenaThree Dutch-language monographs published in 2008-2009 by Ulbe Bosma, Lizzy van Leeuwen and Gert Oostindie in the context of the interdisciplinary research programme Bringing History Home, present a history of identity politics in relation to ‘postcolonial immigrants’. This term refers to some 500,000 people who since 1945 arrived in the Netherlands from Indonesia and the former Dutch New Guinea, Suriname or the Antill...

  9. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  10. Mathematical models in biological discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Charles

    1977-01-01

    When I was asked to help organize an American Association for the Advancement of Science symposium about how mathematical models have con­ tributed to biology, I agreed immediately. The subject is of immense importance and wide-spread interest. However, too often it is discussed in biologically sterile environments by "mutual admiration society" groups of "theoreticians", many of whom have never seen, and most of whom have never done, an original scientific experiment with the biolog­ ical materials they attempt to describe in abstract (and often prejudiced) terms. The opportunity to address the topic during an annual meeting of the AAAS was irresistable. In order to try to maintain the integrity ;,f the original intent of the symposium, it was entitled, "Contributions of Mathematical Models to Biological Discovery". This symposium was organized by Daniel Solomon and myself, held during the 141st annual meeting of the AAAS in New York during January, 1975, sponsored by sections G and N (Biological and Medic...

  11. Microfluidics for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, T.J.T.P.; Segerink, Loes

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the reader with a comprehensive review of the latest developments in the application of microfluidics to medicine and is divided into three main sections. The first part of the book discusses the state-of...

  12. Advances in Chance Discovery : Extended Selection from International Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Since year 2000, scientists on artificial and natural intelligences started to study chance discovery - methods for discovering events/situations that significantly affect decision making. Partially because the editors Ohsawa and Abe are teaching at schools of Engineering and of Literature with sharing the interest in chance discovery, this book reflects interdisciplinary aspects of progress: First, as an interdisciplinary melting pot of cognitive science, computational intelligence, data mining/visualization, collective intelligence, … etc, chance discovery came to reach new application domains e.g. health care, aircraft control, energy plant, management of technologies, product designs, innovations, marketing, finance etc. Second, basic technologies and sciences including sensor technologies, medical sciences, communication technologies etc. joined this field and interacted with cognitive/computational scientists in workshops on chance discovery, to obtain breakthroughs by stimulating each other. Third, �...

  13. Medical Virology in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua

    2009-01-01

    Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and Virus Research in the institute on 23 March 1953. The second institution in the country to establish diagnostic and research work in medical virology was Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya. This was followed by University Kebangsaan Malaysia, University Sains Malaysia and University of Sarawak Malaysia. The National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) is the latest institution to establish a laboratory in 2003 for virus isolation and services to support country surveillance and outbreak investigation of infectious diseases due to viruses. In the field of medical virology, Malaysia contributed substantially in the areas of virus diagnostic services, development and research ranging from survey and documentation on the existence and prevalence of viruses causing diseases in Malaysia, clinical presentation and epidemiological features of virus diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic tests to pathogenesis of viral diseases. Malaysia contributed to the discoveries of at least 12 new viruses in the world. ASEAN plus Three (China, Japan, Republic of Korea) Emerging Infectious Programme was established to overcome the challenges and impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in this region. Malaysia as the co-ordinator of the laboratory component of the programme, contributed to strengthen the regional laboratory capability, capacity, laboratory-based surveillance and networking. The future of medical virology in Malaysia in terms of integration of diagnostic, reference and research to support the country's need will be enhanced and strengthened with the on

  14. Turning Discovery Into Health – Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... untargeted research. NIH not only supports these basic advances but also conducts the clinical and translational research that transforms discoveries into medical practice in four areas: chronic diseases, infectious diseases, personalized medicine and new technologies, and health at all ages. ...

  15. Physics aids new medical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays, fundamental physics has been a source of ideas for radiography and medical imaging. A new imaging method firmly rooted in particle physics was chosen by Time magazine as one of its "Inventions of the Year 2000". The award-winning invention in the medical science category was a scanner that combined the advantages of computer tomography with positron emission tomography. The use of these techniques, which depend on detecting and analysing electromagnetic radiation (X-rays or gamma rays respectively), show that detection techniques from particle physics have made, and continue to make, essential contributions to medical science. (0 refs).

  16. Interpretation of a discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Vučković Vladan

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the development of the theory of asynchronous motors since Tesla’s discovery until the present day. The theory of steady state, as we know it today, was completed already during the first dozen of years. That was followed by a period of stagnation during a number of decades, when the theory of asynchronous motors was developed only in the framework of the general theory of electric machines, which was stimulated by the problems of the development of synchronous generators a...

  17. Discovery Mondays - 'Eureka! Meet the inventors'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Fabio Sauli, the inventor of the GEM detector. Do you imagine an invention as a spontaneous brainchild emergi from the convoluted mind of some scatterbrained and dishevelled scientist? If so, you are mistaken! Join us at Microcosm for the next Discovery Monday at which inventors will be the guests of honour. There you will meet scientists who, thanks to their creativity, have made technological progress possible. By constantly rising to new scientific and technological challenges, CERN has delivered numerous innovations, particularly in the medical field. Members of the Crystal Clear collaboration and the inventor of the GEM detector will give talks about their innovations and their applications, in particular for medical purposes. You will also be able to speak to members of the Medipix collaboration, which is working on improvements to X-ray and gamma ray imaging techniques. The event will be conducted in French. Come to Microcosm, (Reception Building 33, Meyrin site), on Monday 6 February from 7.30 p...

  18. AN AHP MODEL FOR BRINGING EXPERTS TO CONSENSUS ON MEDICAL PAYMENT STANDARDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Huei HUANG; Pei-Yeh CHANG; Chih-Young HUNG; Kuei-Ing WANG; King-Jen CHANG

    2006-01-01

    Many countries with health insurance systems conduct periodic payment standards reform. How to reach consensus in setting payment standards among different specialties with different agendas has become a critical issue. The purpose of this study is to construct an analytic hierarchy process (AHP)model to obtain judgments from experts about the importance of "factors related to establishing payment standards in the national health insurance program". Under this goal, the first tier contains four evaluation aspects, and the second tier contains sixteen evaluation criteria divided into four groups.The AHP model was then used to collect and combine the opinions of experts through an empirical study. The results can be directly used to formulate standard values as the basis for establishing payment standards. The results of our study strongly support that an AHP model is effective in forming a consensus among surgical specialists.

  19. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  20. Representation Discovery using Harmonic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Representations are at the heart of artificial intelligence (AI). This book is devoted to the problem of representation discovery: how can an intelligent system construct representations from its experience? Representation discovery re-parameterizes the state space - prior to the application of information retrieval, machine learning, or optimization techniques - facilitating later inference processes by constructing new task-specific bases adapted to the state space geometry. This book presents a general approach to representation discovery using the framework of harmonic analysis, in particu

  1. An Approach to Implement Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Securely

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gupta; Deepak Sangroha; Lovekesh Dhiman

    2013-01-01

    BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is a business policy to allow employees to bring their own devices at their work. The same device is used in and out of the corporate office and during outside use, it may be connected to insecure internet and critical corporate data become public. This can be a big threat to the office as well as business strategies and future policies are derived from this data. In this paper an approach is explained to guard against this type of threat and to secure the corpora...

  2. Does Satisfaction with Teaching Quality Factors Bring Conceptual Change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifur Rehman Khan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore classroom teaching quality factors that determine the satisfaction level and ultimately bring conceptual change among students. This study tests the theories of customer satisfaction in educational psychology research on a sample of 972 respondents. Overwhelmingly the results point out that male students were highly dissatisfied and have little impact on conceptual change whereas female students were reported significant level of satisfaction and conceptual change. In conclusion, detailed empirical analyses promote the theory of learning-satisfaction with classroom teaching bring conceptual change.

  3. Framework for Bringing Data Streams to the Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Beth Plale

    2004-01-01

    Data streams are a prevalent and growing source of timely data, particularly in the scientific domain. Just as it is common today to read starting conditions such as initial weather conditions, for a scientific simulation from a file, it should be equally as easy to draw starting conditions on-demand from live data streams. But efforts to date to bring streaming data to the grid have lacked generality. In this article we introduce a new model for bringing existing data streams systems onto th...

  4. An Approach to Implement Bring Your Own Device (BYOD Securely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Vishal Gupta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BYOD (Bring Your Own Device is a business policy to allow employees to bring their own devices at their work. The same device is used in and out of the corporate office and during outside use, it may be connected to insecure internet and critical corporate data become public. This can be a big threat to the office as well as business strategies and future policies are derived from this data. In this paper an approach is explained to guard against this type of threat and to secure the corporate data even outside the corporate premises.

  5. Denton Vacuum Discovery-550 Sputterer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: CORAL Name: Sputter 2 Similar to the existing 4-Gun Denton Discovery 22 Sputter system, with the following enhancements: Specifications / Capabilities:...

  6. The Legitimacy of Medical Treatment : What role for the medical exception

    OpenAIRE

    Fovargue, Sara; Mullock, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Whenever the legitimacy of a new or ethically contentious medical intervention is considered, a range of influences will determine whether the treatment becomes accepted as lawful medical treatment. The development and introduction of abortion, organ donation, gender reassignment, and non-therapeutic cosmetic surgery have, for example, all raised ethical, legal, and clinical issues. This book examines the various factors that legitimatise a medical procedure. Bringing together a range of ...

  7. Modernizing and Transforming Medical Education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College

    OpenAIRE

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college’s medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-o...

  8. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery. PMID:21782516

  9. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology - due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented - by preventing malaria or early EBV infection - were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world's poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  10. SocialScope: Enabling Information Discovery on Social Content Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Amer-Yahia, Sihem; Yu, Cong

    2009-01-01

    Recently, many content sites have started encouraging their users to engage in social activities such as adding buddies on Yahoo! Travel and sharing articles with their friends on New York Times. This has led to the emergence of {\\em social content sites}, which is being facilitated by initiatives like OpenID (http://www.openid.net/) and OpenSocial (http://www.opensocial.org/). These community standards enable the open access to users' social profiles and connections by individual content sites and are bringing content-oriented sites and social networking sites ever closer. The integration of content and social information raises new challenges for {\\em information management and discovery} over such sites. We propose a logical architecture, named \\kw{SocialScope}, consisting of three layers, for tackling the challenges. The {\\em content management} layer is responsible for integrating, maintaining and physically accessing the content and social data. The {\\em information discovery} layer takes care of analyz...

  11. Bring Your Own Device: Parental Guidance (PG) Suggested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiger, Derick; Herro, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Educators are incorporating students' mobile devices into the schooling experience via Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. This is advantageous for many reasons, most notably, improving access to Internet resources and digital tools in support of teaching and learning. Obtaining parental support is key to BYOD success. Therefore, this study…

  12. Bringing the Outside In: Insects and Their Galls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Ness, Daniel; Wilkens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Introduces gall-making insects and explains gall development. Explains how to bring galls into the classroom and conduct experiments. Suggests using gall systems to introduce students to the concepts of genetic control, biodiversity, plant and animal development, species interactions, biodiversity, and the flow of energy through the food web. (YDS)

  13. Foreign Aided: Why Democratization Brings Growth When Democracy Does Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    2015-01-01

    if being one does not? This article shows that a substantial and immediate influx of foreign aid into new democracies accounts for the positive growth effect of democratization. The domestic regime characteristics of neither democracy nor democratization therefore seems to bring growth. The...

  14. On Bringing Industry English Teaching into College English Course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏圆圆

    2016-01-01

    With the development of global economy, it’s becoming increasingly important to bring industry English into College English Course. But there are still many problems about industry English teaching in most colleges. This paper will analyze these problems and put forward effective measures to promote industry English teaching.

  15. Bring Your Own Digital Device in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, C. Paul; Cooper, Martin; Pagram, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation to advise a teacher education institution on the feasibility of having a "Bring Your Own Digital Device" policy for students. The investigation built on components of two research projects while adding the comprehensive testing of representative potential hardware and software platforms. The…

  16. Excelsior: Bringing the Benefits of Modularisation to Excel

    OpenAIRE

    Paine, Jocelyn

    2008-01-01

    Excel lacks features for modular design. Had it such features, as do most programming languages, they would save time, avoid unneeded programming, make mistakes less likely, make code-control easier, help organisations adopt a uniform house style, and open business opportunities in buying and selling spreadsheet modules. I present Excelsior, a system for bringing these benefits to Excel.

  17. Pastoral del Nino: Bringing the Abundant Life to Paraguayan Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ann Berghout; Aquino, Cyle; Burro, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Pastoral del Nino is transforming children's lives in rural Paraguay. Part of Pastoral Social (Catholic Social Services), Pastoral del Nino's primary focus is to bring "vida en abundancia" (the abundant life) to families by ensuring that mothers survive childbirth and children reach their first birthdays. In addition, the organization promotes…

  18. Bringing Curriculum Theory and Didactics Together: A Deweyan Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongyi

    2016-01-01

    Using Dewey's method of resolution for resolving a dualism exemplified in "The Child and the Curriculum," this article reconciles and brings together two rival schools of thought--curriculum theory and didactics--in China. The central thesis is that the rapprochement requires a reconceptualisation of curriculum theory and didactics in…

  19. Bringing internet connectivity to rural Zambia using a collaborative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthee, K.W.; Mweemba, G.; Pais, A.V.; Starn, G.V.; Rijken, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an initiative to bring connectivity to rural Zambia using a collaborative approach. In particular, it focuses on a proof-of-concept Internet service that has been implemented in rural Macha located in the Southern Province of Zambia. The service operates using satellite terminals

  20. Medical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and authentic illustrations used in the publication of medical books, journals, films, videotapes, exhibits, posters, wall charts, and computer programs. A medical illustrator may also work as a member of ...

  1. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity is the...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective...

  2. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  3. Academic medical product development: an emerging alliance of technology transfer organizations and the CTSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-12-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS clinical and translational science award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related inventions. The technology transfer Offices (TTO) of CTSA-funded universities can be important partners in the development process; facilitating the transfer of medical research to the commercial sector for further development and ultimately, distribution to patients. The Aggregating Intellectual Property (IP) Working Group (AWG) of the CTSA public private partnerships key function committee (PPP-KFC) developed a survey to explore how CTSA-funded institutions currently interface with their respective TTOs to support medical product development. The results suggest a range of relationships across institutions; approximately half have formal collaborative programs, but only a few have well-connected programs. Models of collaborations are described and provided as examples of successful CTSA/TTO partnerships that have increased the value of health-related inventions as measured by follow-on funding and industry involvement; either as a consulting partner or licensee. PMID:24945893

  4. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  5. Service discovery using Bloom filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goering, Patrick; Heijenk, Geert; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Haverkort, B.R.H.M.; Laat, de C.T.A.M.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A protocol to perform service discovery in adhoc networks is introduced in this paper. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to distribute services to nodes in the neighborhood and thus enable local service discovery. The protocol has been implemented in a discrete event simulator to investigate the beh

  6. Developing a Medical Image Content Repository for E-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Tien-Cheng; Chang, Jing Ning; Stephen J.H. Yang; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei Chyn

    2006-01-01

    The integration of medical informatics and e-learning systems could provide many advanced applications including training, knowledge management, telemedicine, etc. Currently, both the domains of e-learning and medical image have sophisticated specifications and standards. It is a great challenge to bring about integration. In this paper, we describe the development of a Web interface for searching and viewing medical images that are stored in standard medical image servers. With the creation ...

  7. Discovery of the Latent Supportive Relevance in Medical Data Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Sam; Wong, Fai; Ding, Qiulin; Li, Yiping; Dong, Mingchui

    2008-01-01

    5.1. Conclusions In this paper, we have proposed a novel concept of improving the classification accuracy for common learning algorithms by uncovering the potential attributes relevance through multivariate interdependent attribute pre-processing methods. However, many common pre-processing methods ignored the latent inter-correlation between attributes, this sometimes may loose the potential hidden valuable information, thus limit the performance of the learning algorithms. Especially in med...

  8. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-05-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. Key messages The medical disorders with the current best evidence that supports a benefit for cannabinoid use are the following: multiple sclerosis patient-reported symptoms of spasticity (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis central pain or painful spasms (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis bladder frequency (nabiximols), and chronic cancer pain/neuropathic pain (nabiximols and smoked THC). Herbal cannabis has not met rigorous US FDA

  9. Discovery and Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Don; Rodger, Caroline

    The uses of Raman spectroscopy in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) discovery, development and release cover a wide variety of sample types and applications. However, the technique does not have a high prominence in the pharmaceutical industry despite being recognised by regulatory authorities as a suitable methodology for the analysis and release of pharmaceutical API and products. One reason is that other analytical techniques are well established and changing to Raman methods is cost prohibitive considering return on investments (ROI). In addition the technique is often regarded as being one for "experts" and not one for main stream applications. As a consequence Raman spectroscopy is frequently the 2nd or 3rd technique of choice for a specific application. However, due to its unique sampling attributes (e.g. micro and macro measurements direct from the sample, through glass, from well plates or in the presence of water) and selectivity, applications of this technology are found throughout the life cycles of pharmaceutical products. It can therefore be considered to be a spectroscopic common denominator. This chapter highlights a number of routine, specialised and niche Raman spectroscopy applications which have been used in the development of new medicines while detailing some of the limitations of these approaches.

  10. Discovery of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that a number of distinguished scientist, all knowledgeable about the periodic table, irradiated uranium with neutrons during 1934-1938. They observed a number of beta-emitting activities that seemed to be from transuranium elements. discovery of fission and of neptunium was delayed because they assumed that elements 93 and 94 would have chemical properties similar to those of rhenium and osmium, respectively. After fission was finally demonstrated, as new search for element 93 was initiated by McMillan, who showed that when thin films of uranium are exposed to neutrons, high-energy fission products leave the film; 23-min and 2.3-day activities remain. The 23-min activity was known to be an isotope of uranium. In May 1940 Abelson produced conclusive evidence that the 2.3 day activity was from the transuranium element 93. In a reduce state, element 93 coprecipitates with rare earth fluorides. In an oxidized state, the fluoride no longer coprecipitates. Behavior of element 93 was found to resemble that of uranium

  11. Discovery Mondays: Surveyors' Tools

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Surveyors of all ages, have your rulers and compasses at the ready! This sixth edition of Discovery Monday is your chance to learn about the surveyor's tools - the state of the art in measuring instruments - and see for yourself how they work. With their usual daunting precision, the members of CERN's Surveying Group have prepared some demonstrations and exercises for you to try. Find out the techniques for ensuring accelerator alignment and learn about high-tech metrology systems such as deviation indicators, tracking lasers and total stations. The surveyors will show you how they precisely measure magnet positioning, with accuracy of a few thousandths of a millimetre. You can try your hand at precision measurement using different types of sensor and a modern-day version of the Romans' bubble level, accurate to within a thousandth of a millimetre. You will learn that photogrammetry techniques can transform even a simple digital camera into a remarkable measuring instrument. Finally, you will have a chance t...

  12. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  13. Bringing together Anthropology, Ethnology and Folklore: From Factions to Union

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Laurent Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I first focus on the foundation of the AFEA (Association Française d’Ethnologie et d’Anthropologie) and I try to find out how this new association has been managing (or not) to bring together anthropology and folklore since its foundation in 2009. Using this French example, I also try to shed light on more global discussions going on between folklorists, ethnologists and anthropologists worldwide. I present different models of possible cooperation between anthropologists and fol...

  14. Foreign Aided: Why Democratization Brings Growth When Democracy Does Not

    OpenAIRE

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    2015-01-01

    There is an unresolved puzzle in research on the economics of democracy: While there is consensus that democracy is not generally associated with higher rates of economic growth, a recent literature has found that democratization is followed by growth. Why should becoming a democracy bring growth if being one does not? This article shows that the positive growth effect of democratization is accounted for by a substantial and immediate influx of foreign aid into new democracies. The domestic r...

  15. Knowledge Discovery in Spatial Data

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Yee

    2009-01-01

    This book deals with knowledge discovery and data mining in spatial and temporal data, seeking to present novel methods that can be employed to discover spatial structures and processes in complex data. Spatial knowledge discovery is examined through the tasks of clustering, classification, association/relationship, and process. Among the covered topics are discovery of spatial structures as natural clusters, identification of separation surfaces and extraction of classification rules from statistical and algorithmic perspectives, detecting local and global aspects of non-stationarity of spati

  16. Deep Learning in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Erik; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks had their first heyday in molecular informatics and drug discovery approximately two decades ago. Currently, we are witnessing renewed interest in adapting advanced neural network architectures for pharmaceutical research by borrowing from the field of "deep learning". Compared with some of the other life sciences, their application in drug discovery is still limited. Here, we provide an overview of this emerging field of molecular informatics, present the basic concepts of prominent deep learning methods and offer motivation to explore these techniques for their usefulness in computer-assisted drug discovery and design. We specifically emphasize deep neural networks, restricted Boltzmann machine networks and convolutional networks. PMID:27491648

  17. INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIAN COJOCARIU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge, as intellectual capital, has become the main resource of anorganization, and the process of knowledge discovery, acquisition and storage is a very important one. Knowledge discovery can be easily realized through Data Mining, a Machine Learning technique, which allows the discovery of useful knowledge from a large amount of data, this knowledge supporting the decision process. A proper knowledge management of the discovered knowledge is able to improve the organization’s results and will lead to increasing the intellectualcapital, the result being a more efficient management.

  18. [Medical makeup: the correction of hyperpigmentation disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonni, J

    2012-11-01

    Medical makeup corrects skin tone imperfections with dermo-cosmetic products, which bring together tolerance efficacy, colour neutralization and sun protection. Highly suitable for imperfections caused by hyperpigmentation, it allows patients affected by these disorders to cover them up effectively and discretely, giving them a better quality of life. PMID:23260520

  19. Infuriating Tensions: Science and the Medical Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Contemporary medical students, it is suggested, view science in particular and the intellect in general as difficult allies at best. What emerges are physicians without inquiring minds, physicians who bring to the bedside not curiosity and a desire to understand but a set of reflexes. (MLW)

  20. Towards Bringing EEG Research and Diagnostics out of the Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Severijns, Cassandra; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bringing brain research tools like EEG devices out of the lab into the pockets of practitioners and researchers may fundamentally change the way we perform diagnostics and research. While most of the current techniques are limited to research clinics and require excessive set-up, new consumer EEG devices connected to standard, off-the-shelf mobile devices allow us to lift these limitations. This allows neuropsychological assessment and research in mobile settings, possibly even in remote areas with limited accessibility and infrastructure, thus bringing the equipment to the patient, instead of bringing the patient to the equipment. We are developing an Android based mobile framework to perform EEG studies. By connecting a mobile consumer EEG headset directly to an unmodified mobile device, presenting auditory and visual stimuli, as well as user interaction, we create a self-contained experimental platform. We complement this platform by a toolkit for immediate evaluation of the recorded data directly on the device, even without Internet connectivity. Initial results from the replication of two Event Related Potentials studies indicate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:25980867

  1. Bringing History Home. Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural Arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Legêne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bringing History Home: Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural ArenaThree Dutch-language monographs published in 2008-2009 by Ulbe Bosma, Lizzy van Leeuwen and Gert Oostindie in the context of the interdisciplinary research programme Bringing History Home, present a history of identity politics in relation to ‘postcolonial immigrants’. This term refers to some 500,000 people who since 1945 arrived in the Netherlands from Indonesia and the former Dutch New Guinea, Suriname or the Antillean islands in the Caribbean. Bosma traces the development of postcolonial immigrant organizations. In interaction with government policies, these organizations moved from mere socioeconomic emancipation struggles to mere cultural identity politics. Van Leeuwen takes such cultural identity politics as the starting point for her analysis of Indo-Dutch and Dutch Indies cultural initiatives and the competing interests at stake in the Indies heritage discourse. Oostindie discusses these developments in terms of community development and change within Dutch society at large. He introduces the notion of a ‘postcolonial bonus’. In postcolonial Netherlands, this bonus was available to immigrants on the grounds of a shared colonial past. Today, this bonus is (almost spent. The review discusses the three monographs, as well as the coherence of Bringing History Home as a research programme. Legêne argues, that notwithstanding valuable research outcomes, the very category of postcolonial immigrants does not constitute a convincing category of analysis.

  2. The role of industry in bringing foods for particular nutritional uses (PARNUTS) to the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathwood, P; MacLean, W; Uauy, R

    1999-12-01

    The process of bringing new food products from innovation to implementation requires a high level of interaction between researchers, marketers, and consumers. Researchers from industry and academia have the task of developing products that are not only efficacious, but also have a high probability of consumer acceptance. For most foods, industry must provide the most leadership in finding new product concepts, determining which products will have the widest markets, and in funding research and development. To accomplish these tasks, industry has forged partnerships with academic centers and scientists who excel in research and development, and continues to search for the best ways to communicate with consumers. For some FSMPs, other considerations, such as medical and nutritional needs (e.g., products for inborn errors of metabolism), might change the pattern of industry leadership. The following article explores the ways in which industry can facilitate the development and acceptance of beneficial and marketable food products. PMID:10723641

  3. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  4. International Conference Medical Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The second edition of the international conference Medical radiation : research and applications which took place in Marrakech (Morocco) from 7 to 9 April 2010, was designed to bring together researchers and physicians from different countries who dedicated their talents and time to this endeavour. The conference's program defined goals were is to identify the most reliable techniques among the several tested so far and to establish the most practical standardized methodologies, taking into account such recent technological development in radiation medical research. The scientific objectives of this conference are as follows : present the state of the art of the various topics of the congress, give a progress report on the impact of the interaction of the various scientific and technical disciplinary fields (Medicine, Biology, Mathematics, Physics,..) on the applications of radiations in medicine, promote the interdisciplinary efforts of research among researchers, present new technologies and research and development tasks prepared in the field of medical radiations, contribute to the emergence of new ideas of research and development of new collaborations

  5. Medical marijuana.

    OpenAIRE

    Marmor, J B

    1998-01-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several...

  6. Serendipity: Accidental Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Royston M.

    1989-06-01

    Many of the things discovered by accident are important in our everyday lives: Teflon, Velcro, nylon, x-rays, penicillin, safety glass, sugar substitutes, and polyethylene and other plastics. And we owe a debt to accident for some of our deepest scientific knowledge, including Newton's theory of gravitation, the Big Bang theory of Creation, and the discovery of DNA. Even the Rosetta Stone, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the ruins of Pompeii came to light through chance. This book tells the fascinating stories of these and other discoveries and reveals how the inquisitive human mind turns accident into discovery. Written for the layman, yet scientifically accurate, this illuminating collection of anecdotes portrays invention and discovery as quintessentially human acts, due in part to curiosity, perserverance, and luck.

  7. Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2009-01-01

    Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Taxonomy Enabled Discovery (TED) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses the NASA's need to enable scientific discovery and the topic's requirements for: processing large volumes of data, commonly available on the...

  9. Discovery of the Einsteinium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bury, A.; Fritsch, A; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M; Schuh, A.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Seventeen einsteinium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Discovery of the Titanium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Meierfrankenfeld, D.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twentyfive titanium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Discovery of the Scandium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three scandium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery of the Barium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Discovery of the Silver Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Discovery of the Cadmium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Discovery of the Krypton Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, M.; A. Fritsch; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Discovery of the Iron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Discovery of the Gold Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-six gold isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  1. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  2. Verbessern Discovery Systeme die Informationskompetenz?

    OpenAIRE

    Dörte Böhner

    2013-01-01

    Mit dem Auftauchen von Discovery Systemen entstand die Hoffnung, dass der Schulungsbedarf und damit der Aufwand für die Vermittlung von Informationskompetenz verringert und durch die Systeme selbst die Informationskompetenz verbessert werden kann. Dieser Beitrag beleuchtet kritisch das Zusam­menspiel von Discovery Systemen und Informationskompetenz anhand von Recherchegewohnheiten eher untrainierter Studierender. Anhand einer kurzen Gegenüberstellung der unterschiedlichen Recherche­konzepte v...

  3. Database systems for knowledge-based discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Kishan, K V Radha

    2009-01-01

    Several database systems have been developed to provide valuable information from the bench chemist to biologist, medical practitioner to pharmaceutical scientist in a structured format. The advent of information technology and computational power enhanced the ability to access large volumes of data in the form of a database where one could do compilation, searching, archiving, analysis, and finally knowledge derivation. Although, data are of variable types the tools used for database creation, searching and retrieval are similar. GVK BIO has been developing databases from publicly available scientific literature in specific areas like medicinal chemistry, clinical research, and mechanism-based toxicity so that the structured databases containing vast data could be used in several areas of research. These databases were classified as reference centric or compound centric depending on the way the database systems were designed. Integration of these databases with knowledge derivation tools would enhance the value of these systems toward better drug design and discovery. PMID:19727614

  4. Discovery Mondays: crystals and particles for medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Question: what are as heavy as lead, as clear as glass, and appear as tiny specks in a doctor's scanner but large as life in a physicist's detector? Answer: the crystals you will be able to observe in all their facets on 1 September at the start of a new season of Discovery Mondays at Microcosm. Come along and meet the CERN physicists who use crystals not only in their detectors but also in the latest generation of scanners. Four workshops will be organised, each devoted to a different medical imaging technique. The first workshop will be run by a physicist from the Crystal Clear collaboration, who will present her collaboration's special breed of crystals, which emit light when they are traversed by high-energy particles, and explain to you these crystals' role in Positron Emission Tomographs. The second workshop will focus on an imaging technique known as the Compton Camera, also based on scintillating crystals. Crystals worth looking at and admiring. Come to the next Discovery Monday to find out how they ...

  5. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies. PMID:27284062

  6. Genetic programming for knowledge discovery in chest pain diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bojarczuk, Celia C.; Lopes, Heitor S.; Freitas, Alex. A.

    2000-01-01

    This work aims at discovering classification rules for diagnosing certain pathologies. These rules are capable of discriminating among 12 different pathologies, whose main symptom is chest pain. In order to discover these rules we have used genetic programming as well as some concepts of data mining, with emphasis on the discovery of comprehensible knowledge. The fitness function used combines a measure of rule comprehensibility with two usual indicators in medical domain: sensitivity and spe...

  7. Verbessern Discovery Systeme die Informationskompetenz?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Böhner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mit dem Auftauchen von Discovery Systemen entstand die Hoffnung, dass der Schulungsbedarf und damit der Aufwand für die Vermittlung von Informationskompetenz verringert und durch die Systeme selbst die Informationskompetenz verbessert werden kann. Dieser Beitrag beleuchtet kritisch das Zusam­menspiel von Discovery Systemen und Informationskompetenz anhand von Recherchegewohnheiten eher untrainierter Studierender. Anhand einer kurzen Gegenüberstellung der unterschiedlichen Recherche­konzepte von Suchmaschinen und bibliothekarischen Rechercheangeboten werden Rückschlüsse auf die zu fördernden Schwerpunkte bei der Informationskompetenz gezogen und untersucht, welche Schlüsselrolle Discovery Systeme dabei spielen.The dissemination of discovery systems has raised hopes that the need for extensive teaching of information literacy might be reduced in the future. Also, their intuitive approach has been hopefully seen to enable the development of a better information literacy. This article critically focusses on the interaction of discovery systems and information literacy by analysing research behaviours of comparatively untrained students. In order to define which specific themes should be promoted by information literacy education, the author examines various research concepts of search engines as well as research offers of libraries. On this basis the key role of discovery systems will be explored.

  8. Get Involved in Planetary Discoveries through New Worlds, New Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shipp, S. S.; Halligan, E.; Dalton, H.; Boonstra, D.; Buxner, S.; SMD Planetary Forum, NASA

    2013-01-01

    "New Worlds, New Discoveries" is a synthesis of NASA’s 50-year exploration history which provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of our solar system. As NASA spacecraft head to and arrive at key locations in our solar system, "New Worlds, New Discoveries" provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system to educators and the general public! The site combines the amazing discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of ongoing missions, and connects them to the related planetary science topics. "New Worlds, New Discoveries," which includes the "Year of the Solar System" and the ongoing celebration of the "50 Years of Exploration," includes 20 topics that share thematic solar system educational resources and activities, tied to the national science standards. This online site and ongoing event offers numerous opportunities for the science community - including researchers and education and public outreach professionals - to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students, and the public about planetary science. Visitors to the site will find valuable hands-on science activities, resources and educational materials, as well as the latest news, to engage audiences in planetary science topics and their related mission discoveries. The topics are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved? How did life begin and evolve on Earth, and has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system? Scientists and educators are encouraged to get involved either directly or by sharing "New Worlds, New Discoveries" and its resources with educators, by conducting presentations and events, sharing their resources and events to add to the site, and adding their own public events to the site’s event calendar! Visit to find quality resources and ideas. Connect with educators, students and the public to

  9. Commercializing medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Kevin J; Lieberman, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880's, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical industries. The impact of those new employees and their groundbreaking compounds had a profound influence on medicine and medical education in Germany between 1880 and 1930. Germany dominated international science during this period and was a training center for scientists worldwide. This model of synergy between education and business was envied and admired in Europe, Asia and America. British science soon after evolved to dominate the field of science during the prewar and post World War (1930's-1970's) because the German scientists fled Hitler's government. These expatriated scientists had a profound influence on the teaching and training of British scientists, which lead to advances in medicine such as antibiotics. After the Second World War, the US government wisely funded the development of the medical infrastructure that we see today. British and German scientists in medicine moved to America because of this bountiful funding for their research. These expatriated scientists helped drive these medical advances into commercialized products by the 1980's. America has been the center of medical education and advances of biotechnology but will it continue? International scientists trained in America have started to return to Europe and Asia. These American-trained scientists and their governments are very aware of the commercial potential of biotechnology. Those governments are now more prepared to play an active role this new science. Germany, Ireland, Britain, Singapore

  10. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world's looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students' understanding of the cell's position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  11. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F.

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world’s looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students’ understanding of the cell’s position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  12. Medical Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    One element of the CIVCAL project Web-based resources containing images, tables, texts and associated data on the construction of the Medical Complex. This project covers the construction of a new Hong Kong University Medical Complex on Sassoon Road, Pokfulam. The complex will comprise two buildings, one will house laboratories and a car park, while the other will contain lecture halls

  13. Universal Knowledge Discovery from Big Data: Towards a Paradigm Shift from 'Knowledge Discovery' to 'Wisdom Discovery'

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many people hold a vision that big data will provide big insights and have a big impact in the future, and big-data-assisted scientific discovery is seen as an emerging and promising scientific paradigm. However, how to turn big data into deep insights with tremendous value still remains obscure. To meet the challenge, universal knowledge discovery from big data (UKD) is proposed. The new concept focuses on discovering universal knowledge, which exists in the statistical analyses of big data ...

  14. Discovery of Radium 1898

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundred years ago radium was discovered in circumstances depicted in scientific legends. Since then, radium destiny had its ups and downs: for a period of time radium was welcomed as the savior of the mankind, but nowadays radium is perceived only as a threat to the people and environment. For many years possible unfavorable effects of ionizing radiation were less known and rarely discussed. Nobody was concerned with the fact that radium sources could be harmful for thousands of years. Radium euphoria is finally declining in fifties. Since then, the use of radium is limited and the fear rises. Even in the medicine where radium was successfully used for many years and where millions were having direct benefits, radium was replaced. Other sources of radiation, enabled by the development of nuclear technology and production of new and more suitable radionuclides fully replaced radium in other uses, particularly in consumer products. It is estimated that 30,000 medical radium sources are still distributed among numerous users, most of which are in underdeveloped countries. Collecting and conditioning of those sources is important radiation protection task. Long term disposal of long-lived and alpha-emitting radium sources is still unresolved. Most of the countries adopted delayed decision as the strategy. Their intention is to keep conditioned radium sources in storage for at least next forty years. In Croatia 299 radium sources were collected in 1997. They were conditioned and were safely stored at the 'Rudjer Boskovic' Institute in Zagreb. (author)

  15. Integrating proteomic and functional genomic technologies in discovery-driven translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina;

    2003-01-01

    . Here we describe the essence of a long-term initiative undertaken by The Danish Centre for Translational Breast Cancer Research and currently underway for cancer biomarker discovery using fresh tissue biopsies and bio-fluids. The Centre is a virtual hub that brings together scientists working......The application of state-of-the-art proteomics and functional genomics technologies to the study of cancer is rapidly shifting toward the analysis of clinically relevant samples derived from patients, as the ultimate aim of translational research is to bring basic discoveries closer to the bedside...... in various areas of basic cancer research such as cell cycle control, invasion and micro-environmental alterations, apoptosis, cell signaling, and immunology, with clinicians (oncologists, surgeons), pathologists, and epidemiologists, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying breast...

  16. Bringing indigenous ownership back to the private sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    Driven by across-the-board liberalizations and the commodity price boom, Zambia has recently experienced an upsurge in foreign ownership over key parts of its economy. Albeit investors from all over the world have sought to make the most of the current situation in Zambia, Chinese investors have...... been particularly present in all sectors of the Zambian economy. Foreign ownership, however, is not new to African societies and several African countries pursued indigenisation policies in the wake of independence to bring ownership back to their own citizens. Now indigenisation policies thrive again...

  17. Bring Your Own Device in the Information Literacy Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Stonebraker, Ilana; Robertshaw, M Brooke; Kirkwood, Hal; Dugan, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In the 2013 school year, a team of librarians in the Parrish Library of Management and Economics at Purdue University taught a business information literacy course to approximately 500 management students in eight 70-person sessions. Due to limitations on a set of iPads borrowed from another department, one of two concurrent classes was taught with a set of iPads, while another had a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy, where students brought their own laptops or iPads. Focus groups, observat...

  18. The Key to Stabilizing House Prices: Bring Them Down

    OpenAIRE

    Dean Baker

    2008-01-01

    This report states that bringing about the rapid adjustment of house prices to trend levels is the best means of returning stability to the housing market. The paper also calls for the restriction of GSE capital in bubble-inflated markets, with the intent of forcing house prices in these areas to return to trend level. The removal of capital from bubble markets and the consequent infusion of loans into non-bubble markets would stabilize prices in these areas, thus preventing a downward price ...

  19. Bringing a Finnish Company to the Russian E-Market

    OpenAIRE

    Veselova, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the project was to enable a small business case company that is operating in the town of Lappeenranta, Finland, to reach successfully its target segment (Russian consumers) with the help of digital technology in order to increase sales both in its physical shop and in online store. In order to reach the aim of the project and bring Russian consumers and the case company together by the means of electronic marketing, a marketing plan for the promotional campaigns of th...

  20. BRINGING CIVILIZATION: SAVAGERY AND THE TAMING OF THE SAVAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Newman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “See, the Conqu’ring Hero Comes” goes the famous chorus from Handel’s Judas Maccabeus, but how does the hero conquer? Achilles defeats his enemies through his extraordinary prowess in battle, Odysseus by using his wit, but some heroes must abandon the trappings of civilization in order to conquer. This paper examines two examples of such heroes from Germanic and Greco-Roman myth: Beowulf and Herakles. In the texts analyzed, these heroes not only set aside their civilized veneer, but must journey into the territory of the monster they wish to destroy and there use savagery to defeat the savage, in order to bring civilization.

  1. Medical Journalism and Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Safari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many researches in the field of medicine are conducting all around the world and medical journalism is a way to share the results. In fact, dissemination of the related manuscripts can prevent the repetitive research or may even lead to conducting a better survey. Therefore high quality medical journals are considered as up-to-date resources for further investigations. Medical journals are propagating their papers in various media including television programs, newspapers, internet websites and different social media. So they can influence the government policy makers, health-care professionals and even public. Moreover, most researchers hear about medical discoveries for the first time through medical journals and their related social media. So as well a high quality journal can help to improve medical science, a journal of poor quality can be damaging and distorting. Indeed, popular journals have the power of inventing a “communication storm” to draw attention to a certain topic. Thus they have to respect the accepted international principles to prevent spreading inaccurate and misleading data. This paper aims to review the previous and current situation of medical journalism by focus on field of emergency medicine.

  2. 43 CFR 4.1130 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery methods. 4.1130 Section 4.1130... Special Rules Applicable to Surface Coal Mining Hearings and Appeals Discovery § 4.1130 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods— (a) Depositions upon...

  3. 42 CFR 405.1037 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... original discovery deadline. (5) If the ALJ grants the extension request, it must impose a new discovery... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discovery. 405.1037 Section 405.1037 Public Health... Appeals Under Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) Alj Hearings § 405.1037 Discovery. (a) General...

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AMONG MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN A GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    Ramamurthy; Lilian D; Ranganath; Arun Mohan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The improved health of all people is the ultimate goal of medical education. Every student works hard to get into the best educational institution in order to pursue a competent career. Every institution has its core objective as imparting high standards of education and bringing out well trained students. The environment in which a student learns and grows is crucial to the overall development. AIM: To assess the perceptions of medical students of their educat...

  5. Bringing home the health humanities: narrative humility, structural competency, and engaged pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevat, Rebecca K; Sinha, Anoushka A; Gutierrez, Kevin J; DasGupta, Sayantani

    2015-11-01

    As health humanities programs grow and thrive across the country, encouraging medical students to read, write, and become more reflective about their professional roles, educators must bring a sense of self-reflexivity to the discipline itself. In the health humanities, novels, patient histories, and pieces of reflective writing are often treated as architectural spaces or "homes" that one can enter and examine. Yet, narrative-based learning in health care settings does not always allow its participants to feel "at home"; when not taught with a critical attention to power and pedagogy, the health humanities can be unsettling and even dangerous. Educators can mitigate these risks by considering not only what they teach but also how they teach it.In this essay, the authors present three pedagogical pillars that educators can use to invite learners to engage more fully, develop critical awareness of medical narratives, and feel "at home" in the health humanities. These pedagogical pillars are narrative humility (an awareness of one's prejudices, expectations, and frames of listening), structural competency (attention to sources of power and privilege), and engaged pedagogy (the protection of students' security and well-being). Incorporating these concepts into pedagogical practices can create safe and productive classroom spaces for all, including those most vulnerable and at risk of being "unhomed" by conventional hierarchies and oppressive social structures. This model then can be translated through a parallel process from classroom to clinic, such that empowered, engaged, and cared-for learners become empowering, engaging, and caring clinicians. PMID:25945967

  6. Bringing Technology into college and High School Physics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2007-04-01

    We want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to college and high school physics classrooms. We focus in particular on our outreach initiative in supporting a number of school districts with ways to improve high school physics education. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED aims at helping high school teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama course of study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of programs: a two-week long summer institute, a series of five technology workshops, and onsite year-round support. Through our hands-on approach, we have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms. A number of technology projects were assigned to the teachers so as to show their students how physics connects to the technological devices around us. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics education that enjoys continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  7. A Mars Exploration Discovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    The Mars Exploration Program should consider following the Discovery Program model. In the Discovery Program a team of scientists led by a PI develop the science goals of their mission, decide what payload achieves the necessary measurements most effectively, and then choose a spacecraft with the capabilities needed to carry the payload to the desired target body. The primary constraints associated with the Discovery missions are time and money. The proposer must convince reviewers that their mission has scientific merit and is feasible. Every Announcement of Opportunity has resulted in a collection of creative ideas that fit within advertised constraints. Following this model, a "Mars Discovery Program" would issue an Announcement of Opportunity for each launch opportunity with schedule constraints dictated by the launch window and fiscal constraints in accord with the program budget. All else would be left to the proposer to choose, based on the science the team wants to accomplish, consistent with the program theme of "Life, Climate and Resources". A proposer could propose a lander, an orbiter, a fleet of SCOUT vehicles or penetrators, an airplane, a balloon mission, a large rover, a small rover, etc. depending on what made the most sense for the science investigation and payload. As in the Discovery program, overall feasibility relative to cost, schedule and technology readiness would be evaluated and be part of the selection process.

  8. The Europa Ocean Discovery mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chyba, C.F. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abshire, J.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Since it was first proposed that tidal heating of Europa by Jupiter might lead to liquid water oceans below Europa`s ice cover, there has been speculation over the possible exobiological implications of such an ocean. Liquid water is the essential ingredient for life as it is known, and the existence of a second water ocean in the Solar System would be of paramount importance for seeking the origin and existence of life beyond Earth. The authors present here a Discovery-class mission concept (Europa Ocean Discovery) to determine the existence of a liquid water ocean on Europa and to characterize Europa`s surface structure. The technical goal of the Europa Ocean Discovery mission is to study Europa with an orbiting spacecraft. This goal is challenging but entirely feasible within the Discovery envelope. There are four key challenges: entering Europan orbit, generating power, surviving long enough in the radiation environment to return valuable science, and complete the mission within the Discovery program`s launch vehicle and budget constraints. The authors will present here a viable mission that meets these challenges.

  9. Does Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri, L.; Brooks, PJ; Aldrich, NJ; Tenenbaum, HR

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning approaches to education have recently come under scrutiny (Tobias & Duffy, 2009), with many studies indicating limitations to discovery learning practices. Therefore, 2 meta-analyses were conducted using a sample of 164 studies: The 1st examined the effects of unassisted discovery learning versus explicit instruction, and the 2nd examined the effects of enhanced and/or assisted discovery versus other types of instruction (e.g., explicit, unassisted discovery). Random effect...

  10. Integration of Proteomics, Bioinformatics, and Systems Biology in Traumatic Brain Injury Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Guingab-Cagmat, J.D.; Cagmat, E.B.; Hayes, R. L.; Anagli, J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for their...

  11. Integration of Proteomics, Bioinformatics and Systems biology in Brain Injury Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    JoyGuingab-Cagmat

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for thei...

  12. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  13. Once Upon a Time ... Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    In 1956, a year and a half after the establishment of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, the states of the "socialist bloc" signed an agreement establishing a similar international centre for the study of fundamental problems in physics: the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR. The seat of the Institute was chosen to be the town of Dubna, 120 km north of Moscow. Though the establish-ment of JINR was clearly a political response, during the Cold War, to the establishment of CERN, from the very beginning the Institute's activities were aimed solely at investigating the fundamental properties of matter and using scientific discoveries for peaceful purposes.

  14. Teaching hospital costs: the effects of medical staff characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Custer, W S; Willke, R J

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the effect of medical staff behavior on the cost of hospital-based care and graduate medical education, and shows its implications for estimation of hospital costs. The empirical work brings a unique new data source for these characteristics to the estimation process. Our results indicate that there are important economies of scale and scope in hospital production, both for inpatient stays and for residency training. Controlling for medical staff characteristics signific...

  15. TU-C-BRF-01: Innovation in Medical Physics and Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pelc, N [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mackie, T [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We seek to heighten the awareness of the role of research and innovation that leads to clinical advances in the field of medical physics and engineering. Marie Curie (discovery and use of radium) and Harold Johns (Co-60 tele-therapy) in radiotherapy, and pioneers in imaging (Allan Cormack and Godfrey Hounsfield for the CT and Paul Lauterbur, Peter Mansfield for MRI, etc.) were scientists often struggling against great odds. Examples of more recent innovations that are clearly benefitting our patients include IMRT, Image Guided Radiation Therapy and Surgery, Particle Therapy, Quantitative imaging, amongst others.We would also like to highlight the fact that not all of the discovery and engineering that we benefit from in today’s world, was performed at research institutions alone. Rather, companies often tread new ground at financial and reputational risk. Indeed the strength of the private sector is needed in order to bring about new advances to our practice. The keys to long term success in research and development may very well include more public and private research spending. But, when more investigators are funded, we also need to recognize that there needs to be a willingness on the part of the funding institutions, academic centers and investigators to risk failure for the greater potential achievements in innovation and research. The speakers will provide examples and insight into the fields of innovation and research in medical physics from their own first hand experiences. Learning Objectives: To obtain an understanding of the importance of research and development towards advances in physics in medicine. To raise awareness of the role of interdisciplinary collaborations in translational research and innovation. To highlight the importance of entrepreneurships and industrial-institutional research partnerships in fostering new ideas and their commercial success. To recognize and account for the risk of failure for the greater potential achievements in

  16. TU-C-BRF-01: Innovation in Medical Physics and Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We seek to heighten the awareness of the role of research and innovation that leads to clinical advances in the field of medical physics and engineering. Marie Curie (discovery and use of radium) and Harold Johns (Co-60 tele-therapy) in radiotherapy, and pioneers in imaging (Allan Cormack and Godfrey Hounsfield for the CT and Paul Lauterbur, Peter Mansfield for MRI, etc.) were scientists often struggling against great odds. Examples of more recent innovations that are clearly benefitting our patients include IMRT, Image Guided Radiation Therapy and Surgery, Particle Therapy, Quantitative imaging, amongst others.We would also like to highlight the fact that not all of the discovery and engineering that we benefit from in today’s world, was performed at research institutions alone. Rather, companies often tread new ground at financial and reputational risk. Indeed the strength of the private sector is needed in order to bring about new advances to our practice. The keys to long term success in research and development may very well include more public and private research spending. But, when more investigators are funded, we also need to recognize that there needs to be a willingness on the part of the funding institutions, academic centers and investigators to risk failure for the greater potential achievements in innovation and research. The speakers will provide examples and insight into the fields of innovation and research in medical physics from their own first hand experiences. Learning Objectives: To obtain an understanding of the importance of research and development towards advances in physics in medicine. To raise awareness of the role of interdisciplinary collaborations in translational research and innovation. To highlight the importance of entrepreneurships and industrial-institutional research partnerships in fostering new ideas and their commercial success. To recognize and account for the risk of failure for the greater potential achievements in

  17. Towards structural web services discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiang-feng

    2008-01-01

    A syntactic and structural matching mechanism for service discovery was put forward, which tries to exploit the underlying semantics of web services to enhance the traditional syntactic service discovery. We commit WSDL (Web Service Description Language) as service description language. The syntactic matching mechanism is based on the textual similarity among WSDL documents using VSM (Vector Space Model). The structural information is extracted from WSDL document tree or the invocation sequence of a series of services which can be viewed as the problem of graph isomorphism. Then we combine the syntactic and structural similarity linearly to calculate the service similarity. Finally we provide a novel web services discovery framework named SG* to find the exact services meeting the users' goals based on service similarity.

  18. Cardiac Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Medication For the treatment of heart failure Beta Blockers (Also known as Beta-Adrenergic Blocking Agents) Commonly ... have had a heart attack. Combined alpha and beta-blockers Combined alpha and beta-blockers are used as ...

  19. Medication Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... behavior, such as to reduce self-injury or aggression. Once a symptom is no longer a problem, ... of repetitive behaviors; decrease anxiety, irritability, tantrums, and aggressive behavior; and improve eye contact. Tricyclics These medications are ...

  20. Taking Medication

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing Risks Healthy Coping Education & Career Webinars Upcoming Webinars Recorded Webinars ...

  1. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Help the Cause Glaucoma affects ...

  2. Taking Medication

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing Risks Healthy Coping Education & Career Webinars ...

  3. Medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This didactical book presents the medical imaging techniques: radiography, scanner, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Examples are given for the most common pathologies in all domains of medicine. (J.S.)

  4. Taking Medication

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication Problem Solving Reducing ... Media Policy | Contact AADE | Sitemap Copyright 2016 AADE Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest Google Plus Instagram

  5. Taking Medication

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislation State Legislation AADE Policy Positions & Statements Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  6. Medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK)

  7. Medical tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Ghanbari; Khadijeh Zirak Moradlu; Morteza Ramazani

    2014-01-01

    Medical tourism is considered as one of the tourism dimensions and it can contribute to the stabilized and dynamic development of a country's economy. Since it is cost-effective industry, most developing countries have focused on this industry and they are planning to develop this industry. Not only does Zanjan province, as the central region in medicine services, enjoy different kinds of variety and acceptable medical specialties but also it has historical, natural, and religious tourism pot...

  8. Knowledge discovery from legal databases

    CERN Document Server

    Stranieri, Andrew; Schauer, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge Discovery from Legal Databases is the first text to describe data mining techniques as they apply to law. Law students, legal academics and applied information technology specialists are guided thorough all phases of the knowledge discovery from databases process with clear explanations of numerous data mining algorithms including rule induction, neural networks and association rules. Throughout the text, assumptions that make data mining in law quite different to mining other data are made explicit.  Issues such as the selection of commonplace cases, the use of discretion as a form

  9. Mars Mapping Technology Brings Main Street to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Red Planet has long held a particular hold on the human psyche. From the Roman god of war to Orson Welles infamous Halloween broadcast, our nearest planetary neighbor has been viewed with curiosity, suspicion, and awe. Pictures of Mars from 1965 to the present reveal familiar landscapes while also challenging our perceptions and revising our understanding of the processes at work in planets. Frequent discoveries have forced significant revisions to previous theories. Although Mars shares many familiar features with Earth, such as mountains, plains, valleys, and polar ice, the conditions on Mars can vary wildly from those with which we are familiar. The apparently cold, rocky, and dusty wasteland seen through the eyes of spacecraft and Martian probes hints at a dynamic past of volcanic activity, cataclysmic meteors, and raging waters. New discoveries continue to revise our view of our next-door neighbor, and further exploration is now paving the way for a human sortie to the fourth stone from the Sun. NASA s Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration, utilizes wide-angle stereo cameras mounted on NASA s twin robot geologists, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs), launched in 2003. The rovers, named "Spirit" and "Opportunity," celebrated 4 Earth years of exploration on January 3, 2008, and have sent back a wealth of information on the terrain and composition of the Martian surface. Their marathon performance has far outlasted the intended 90 days of operation, and the two intrepid explorers promise more images and data.

  10. Knowledge Discovery/A Collaborative Approach, an Innovative Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration between Medical Informatics and Healthcare Systems (MIHCS) at NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Texas Medical Center (TMC) Library was established to investigate technologies for facilitating knowledge discovery across multiple life sciences research disciplines in multiple repositories. After reviewing 14 potential Enterprise Search System (ESS) solutions, Collexis was determined to best meet the expressed needs. A three month pilot evaluation of Collexis produced positive reports from multiple scientists across 12 research disciplines. The joint venture and a pilot-phased approach achieved the desired results without the high cost of purchasing software, hardware or additional resources to conduct the task. Medical research is highly compartmentalized by discipline, e.g. cardiology, immunology, neurology. The medical research community at large, as well as at JSC, recognizes the need for cross-referencing relevant information to generate best evidence. Cross-discipline collaboration at JSC is specifically required to close knowledge gaps affecting space exploration. To facilitate knowledge discovery across these communities, MIHCS combined expertise with the TMC library and found Collexis to best fit the needs of our researchers including:

  11. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  12. Computer vision in medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H

    2013-01-01

    The major progress in computer vision allows us to make extensive use of medical imaging data to provide us better diagnosis, treatment and predication of diseases. Computer vision can exploit texture, shape, contour and prior knowledge along with contextual information from image sequence and provide 3D and 4D information that helps with better human understanding. Many powerful tools have been available through image segmentation, machine learning, pattern classification, tracking, reconstruction to bring much needed quantitative information not easily available by trained human specialists

  13. Innovations in higher medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the innovations in the higher medical education. Particular attention in this sphere is paid to the detailed analysis of the subject as a mechanism of cognition and psycho-emotional aspect. It should be noticed that the development of the university education demands the integration of functional systems to study the general medicine and the art of healing. In conclusion it has been found out that the new methodological approach is necessary to bring the teacher closer to the subject particularly to integrate the relation of the opposites.

  14. Bringing Science into Schools through Astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    CERN Document Server

    Barban, C; Barban, Caroline; Dole, Herve

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphelie). This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

  15. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied. PMID:17152604

  16. Bringing the power of dynamic languages to hardware control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caicedo, J M; Neufeld, N

    2009-01-01

    Hardware control systems are normally programmed using high-performance languages like C or C++ and increasingly also Java. All these languages are strongly typed and compiled which brings usually good performance but at the cost of a longer development and testing cycle and the need for more programming expertise. Dynamic languages which were long thought to be too slow and not powerful enough for control purposes are, thanks to modern powerful computers and advanced implementation techniques, fast enough for many of these tasks. We present examples from the LHCb Experiment Control System (ECS), which is based on a commercial SCADA software. We have successfully used Python to integrate hardware devices into the ECS. We present the necessary lightweight middle-ware we have developed, including examples for controlling hardware and software devices. We also discuss the development cycle, tools used and compare the effort to traditional solutions.

  17. Mathematical models in biology bringing mathematics to life

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Maria; Guarracino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an exciting collection of contributions based on the workshop “Bringing Maths to Life” held October 27-29, 2014 in Naples, Italy.  The state-of-the art research in biology and the statistical and analytical challenges facing huge masses of data collection are treated in this Work. Specific topics explored in depth surround the sessions and special invited sessions of the workshop and include genetic variability via differential expression, molecular dynamics and modeling, complex biological systems viewed from quantitative models, and microscopy images processing, to name several. In depth discussions of the mathematical analysis required to extract insights from complex bodies of biological datasets, to aid development in the field novel algorithms, methods and software tools for genetic variability, molecular dynamics, and complex biological systems are presented in this book. Researchers and graduate students in biology, life science, and mathematics/statistics will find the content...

  18. Structural Biology Guides Antibiotic Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Modern drug discovery programs require the contribution of researchers in a number of specialist areas. One of these areas is structural biology. Using X-ray crystallography, the molecular basis of how a drug binds to its biological target and exerts its mode of action can be defined. For example, a drug that binds into the active site of an…

  19. Macchines per scoprire - Discovery Machines

    CERN Multimedia

    Auditorium, Rome

    2016-01-01

    During the FCC week 2016 a public event entitled “Discovery Machines: The Higgs Boson and the Search for New Physics took place on 14 April at the Auditorium in Rome. The event, brought together physicists and experts from economics to discuss intriguing questions on the origin and evolution of the Universe and the societal impact of large-scale research projects.

  20. Smartphones: A Potential Discovery Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Starkweather, Wendy; Stowers, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The anticipated wide adoption of smartphones by researchers is viewed by the authors as a basis for developing mobile-based services. In response to the UNLV Libraries’ strategic plan’s focus on experimentation and outreach, the authors investigate the current and potential role of smartphones as a valuable discovery tool for library users.

  1. New oil and gas discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1999-2003, new oil and gas fields generated additional reserves of nearly 11 000 bcm of natural gas and 62 Gbbl of oil and condensates, volumes very much superior to those discovered in the five previous years. Two-thirds of these discoveries were located offshore, half in deep water. (author)

  2. Medical migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loefler, I J

    2001-10-01

    The issue of professional migration, however emotional it may have become, ought not to be regarded in moralizing terms. The history of western medicine is the history of migrating physicians. A doctor who moves from a locality to another to take up a new assignment there cannot be said to have "abandoned his patients". This emotional bond has become the victim of specialization and of depersonalization of medical services and not of medical migration, brain drain or otherwise. The primary reason for medical migration is not financial; the desire to migrate usually begins with the desire to learn. Professionals crave in the first line for professional satisfaction. The migration of medical manpower cannot be stopped with administrative measures and will not be stopped by exhortations and appeals, moralization and condemnations. Brain drain is a global phenomenon and has always been so. A country which loses its professionals, its doctors, should examine the social relationships within the profession and should investigate whether the opportunities for deriving professional satisfaction from everyday work exist or whether these have been thwarted by the hierarchy, conservatism, cronyism and the general lack of comprehension of what good medical care is about. PMID:11593497

  3. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed. PMID:19357056

  4. Press conference bring excitement of geophysical research to the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Harvey

    “A Flare to Remember.” “Starbucks for Starfish.” “Earth's Rotation Slows for El Niño.” What do these catchy headlines have in common? They all resulted from presentations at AGU's Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass. Yes, geophysical science can be big news when presented in a way that is interesting to general audiences.Proof? Well, the “Flare to Remember” headline (in the Dallas Morning News) reported the discovery, via the SOHO spacecraft, that a solar flare had produced, deep inside the Sun, seismic disturbances of a magnitude never experienced on Earth. Researchers Valentina Zharkova of Glasgow University and Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford gave media representatives a preview of their session, supported by visual aids, in the AGU press briefing room.

  5. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trosset JY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Yves Trosset,1 Pablo Carbonell2,3 1Bioinformation Research Laboratory, Sup’Biotech, Villejuif, France; 2Faculty of Life Sciences, SYNBIOCHEM Centre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS, Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Synthetic biology (SB is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell–cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity. Keywords: metabolic engineering, plant synthetic biology, natural products, synthetic quorum sensing, drug resistance

  6. Medical leasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements. PMID:22594070

  7. Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Biscari, C

    2014-01-01

    The use of accelerators for medical applications has evolved from initial experimentation to turn-key devices commonly operating in hospitals. New applications are continuously being developed around the world, and the hadrontherapy facilities of the newest generation are placed at the frontier between industrial production and advanced R&D. An introduction to the different medical application accelerators is followed by a description of the hadrontherapy facilities, with special emphasis on CNAO, and the report closes with a brief outlook on the future of this field.

  8. SEA Change: Bringing together Science, Engineering and the Arts at the University of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfit, M. R.; Mertz, M. S.; Lavelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    A group of interested and multifaceted faculty, administrators and students created the Science, Engineering, Arts Committee (SEA Change) two years ago at the University of Florida (UF). Recognizing that innovative ideas arise from the convergence of divergent thinkers, the committee seeks to bring together faculty in Science, Engineering, the Arts and others across campus to develop and disseminate innovative ideas for research, teaching and service that will enhance the campus intellectual environment. We meet regularly throughout the year as faculty with graduate and undergraduate students to catalyze ideas that could lead to collaborative or interdisciplinary projects and make recommendations to support innovative, critical and creative work. As an example, the Department of Geological Sciences and the School of Art and Art History collaborated on a competition among UF undergraduate painting students to create artistic works that related to geoscience. Each student gathered information from Geological Sciences faculty members to use for inspiration in creating paintings along with site-specific proposals to compete for a commission. The winning work was three-story high painting representing rock strata and the Florida environment entitled "Prairie Horizontals" that is now installed in the Geoscience building entrance atrium. Two smaller paintings of the second place winner, depicting geologists in the field were also purchased and displayed in a main hallway. Other activities supported by SEA Change have included a collaborative work of UF engineering and dance professors who partnered for the Creative Storytelling and Choreography Lab, to introduce basic storytelling tools to engineering students. A campus-wide gathering of UF faculty and graduate students titled Creative Practices: The Art & Science of Discovery featured guest speakers Steven Tepper, Victoria Vesna and Benjamin Knapp in spring 2014. The Committee plans to develop and foster ideas that will

  9. Six roads from Newton great discoveries in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Speyer, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Why is time relative to the observer? Can an atomic particle exist in two places at once? Is light a wave, a particle, or both? Six Roads from Newton is a lively tour through six monumental developments in physics since Newton: wave theory, field theory, statistical physics, special relativity, quantum theory, and general relativity. Together these crucial discoveries formed the basis of the modern revolution in physics, shattering Newton's view of the universe, and leading the way to the mind-boggling and fascinating questions at the cutting edge of physics today. With real-world examples that bring physics vividly to life, Edward Speyer explains each theoretical development, in-troducing the leading figures, their famous experiments, and a number of delightfully perplexing problems that have challenged physicists along the way--from the Paradox of the Three Polarizers to Maxwell's Demon and the infamous case of Schrodinger's Cat.

  10. The IOC Centres of Excellence bring prevention to Sports Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald; Cook, Jill L.; Derman, Wayne; Emery, Carolyn A.; Finch, Caroline; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Schwellnus, Martin; Steffen, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    The protection of an athlete’s health and preventing injuries and illnesses in sport are top priorities for the IOC and its Medical Commission. The IOC therefore partners with selected research centres around the world and supports research in the field of sports medicine. This has enabled the IOC to develop an international network of expert scientists and clinicians in sports injury and disease prevention research. The IOC wants to promote injury and disease prevention and the improvement o...

  11. Nursing leadership: bringing caring back to the future

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson, A.

    2001-01-01

    Leadership, whether it is nursing, medical or healthcare leadership, is about knowing how to make visions become reality. The vision that many nurses hold dear to their hearts is one where patients are treated with dignity and respect at all times; where systems are designed for the benefit of individual needs; and where the work performed by nurses and other carers is valued and respected. Achieving such a vision will require a paradigm shift in the philosophy, priorities, policies, and powe...

  12. Spin-off from Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of fundamental research in physics is to discover the laws of Nature. The results of this research become available to all mankind, allowing breakthroughs in high technology and in the development of human civilization. Modern physics makes a decisive contribution to such highly important areas as cancer treatment, medical applications of nuclear detectors, computer tomography, World Wide Web, safe nuclear power, and many others.

  13. Conceptualising International Peace Mediation - Bring Back the Law

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Noelle; Daly, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Mediation has been acknowledged and utilised for a number of decades as an effective method of alternative dispute resolution in a variety of areas of law, including family law, commercial law and medical law. A uniform, standardised framework exists within legal discourse which clearly identifies and categorises three main styles of mediation as facilitative, evaluative and transformative mediation. In the post-Cold War period, mediation has also emerged as an important resolution tool in ar...

  14. Community Efforts Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Kastens, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Individual, departmental and community efforts have all played a major role in developing a thriving research effort addressing thinking and learning in the geosciences. Community efforts have been effective in elevating the importance of the field, defining a research agenda, fostering collaborations with cognitive science and education communities, building capacity within the geosciences, and developing reviewer awareness of the importance and opportunities within geoscience education research. Important community efforts include a call for geoscience education research in the 1997 NSF report Geoscience Education: A Recommended Strategy and in the subsequent 2000 NSF report ‘Bridges: Connecting Research and Education in the Earth System Sciences’. A research agenda and supporting recommendations for collaboration and capacity building were jointly developed by geoscience educators, cognitive scientists and education researchers at the 2002 NSF/Johnson Foundation funded workshop Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences. This research agenda emphasized studies of geoscience expertise, learning pathways (and their challenges) that are critical to the development of that expertise, and materials and environments that support this learning, with a focus on learning in the field and from large data sets, complex systems and deep time, spatial skills, and the synthesis of understanding from multiple sources of incomplete data. Collaboration and capacity building have been further supported by the NAGT sponsored professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” with workshops bringing together cognitive scientists, educators and geoscientists on topics including developing on-line learning resources, teaching with visualizations, the role of the affective domain in geoscience learning, teaching metacognition, and teaching with data. 40 successful educational research proposals are attributed to participation in On the Cutting Edge. An NSF funded

  15. EarthObserver: Bringing the world to your fingertips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, W. B.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Ferrini, V.; O'hara, S. H.; Chan, S.; Bonczkowski, J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Morton, J. J.; McLain, K.; Weissel, R.

    2011-12-01

    EarthObserver (http://www.earth-observer.org/), developed by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, brings a wealth of geoscience data to Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch mobile devices. Built around an easy-to-use interface, EarthObserver allows users to explore and visualise a wide range of data sets superimposed upon a detailed base map of land elevations and ocean depths - tapping the screen will instantly return the height or depth at that point. A simple transparency function allows direct comparison of built-in content. Data sets include high-resolution coastal bathymetry of bays, sounds, estuaries, harbors and rivers; geological maps of the US states and world - tapping the screen displays the rock type, and full legends can be viewed; US Topo sheets; and, geophysical content including seafloor crustal age and sediment thickness, earthquake and volcano data, gravity and magnetic anomalies, and plate boundary descriptions. The names of physiographic features are automatically displayed. NASA Visible Earth images along with ocean temperature, salinity and productivity maps and precipitation information expose data sets of interest to the atmospheric, oceanic and biological communities. Natural hazard maps, population information and political boundaries allow users to explore impacts upon society. EarthObserver, so far downloaded by more than 55,000 users, offers myriad ways for educators at all levels to bring research-quality geoscience data into the learning environment, whether for use as an in-class illustration or for extensive exploration of earth sciences data. By using cutting-edge mobile app technology, EarthObserver boosts access to relevant earth science content. The EarthObserver base map is the Global Multi-Resolution Topography digital elevation model (GMRT; http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/gmrt/), also developed at LDEO and updated regularly. It provides land elevations with horizontal resolution as high as 10m for

  16. Glaucoma medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Bora; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Desai, Manishi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide, making it the second-leading cause of blindness. Because glaucoma is associated with increased IOP level, the primary goal in treatment of glaucoma includes lowering IOP to prevent further progression of the disease. While various surgical interventions exist, medical therapy is currently the first line of treatment. Medical treatment of glaucoma includes topical beta-blockers, alpha-2 agonists, prostaglandins, parasympathomimetics and CAIs. Anti-glaucoma agents help reduce IOP by affecting the production of aqueous humor or increasing the outflow of aqueous through the trabecular or uveoscleral pathway. Choosing an appropriate medical regimen can be challenging and various factors such as efficacy, safety, cost and patient compliance must be considered. First-line treatment is often topical beta-blockers or prostaglandin analogs. However, beta-blocking agents can be associated with systemic side effects and need to be used cautiously in patients with serious concomitant cardiopulmonary disease. Alpha-2 agonists and parasympathomimetics are often considered second- or third-line treatment options but good adjunctive agents. Oral CAIs are often indicated for patients with elevated IOP in an acute setting or for patients resistant to other glaucoma medications and patients who are not good surgical candidates. PMID:23505792

  17. Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Proprietary Names (PDF - 146KB) Draft Guidance for Industry: Best Practices in Developing Proprietary Names for Drugs (PDF - 279KB) ... or (301) 796-3400 druginfo@fda.hhs.gov Human Drug ... in Medication Errors Resources for You Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: ...

  18. Geodesy Brings the Geoscience Community Together as Geophysicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittross, S.; Rowan, L. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Morris, A. R.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geodesy, the science of determining Earth's shape, gravity field and rotation, has been in existence for millennia. Today, few geoscientists identify with the pure science of geodesy, though many use geodetic tools and data for their research. In 2014, we interviewed members of the UNAVCO community and asked, "Do you call yourself a geodesist?" Most replied that they used geodesy, but would call themselves "geophysicists". This "use of geodesy" for other fields of study, particularly for geophysics-related fields, is consistent with an analysis of AGU's sections and focus groups. Additional analysis of geoscience departments at U.S. universities would suggest a similar trend. The expanding use of geodetic tools and geodetic data for many fields of research such as geophysics, tectonophysics, geodynamics, space physics, geology, geomorphology, seismology, hydrology, volcanology, glaciology, paleontology, paleoseismology, structural geology, meteorology, ecology, archaeology, oceanography, geography, soil science, atmospheric science, and snow science, may provide an approach to bringing diverse fields together under the moniker of geoscience and geoscientists. Scientists using a shared approach to research and education might be able to see themselves under the broader identity of geoscientist. The hurdle to making this transformation towards a larger shared voice in public discourse, is the more common use of "geophysicist" among the geodesy community, which is tied to the strong foundation of physics and mathematics needed to work with geodetic data and tools.

  19. Demarketing fear: Bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to explore the strategies for breaking the deadlock between the demand for resolving climate crisis and the resistance to deploying nuclear power. Since our present renewable technology is not advanced enough to replace fossil fuel power plants, nuclear power becomes the only available means that can buy us more time to explore better energy sources for coping with the dilemma of global warming and energy security. Therefore, this paper proposes an elaborated fear appeal framework that may shed light on the intervention points for mitigating fear. By examining the influence of fear appeal on the nuclear issue, three strategies for demarketing the nuclear fear of the public are recommended. The paper concludes that only when energy policy makers and the nuclear industry recognize the significance of minimizing fear and begin to work on removing the sources of fear, can we then expect to bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse. - Highlights: • Both cognition and emotion are critical in decision-making processes. • Dealing with the emotion of fear is essential for resolving the nuclear issue. • Fear should be mitigated to make rational discourses on nuclear power happen. • Fear can be mitigated by manipulating issue familiarity and response feasibility. • Using equivalency and issue framing may alter public perceptions of nuclear power

  20. Bringing Western-standard service stations to the Baltic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neste is the only Western oil company so far to have established a service station presence in the Baltic, with the exception of Norway's Statoil, which has one outlet near Tallinn Airport. Neste has an important logistical advantage compared to other companies in this respect as its two Finnish refineries are ideally located for supplying the region with high-quality petroleum products. Neste's first joint venture in the Baltic, Traffic Service, based in Estonia, was set up with Eesti Kutus in 1988 and opened its first service station in 1990. Other joint ventures are now up and running in Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and St. Petersburg. A total of 10 - 15 stations, the majority strategically located along the route of the Via Baltica, are expected to be operational by the end of this year. The Neste network comprises a combination of new outlets and refurbished older stations that have been modernized to bring them up to Western standards. These offer a comprehensive range of fuels, lubricants, spare parts, and accessories, as well as food, confectionery, and coffee shop services. Some stations also offer repair and car wash facilities. Adapting to the transition from a communist economy to a Western, capitalist one has not been easy for the Baltic countries, and has inevitably created difficulties for companies like Neste, in areas such as legislation covering land ownership. Neste's joint ventures have also encountered difficulties in instilling the Western approach to business efficiency, and customer service in a workforce used to the Soviet retail system

  1. Bringing solar light to the bottom of the pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S. [SGA Energy Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation described the efforts in bringing solar light to areas of Rwanda, Uganda and the Congo that are currently unserved by electricity. In particular, it highlighted the contributions made by Light Up the World Foundation (LUTW) and the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP) to improve the quality of life in periphery villages by introducing solar LED lighting in 6 pilot villages. Efficient, long-lasting white LED lamps combined with solar can provide a low cost alternative to the current light source, which is kerosene, diesel and candles. It was noted that the technology exists, but the challenge lies in reaching the market and making a sustainable intervention. The operating parameters of solar panels, LED lamps and batteries were listed with reference to output power, open circuit voltage, maximum power voltage, maximum power current, and capacity. The service life of these devices was also listed along with estimates of their operating costs. The project needs were also identified. It was emphasized that financial support of IGCP and LUTW is needed to support private sector development and market expansion to other areas of Africa. figs.

  2. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability. PMID:27119635

  3. 29 CFR 18.13 - Discovery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Discovery methods. 18.13 Section 18.13 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.13 Discovery methods. Parties may obtain discovery by one or more of the following methods: Depositions upon oral examination or written questions; written...

  4. Does Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Louis; Brooks, Patricia J.; Aldrich, Naomi J.; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery learning approaches to education have recently come under scrutiny (Tobias & Duffy, 2009), with many studies indicating limitations to discovery learning practices. Therefore, 2 meta-analyses were conducted using a sample of 164 studies: The 1st examined the effects of unassisted discovery learning versus explicit instruction, and the…

  5. Materials discovery via CALYPSO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure prediction at the atomic level is emerging as a state-of-the-art approach to accelerate the functionality-driven discovery of materials. By combining the global swarm optimization algorithm with first-principles thermodynamic calculations, it exploits the power of current supercomputer architectures to robustly predict the ground state and metastable structures of materials with only the given knowledge of chemical composition. In this Review, we provide an overview of the basic theory and main features of our as-developed CALYPSO structure prediction method, as well as its versatile applications to design of a broad range of materials including those of three-dimensional bulks, two-dimensional reconstructed surfaces and layers, and isolated clusters/nanoparticles or molecules with a variety of functional properties. The current challenges faced by structure prediction for materials discovery and future developments of CALYPSO to overcome them are also discussed. (topical review)

  6. Glycoscience aids in biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenus Hua1,2 & Hyun Joo An1,2,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The glycome consists of all glycans (or carbohydrates within abiological system, and modulates a wide range of important biologicalactivities, from protein folding to cellular communications.The mining of the glycome for disease markers representsa new paradigm for biomarker discovery; however, this effortis severely complicated by the vast complexity and structuraldiversity of glycans. This review summarizes recent developmentsin analytical technology and methodology as applied tothe fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics. Mass spectrometricstrategies for glycan compositional profiling are described, as arepotential refinements which allow structure-specific profiling.Analytical methods that can discern protein glycosylation at aspecific site of modification are also discussed in detail.Biomarker discovery applications are shown at each level ofanalysis, highlighting the key role that glycoscience can play inhelping scientists understand disease biology.

  7. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    OpenAIRE

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  8. Five Years of GWAS Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Visscher, Peter M.; Brown, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The past five years have seen many scientific and biological discoveries made through the experimental design of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). These studies were aimed at detecting variants at genomic loci that are associated with complex traits in the population and, in particular, at detecting associations between common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, auto-immune diseases, and psychiatric disorders. We start by giving a...

  9. Gas reserves, discoveries and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 2000 and 2004, new discoveries, located mostly in the Asia/Pacific region, permitted a 71% produced reserve replacement rate. The Middle East and the offshore sector represent a growing proportion of world gas production Non-conventional gas resources are substantial but are not exploited to any significant extent, except in the United States, where they account for 30% of U.S. gas production. (author)

  10. Freud's great voyage of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The author discusses some of Freud's most significant contributions: the psychoanalytic method, called free association by Freud; the discovery that symptoms have a meaning and that every symptom is a compromise formation; the interpretation of dreams; psychic determinism; the central role of infantile sexuality; and sublimation. Included is a brief review of the views of some noteworthy analysts, all of whom agree in ignoring the importance of infantile sexuality and/or in minimizing its importance. PMID:17294822

  11. Gas reserves, discoveries and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saniere, A

    2006-07-01

    Between 2000 and 2004, new discoveries, located mostly in the Asia/Pacific region, permitted a 71% produced reserve replacement rate. The Middle East and the offshore sector represent a growing proportion of world gas production Non-conventional gas resources are substantial but are not exploited to any significant extent, except in the United States, where they account for 30% of U.S. gas production. (author)

  12. Towards Discovery of Subgraph Bisociations

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Uwe; Thiel, Kilian; Kötter, Tobias; Piatek, Dawid; Berthold, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of surprising relations in large, heterogeneous information repositories is gaining increasing importance in real world data analysis. If these repositories come from diverse origins, forming different domains, domain bridging associations between otherwise weakly connected domains can provide insights into the data that are not accomplished by aggregative approaches. In this paper, we propose a first formalization for the detection of such potentially interesting, domaincrossin...

  13. Molecular Networks in Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Tian, Longzhang; Zhang, Shuxing

    2010-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase of global spending on drug discovery and development, the approval rate for new drugs is declining, due chiefly to toxicity and undesirable side effects. Simultaneously, the growth of available biomedical data in the post-genomic era has provided fresh insight into the nature of redundant and compensatory drug-target pathways. This stagnation in drug approval can be overcome by the novel concept of polypharmacology, which is built on the fundamental concept that ...

  14. Computational Methods in Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sliwoski, Gregory; Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Meiler, Jens; Edward W. Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Computer-aided drug discovery/design methods have played a major role in the development of therapeutically important small molecules for over three decades. These methods are broadly classified as either structure-based or ligand-based methods. Structure-based methods are in principle analogous to high-throughput screening in that both target and ligand structure information is imperative. Structure-based approaches include ligand docking, pharmacophore, and ligand design methods. The articl...

  15. A New Universe of Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, France A.

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of emerging advances in astronomical instruments, computational capabilities and talented practitioners (both professional and civilian) is creating an extraordinary new environment for making numerous fundamental discoveries in astronomy, ranging from the nature of exoplanets to understanding the evolution of solar systems and galaxies. The National Science Foundation is playing a critical role in supporting, stimulating, and shaping these advances. NSF is more than an agency of government or a funding mechanism for the infrastructure of science. The work of NSF is a sacred trust that every generation of Americans makes to those of the next generation, that we will build on the body of knowledge we inherit and continue to push forward the frontiers of science. We never lose sight of NSF's obligation to "explore the unexplored" and inspire all of humanity with the wonders of discovery. As the only Federal agency dedicated to the support of basic research and education in all fields of science and engineering, NSF has empowered discoveries across a broad spectrum of scientific inquiry for more than six decades. The result is fundamental scientific research that has had a profound impact on our nation's innovation ecosystem and kept our nation at the very forefront of the world's science-and-engineering enterprise.

  16. Unsupervised Discovery of Subspace Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Qiu, Peng; Roysam, Badrinath

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents unsupervised algorithms for discovering previously unknown subspace trends in high-dimensional data sets without the benefit of prior information. A subspace trend is a sustained pattern of gradual/progressive changes within an unknown subset of feature dimensions. A fundamental challenge to subspace trend discovery is the presence of irrelevant data dimensions, noise, outliers, and confusion from multiple subspace trends driven by independent factors that are mixed in with each other. These factors can obscure the trends in conventional dimension reduction & projection based data visualizations. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel graph-theoretic neighborhood similarity measure for detecting concordant progressive changes across data dimensions. Using this measure, we present an unsupervised algorithm for trend-relevant feature selection, subspace trend discovery, quantification of trend strength, and validation. Our method successfully identified verifiable subspace trends in diverse synthetic and real-world biomedical datasets. Visualizations derived from the selected trend-relevant features revealed biologically meaningful hidden subspace trend(s) that were obscured by irrelevant features and noise. Although our examples are drawn from the biological domain, the proposed algorithm is broadly applicable to exploratory analysis of high-dimensional data including visualization, hypothesis generation, knowledge discovery, and prediction in diverse other applications. PMID:26353189

  17. Nanoinformatics knowledge infrastructures: bringing efficient information management to nanomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology represents an area of particular promise and significant opportunity across multiple scientific disciplines. Ongoing nanotechnology research ranges from the characterization of nanoparticles and nanomaterials to the analysis and processing of experimental data seeking correlations between nanoparticles and their functionalities and side effects. Due to their special properties, nanoparticles are suitable for cellular-level diagnostics and therapy, offering numerous applications in medicine, e.g. development of biomedical devices, tissue repair, drug delivery systems and biosensors. In nanomedicine, recent studies are producing large amounts of structural and property data, highlighting the role for computational approaches in information management. While in vitro and in vivo assays are expensive, the cost of computing is falling. Furthermore, improvements in the accuracy of computational methods (e.g. data mining, knowledge discovery, modeling and simulation) have enabled effective tools to automate the extraction, management and storage of these vast data volumes. Since this information is widely distributed, one major issue is how to locate and access data where it resides (which also poses data-sharing limitations). The novel discipline of nanoinformatics addresses the information challenges related to nanotechnology research. In this paper, we summarize the needs and challenges in the field and present an overview of extant initiatives and efforts. (paper)

  18. DISCOVERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    新产品 国际家居品牌石家庄勒泰中心店盛大开幕近日,国际时尚家饰家用品牌HOLA特力和乐石家庄首店盛大开幕,正式入驻位于中山路核心商圈的勒泰购物中心。HOLA将以优质精品家居和贴心的服务,

  19. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  20. Medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Christie M

    2008-11-01

    Searches of the literature or Internet using the term "medical tourism" produce two sets of articles: travel for the purpose of delivering health care or travel for the purpose of seeking health care. The first usage primarily appears in the medical literature and is beyond the scope of this article, which focuses on travel to seek health care. Still, there are some aspects these two topics have in common: both are affected by ease and speed of international travel and communication associated with globalization, and both raise questions about continuity of care as well as issues related to cultural, language, and legal differences; both also raise questions about ethics. This article describes some of the motivating factors, contributing elements, and challenges in elucidating trends, as well as implications for clinicians who provide pretravel advice and those who care for ill returning travelers. PMID:19061760

  1. Medical Malpractice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grembi, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    MM first came to the attention of policy makers primarily in the USA where, from the 1970s, healthcare providers denounced problems in getting insurance for medical liability, pointing out to a crisis in the MM insurance market (Sage WM (2003) Understanding the first malpractice crisis of the 21th....../or its affordability, the withdrawal from the MM insurance of commercial insurers, the growth of MM public insurance or self-insurance solutions, the choice of no-fault rather than negligence liability, the adoption of enterprise liability for hospitals, the concerns for defensive medicine, and the...... in the last decades also among European countries (Hospitals of the European Union (HOPE) (2004) Insurance and malpractice, final report. Brussels, www.hope.be; OECD (2006) Medical malpractice, insurance and coverage options, policy issues in insurance n.11; EC (European Commission, D.G. Sanco) (2006...

  2. Method and Application of Comprehensive Knowledge Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Zongyao; BIAN Fuling

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes the principle of comprehensive knowledge discovery. Unlike most of the current knowledge discovery methods, the comprehensive knowledge discovery considers both the spatial relations and attributes of spatial entities or objects. We introduce the theory of spatial knowledge expression system and some concepts including comprehensive knowledge discovery and spatial union information table(SUIT). In theory, SUIT records all information contained in the studied objects, but in reality, because of the complexity and varieties of spatial relations,only those factors of interest to us are selected. In order to find out the comprehensive knowledge from spatial databases, an efficient comprehensive knowledge discovery algorithm called recycled algorithm (RAR) is suggested.

  3. Medical imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. Th...

  4. Medical Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within Brookhaven National Laboratory, the life sciences program is carried out under two departments, the Medical Department and the Biological Department. The Medical Research Center contains three major divisions: the Hospital, the Research Laboratories, and the Occupational Medicine Clinic. The hospital, which is devoted entirely to research patients, supports clinical studies in: pulmonary diseases; neuropsychiatric disorders; hematological diseases (e.g., chronic lymphocytic leukemia); cardiopulmonary disorders; hepatobiliary dysfunction; cancer of various types; toxicological problems; bone and mineral metabolism; and dietary and nutritional disorders. Research efforts are also made to improve therapeutic measures for disease: brain tumor therapy through boron capture of epithermal neutrons, and proton beam irradiation; extracorporeal irradiation of blood in leukemia; iron chelator efficacy in thalassemia; and nonsurgical treatment of ocular melanoma. Early diagnoses and studies of the mechanism of disease are approached through medical applications of nuclear technology, including positron emission tomography. Work carried out within the Biological Department includes: biological structure determination, molecular genetics, DNA repair and plant sciences. A large part of the research is devoted to understanding how biological systems work. Central to this aim is the study of DNA. This includes effects of damage by physical and chemical agents, gene cloning of bacteria and plants and effects of low doses of radiation and other energy derived hazards

  5. Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Mordon, Serge

    2015-10-01

    In re-listening to the lectures of Charles Townes shortly after the invention of the laser (e.g., in the Boston Science Museum), one can already have a realistic vision of the potentialities of this new tool in the field of medical therapy, as evidenced by the use of the laser in ophthalmology to cure retinal detachment in the 1960's. Since then, applications have flourished in the domain of therapy. We will thus illustrate here only some of the main fields of application of medical lasers. On the opposite, the use of lasers in medical imaging is, with one exception in ophthalmology, still at the development level. It is becoming a diagnostic tool in addition to high performance imaging facilities that are often very expensive (such as CT scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging). Even if progress is sometimes slow, one can now image with light inside the human body, in spite of the strong scattering of light by tissues, in the same way as a pathologist sees surgical specimens.

  6. Gender equity and tobacco control: bringing masculinity into focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Martha; Barraclough, Simon

    2010-03-01

    Gender is a key but often overlooked--determinant of tobacco use, especially in Asia, where sex-linked differences in prevalence rates are very large. In this article we draw upon existing data to consider the implications of these patterns for gender equity and propose approaches to redress inequity through gender-sensitive tobacco control activities. International evidence demonstrates that, in many societies, risk behaviours (including tobacco use) are practised substantially more by men and boys, and are also viewed as expressions of masculine identity. While gender equity focuses almost exclusively on the relative disadvantage of girls and women that exists in most societies, disproportionate male use of tobacco has profound negative consequences for men (as users) and for women (nonusers). Surprisingly, health promotion and tobacco control literature rarely focus on the role of gender in health risks among boys and men. However, tobacco industry marketing has masterfully incorporated gender norms, and also other important cultural values, to ensure its symbols are context-specific. By addressing gender-specific risks within the local cultural context--as countries are enjoined to do within the Framework Convention's Guiding Principles--it may be possible to accelerate the impact of mechanisms such as tobacco pricing, restrictions on marketing, smoking bans and provision of accurate information. It is essential that we construct a new research-to-policy framework for gender-sensitive tobacco control. Successful control of tobacco can only be strengthened by bringing males, and the concept of gender as social construction, back into our research and discussion on health and gender equity. PMID:20595351

  7. Who's bringing you hot ideas and how are you responding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thomas H; Prusak, Laurence; Wilson, H James

    2003-02-01

    There's an unsung hero in your organization. It's the person who's bringing in new ideas from the outside about how to manage better. These aren't your product and service innovators--those people are celebrated loudly and often. This is the manager who, for instance, first uttered the phrase "balance scorecard" in your hallways, or "real options," or "intellectual capital." Managerial innovation is an increasingly important source of competitive advantage--especially given the speed with which product innovations are copied--but it doesn't happen automatically. It takes a certain kind of person to welcome new management ideas and usher them into an organization. The authors recently studied 100 such people to find out how they translate new ideas into action in their organizations. They discovered that they are a distinct type of practitioner; that is to say, they resemble their counterparts in other organizations more than they resemble their own colleagues, and they share a common way of working. "Idea practitioners," as the authors call them, begin by scouting for ideas. All of them are avid readers of management literature and enthusiastic participants in business conferences; many are friendly with business gurus. Once they've identified an idea that seems to hold promise, they tailor it to fit their organizations' specific needs. Next, they actively sell the idea--to senior executives, to the rank and file, to middle managers. And finally, they get the ball rolling by participating in small-scale experiments. But when those take off, they get out of the way and let others execute. In this article, the authors identify the characteristics of idea practitioners and offer strategies for managing them wisely. PMID:12577653

  8. Replication, Communication, and the Population Dynamics of Scientific Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McElreath

    Full Text Available Many published research results are false (Ioannidis, 2005, and controversy continues over the roles of replication and publication policy in improving the reliability of research. Addressing these problems is frustrated by the lack of a formal framework that jointly represents hypothesis formation, replication, publication bias, and variation in research quality. We develop a mathematical model of scientific discovery that combines all of these elements. This model provides both a dynamic model of research as well as a formal framework for reasoning about the normative structure of science. We show that replication may serve as a ratchet that gradually separates true hypotheses from false, but the same factors that make initial findings unreliable also make replications unreliable. The most important factors in improving the reliability of research are the rate of false positives and the base rate of true hypotheses, and we offer suggestions for addressing each. Our results also bring clarity to verbal debates about the communication of research. Surprisingly, publication bias is not always an obstacle, but instead may have positive impacts-suppression of negative novel findings is often beneficial. We also find that communication of negative replications may aid true discovery even when attempts to replicate have diminished power. The model speaks constructively to ongoing debates about the design and conduct of science, focusing analysis and discussion on precise, internally consistent models, as well as highlighting the importance of population dynamics.

  9. Discovery Mondays: 'The Grid: a universal computer'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    How can one store and analyse the 15 million billion pieces of data that the LHC will produce each year with a computer that isn't the size of a sky-scraper? The IT experts have found the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers in the world by putting them together on one network and making them work like a single computer achieving a power that has not yet been matched. The Grid, inspired from the Web, already exists - in fact, several of them exist in the field of science. The European EGEE project, led by CERN, contributes not only to the study of particle physics but to medical research as well, notably in the study of malaria and avian flu. The next Discovery Monday invites you to explore this futuristic computing technology. The 'Grid Masters' of CERN have prepared lively animations to help you understand how the Grid works. Children can practice saving the planet on the Grid video game. You will also discover other applications such as UNOSAT, a United Nations...

  10. Designer drugs: the evolving science of drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, L A; DuBose, R F

    1998-07-01

    Drug discovery and design are fundamental to drug development. Until recently, most drugs were discovered through random screening or developed through molecular modification. New technologies are revolutionizing this phase of drug development. Rational drug design, using powerful computers and computational chemistry and employing X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship analysis, is creating highly specific, biologically active molecules by virtual reality modeling. Sophisticated screening technologies are eliminating all but the most active lead compounds. These new technologies promise more efficacious, safe, and cost-effective medications, while minimizing drug development time and maximizing profits. PMID:10185235

  11. Medical device data systems and FDA regulation. Should medical device data systems require FDA clearance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    It is widely understood why medical devices need to be regulated by the FDA and other governing bodies. However medical software does not typically require the same level of regulation. Currently the FDA is investigating whether one type of medical software, Medical Device Data Systems (MDDS), should require FDA clearance because of the potential risk they impose when interconnected with medical devices. Hospitals are looking to implement MDDS because the technology allows nursing staff to spend more time on direct patient care and reduces charting errors. This article will explore the FDA's proposal and will review the possible risks and provide a rationale for why MDDS should be regulated by the FDA and why MDDS vendors should have the right level of quality and risk management procedures in place to ensure that they are developing and bringing to market the safest products possible. PMID:20677470

  12. Future clinical trials in DIPG: bringing epigenetics to the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres E. Morales La Madrid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of major recent advances in DIPG molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments.To date,more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents,have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone.The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis;ideally in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety.These pre-treatment tumor samples,and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem,have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular biology.We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high grade glioma,other non-pontine pediatric high grade gliomas and even between pontine gliomas.The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation,maintenance and progression.Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG.To date,clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic modifiers have been unsuccessful.Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used,their CNS penetration,redundant pathways within the tumor,or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth,suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways,and the drugs designed to target them.In this review, we discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment strategies directed against the unique abnormalities

  13. The medical record system in acute situations at Okhaldhunga Community Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Thaulow, Eli Øyen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Okhaldhunga community hospital lies in rural Nepal, and is a hospital with simple equipment and facilities. The supply of power is little, therefore it does not excist any electronical medical record system. Each patient has its own notebook, which serves as their medical record, and each patient is responsible for this medical record. That means that they bring their medical record back home when they are discharged from the hospital, and the hospital has no archive. Two other no...

  14. ISSLIVE! Bringing the Space Station to Every Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Philip D.; Price, Jennifer B.; Severance, Mark; Blue, Regina; Khan, Ahmed; Healy, Matthew D.; Ehlinger, Jesse B.

    2011-01-01

    traditional education system, ISSLive! provides a single, interactive, and engaging experience to learn about the ISS and its role in space exploration, international collaboration, and science. While traditional students are using ISSLive! in the classroom, their parents, grandparents, and friends are using it at home. ISSLive! truly brings the daily operations of the ISS into the daily lives of the public from every generation.

  15. Kaiserschnitten Wien - Let's bring the forest in the city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Primožič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The location is part of the Vienna River Valley, known as "Wiental", one of the most dissonant, incongruous, and contested areas of Vienna. Depending on one’s perspective, the Vienna River Valley can be viewed as a transit corridor, an unresolved urban area, an urban interface, an inter- zone, an infrastructure bundle, an ugly wound in the urban landscape, a socially charged boundary, etc. We started the project with urban pattern analyses on different scales: the scale of the city, the scale of Wiental (from Schönbrunn to Hofburg and on a minor scale, i.e. the scale of the project.The analysis showed that Wiental constitutes the main connection between the city centre and suburbia and the countryside in the background of the city. With its clear morphological importance, it could become a green axis of the city, a pleasant place for people, rather than having only an infrastructural role. Our concept is to bring new character to Wiental by making it a pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly green axis. Our initial goal was to reduce car traffic. We proposed introducing a park-and-ride system, which would become a point of transfer where car traffic is replaced by public transport and cycle traffic. Through the afforestation of Wiental, the area could become a park or recreational route, and the quality of life in the area would improve.An important aspect of the project was dealing with the Danube. We proposed to manage the flood peaks by introducing a dam, and after the point of regulation, we arranged the River into two levels: an ambient upper flow and infrastructural lower flow in the existing channel. Also, by rearranging "Naschmarkt" with the Danube uncovered, we predicted an extension of tourism from the city centre to Schönbrunn by bicycle or on foot, which could be followed by an expansion of the public programme. We wanted to show that the Danube, with an appropriate environment, could become a significant element of the city structure.

  16. Guided Discovery with Socratic Questioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan TURKCAPAR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available “The Socratic method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions. It was first used by in ancient times by the Greek philosopher Socrates who taught his followers by asking questions; these conversations between them are known as “Socratic dialogues”. In this methodology, no new knowledge is taught to the individual; rather, the individual is guided to remember and rediscover what was formerly known through this process. The main method used in cognitive therapy is guided discovery. There are various methods of guided discovery in cognitive therapy. The form of verbal exchange between the therapist and client which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as “socratic questioning”. In this method the goal is to make the client rediscover, with a series of questions, a piece of knowledge which he could otherwise know but is not presently conscious of. The Socratic Questioning consists of several steps, including: identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly rediscovered information and questioning the old distorted belief, and reaching a new conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are: questions for collecting information, questions revealing meanings, questions revealing beliefs, questions about behaviours during similar past experiences, analytic questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood, it is important to be empathetic and summarize the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues provided for each step.

  17. Discovery of a Makemakean Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alex H.; Buie, Marc W.; Grundy, Will M.; Noll, Keith S.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the discovery of a satellite in orbit about the dwarf planet (136472) Makemake. This satellite, provisionally designated S/2015 (136472) 1, was detected in imaging data collected with the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 on UTC 2015 April 27 at 7.80 ± 0.04 mag fainter than Makemake and at a separation of 0.″57. It likely evaded detection in previous satellite searches due to a nearly edge-on orbital configuration, placing it deep within the glare of Makemake during a substantial fraction of its orbital period. This configuration would place Makemake and its satellite near a mutual event season. Insufficient orbital motion was detected to make a detailed characterization of its orbital properties, prohibiting a measurement of the system mass with the discovery data alone. Preliminary analysis indicates that if the orbit is circular, its orbital period must be longer than 12.4 days and must have a semimajor axis ≳21,000 km. We find that the properties of Makemake’s moon suggest that the majority of the dark material detected in the system by thermal observations may not reside on the surface of Makemake, but may instead be attributable to S/2015 (136472) 1 having a uniform dark surface. This “dark moon hypothesis” can be directly tested with future James Webb Space Telescope observations. We discuss the implications of this discovery for the spin state, figure, and thermal properties of Makemake and the apparent ubiquity of trans-Neptunian dwarf planet satellites.

  18. Medical electromechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Y. M.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Osipov, O. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The first part of the article presentsdevices of rehabilitation electromechatronics.As a research work, the author's team has performed sketch and technical developments on this subject, which are protected by patents of the Russian Federation. The second part providesan overview of medical robotic surgery, which is ideal for imperfections removing.It also describes capabilities of the author's team in development of active driveline based "iron" hands.Scalpels never tremble in the iron hands, which are not afraid of the aftershocks and never get tired.They can perform operations during not less than 48 consecutive hours.

  19. Medical robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In this book, we present medical robotics, its evolution over the last 30 years in terms of architecture, design and control, and the main scientific and clinical contributions to the field. For more than two decades, robots have been part of hospitals and have progressively become a common tool for the clinician. Because this domain has now reached a certain level of maturity it seems important and useful to provide a state of the scientific, technological and clinical achievements and still open issues. This book describes the short history of the domain, its specificity and constraints, and

  20. [Medical nanodevices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2006-02-01

    Development of implantable medical nanodevices enables us continuous automatic treatment of patients from inside of their body. Bionic devices, interfacing with neural systems and substituting native functions, such as bionic pacemaker, bionic pressure controller are candidates to miniaturize. For such miniaturization, efforts to reduce size of power supply (e.g., biological fuel cell) and to establish reliable high-throughput, low power telecommunication (e.g., spread spectrum telecommunication) are required. Simple devices such as pacemakers would benefit from miniaturization by lowering invasion and by developing a new usage such as ventricular resynchronization. PMID:16454192

  1. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill R. T.; Rothall D.

    2012-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of...

  2. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... (iii) antibody numbering and IMGT. Here, we review “antibody informatics,” which may integrate the above three fields so that bridging the gaps between industrial needs and academic solutions can be accelerated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering...

  3. Smoking cessation medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - medications; Smokeless tobacco - medications; Medications for stopping tobacco ... Creating a plan to help you deal with smoking urges. Getting support from a doctor, counselor, or ...

  4. Mechanical safety of medical x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical X-ray equipment brings about radiological, electrical and mechanical dangers to the patient and the operator. In order to produce the equipment free from danger, technical consideration especially from the standpoint of human engineering and safety engineering is necessary. Fundamental methods used in the design of medical X-ray equipment and several concrete examples of these methods are introduced in this paper. (author)

  5. Borrower use of a modern medical library by practicing physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseasohn, R

    1970-01-01

    Modern data processing equipment in a new medical school library permitted analysis of borrowing patterns of practicing physicians in an urban community. Only a quarter of the physicians in the community borrowed one or more books or periodicals from the library during a two-year interval and less than 10 percent were frequent users. Health information centers need to devise and test new ways of bringing data to providers of medical care if this pattern of use is widespread. PMID:5411705

  6. Triplex DNA: Importance and its medical application

    OpenAIRE

    Noori Dalooei M; Mojoodi A

    1998-01-01

    Back in 1957, when investigators produced a triple-stranded form of DNA while studying synthetic nucleic acids, few researchers paid much attention to the discovery. However, triplex DNA was never entirely forgotton and especially since 1987 its structural and functional importance in biological systems as well as its medical applications and therapeutic potentional have been extensively studied. It was suggested that in triplex DNA, the third strand was hydrogen bonded and positioned in the ...

  7. Discovery of a Makemakean Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Alex H; Grundy, Will M; Noll, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    We describe the discovery of a satellite in orbit about the dwarf planet (136472) Makemake. This satellite, provisionally designated S/2015 (136472) 1, was detected in imaging data collected with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 on UTC April 27, 2015 at 7.80$\\pm$0.04 magnitudes fainter than Makemake. It likely evaded detection in previous satellite searches due to a nearly edge-on orbital configuration, placing it deep within the glare of Makemake during a substantial fraction of its orbital period. This configuration would place Makemake and its satellite near a mutual event season. Insufficient orbital motion was detected to make a detailed characterization of its orbital properties, prohibiting a measurement of the system mass with the discovery data alone. Preliminary analysis indicates that if the orbit is circular, its orbital period must be longer than 12.4 days, and must have a semi-major axis $\\gtrsim$21,000 km. We find that the properties of Makemake's moon suggest that the majority ...

  8. Drug discovery in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Dana M; Mathur, Nidhee; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2010-11-01

    Drug discovery in the ovarian cancer arena has led to the activation of several important clinical trials. Many biologic agents have come down the pipeline and are being studied in phase II trials for recurrent disease. These agents include antivascular compounds that disrupt angiogenesis through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., prevention of ligand-binding to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), high-affinity VEGF blockade, oral inhibitors of tyrosine kinases stimulated by VEGF, inhibition of alpha5beta1 integrin, neutralization of angioproteins, etc.). Other novel drugs include oral platinum compounds as well as those that antagonize the tumor proliferation genes in the Hedgehog pathway, and that target folic acid receptors which are expressed by ovarian cancer cells. In addition, studies are underway with oral agents that inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity associated with two oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2/neu). Finally, emerging technologies in clinical trials include nanotechnology to enhance delivery of chemotherapy to ovarian tumors, drug resistance/sensitivity assays to guide therapy, and agents that mobilize and induce proliferation of hematopoetic progenitor cells to aid in red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet recovery following chemotherapy. The relevant patents in drug discovery of ovarian cancer are discussed. PMID:20524931

  9. The discovery of uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  10. Tools for GPCR drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru ZHANG; Xin XIE

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases.The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR assays that allow the cost-effective screening of large compound libraries to identify novel drug candidates are critical in early drug discovery.Early functional GPCR assays depend primarily on the measurement of G-protein-mediated 2nd messenger generation.Taking advantage of the continuously deepening understanding of GPCR signal transduction,many G-protein-independent pathways are utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs,and may provide additional information on functional selectivity of candidate compounds.With the combination of automated imaging systems and label-free detection systems,such assays are now suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS).In this review,we summarize the most widely used GPCR assays and recent advances in HTS technologies for GPCR drug discovery.

  11. Trends in medical information retrieval on Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baujard, O; Baujard, V; Aurel, S; Boyer, C; Appel, R D

    1998-09-01

    Information on the World Wide Web is unstructured, distributed, multimedia and multilingual. Many tools have been developed to help users search for useful information: subject hierarchies, general search engines, browsers and search assistants. Although helpful, they present serious limitations, mainly in terms of precision, multilingual indexing and distribution. In this paper, we cover some on-line solutions to medical information discovery and present our own approach, the MARVIN (multi-agent retrieval vagabond on information network) project, which tackles medical information research with specialized cooperative retrieval agents. We also draw some outlines for future extensions. PMID:9861514

  12. A UDDI Search Engine for SVG Federated Medical Imaging Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Sabah Mohammed; Jinan Fiaidhi; Marshal Hahn

    2006-01-01

    With more and more medical web services appearing on the web, web services discovery mechanism becomes essential. UDDI is an online registry standard to facilitate the discovery of business partners and services. However, most medical imaging applications exist within their own protected domain and were never designed to participate and operate with other applications across the web. However, private UDDI registries in federated organizations should be able to share the service descriptions a...

  13. The Question of Stress Among First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Stress was investigated in two classes of first-year medical students with support groups, didactic sessions, and no-contact control conditions. Few differences in personality measures were found, and all group means were within the normal range. Results bring into question the reported extent of chronic stress in this group. (MSE)

  14. Beyond Comfort Zones: An Experiment in Medical and Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Kelli; Baruch, Jay M.

    2012-01-01

    Practicing medicine and creating art are both informed by observation and perception, yet how artists and doctors view the world and their place in it might be quite different. By bringing two populations together--RISD students and Warren Alpert Medical School students--into one experimental course, "No Innocent Eye: Knowledge and Interpretation…

  15. Selective hair therapy: bringing science to the fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Annika; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on carrier-based drug delivery systems for higher selectivity in hair therapy have clearly evolved from dye release and model studies to highly sophisticated approaches, many of which specifically tackle hair indications and the delivery of hair-relevant molecules. Here, we group recent hair disease-oriented work into efforts towards (i) improved delivery of conventional drugs, (ii) delivery of novel drug classes, for example biomolecules and (iii) targeted delivery on the cellular/molecular level. Considering the solid foundation of experimental work, it does not take a large step outside the current box of thinking to follow the idea of using large carriers (>500 nm, unlikely to penetrate as a whole) for follicular penetration, retention and protection of sensitive compounds. Yet, reports on particles hair follicles) combined with recent advances in nanodermatology add interesting new facets to the possibilities carrier technologies could offer, for example, unprecedented levels of selectivity. The authors provide thought-provoking ideas on how smart delivery technologies and advances in our molecular understanding of hair pathophysiology could result in a whole new era of hair therapeutics. As the field still largely remains in preclinical investigation, determined efforts towards production of medical grade material and truly translational work are needed to demonstrate surplus value of carrier systems for clinical applications. PMID:24387677

  16. The Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print A ... for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a place ...

  17. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Take Part in Online ...

  20. Supersymmetry after the Higgs discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is a new symmetry that relates bosons and fermions, which has strong support at both the mathematical and the physical level. This book offers a comprehensive review, following the development of SUSY from its very early days up to present. The order of the contributions should provide the reader with the historical development as well as the latest theoretical updates and interpretations, and experimental constraints from particle accelerators and dark matter searches. It is a great pleasure to bring together here contributions from authors who initiated or have contributed significantly to the development of this theory over so many years. To present a balanced point of view, the book also includes a closing contribution that attempts to describe the physics beyond the Standard Model in the absence of SUSY. The contributions to this book have been previously published in The European Physical Journal C - Particles and Fields.

  1. Forms of Discovery for Design Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Christian; Gregor, Shirley; Aier, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The article at hand analyses an often disregarded aspect of design science research that is how design knowledge is actually built or, more precisely, how new design knowledge is discovered. In the article we distinguish abductive and inductive forms of discovery. We describe how inductive and abductive discoveries are dealt with in traditional science and how these two forms of discovery have been discussed in Information Systems Design Science Research literature. By means of a case study w...

  2. Indexer Based Dynamic Web Services Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Saba Bashir,; Farhan Hassan Khan; M. Younus Javed; Aihab Khan; Malik Sikandar Hayat Khiyal

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in web services plays an important role in business to business and business to consumer interaction. Discovery mechanism is not only used to find a suitable service but also provides collaboration between service providers and consumers by using standard protocols. A static web service discovery mechanism is not only time consuming but requires continuous human interaction. This paper proposed an efficient dynamic web services discovery mechanism that can locate relevant a...

  3. Using rule learning for subgroup discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kavšek, Branko

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how to adapt standard classification rule learning approaches to subgroup discovery. The goal of subgroup discovery is to find rules describing subsets of a selected population that are sufficiently large and statistically unusual in terms of class distribution. The dissertation presents a subgroup discovery algorithm, CN2-SD, developed by modifying parts of the CN2 classification rule learner: its covering algorithm, search heuristic, pr...

  4. MODIS: an audio motif discovery software

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, Laurence; Souviraà-Labastie, Nathan; Qu, Bingqing; Campion, Sébastien; Gravier, Guillaume; Vincent, Emmanuel; Bimbot, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    International audience MODIS is a free speech and audio motif discovery software developed at IRISA Rennes. Motif discovery is the task of discovering and collecting occurrences of repeating patterns in the absence of prior knowledge, or training material. MODIS is based on a generic approach to mine repeating audio sequences, with tolerance to motif variability. The algorithm implementation allows to process large audio streams at a reasonable speed where motif discovery often requires hu...

  5. Price Discovery in the Chinese Gold Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Muzhao; Li, Youwei; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Yung Chiang

    2016-01-01

    This study conducts price discovery analysis in the Chinese gold market. Our result indicates that the price discovery in Chinese gold market occurs predominantly in the futures market. The result is robust to the different measures of price discovery, namely information share, component share, and information leadership share. Partitioning the daily trades into three trading sessions, we find that the dominance of the futures market occurs in all trading sessions. We further investigate the ...

  6. Proteomics and Its Application in Biomarker Discovery and Drug Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Qing-Yu; Chiu Jen-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is a research field aiming to characterize molecular and cellular dynamics in protein expression and function on a global level. The introduction of proteomics has been greatly broadening our view and accelerating our path in various medical researches. The most significant advantage of proteomics is its ability to examine a whole proteome or sub-proteome in a single experiment so that the protein alterations corresponding to a pathological or biochemical condition at a given time can be considered in an integrated way. Proteomic technology has been extensively used to tackle a wide variety of medical subjects including biomarker discovery and drug development. By complement with other new technique advance in genomics and bioinformatics,proteomics has a great potential to make considerable contribution to biomarker identification and revolutionize drug development process. A brief overview of the proteomic technologies will be provided and the application of proteomics in biomarker discovery and drug development will be discussed using our current research projects as examples.

  7. Medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three slide sets which can be used in lectures about radiation protection have been published by NRPB. The slide sets are based on publications in the NRPB ''At-a-Glance'' series of broadsheets, which use illustrations as the main source of information, supported by captions; the series generally avoids the jargon of radiation protection, although each leaflet is based on scientific studies. Slide Set Number 3, ''Medical Radiation'', outlines the production and use of x-rays in diagnosis, the protection of staff and patients, and the use of radioactive materials in diagnosis and radiotherapy. It summarises the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Radiation doses received during various x-ray examinations are compared with radiation doses from nature. (Author)

  8. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions......IT is central for the development of modern healthcare. Until now, researchers and designers have given great attention to how IT can render clinical data accessible and support collaborative and coordinative work. By focusing on how physicians make sense of patients’ illness trajectories and by...... conceptualizing this as narrative reasoning, this PhD dissertation offers novel perspectives on design of health IT. The dissertation consists of five research articles and an extended synopsis that presents findings from three years of research within the project ‘Co-Constructing IT and Healthcare...

  9. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment. PMID:27215115

  10. THE CALIFORNIA MEDICAL MALPRACTICE PICTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUBSAMEN, D S

    1963-11-01

    The California physician's steadily increasing risk of legal liability poses a basic question: Will he ultimately wind up a guarantor of results, carrying a great burden of malpractice insurance in order to pay for every untoward result of medical treatment? This alarming prospect is the result of many years of judicial (and therefore lay) speculation on the legal significance of the injury which brings the patient into court. Does it look as though this injury probably is associated with medical negligence? If so, let the doctor explain. And the explanation must be very complete. The legal instrument which thus reverses the traditional requirements of proof, permitting the patient-plaintiff to remain silent while the doctor-defendant must exculpate himself, is an evidentiary doctrine called res ipsa loquitur-the thing speaks for itself. The application of the doctrine relieves the patient-plaintiff of the necessity of producing an expert witness to point the finger and say, "The medical conduct that produced this injury was sub-standard." The increased use of the doctrine reflects a judicial conviction that in many parts of California physicians refuse to testify for the patient-plaintiff regardless of the merit to his case.A recent California Supreme Court decision suggests that the Court is not unaware of the adverse social consequences implicit in the irrational expansion of the physician's risk of legal liability. But a reversal of this trend would seem to be contingent on positive conduct from the medical profession in California-conduct demonstrating that no meritorious patient-plaintiff will fail in his malpractice lawsuit for lack of an expert medical witness. PMID:14081771

  11. 20 CFR 1002.308 - Who has legal standing to bring an action under USERRA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who has legal standing to bring an action under USERRA? 1002.308 Section 1002.308 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR... Rights and Benefits Against A State Or Private Employer § 1002.308 Who has legal standing to bring...

  12. 36 CFR 1280.18 - May I bring guns or other weapons onto NARA property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I bring guns or other weapons onto NARA property? 1280.18 Section 1280.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES... Conduct on NARA Property? Prohibited Activities § 1280.18 May I bring guns or other weapons onto...

  13. To Scan or not to Scan: Consideration of Medical Benefit in the Justification of CT Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-03-01

    While there are ongoing debates with regard to the level of risk, if any, associated with medical imaging, the benefits from medical imaging exams are well documented. This forum article looks at outcome-based medical studies and guidance from expert panels in an effort to bring the benefits of medical imaging, specifically CT imaging, into focus. The position is taken that imaging, medical, and safety communities must not continue to discuss small hypothetical risks from ionizing radiation without emphasizing the large well-documented benefits from medical imaging exams that use ionizing radiation. PMID:26808885

  14. Data Driven Discovery in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Longo, Giuseppe; Djorgovski, George S; Cavuoti, Stefano; Donalek, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    We review some aspects of the current state of data-intensive astronomy, its methods, and some outstanding data analysis challenges. Astronomy is at the forefront of "big data" science, with exponentially growing data volumes and data rates, and an ever-increasing complexity, now entering the Petascale regime. Telescopes and observatories from both ground and space, covering a full range of wavelengths, feed the data via processing pipelines into dedicated archives, where they can be accessed for scientific analysis. Most of the large archives are connected through the Virtual Observatory framework, that provides interoperability standards and services, and effectively constitutes a global data grid of astronomy. Making discoveries in this overabundance of data requires applications of novel, machine learning tools. We describe some of the recent examples of such applications.

  15. Automating Spreadsheet Discovery & Risk Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Eric

    2008-01-01

    There have been many articles and mishaps published about the risks of uncontrolled spreadsheets in today's business environment, including non-compliance, operational risk, errors, and fraud all leading to significant loss events. Spreadsheets fall into the realm of end user developed applications and are often absent the proper safeguards and controls an IT organization would enforce for enterprise applications. There is also an overall lack of software programming discipline enforced in how spreadsheets are developed. However, before an organization can apply proper controls and discipline to critical spreadsheets, an accurate and living inventory of spreadsheets across the enterprise must be created, and all critical spreadsheets must be identified. As such, this paper proposes an automated approach to the initial stages of the spreadsheet management lifecycle - discovery, inventory and risk assessment. Without the use of technology, these phases are often treated as a one-off project. By leveraging techn...

  16. Matching Medical Websites to Medical Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Dusan Rak; Vojtech Svatek

    2016-01-01

    The quality of medical texts provided to general public on the Internet is a serious issue nowadays. Unfortunately the only feasible way to approve the adequacy of the medical information content is human verification today. Best practices in medicine are systematically captured by medical guidelines (MGLs), which are provided by renowned medical societies. We propose a simple approach to exploiting MGL content as ’gold standard’ for the assessment of content quality in medical we...

  17. Considering something 'ELSE': ethical, legal and socio-economic factors in medical imaging and medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquenoy, Penny; George, Carlisle; Solomonides, Anthony

    2008-12-01

    The focus on the use of existing and new technologies to facilitate advances in medical imaging and medical informatics (MIMI) is often directed to the technical capabilities and possibilities that these technologies bring. The technologies, though, in acting as a mediating agent alter the dynamics and context of information delivery in subtle ways. While these changes bring benefits in more efficient information transfer and offer the potential of better healthcare, they also disrupt traditional processes and practices which have been formulated for a different setting. The governance processes that underpin core ethical principles, such as patient confidentiality and informed consent, may no longer be appropriate in a new technological context. Therefore, in addition to discussing new methodologies, techniques and applications, there is need for a discussion of ethical, legal and socio-economic (ELSE) issues surrounding the use and application of technologies in MIMI. Consideration of these issues is especially important for the area of medical informatics which after all exists to support patients, healthcare practitioners and inform science. This paper brings to light some important ethical, legal and socio-economic issues related to MIMI with the aim of furthering an interdisciplinary approach to the increasing use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in healthcare. PMID:18649968

  18. GalenOWL: Ontology-based drug recommendations discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doulaverakis Charalampos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of drug-drug and drug-diseases interactions can pose a difficult problem to cope with, as the increasingly large number of available drugs coupled with the ongoing research activities in the pharmaceutical domain, make the task of discovering relevant information difficult. Although international standards, such as the ICD-10 classification and the UNII registration, have been developed in order to enable efficient knowledge sharing, medical staff needs to be constantly updated in order to effectively discover drug interactions before prescription. The use of Semantic Web technologies has been proposed in earlier works, in order to tackle this problem. Results This work presents a semantic-enabled online service, named GalenOWL, capable of offering real time drug-drug and drug-diseases interaction discovery. For enabling this kind of service, medical information and terminology had to be translated to ontological terms and be appropriately coupled with medical knowledge of the field. International standards such as the aforementioned ICD-10 and UNII, provide the backbone of the common representation of medical data, while the medical knowledge of drug interactions is represented by a rule base which makes use of the aforementioned standards. Details of the system architecture are presented while also giving an outline of the difficulties that had to be overcome. A comparison of the developed ontology-based system with a similar system developed using a traditional business logic rule engine is performed, giving insights on the advantages and drawbacks of both implementations. Conclusions The use of Semantic Web technologies has been found to be a good match for developing drug recommendation systems. Ontologies can effectively encapsulate medical knowledge and rule-based reasoning can capture and encode the drug interactions knowledge.

  19. History of mathematics a chronological discovery up to 20th century

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, PC

    2010-01-01

    Every discipline has it own unique history. Markedly different from others, the history of mathematics is primarily concerned with investigations into the origin of discoveries in mathematics and, to a lesser extent, an investigation into methods and notations of the past. Again, the history of mathematics covers the whole of mankind's civilization. This book is an effort to show how mathematical works, carried out by scholars from different countries and different regions, in any particular age, have spread all over the world, despite the geographical barriers. The author here brings out cent

  20. Gravity's ghost and big dog scientific discovery and social analysis in the twenty-first century

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Gravity's Ghost and Big Dog brings to life science's efforts to detect cosmic gravitational waves. These ripples in space-time are predicted by general relativity, and their discovery will not only demonstrate the truth of Einstein's theories but also transform astronomy. Although no gravitational wave has ever been directly detected, the previous five years have been an especially exciting period in the field. Here sociologist Harry Collins offers readers an unprecedented view of gravitational wave research and explains what it means for an analyst to do work of this kind.

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Open Discovery Space webinar in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Open Discovery Space (ODS) is a socially-powered and multilingual open learning infrastructure to boost the adoption of eLearning resources. ODS brings millions of educational resources directly into school classrooms. A key part of planning engaging lessons is access to high-quality, trustworthy teaching content. The platform empowers teachers by helping them build their schools` digital libraries, join lively communities of peers to share best practices, and connect their schools virtually with the world`s best research centres, museums and libraries.

  2. A prerecognition model for hot topic discovery based on microblogging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongyu; Yu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The microblogging is prevailing since its easy and anonymous information sharing at Internet, which also brings the issue of dispersing negative topics, or even rumors. Many researchers have focused on how to find and trace emerging topics for analysis. When adopting topic detection and tracking techniques to find hot topics with streamed microblogging data, it will meet obstacles like streamed microblogging data clustering, topic hotness definition, and emerging hot topic discovery. This paper schemes a novel prerecognition model for hot topic discovery. In this model, the concepts of the topic life cycle, the hot velocity, and the hot acceleration are promoted to calculate the change of topic hotness, which aims to discover those emerging hot topics before they boost and break out. Our experiments show that this new model would help to discover potential hot topics efficiently and achieve considerable performance. PMID:25254235

  3. A Tale of Two Discoveries: Comparing the Usability of Summon and EBSCO Discovery Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Anita K.; MacDonald, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Web-scale discovery systems are gaining momentum among academic libraries as libraries seek a means to provide their users with a one-stop searching experience. Illinois State University's Milner Library found itself in the unique position of having access to two distinct discovery products, EBSCO Discovery Service and Serials Solutions' Summon.…

  4. [Grmek, medical history, and paleopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillaud, P L

    2001-01-01

    Mirko Drazen Grmek died on 6 March 2000, defeated by an implacable enemy (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which had been diagnosed just 18 months earlier). He has now found peace in his final resting place, the Montparnasse cemetery in Paris. His immense body of work reveals an omniscient man of great wisdom, a cosmopolitan polyglot who devoted his life to the history of science, with particular emphasis on medicine and disease. He looked at paleopathology for what that discipline could bring to the study of populations in antiquity, and succeeded in anchoring it in history with his definitive concept of "pathocenose", created in 1969. Several years later, his most important work, "Les Maladies à l'aube de la civilisation occidentale", (1983) set forth with definitive and convincing illustrations the importance of paleopathology, which will therefore be forever associated with one of the most outstanding medical history books of the XXth. century. PMID:11908523

  5. [Three aspects of the medical ethos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Marion-Veyron, Régis; Stiefel, Friedrich; Bourquin, Céline

    2016-02-10

    For many years, a major focus of interest has been the patient, in the context of a constantly changing society and increasingly complex medical practices. We propose to shift this focus on the physician, who is entangled in a similar, but less evident way. In these three articles, we explore, in succession, the lived experience of the contemporary physician, the ethos which brings together the medical community, and the education of the future physician, using research projects currently under way within the Service of Liaison Psychiatry at Lausanne University Hospital. Here, we describe three aspects of the medical ethos shaping medicine and the physicians: pragmatism, scientific rationality, and the individualistic embodiment of clinical practice. PMID:27039440

  6. Note from the CERN Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2004-01-01

    FLU VACCINATION People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2004. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  7. Note from the CERN Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2005-01-01

    FLU VACCINATION People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have the flu vaccination.  Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious illness or after major surgery . The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their usual family doctor. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  8. Medical muddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis. PMID:24400630

  9. Intraday Price Discovery in Fragmented Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Ozturk (Sait); M. van der Wel (Michel); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractFor many assets, trading is fragmented across multiple exchanges. Price discovery measures summarize the informativeness of trading on each venue for discovering the asset’s true underlying value. We explore intraday variation in price discovery using a structural model with time-varying

  10. 2015 Update of the Discoveries of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Thoennessen, M

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 update of the discovery of nuclide project is presented. Twenty new nuclides were observed for the first time in 2015. An overall review of all previous assignments was made in order to apply the discovery criteria consistently to all elements. In addition, a list of isotopes published so far only in conference proceedings or internal reports is included.

  11. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  12. Scaling Bayesian network discovery through incremental recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelo, J.R.; Siebes, A.P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Bayesian networks are a type of graphical models that, e.g., allow one to analyze the interaction among the variables in a database. A well-known problem with the discovery of such models from a database is the ``problem of high-dimensionality''. That is, the discovery of a network from a database w

  13. In silico discoveries for biomedical sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagen, Herman van

    2011-01-01

    Text-mining is a challenging field of research initially meant for reading large text collections with a computer. Text-mining is useful in summarizing text, searching for the informative documents, and most important to do knowledge discovery. Knowledge discovery is the main subject of this thesis.

  14. 24 CFR 26.42 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery. 26.42 Section 26.42 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HEARING... not unduly delay the proceeding. Discovery of privileged information shall not be permitted....

  15. Proteomics: a new approach for drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-junLI; YangXIANG; Hui-kaiTIAN; BingMA; Xiao-haoYAO; Hong-meiZHANG; He-mingYU

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is a bridge that crosses genome to drug discovery. Proteomic studies will provide possible targets for therapeutic usage and moreover increase the efficiency of the downstream of drug discovery process. By using the 2-D electrophoresis combining with MS technology, which is most preva-lent techniques of proteome, we have identified more than 20

  16. Discovery of inhibitors of bacterial histidine kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velikova, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Inhibitors of Bacterial Histidine Kinases

    Summary

    The thesis is on novel antibacterial drug discovery (http://youtu.be/NRMWOGgeysM). Using structure-based and fragment-based dru

  17. Service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blangé, M.J.; Karkowski, I.P.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a possible solution to the problem of service discovery in heterogeneous wireless networks. This solution involves introduction of a network independent service discovery layer, with as main goal the improved robustness of applications running on top of it. A possible imple

  18. DISCOVERY OF EVIDENCE IN INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakumenko, V.V.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the different concepts of discovery of evidence, which exist under different legal jurisdictions, with their theoretical analysis to determine the feasibility and rationality of the application of the discovery mechanisms in the frameworks of international commercial arbitration and its fundamental principles.

  19. 49 CFR 1121.2 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures set forth at 49 CFR part 1114, subpart B. Discovery may begin upon the filing of the petition for exemption or petition for revocation of an exemption. In petitions to revoke an exemption, a party must... requests at the same time it files its petition to revoke. Discovery shall be completed 30 days after...

  20. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles

    OpenAIRE

    Jonnalagadda Siddhartha; Peeler Ryan; Topham Philip

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic....

  1. Design for a Superconductor Discovery Engine (SCODEngine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O. Paul

    2010-03-01

    One of the grand challenges of superconductivity is achieving a paradigm shift from discovery by serendipity to discovery by design. Periodic Table-based Maps that involve electronegativity, valence electrons and atomic number that correlate with superconducting transition temperature can be used to design novel superconductors. Combining these maps with experimental databases on superconductors, databases of crystal structures and integrating material design software engine, we can re-design many known superconductor families and predict novel systems. By adding search engine technology with a ``knowledge discovery engine'', we produce a superconductor discovery engine (SCODEngine). The SCODEngine enables us to discover novel superconductors with the accelerated speed of a Google search. We have produced a primitive SCODEngine that may revolutionize novel superconductor search and discovery.

  2. The discovery of the periodic table as a case of simultaneous discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Eric

    2015-03-13

    The article examines the question of priority and simultaneous discovery in the context of the discovery of the periodic system. It is argued that rather than being anomalous, simultaneous discovery is the rule. Moreover, I argue that the discovery of the periodic system by at least six authors in over a period of 7 years represents one of the best examples of a multiple discovery. This notion is supported by a new view of the evolutionary development of science through a mechanism that is dubbed Sci-Gaia by analogy with Lovelock's Gaia hypothesis. PMID:25666063

  3. Medical marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Michael

    1991-08-01

    Solid state lasers are the real highlight of my talk today, and were really the star of the year. In every application area I can think of, people have tried with some success to introduce corturiercial solid state products. I'll go into more detail, but aside from solid state, a very significant event happened in Deceniber when one of the laser angioplasty companies (Advanced Interventional Systens) received FDA clearance to begin marketing the excimer for coronary applications (Figure 1) . This is the first time to my knowledge that an excimer has ever been cleared for a medical application in the United States. It's an event that we didn't really expect to happen so soon. It's extremely significant and we'll see where it goes from here. The system needs to be road-tested a bit but to get past the FDA is the major obstacle. Looking back to solid state laser the importance of solid state lasers is as researchers become more involved with the excimer and conduct more clinical studies in ophthalmology, they realize that it's not going to be a panacea for all refractive surgery or other ophthalmolic applications. In many cases it looks like the solid state laser may be the laser of choice in certain types of surgery; most notably perhaps in refractive surgery. We've all read about the success of the excimer at least in capturing the press's attention for corneal sculpting and vision correction. Well, it could be that actually the next generation will be a solid state laser, so let's keep an open mind here.

  4. Assessment of composite motif discovery methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansen Jostein

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational discovery of regulatory elements is an important area of bioinformatics research and more than a hundred motif discovery methods have been published. Traditionally, most of these methods have addressed the problem of single motif discovery – discovering binding motifs for individual transcription factors. In higher organisms, however, transcription factors usually act in combination with nearby bound factors to induce specific regulatory behaviours. Hence, recent focus has shifted from single motifs to the discovery of sets of motifs bound by multiple cooperating transcription factors, so called composite motifs or cis-regulatory modules. Given the large number and diversity of methods available, independent assessment of methods becomes important. Although there have been several benchmark studies of single motif discovery, no similar studies have previously been conducted concerning composite motif discovery. Results We have developed a benchmarking framework for composite motif discovery and used it to evaluate the performance of eight published module discovery tools. Benchmark datasets were constructed based on real genomic sequences containing experimentally verified regulatory modules, and the module discovery programs were asked to predict both the locations of these modules and to specify the single motifs involved. To aid the programs in their search, we provided position weight matrices corresponding to the binding motifs of the transcription factors involved. In addition, selections of decoy matrices were mixed with the genuine matrices on one dataset to test the response of programs to varying levels of noise. Conclusion Although some of the methods tested tended to score somewhat better than others overall, there were still large variations between individual datasets and no single method performed consistently better than the rest in all situations. The variation in performance on individual

  5. Medical missionaries to China and the reformation of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Louis

    2016-05-01

    The earliest record of human anatomy in chapters of the Yellow Emperor's Inner Classic is likely to be based upon proper dissections. The first incident of human dissection for medical purpose documented in the History of Han Dynasty occurred in AD 13. During the Sung dynasty, a physician prepared illustrations of internal organs of executed criminals, published in 1113 as the Images of Truth Successive Chinese medical treatises have plagiarized but preserved the anatomical diagrams without improvements or modifications. China had to wait till the mid-19th century for Anglo-American Protestant medical missionaries to bring about a complete and permanent reformation of anatomical science. PMID:24833543

  6. NOTE FROM THE CERN MEDICAL SERVICE - FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  7. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  8. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  9. Note from the CERN Medical Service: FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2003. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  10. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Sylvain Weisz

    2002-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2002. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  11. Note from the CERN Medical Service. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2000. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  12. Note from the CERN Medical Service FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2003. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  13. Note from the CERN Medical Service: FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN Members of personnel who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment, but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 16th October and 30th November 2001. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor.

  14. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  15. A cloud solution for medical image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mirarab,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in the use of Electronic Health Records across the globe along with the rich mix of multimedia held within an EHR combined with the increasing level of detail due to advances in diagnostic medical imaging means increasing amounts of data can be stored for each patient. Also lack of image processing and analysis tools for handling the large image datasets has compromised researchers and practitioner‟s outcome. Migrating medical imaging applications and data to the Cloud can allow healthcare organizations to realize significant cost savings relating to hardware, software, buildings, power and staff, in addition to greater scalability, higher performance and resilience. This paper reviews medical image processing and its challenges, states cloud computing and cloud computing benefits due to medical image processing. Also, this paper introduces tools and methods for medical images processing using the cloud. Finally a method is provided for medical images processing based on Eucalyptus cloud infrastructure with image processing software “ImageJ” and using improved genetic algorithm for the allocation and distribution of resources. Based on conducted simulations and experimental results, the proposed method brings high scalability, simplicity, flexibility and fully customizability in addition to 40% cost reduction and twice increase in speed.

  16. Information Retrieval Technique in Medical Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrulhizam Shapi'i

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical field at present is an example for appropriate innovation in the information technology sector where it can bring benefits to physicians and patients and also the medical tools to prevent disease.  Among the examples of innovation in information technology are in the field of medical imaging technology, laser technology, nanotechnology and others. As we know, medical imaging technology is very important because it can help medical experts in conducting research on patients.  A medical image is known as DICOM.  DICOM format is unique, it is not only contain the image of the patient, but it also contains information related to the patient. This paper will show the development of software to retrieve the information from the digital x-ray image (DICOM. Software developed using Netbeans and library used was pixelmed library. This software is then tested with a number of patient data. Results showed that the software is able to find the information contained in the patient x-ray images accurately.

  17. Discovery of Uniformly Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Saul Perlmutter and the Brian Schmidt – Adam Riess teams reported that their Friedmann-model GR-based analysis of their supernovae magnitude-redshift data re- vealed a new phenomenon of “dark energy” which, it is claimed, forms 73% of the energy / matter density of the present-epoch universe, and which is linked to the further claim of an accelerating expansion of the universe. In 2011 Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess received the Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating ex- pansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae”. Here it is shown that (i a generic model-independent analysis of this data reveals a uniformly expanding universe, (ii their analysis actually used Newtonian gravity, and finally (iii the data, as well as the CMB fluctuation data, does not require “dark energy” nor “dark matter”, but instead reveals the phenomenon of a dynamical space, which is absent from the Friedmann model.

  18. Discovery Mondays: Zoom on materials

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Following the success of the first Discovery Monday, which had over 100 visitors, the series of evening events in Microcosm continues. On Monday 2nd June, discover the world of materials. Find out how CERN scientists examine, manufacture and study different materials, at different scales. Did you know for example that using electrons you can observe a hair at a scale equivalent to looking at a boat with the naked eye? Also, that using ultrasound, you can measure the thickness of an object that is completely inaccessible? Find out more about these techniques, and also the high-tech machining and soldering that is carried out in CERN's central workshop. Plus, see how engineers can detect tiny leaks through solder points - essential for maintaining the vacuum in the LHC. The evening is open to all, without reservation, suggested age 12 and above. Rendez-vous in Microcosm on Monday 2nd June From 19.30 - 21.00 Free entry For more information : http://www.cern.ch/microcosm Using a scanning microscope, the head o...

  19. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  20. The Discovery of Dabigatran Etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne evan Ryn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolic disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world and is caused by an excessive stimulation of coagulation. Thrombin is a key serine protease in the coagulation cascade and numerous efforts have been made to develop safe and effective orally active direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs. Current anticoagulant therapy includes the use of indirect thrombin inhibitors (e.g. heparins, low-molecular-weight-heparins [LMWHs] and vitamin K antagonists (VKA such as warfarin. However there are several caveats in the clinical use of these agents including narrow therapeutic window, parenteral delivery, and food- and drug-drug interactions. Dabigatran is a synthetic, reversible DTI with high affinity and specificity for its target binding both free and clot-bound thrombin, and offers a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Large randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that dabigatran provides comparable or superior thromboprophylaxis in multiple thromboembolic disease indications compared to standard of care. This minireview will highlight the discovery and development of dabigatran, the first in a class of new oral anticoagulant (NOAC agents to be licensed worldwide for the prevention of thromboembolism in the setting of orthopedic surgery and stroke prevent in atrial fibrillation.

  1. Materials discovery through crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new materials and associated desirable properties has been a driving force behind chemical innovation for centuries. When we look at some of the many recent technological advances, and how widespread and significant their impact has been, we appreciate how much they have relied on new materials. The increase in hard drive storage capacity due to new giant magneto-resistive materials, the ever-shrinking cell phone due to improved microwave dielectric materials, the enhancement in lithium battery storage capacity due to new intercalation materials, or the improved capacitor due to new ferroelectric materials are all excellent examples. How were these materials discovered? While there is no single answer, in all cases there was a First-Material, the archetype in which the phenomenon was first observed, the one that led to further investigations and the subsequent preparation of improved 2nd or 3rd generation materials. It is this First-Material, the archetype, that was discovered - often via crystal growth.

  2. Impact of medical informatics on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, S M

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, medical informatics has become a well-recognized branch of medicine. It is a multidisciplinary science that combines information technology and various specialties of medicine. The impact of medical informatics on medical education is advancing along with the rapid developments in computer science. Departments of medical informatics or similar divisions have appeared in schools of medicine in Taiwan in the past 5 years. At National Taiwan University College of Medicine, we offer curricula in basic computer concepts, network concepts, operating systems, word processing, database and data processing, computer media resources, multimedia computer statistics, intelligent health information systems, medical diagnostic support systems, and electronic medical record systems. Distance learning has also been favorably accepted on this campus. Recently, we proposed the concept of a virtual medical campus, which will break the physical barriers of time and space. We expect this revolution to influence every aspect of medicine, especially medical education. PMID:10705693

  3. The future of medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organisers of this conference have kindly provided me with the forum to look forward and examine the future of medical imaging. My view of the future is informed by my own research directions; thus, I illustrate my vision of the future with results from my own research, and from the research that has motivated me over the last few years. As such, the results presented are specific to the field of breast imaging; however, I believe that the trends presented have general applicability, and hope that this discourse will motivate new research. My vision of the future can be summarised in accordance with three broad trends: (1) increased prevalence of low-dose tomographic X-ray imaging; (2) continuing advances in functional and molecular X-ray imaging; and (3) novel image-based bio-marker discovery. (authors)

  4. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  5. 16 CFR 1025.36 - Motions to compel discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Discovery, Compulsory Process § 1025.36 Motions to compel discovery. If a party fails... examination to the extent possible with respect to other areas of inquiry before moving to compel discovery....

  6. Teaching about the Physics of Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollman, Dean; McBride, Dyan; Murphy, Sytil; Aryal, Bijaya; Kalita, Spartak; Wirjawan, Johannes v. d.

    2010-07-01

    Even before the discovery of X-rays, attempts at non-invasive medical imaging required an understanding of fundamental principles of physics. Students frequently do not see these connections because they are not taught in beginning physics courses. To help students understand that physics and medical imaging are closely connected, we have developed a series of active learning units. For each unit we begin by studying how students transfer their knowledge from traditional physics classes and everyday experiences to medical applications. Then, we build instructional materials to take advantage of the students' ability to use their existing learning and knowledge resources. Each of the learning units involves a combination of hands-on activities, which present analogies, and interactive computer simulations. Our learning units introduce students to the contemporary imaging techniques of CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and wavefront aberrometry. The project's web site is http://web.phys.ksu.edu/mmmm/.

  7. Who is Responsible for Evaluating the Safety and Effectiveness of Medical Devices? The Role of Independent Technology Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Mitchell D.; Petersen, Amy J.; Karliner, Leah S.; Tice, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The global medical technology industry brings thousands of devices to market every year. However, significant gaps persist in the scientific literature, in the medical device approval process, and in the realm of postmarketing surveillance. Although thousands of drugs obtain approval only after review in randomized controlled trials, relatively few new medical devices are subject to comparable scrutiny. Objective To improve health outcomes, we must enhance our scrutiny of medical...

  8. Xerostomy prevalence related to medication on patients assisted by the dentistry area of the UNIVILLE

    OpenAIRE

    Juliano Henrique PEROTTO; Kesly Mary Ribeiro ANDRADES; Aleysson Olimpio PAZA; Lúcia Ferreira de Castro ÁVILA

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to know the xerostomy prevalence onpatients who have been assisted by the Dentistry Area of the Univilleand its relation with some drugs for the following treatments: arterial hypertension disease, seizure, depression and other diseases which require medication.The methodology consists of bringing aquestionnaire referent to patients’ health conditions, xerostomysymptoms and medications use. Patients were separated and analyzeddepending on the medication drug used ...

  9. The effectiveness of risk management program on pediatric nurses’ medication error

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Bayat, Fariba; Salehi, Tahmineh; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medication therapy is one of the most complex and high-risk clinical processes that nurses deal with. Medication error is the most common type of error that brings about damage and death to patients, especially pediatric ones. However, these errors are preventable. Identifying and preventing undesirable events leading to medication errors are the main risk management activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a risk management program on the pediatri...

  10. Acknowledging Stress in Undergraduate Medical Education and Methods of Overcoming it

    OpenAIRE

    Ujjwala Jayant kulkarni; M.S. Kate; Y.C. Shetty; Y.A. Deshmukh and V.V. Moghe

    2010-01-01

    Medical education is very demanding and stressful. Medical undergraduates face social, emotional and physical problems due to stress which affect their learning ability, academic performance and patient care. When students look at their education as a challenge, stress can bring them a sense of competence and increased capacity to learn but when education is seen as a threat, such stress can elicit feelings of helplessness. Each year of medical education is characterized having unique stress....

  11. The Medical Geology revolution——The evolution of an IUGS initiative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olle Selinus; Robert B.Finkelman; Jose A.Centeno

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction In December 2003 Episodes published an article entitled"Medical Geology:New Relevance in the Earth Sciences"by Bowman,Bobrowski,and Selinus.This paper was iust one early example of the interest and excitement sparked by this emerging field of medical geology-the impacts of geologic materials and geologic processes on animal and human health.Medical geology attempts to bring together geoscientists and biomedical/public health researchers to address a range of environmental health problems.

  12. A new evaluation methodology for literature-based discovery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Pratt, Wanda

    2009-08-01

    While medical researchers formulate new hypotheses to test, they need to identify connections to their work from other parts of the medical literature. However, the current volume of information has become a great barrier for this task. Recently, many literature-based discovery (LBD) systems have been developed to help researchers identify new knowledge that bridges gaps across distinct sections of the medical literature. Each LBD system uses different methods for mining the connections from text and ranking the identified connections, but none of the currently available LBD evaluation approaches can be used to compare the effectiveness of these methods. In this paper, we present an evaluation methodology for LBD systems that allows comparisons across different systems. We demonstrate the abilities of our evaluation methodology by using it to compare the performance of different correlation-mining and ranking approaches used by existing LBD systems. This evaluation methodology should help other researchers compare approaches, make informed algorithm choices, and ultimately help to improve the performance of LBD systems overall. PMID:19124086

  13. Investigations into Library Web-Scale Discovery Services

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Web-scale discovery services for libraries provide deep discovery to a library’s local and licensed content, and represent an evolution, perhaps a revolution, for end user information discovery as pertains to library collections.  This article frames the topic of web-scale discovery, and begins by illuminating web-scale discovery from an academic library’s perspective – that is, the internal perspective seeking widespread staff participation in the discovery conversation.  This included the c...

  14. Hierarchical Task Networks in COMBATXXI, Bringing AI Techniques Into Closed Form Combat Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, David; Balogh, Imre

    2012-01-01

    MOVES Research & Education Systems Seminar: Presentation; Session 10: Human Behavior Simulation; Moderator: Steve Hall; HTNs in COMBATXXI – Bringing AI Techniques Into Closed Form Combat Sims; speakers: David Reeves & Imre Balogh

  15. Service Discovery – A Survey and Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendaoud Karim Talal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of services in the internet, companies’ intranets, and home networks: servicediscovery becomes an integral part of modern networked system. This paper provides a comprehensivesurvey of major solutions for service discovery. We cover techniques and features used in existing systems.Although a few survey articles have been published on this object, our contribution focuses on comparingand analyzing surveyed solutions according eight prime criteria, which we have defined before. Thiscomparison will be helpful to determine limits of existing discovery protocols and identify future researchopportunities in service discovery.

  16. Two Kinds of Discovery: An Ontological Account

    CERN Document Server

    Gilead, Amihud

    2014-01-01

    What can we discover? As the discussion in this paper is limited to ontological considerations, it does not deal with the discovery of new concepts. It raises the following question: What are the entities or existents that we can discover? There are two kinds of such entities: (1) actual entities, and (2) possible entities, which are pure possibilities. The paper explains why the first kind of discovery depends primarily on the second kind. The paper illustrates the discoveries of individual pure possibilities by presenting examples such as the Higgs particle, Dirac's positron, and Pauli-Fermi's neutrino.

  17. Open PHACTS: semantic interoperability for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Antony J; Harland, Lee; Groth, Paul; Pettifer, Stephen; Chichester, Christine; Willighagen, Egon L; Evelo, Chris T; Blomberg, Niklas; Ecker, Gerhard; Goble, Carole; Mons, Barend

    2012-11-01

    Open PHACTS is a public-private partnership between academia, publishers, small and medium sized enterprises and pharmaceutical companies. The goal of the project is to deliver and sustain an 'open pharmacological space' using and enhancing state-of-the-art semantic web standards and technologies. It is focused on practical and robust applications to solve specific questions in drug discovery research. OPS is intended to facilitate improvements in drug discovery in academia and industry and to support open innovation and in-house non-public drug discovery research. This paper lays out the challenges and how the Open PHACTS project is hoping to address these challenges technically and socially. PMID:22683805

  18. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Allergy: Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because they ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count Allergy Treatment Programs, Adult At National Jewish Health, some ...

  19. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of pain. This may involve a low-dose antidepressant, which acts as a pain reliever. Seeking referral ... Yoga Medications Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Psychological ...

  20. Medications: Myths Versus Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications: Myths Versus Facts Updated:Aug 30,2016 Taking medication ... Association volunteer. Here are some of the top myths about taking cardiovascular medication: I feel OK, so ...

  1. Medications After the NICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICU) > Medications after the NICU Medications after the NICU E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... go home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on medication for apnea, reflux or respiratory problems. ...

  2. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD Medical Director, Health Initiatives View full profile Asthma and Pregnancy: Asthma Medications We would like to avoid all medicine ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  3. Cross-Surface: Challenges and Opportunities for ‘bring your own device’ in the wild

    OpenAIRE

    Houben, Steven; VERMEULEN, Jo; Klokmose, Clemens; Korsgaard, Henrik; Marquardt, Nicolai; Schöning, Johannes; Reiterer, Harald; Schreiner, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In this workshop, we will review and discuss challenges and opportunities for HCI in relation to cross-surface interaction in the wild based on the bring-your-owndevice (BYOD) practice. We aim to bring together researchers and practitioners working on technical infrastructures for cross-surface computing, studies of cross-surface computing in particular domains as well as interaction challenges for introducing cross-surface computing in the wild, all with a particular focus on BYOD. Exampl...

  4. Automated Knowledge Discovery From Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burl, Michael; DeCoste, Dennis; Mazzoni, Dominic; Scharenbroich, Lucas; Enke, Brian; Merline, William

    2007-01-01

    A computational method, SimLearn, has been devised to facilitate efficient knowledge discovery from simulators. Simulators are complex computer programs used in science and engineering to model diverse phenomena such as fluid flow, gravitational interactions, coupled mechanical systems, and nuclear, chemical, and biological processes. SimLearn uses active-learning techniques to efficiently address the "landscape characterization problem." In particular, SimLearn tries to determine which regions in "input space" lead to a given output from the simulator, where "input space" refers to an abstraction of all the variables going into the simulator, e.g., initial conditions, parameters, and interaction equations. Landscape characterization can be viewed as an attempt to invert the forward mapping of the simulator and recover the inputs that produce a particular output. Given that a single simulation run can take days or weeks to complete even on a large computing cluster, SimLearn attempts to reduce costs by reducing the number of simulations needed to effect discoveries. Unlike conventional data-mining methods that are applied to static predefined datasets, SimLearn involves an iterative process in which a most informative dataset is constructed dynamically by using the simulator as an oracle. On each iteration, the algorithm models the knowledge it has gained through previous simulation trials and then chooses which simulation trials to run next. Running these trials through the simulator produces new data in the form of input-output pairs. The overall process is embodied in an algorithm that combines support vector machines (SVMs) with active learning. SVMs use learning from examples (the examples are the input-output pairs generated by running the simulator) and a principle called maximum margin to derive predictors that generalize well to new inputs. In SimLearn, the SVM plays the role of modeling the knowledge that has been gained through previous simulation trials

  5. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S. D.; Pardo, J. R.; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Davis, G. R.

    2007-04-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 110-101 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a ``hot corino'' environment), we determine a total column density of N(D2O) of 1.0×1013 cm-2 and a fractional abundance of D2O/H2=1.7×10-10. The derived column density ratios for IRAS 16293-2422 are D2O/HDO=1.7×10-3 and D2O/H2O=5×10-5 for the hot corino gas. Steady state models of water ice formation, either in the gas phase or on grains, predict D2O/HDO ratios that are about 4 times larger than that derived from our observations. For water formation on grain surfaces to be a viable explanation, a larger H2O abundance than that measured in IRAS 16293-2422 is required. Alternatively, the observed D2O/HDO ratio could be indicative of gas-phase water chemistry prior to a chemical steady state being attained, such as would have occurred during the formation of this source. Future observations with the Herschel Space Observatory satellite will be important for settling this issue.

  6. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  7. Practical design control implementation for medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Justiniano, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Bringing together the concepts of design control and reliability engineering, this book is a must for medical device manufacturers. It helps them meet the challenge of designing and developing products that meet or exceed customer expectations and also meet regulatory requirements. Part One covers motivation for design control and validation, design control requirements, process validation and design transfer, quality system for design control, and measuring design control program effectiveness. Part Two discusses risk analysis and FMEA, designing-in reliability, reliability and design verific

  8. Queen's discovery lauded by top scientific journal

    CERN Multimedia

    McGrady, S

    2002-01-01

    A scientific breakthrough at Queen's University's Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has received major international recognition. The journal Science ranked the discovery that cracked the "neutrino problem" second, in the journal's top 10 scientific achievements of 2002 (1/2 page).

  9. The National Cancer Program: Driving Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of NCI’s role in driving cancer research discoveries: conducting and funding research in challenging areas and providing resources and leadership to national infrastructures for cancer research.

  10. Association Rule Discovery and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Data mining, i.e. , mining knowledge from large amounts of data, is a demanding field since huge amounts of data have been collected in various applications. The collected data far exceed peoples ability to analyze it. Thus, some new and efficient methods are needed to discover knowledge from large database. Association rule discovery is an important problem in knowledge discovery and data mining.The association mining task consists of identifying the frequent item sets and then forming conditional implication rule among them. In this paper, we describe and summarize recent work on association rule discovery, offer a new method to association rule mining and point out that association rule discovery can be applied in spatial data mining. It is useful to discover knowledge from remote sensing and geographical information system.``

  11. Effective Online Group Discovery in Trajectory Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohui; Ceikute, Vaida; Jensen, Christian S.;

    2013-01-01

    GPS-enabled devices are pervasive nowadays. Finding movement patterns in trajectory data stream is gaining in importance. We propose a group discovery framework that aims to efficiently support the online discovery of moving objects that travel together. The framework adopts a sampling-independen......GPS-enabled devices are pervasive nowadays. Finding movement patterns in trajectory data stream is gaining in importance. We propose a group discovery framework that aims to efficiently support the online discovery of moving objects that travel together. The framework adopts a sampling......-independent approach that makes no assumptions about when positions are sampled, gives no special importance to sampling points, and naturally supports the use of approximate trajectories. The framework's algorithms exploit state-of-the-art, density-based clustering (DBScan) to identify groups. The groups are scored...

  12. Anthelmintics – From Discovery to Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J. Wolstenholme

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific meeting entitled ‘Anthelmintics: From Discovery to Resistance’ was held in San Francisco in February 2014. The themes of the meeting were drug discovery, modes of action and resistance. Both human and veterinary parasites were covered in the oral and poster presentations. The attendees were from both academic and industrial backgrounds. In the present article we introduce a number of the papers that emerged from the meeting. Several of the papers covered current drug discovery efforts underway worldwide, with some specific examples focusing on ion channels, protein kinases and cysteine proteases. These efforts included the repurposing of known drugs as well as the discovery of novel actives. Two papers described recently-developed whole-organism screening techniques. Finally, we introduce several papers looking at mechanisms and management of drug resistance in human and veterinary parasites.

  13. Priority of discovery in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  14. 42 CFR 93.512 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Process § 93.512 Discovery. (a) Request to provide documents. A party may only request another party to...; (2) Analyses and summaries prepared in conjunction with the inquiry, investigation, ORI...

  15. SCALABLE GRID RESOURCE DISCOVERY THROUGH DISTRIBUTED SEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Butt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a simple and scalable web-based model for grid resource discovery for the Internet.The resource discovery model contains the metadata and resource finder web services. The information ofresource finder web services is kept in the repositories that are distributed in the application layer ofInternet. The resource finder web services will be discovered by sending queries to the repositories in asimilar way as the DNS protocol. The underlying technology for implementation of the two architectures ofthis model is introduced.These architectures are: Direct and Centralized Web-Based Grid Resource Discovery. The resourcediscovery time is computed after simulating each of these models in GridSim.By performing scalability tests, we found that when increasing the load on the grid with more users andresources, the cost of our model in comparison to the grid resource discovery time is marginal.

  16. Discovery announced of four new elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) have announced the discovery of four new elements: 113, 115, 117 and 118 - completing the periodic table's seventh row.

  17. Specification Editing and Discovery Assistant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will prototype a specification editing and discovery tool (SPEEDY) for C/C++ that will assist software developers with modular formal verification tasks...

  18. 43 CFR 4.826 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Special Procedural Rules Applicable to Practice and Procedure for Hearings, Decisions, and Administrative... make any order which justice requires to limit or condition discovery in order to protect a party...

  19. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  20. DNA Coding Based Knowledge Discovery Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-yun; GENG Zhao-feng; SHAO Shi-huang

    2002-01-01

    A novel DNA coding based knowledge discovery algorithm was proposed, an example which verified its validity was given. It is proved that this algorithm can discover new simplified rules from the original rule set efficiently.

  1. Combinatorial Discovery and Optimization of New Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Chen; Zhang Xinyi; Yan Dongsheng

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the combinatorial discovery and optimization of new materials, and its background,importance, and application, as well as its current status in the world, are briefly reviewed in this paper.

  2. Laminaria: a new Timor Sea [petroluem] discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.C.; Tilbury, L.A.; Chatfield, A.; Senycia, P.; Thompson, N. [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth, WA (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Laminaria-1 discovery in the southeast of AC/P8 petroleum exploration area is a major new Timor Sea oil accumulation. It is one of several significant oil discoveries made in Australia during the last decade, and when developed, being in about 350 m of water, it should be the deepest yet undertaken. This paper describes the exploration background to the discovery, its regional setting, seismic data and interpretation, and reservoir stratigraphy and characteristics. Since the discovery, a comprehensive appraisal campaign has been undertaken to delineate the accumulation, including the acquisition of a large 3D seismic survey over almost the entire AC/P8 permit, and the drilling of a further two wells and a sidetrack. The Laminaria horst is now interpreted to comprise a series of tilted fault-blocks, oriented ENE to WSW and dipping to the southeast. (author). 19 figs., 18 refs.

  3. Indexer Based Dynamic Web Services Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Bashir, Saba; Javed, M Younus; Khan, Aihab; Khiyal, Malik Sikandar Hayat

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in web services plays an important role in business to business and business to consumer interaction. Discovery mechanism is not only used to find a suitable service but also provides collaboration between service providers and consumers by using standard protocols. A static web service discovery mechanism is not only time consuming but requires continuous human interaction. This paper proposed an efficient dynamic web services discovery mechanism that can locate relevant and updated web services from service registries and repositories with timestamp based on indexing value and categorization for faster and efficient discovery of service. The proposed prototype focuses on quality of service issues and introduces concept of local cache, categorization of services, indexing mechanism, CSP (Constraint Satisfaction Problem) solver, aging and usage of translator. Performance of proposed framework is evaluated by implementing the algorithm and correctness of our method is shown. The results of p...

  4. [Use of GWAS for drug discovery and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Shyh-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. A catalog of common genetic variants in humans was built at the International HapMap Project. These variants, known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), occur in human DNA and distributed among populations in different parts of the world. By using the Linkage Disequilibrium and mapping blocks are able to define quantitative characters of inherited diseases. Currently 50 K-5.0 M microarray are available commercially, which based on the results of following the ENCODE & 1000 genome projects. Therefore the genome wide association study (GWAS) has become a key tool for discovering variants that contribute to human diseases and provide maximum coverage of the genome, in contrast to the traditional approach in which only a few candidates genes was targeted. The available public GWAS databases provided valuable biological insights and new discovery for many common diseases, due to the availability of low cost microarray. The GWAS has the potential to provide a solution for the lack of new drug targets and reducing drug failure due to adverse drug reactions either. These are critical issues for pharmaceutical companies. Here, the Japan PGx Data Science Consortium (JPDSC), which was established on February 20, 2009 by six leading pharmaceutical companies in Japan, was introduced. We believe that the efforts of stakeholders including the regulatory authorities, health providers, and pharmaceutical companies to understand the potential and ethical risk of using genetic information including GWAS will bring benefits to patients in the future. PMID:24694807

  5. Proteomics. Making sense of genomic information for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelegge, J P; le Coutre, J

    2001-01-01

    As an increasing number of available genomes triggers a gold rush in modern biology, the scientific challenge shifts towards understanding the total of the encoded information, most notably the proteins, their structures, functions and interactions. Currently this work is in its early stages but the near future will bring a merger of biology, engineering and informatics with a far broader impact on society than pure genomics has had so far. The challenge of characterizing the structures and functions of all proteins in a given cell demands technological advances beyond the classical methodologies of protein biochemistry. Mass spectrometry techniques for high-throughput protein identification, including peptide mass fingerprinting, sequence tagging and mass spectrometry on full-length proteins are providing the driving force behind proteomics endeavors. New technologies are needed to move high-resolution protein structure determination to an industrial scale. Nonetheless, improvements in techniques for the separation of intrinsic membrane proteins are enabling proteomics efforts towards identifying drug targets within this important class of biomolecules. Beyond the acquisition of data on sequences, structures and interactions, however, the major work in drug discovery remains: the screening of large candidate compound libraries combined with clever medicinal chemistry that guarantees selective action and defined delivery of the drug. PMID:12173311

  6. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Three Years of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Maura; Heatherly, S.; Rosen, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) is a joint partnership between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) to improve the quality of science education in West Virginia high schools. The ultimate goal of the PSC is to engage students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM), and related fields by using information technology to conduct current scientific research, specifically searching for new pulsars. We expect to discover roughly 30 new pulsars in the PSC data. The PSC has had several scientific and educational successes. To date, the PSC students have made two astronomical discoveries: a 4.8-s pulsar and bright radio burst of astrophysical origin, most likely from a sporadic neutron star. We have 21 new high schools this year, bringing the number of PSC schools to 43. Ten of these schools are part of PSC West, a trial scale-up of our original PSC program. Of the 33 schools in the original PSC program, 13 come from rural school districts; one third of these are from schools where over 50% participate in the Free/Reduced School Lunch program. We are reaching first generation college-goers. For students, the program succeeds in building confidence in students, rapport with the scientists involved in the project, and team-work ability. We see additional gains in girls, who see themselves as scientists after participating in the PSC program. This is an important predictor of success in STEM fields.

  7. Celebrating 20 years of the discovery of the top quark

    CERN Document Server

    Azzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An historical recount of the events leading to the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and DO experiments at the Tevatron. 1 Introduction This presentation brings us back to the early nineties. It is interesting to picture ourselves without iphone and laptops, working on DEC VAX and having to stay in the office to work because there was no internet at home. The programming language was Fortran and plots were made with PAW. Detectors were becoming bigger and more complex, but no Silicon detector had been tried in a hadron collider yet. To put things in perspective for the LHC physicist of today: the MonteCarlo programs of the time did not differentiate between heavy and light quarks (VECBOS), there were no b-tagging algorithms, it was not clear that a Silicon detector could survive the radiation environement of an hadron collider such as the Tevatron and collecting data took a long time (one year for 20 pb-1). Nonetheless, working at the most powerful accelerator of the time was as exciting as it tod...

  8. Discovery of Two New Pulsars in 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhichen; Li, Di; Ridolfi, Alessandro; Wang, Pei; Freire, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new millisecond pulsars (PSRs J0024$-$7204aa and J0024$-$7204ab) in the globular cluster 47\\,Tucanae (NGC 104). Our results bring the total number of pulsars in 47\\,Tucanae to 25. These pulsars were discovered by reprocessing archival observations from the Parkes radio telescope. We reprocessed the data using a standard search procedure based on the PRESTO software package as well as using a new method in which we incoherently added the power spectra corresponding to $\\sim$1100\\,hr of observations. The newly discovered PSR~J0024$-$7204aa, has a pulse frequency of $\\rm \\sim$541\\,Hz (corresponding to a $\\rm \\sim$1.84 ms period), which is higher than any other pulsars currently known in the cluster and ranks 12$^{\\rm{th}}$ amongst all the currently known pulsars. The dispersion measure of this pulsar, 24.941(7)\\,cm$^{-3}$ pc, is the highest in the cluster. The second discovered pulsar, PSR~J0024$-$7204ab, is an isolated pulsar with a pulse frequency of $\\rm \\sim$270\\,Hz (correspond...

  9. Group Evolution Discovery in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Group extraction and their evolution are among the topics which arouse the greatest interest in the domain of social network analysis. However, while the grouping methods in social networks are developed very dynamically, the methods of group evolution discovery and analysis are still uncharted territory on the social network analysis map. Therefore the new method for the group evolution discovery called GED is proposed in this paper. Additionally, the results of the first experiments on the ...

  10. Fission and the discovery of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of new isotopes requires new developments in accelerator and detector technology. The new RI Beam Factory at RIKEN and the future projects FAIR at GSI and FRIB at MSU promise to expand the nuclear horizon even further. In the talk a short history of the role that fission played in the discovery of isotopes will be presented and future perspectives will be discussed

  11. Discoveries of Elements 113, 115 and 117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discovery of two isotopes of the new element 117 in the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction is described. A new 243Am + 48Ca experiment was carried out to firmly establish the discoveries of new elements 115 and 113. A total of thirty one decay chains of 288115 are now observed in the Am reaction. In addition, four new decay chains are assigned to 289115.

  12. Discovery of the Higgs boson and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk is about the Higgs mechanism, the theoretical discovery of which, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize. It also discusses the discovery of the Higgs boson at the large hadron collider which provided the experimental proof that made the Nobel prize possible. It covers the implications of these for the quest of unravelling the fundamental laws of nature which seem to govern both, the behavior of the ultra small (subatomic particles) and the ultra large (the cosmos)

  13. The Higgs boson discovery and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at a mass around 125 GeV by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC collider in 2012 establishes a new landscape in high-energy physics. The analysis of the full data sample collected with pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV has allowed for considerable progress since the discovery. A review of the latest results is presented. (authors)

  14. Routing Discovery Algorithm Using Parallel Chase Packet

    OpenAIRE

    Amera Al-Ameri; Muneer Bani Yassein; Khamayseh, Yaser M.

    2013-01-01

    On demand routing protocols for ad hoc networks such as Ad Hoc On Demand Distance Vector (AODV) initiate a route discovery process when a route is needed by flooding the network with a route request packet. The route discovery process in such protocols depends on a simple flooding as a broadcast technique due to its simplicity. Simple flooding results in packet congestion, route request overhead and excessive collisions, namely broadcast storm problem. A number of routing techniques have been...

  15. Towards Robot Scientists for autonomous scientific discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Byrne, Emma; Clare, Amanda; Khan, Muhammed N; Liakata, Maria; Markham, Magdalena; Rowland, Jem; Soldatova, Larisa N.; Whelan, Kenneth E; Young, Michael; King, Ross D.

    2010-01-01

    We review the main components of autonomous scientific discovery, and how they lead to the concept of a Robot Scientist. This is a system which uses techniques from artificial intelligence to automate all aspects of the scientific discovery process: it generates hypotheses from a computer model of the domain, designs experiments to test these hypotheses, runs the physical experiments using robotic systems, analyses and interprets the resulting data, and repeats the cycle. We describe our two ...

  16. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  17. Forecasting Study on Demand and Supply of Medical Postgraduates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪志宏; 赵志广; 黄畦; 吴森林; 卢祖洵

    2003-01-01

    This article was designed to forecast the supply and demand of medical postgraduate from 2001 to 2010 and bring forward the development strategy of medical postgraduate education in Hubei province. The line regression, the ratio of health manpower to population, grey dynamics model (1,1) was employed to forecast the supply and demand of medical postgraduate according to the corresponding data from 1991 to 2000 in Hubei province. The results showed that the number of health professionals of Hubei province in 2010 would attain 265892, the graduates' proportion of which would be about 1.8 % ; and the demand and supply of medical postgraduate would be 4699 and 2264 respectively. To improve conditions actively to attract and cultivate excellent professionals, especially the senior medical scholars, are effective measures to adjust the degree structure of health manpower as soon as possible in Hubei province.

  18. "ocean Discovery": At-Sea Research Opportunities for the Next Generation of Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisak, M.; Frank, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research and Technology (CIOERT) explores and studies the nation's ocean frontiers using innovation and cutting edge technologies. CIOERT is committed to bringing "science at sea" experiences to university students, in the context of a complete research project-from data collection to presentation. Multidisciplinary :Ocean Discovery" cruises, designed to communicate the excitement of research and discovery to university students at a critical stage of their career decision-making have been incorporated into CIOERT's two Florida Shelf Edge Explorations , including use of the Johnson-Sea-Link II submersible (2010) and the University of Connecticut's K2 ROV (2011) CIOERT's "Ocean Discovery. "Ocean Discovery" provides a high-quality research experience for students by engagement in ocean research through shipboard data collections and analyses. Student research questions are created in association with CIOERT research projects and result in a written paper and poster presentation. Through active engagement in the entire process of research, students not only increase their understanding of the scientific process, but they will also observe, study, and characterize ocean conditions and selected benthic and pelagic habitats across the continental shelf. Student presentations impact their peers and younger students who may then also aspire to ocean-related careers. Student experiences and knowledge are transferred to the general public, college students, pre-college teachers, and their students via presentations and web-based resources. There is a high probability the Ocean Discovery students will become tomorrow's marine scientists, educators, and managers, all working, directly or indirectly, in support of NOAA's mission.;

  19. Risk and liabilities of prescribing compounded medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Michael D; Duffy, Phillip J

    2014-07-01

    Complications resulting from the use of compounded medications have become a troubling trend nationwide. There is a significant potential for patients to suffer serious harm from the use of substandard medications prepared by compounding pharmacies, and the reality of this problem has been demonstrated in several well-publicized incidences of serious medical complications, including patient deaths, that directly resulted from the use of medications prepared at compounding pharmacies. Unlike US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, compounded products are not required to meet evidentiary standards for establishing safety and efficacy. Moreover, these products are not held to Good Manufacturing Practices, which require regular inspections, quality control testing, and rejection of material not meeting specifications. Physicians, as well as other prescribers, need to be aware that when a patient suffers harm from using a compounded medication, those injured patients may bring negligence and malpractice claims, not only against the pharmacy and the pharmacist responsible for preparing the medication, but also against the prescribing physician and the physician’s practice. Consequently, the best way for physicians to manage professional risk and avoid both litigation and potential negative patient outcomes related to compounded pharmaceuticals is to not use these products if there is an FDA-approved product available. However, if the use of a compounded medication is medically necessary, then physicians should adhere to the FDA guidance concerning traditional compounding. Moreover, it would be prudent for any physician who intends to either resell or participate in the distribution of compounded products beyond the direct treatment of their patients to consider obtaining the appropriate insurance coverage for this activity. PMID:25276868

  20. Keeping your medications organized

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you take it Side effects Use a Regular Doctor and Pharmacist Bring the list and your medicines in their ... your medicines. Review your drug list with your doctor or pharmacist. Ask if there are any problems with taking ...

  1. Stem cells: a model for screening, discovery and development of drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kitambi SS; Chandrasekar G

    2011-01-01

    Satish Srinivas Kitambi1, Gayathri Chandrasekar21Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics; 2Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The identification of normal and cancerous stem cells and the recent advances made in isolation and culture of stem cells have rapidly gained attention in the field of drug discovery and regenerative medicine. The prospect of performing screens aimed at proliferation, directed differentiation, and toxicity and efficac...

  2. Implementation of a deidentified federated data network for population-based cohort discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Nicholas; Abend, Aaron; Mandel, Aaron; Geraghty, Estella; Gabriel, Davera; Wynden, Rob; Kamerick, Michael; Anderson, Kent; Rainwater, Julie; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective The Cross-Institutional Clinical Translational Research project explored a federated query tool and looked at how this tool can facilitate clinical trial cohort discovery by managing access to aggregate patient data located within unaffiliated academic medical centers. Methods The project adapted software from the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) program to connect three Clinical Translational Research Award sites: University of Washington, Seattle, Univers...

  3. Integration of Proteomics, Bioinformatics and Systems biology in Brain Injury Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoyGuingab-Cagmat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for their efficacy as TBI biomarkers. However, several hurdles have to be overcome even during the discovery phase which is only the first step in the long process of biomarker development. The high throughput nature of MS-based proteomic experiments generates a massive amount of mass spectral data presenting great challenges in downstream interpretation. Currently, different bioinformatics platforms are available for functional analysis and data mining of MS-generated proteomic data. These tools provide a way to convert data sets to biologically interpretable results and functional outcomes. A strategy that has promise in advancing biomarker development involves the triad of proteomics, bioinformatics and systems biology. In this review, a brief overview of how bioinformatics and systems biology tools analyze, transform and interpret complex MS datasets into biologically relevant results is discussed. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics, bioinformatics and systems biology in TBI biomarker discovery are presented. A brief survey of researches that utilized these three overlapping disciplines in TBI biomarker discovery is also presented. Finally, examples of TBI biomarkers and their applications are discussed.

  4. Integration of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology in traumatic brain injury biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guingab-Cagmat, J D; Cagmat, E B; Hayes, R L; Anagli, J

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for their efficacy as TBI biomarkers. However, several hurdles have to be overcome even during the discovery phase which is only the first step in the long process of biomarker development. The high-throughput nature of MS-based proteomic experiments generates a massive amount of mass spectral data presenting great challenges in downstream interpretation. Currently, different bioinformatics platforms are available for functional analysis and data mining of MS-generated proteomic data. These tools provide a way to convert data sets to biologically interpretable results and functional outcomes. A strategy that has promise in advancing biomarker development involves the triad of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology. In this review, a brief overview of how bioinformatics and systems biology tools analyze, transform, and interpret complex MS datasets into biologically relevant results is discussed. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology in TBI biomarker discovery are presented. A brief survey of researches that utilized these three overlapping disciplines in TBI biomarker discovery is also presented. Finally, examples of TBI biomarkers and their applications are discussed. PMID:23750150

  5. MEDICAL ETHICS COURSE IMPROVES MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM: MEDICAL STUDENTS´ OPINIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Sotoodeh Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Training physicians who are expert in many medical aspects is the most improtant mission of medical universities. One of these aspects, is professional behavior achievement. One of the important goals in training of ethics, is recognition of conflicts in different parts of ethics and having logical viewpoint for resolving and analyzing these conflicts. This descriptive and analytical study was done to evaluate the efficacy of medical ethics education in medical students´ professional attitudes improvement. One hundred and two medical students were selected randomly in different steps of education and were questioned and their opinions correlation with stage of education and gender were evaluated. There was a significant difference between female viewpoint (in roles of ethic course which is presented in preclinical step in professional attitude improvement (P = 0.009 and also a significant difference was seen in the viewpoint score between student stage with intern stage (P = 0.031. Medical students in educational student stage believe ethic course improve medical professionalism. Since there is no special course to train medical students in professionalism, some interventions are required in this field to improve this aspect of physicians' professional life.

  6. Stress and mental health among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backović Dušan V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical studies bring many stressful activities to students. Prolonged stress can make adverse effects to mental health and lead to further professional burnout. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the association of stress impact and adverse effects of medical studies with psychological distress among medical students. Methods. The cross sectional study was conducted on 367 fourth­year medical students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, by means of the anonymous questionnaire, containing: socio­demographic data, self­reported health status and stressful influences of studying activities. Mental health status was estimated by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ­12. Results. More than 50% of students perceive frequent feeling of psychic tension, and one third has problems with insomnia. Nearly one­half of students assessed their general stress level as moderate or high. Exams were estimated as high stressor in 63.1% of all students. Stressful effects of communication with teaching staff were reported by one quarter of the examinees. The scores of GHQ­12 were above the threshold in 55.6 % of all students. Mental health problems among students were most significantly associated with stressful experience during exams and contacts with teaching staff. Conclusion. Academic stress makes great influence on mental health of medical students. Reduction of stress effects should be directed to optimization of the examination process and improvement of communication skills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175078

  7. Medical Informatics For Medical Students And Medical Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai MOHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of incorporating medical (or healthinformatics into the education of medical students andmedical practitioners is being increasingly recognised.The advances in information and communicationtechnology and the pervasion of the Internet intoeveryday life have important implications forhealthcare services and medical education.Students and practitioners should learn to utilisebiomedical information for problem solving anddecision making based on evidence. The extensiveintroduction of electronic health information systemsinto hospitals and clinics and at the enterprise level inMalaysia and elsewhere is driving a demand for healthprofessionals who have at least basic skills in andappreciation of the use of these technologies.The essential clinical informatics skills have beenidentified and should be incorporated into theundergraduate medical curriculum. It is recommendedthat these be introduced in stages and integrated intoexisting programmes rather than taught as a separatemodule. At the same time, medical schools shouldsupport the integration of e-learning in the educationalprocess in view of the numerous potential benefits.

  8. Invitation to medical image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This medical essay explains the present state of CT image processing technology about its recognition, acquisition and visualization for computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) and surgery (CAS), and future view. Medical image processing has a series of history of its original start from the discovery of X-ray to its application to diagnostic radiography, its combination with the computer for CT, multi-detector raw CT, leading to 3D/4D images for CAD and CAS. CAD is performed based on the recognition of normal anatomical structure of human body, detection of possible abnormal lesion and visualization of its numerical figure into image. Actual instances of CAD images are presented here for chest (lung cancer), abdomen (colorectal cancer) and future body atlas (models of organs and diseases for imaging), a recent national project: computer anatomy. CAS involves the surgical planning technology based on 3D images, navigation of the actual procedure and of endoscopy. As guidance to beginning technological image processing, described are the national and international community like related academic societies, regularly conducting congresses, textbooks and workshops, and topics in the field like computed anatomy of an individual patient for CAD and CAS, its data security and standardization. In future, protective medicine is in authors' view based on the imaging technology, e.g., daily life CAD of individuals ultimately, as exemplified in the present body thermometer and home sphygmometer, to monitor one's routine physical conditions. (T.T.)

  9. STS-3 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  10. Machine medical ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  11. Information Discovery on Electronic Health Records

    CERN Document Server

    Hristidis, Vagelis

    2009-01-01

    Exploiting the information found in electronic health records (EHRs) can facilitate better medical research and improve the quality of medical practice. Addressing the challenges of leveraging this information, this book explores the technology to unleash the data stored in EHRs

  12. Note from the CERN Medical Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    FLU VACCINATION People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Medical Service (ground-floor, bldg. 57), without a prior appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), but THEY MUST BRING THEIR VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2005. CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have the flu vaccination. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious illness or after major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their usual family doctor.

  13. The contribution of Medical Physics to Nuclear Medicine: looking back - a physicist’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hutton, Brian F

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper is the first in a series of invited perspectives by four pioneers of Nuclear Medicine imaging and physics. A medical physicist and a Nuclear Medicine clinical specialist each take a backward look and a forward look at the contributions of Medical Physics to Nuclear Medicine. Discussion Contributions of Medical Physics are presented from the early discovery of radioactivity, development of first imaging devices, computers and emission tomography to recent development of h...

  14. Proceedings of IDMP 2013: first international day of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    November 7 was the birth day of Marie Curie and was chosen by the International Organisation of Medical Physics (IOMP) to celebrate his 50 years of existence at the Institut Curie, the exact place of Marie Curie's lab. The aim of this conference day was to promote medical physics and to give grounds for common reflection about international cooperation, the medical physicist profession, medical physics teaching and research. The conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Medical Physics and the Paris area medical centres specialised in cancer and in the training of medical physicists. This document brings together the presentations (slides) presented during the conference and dealing with: 1 - 26 years of French-Chinese cooperation in radiotherapy and medical radio-physics (G. Marinello); 2 - Activities conducted by Medical Physicists Without Borders (PMSF, Daniel Taisant); 3 - Cooperation in response to MAE and IAEA request (Y. Metayer); 4 - Teaching in France provided to foreigners by the National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies (INSTN, A. Roue); 5 - Radiation oncology and medical physics in Tunisia (M. Besbes); 6 - Medical physics education and training in the Global village: issues, strategies and experiences (J. Van Dyk); 7 - CEA/INSTN participation to training courses abroad (A. Hammadi); 8 - Medical physics to the benefit of patients: the role of IAEA (A. Meghzifene); 9 - Actions, results and perspectives of national and international organisations directly involved in medical physics and oncology (F. Nuesslin); 10 - The AAPM's Cooperation in Medical Physics with Low and Middle Income Countries: Actions, Achievements and Future Prospects (Y. Pipman); 11 - Alliance of African and Mediterranean French Speaking leagues against cancer (ALIAM, M.R. Keller); 12 - Opening talk for the first international day of medical physics (F. Nuesslin); 13 - IAEA support 14 - Marie Curie's contribution to medical physics (J.C. Rosenwald); 15

  15. Medical Virtual Public Services

    OpenAIRE

    Iulia SURUGIU; Manole VELICANU

    2008-01-01

    The healthcare enterprises are very disconnected. This paper intends to propose a solution that will provide citizens, businesses and medical enterprises with improved access to medical virtual public services. Referred medical services are based on existing national medical Web services and which support medically required services provided by physicians and supplementary health care practitioners, laboratory services and diagnostic procedures, clinics and hospitals’ services. Requireme...

  16. 18 CFR 385.908 - Discovery (Rule 908).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct discovery where such discovery relates to new facts or issues raised in accordance with Rule 907(b... discovery: (1) Relates to new facts or issues raised in accordance with Rule 907(c) (new facts and issues... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discovery (Rule...

  17. Rethinking the medical in the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Desmond; Jenkins, Elinor; Mawhinney, Rebecca; Cosgrave, Ellen; O'Mahony, Sarah; Guest, Clare; Moss, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    To clinicians there are a number of striking features of the ever-evolving field of the medical humanities. The first is a perception of a predominantly unidirectional relationship between medicine and the humanities, generally in terms of what the arts and humanities have to offer medicine. The second is the portrayal of medical practice in terms of problems and negativities for which the medical humanities are seen to pose the solution rather than viewing medicine as an active and positive contributor to an interdisciplinary project. Paradigms that fail to recognise the contributions of medicine and its practitioners (including students) to the medical humanities, this paper argues, will continue to struggle with definition and acceptance. This paper explores the possibilities for advancing the medical humanities through recognition of the contribution of medicine to the humanities and the importance of engaging with the arts, culture and leisure pursuits of doctors and medical students. Our research shows the richness of cultural engagement of medical students, their broad range of cultural interests and their ability to contribute to research and scholarship in the medical humanities. Mutual recognition of strengths, weaknesses and differences of scholarly approach is critical to successful development of the enterprise. Recognising and building on the interests, sympathies and contributions of medicine and its practitioners to the medical humanities is a fundamental component of this task. Future directions might include introductory courses for humanities scholars in aspects of healthcare and medicine. PMID:26944516

  18. Tracking medication information across medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Rocks, Krupa; Jahanshad, Neda; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Andrada, Lewellyn P.; Bui, Alex A. T.

    2009-01-01

    A patient’s electronic medical record can consist of a large number of reports, especially for an elderly patient or for one affected by a chronic disease. It can thus be cumbersome for a physician to go through all of the reports to understand the patient’s complete medical history. This paper describes work in progress towards tracking medications and their dosages through the course of a patient’s medical history. 923 reports associated with 11 patients were obtained from a university hosp...

  19. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Morini

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R. Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR. In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  20. Discovery-driven research and bioinformatics in nuclear receptor and coregulator signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Neil J

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors that interact with coregulators and other transcription factors to direct tissue-specific programs of gene expression. Recent years have witnessed a rapid acceleration of the output of high-content data platforms in this field, generating discovery-driven datasets that have collectively described: the organization of the NR superfamily (phylogenomics); the expression patterns of NRs, coregulators and their target genes (transcriptomics); ligand- and tissue-specific functional NR and coregulator sites in DNA (cistromics); the organization of nuclear receptors and coregulators into higher order complexes (proteomics); and their downstream effects on homeostasis and metabolism (metabolomics). Significant bioinformatics challenges lie ahead both in the integration of this information into meaningful models of NR and coregulator biology, as well as in the archiving and communication of datasets to the global nuclear receptor signaling community. While holding great promise for the field, the ascendancy of discovery-driven research in this field brings with it a collective responsibility for researchers, publishers and funding agencies alike to ensure the effective archiving and management of these data. This review will discuss factors lying behind the increasing impact of discovery-driven research, examples of high-content datasets and their bioinformatic analysis, as well as a summary of currently curated web resources in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease. PMID:21029773

  1. What Does Galileo's Discovery of Jupiter's Moons Tell Us about the Process of Scientific Discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Given that hypothetico-deductive reasoning has played a role in other important scientific discoveries, asks the question whether it plays a role in all important scientific discoveries. Explores and rejects as viable alternatives possible alternative scientific methods such as Baconian induction and combinatorial analysis. Discusses the…

  2. Beyond discovery: A review of the critique of the discovery view of opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen T.

    This paper systematically reviews and synthesises the critique since 2000 of the discovery view's interpretation of entrepreneurial opportunities. The review shows that the framing of the debate as polarised between two oppositions, the discovery view versus the creation view, is oversimplified...

  3. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K–12 Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Westenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposing K–12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, “engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use.” This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K–12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K–12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom.

  4. Compressed Neighbor Discovery for Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Dongning; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies neighbor discovery problem in wireless networks. A novel scheme, called compressed neighbor discovery is proposed, which assigns each node a unique signature and let nodes simultaneously transmit their signatures during the discovery period. The query node then determines, based on the superposition of the signatures, a small number of nodes as its neighbors, out of a large number of nodes in the network. This is fundamentally a sparse recovery problem. Using the proposed scheme, a single frame time suffices to achieve reliable discovery for large networks. This is in contrast to conventional schemes, where each node repeatedly transmits its identity with random delay, so that a receiver can identify each neighbor at least once without collision. Two practical, low-complexity discovery schemes are studied. The first scheme assigns sparse pseudo-random on-off signatures to the nodes, so that each node can listen to the channel during its own off-slots. Despite of half-duplex constraint, all ...

  5. Internet Naming and Discovery Architecture and Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Joud S

    2013-01-01

    Naming is an integral building block within data networks and systems and is becoming ever more important as complex data-centric usage models emerge. Internet Naming and Discovery is timely in developing a unified model for studying the topic of naming and discovery. It details the architectural and economic tools needed for designing naming and discovery schemes within the broader context of internetwork architecture.   Readers will find in this book a historic overview of the Internet and a comprehensive survey of the literature, followed by and an in-depth examination of naming and discovery. Specific topics covered include: ·         formal definitions of name, address, identifier, locator, binding, routing, discovery, mapping, and resolution; ·         a discussion of the properties of names and bindings, along with illustrative case studies; ·         taxonomy that helps in organizing the solution space, and more importantly in identifying new avenues for contributing to the...

  6. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  7. Facilitating Service Discovery with Semantic Overlay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jin; Hao Wu; Xiao-Min Ning

    2006-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing share many common characteristics.It is believed that the combination of the two emerging techniques is a very promising method in promoting the web services (WS). Because the service discovery plays a key role in the integration, here a P2P-based framework to manage the knowledge of service and locating services is proposed. In this paper, the details of the principle, constructing and maintaining of service semantic overlay architecture have been described, and the way how the semantic overlay facilitates discovery of service resources is illustrated. To enable the semantic web service superiority, Service Ontology, which is considered as the service semantic model, is employed to depict service. The service discovery includes two phases: searching on the service semantic overlay; and local discovery in peer's service repository. Various solutions have been proposed to realize those two phases.Furthermore, tests are carried out to evaluate service discovery on the architecture.

  8. The approach of Bayesian model indicates media awareness of medical errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, K.; Arulchelvan, S.

    2016-06-01

    This research study brings out the factors behind the increase in medical malpractices in the Indian subcontinent in the present day environment and impacts of television media awareness towards it. Increased media reporting of medical malpractices and errors lead to hospitals taking corrective action and improve the quality of medical services that they provide. The model of Cultivation Theory can be used to measure the influence of media in creating awareness of medical errors. The patient's perceptions of various errors rendered by the medical industry from different parts of India were taken up for this study. Bayesian method was used for data analysis and it gives absolute values to indicate satisfaction of the recommended values. To find out the impact of maintaining medical records of a family online by the family doctor in reducing medical malpractices which creates the importance of service quality in medical industry through the ICT.

  9. Medical narratives in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, H J; Hasman, A; de Vries Robbé, P F; Schouten, H C

    1997-08-01

    In this article, we describe the state of the art and directions of current development and research with respect to the inclusion of medical narratives in electronic medical-record systems. We used information about 20 electronic medical-record systems as presented in the literature. We divided these systems into 'classical' systems that matured before 1990 and are now used in a broad range of medical domains, and 'experimental' systems, more recently developed and, in general, more innovative. In the literature, three major challenges were addressed: facilitation of direct data entry, achieving unambiguous understandability of data, and improvement of data presentation. Promising approaches to tackle the first and second challenge are the use of dynamic data-entry forms that anticipate sensible input, and free-text data entry followed by natural-language interpretation. Both these approaches require a highly expressive medical terminology. How to facilitate the access to medical narratives has not been studied much. We found facilitating examples of presenting this information as fluent prose, of optimising the screen design with fixed position cues, and of imposing medical narratives with a structure of indexable paragraphs that can be used in flowsheets. We conclude that further study is needed to develop an optimal searching structure for medical narratives. PMID:9476152

  10. Change, bring it on! a simple, workable framework for leading and managing successful business transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, Keely

    2010-01-01

    Change is inevitable in any business but it is almost always resisted from within. As a management consultant Keely Nugent frequently witnesses the hurdles organisations face when implementing change within the business. Over the years she has also observed this same inflexibility in horses being prepared for international competitions. Change: Bring it on! builds on tried and tested techniques and emotional engagement used in the training of horses and applies these theories to the world of business. Through the ongoing example of a fictional company, Change: Bring it on! provides a very simp

  11. Reflections on the 'discovery' of the antimalarial qinghao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Elisabeth

    2006-06-01

    Artemisinin, qinghaosu, was extracted from the traditional Chinese medical drug qinghao (the blue-green herb) in the early 1970s. Its 'discovery' can thus be hailed as an achievement of research groups who were paradoxically successful, working as they were at the height of a political mass movement in communist China, known in the West as the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), a period that was marked by chaos, cruelty and enormous suffering, particularly, but by no means only, among the intelligentsia. On the one hand, China's cultural heritage was seen as a hindrance to progress and Mao set out to destroy it, but on the other hand he praised it as a 'treasure house', full of gems that, if adjusted to the demands of contemporary society, could be used 'for serving the people' (wei renmin fuwu). The success of the 'task of combating malaria' (kang nüe ren wu), sometimes known as 'task number five hundred and twenty-three', depended crucially on modern scientists who took seriously knowledge that was recorded in a traditional Chinese medical text, Emergency Prescriptions Kept up one's Sleeve by the famous physician Ge Hong (284-363). PMID:16722826

  12. IYA2009 and Beyond - Update On "Music and Astronomy Under the Stars” To Bring Telescopes To Where the People Are!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2009-05-01

    This NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars outreach program brings telescopes and astronomy information (via a video display and outdoor exhibit) to community parks during and after music concerts and outdoor family films attended by 500 to 50,000 people. This program will permit the entire community to participate with telescope observations and will enhance the public appreciation of astronomy. The telescopes will be accessible to those with physical disabilities. This program combines music, telescope observations, and astronomy information and targets people who may not attend star parties, planetariums, or science museums. I update this program and discus the lessons learned such as the importance of coordination with local governments, community park districts, and amateur astronomer clubs. This program can be expanded and modified for the local communities. I have expanded this program to large and small venues from New York Philharmonic concert at Heckscher State Park, the boardwalk and a "tail-gate” star party by at pop-music concerts at Jones Beach State Park, and at the Tanglewood Music Festival in Lenox, MA, summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (http://www.bso.org/bso/mods/perf_detail.jsp?pid=prod2880024). This program is expandable to include outdoor dance or theatre programs, festivals in parks or beaches or amusement parks. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is program that should continue beyond IYA-2009 beaches. Special events such as a Super Bowl Star Party and Halloween Stars will be presented as will the results form NASA-funded hands-on astronomy activities to children and their families receiving medical treatment at the Children's Medical Center at Winthrop University Hospital (Mineola, NY) and the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY).

  13. IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The NSS/MIC is a well-established meeting that has continuously provided an exceptional venue to showcase outstanding developments and contributions across the nuclear and medical instrumentation fields. This conference brings together engineers and scientists from around the world to share their knowledge and to gain insight and inspiration from others. The conference will include a distinguished series of short courses, relevant refresher courses, and workshops that will address areas of particular interest.

  14. Integrating addiction medicine training into medical school and residency curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, Jan; Rieb, Launette; Bury, Gerard; Muench, John; O’Toole, Thomas; Rieckman, Traci; Cullen, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Affordable Care Act (2010) brings an opportunity to increase the integration of addiction treatment into the health care system. With the anticipated expansion of addiction care services in primary care, challenges, such as workforce training, can be expected. This presentation discusses challenges and opportunities for addiction medicine training of primary care professionals in Ireland, Canada and Portland, OR. Objectives: To explore ideas for integrating addiction medic...

  15. A perfect launch of Space Shuttle Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off Launch Pad 39A against a backdrop of xenon lights (just above the orbiter' nose and at left). On the Mobile Launcher Platform beneath, water begins flooding the area for flame and sound control. The perfect on- time liftoff occurred at 7:17 p.m. EDT, sending a crew of seven on the 100th launch in the history of the Shuttle program. Discovery carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Discovery's landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  16. Discovery and design of nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on properties such as thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels, with a focus on predictions of point defect concentration, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, and gas bubble formation and evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiatives are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (b Create an International Knowledgebase for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions, and simulations (codes, (c Improve education and (d Set up international collaborations.

  17. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that 'repurposing' compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  18. STS-1 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  19. Stable Feature Selection for Biomarker Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zengyou

    2010-01-01

    Feature selection techniques have been used as the workhorse in biomarker discovery applications for a long time. Surprisingly, the stability of feature selection with respect to sampling variations has long been under-considered. It is only until recently that this issue has received more and more attention. In this article, we review existing stable feature selection methods for biomarker discovery using a generic hierarchal framework. We have two objectives: (1) providing an overview on this new yet fast growing topic for a convenient reference; (2) categorizing existing methods under an expandable framework for future research and development.

  20. On the 1932 Discovery of the Positron.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawncizak, Alexander; Åsbrink, Victor

    2014-01-01

    An experiment on Cosmic rays performed by Carl D Anderson led to the accidental discovery of the positron in 1932. The discovery was a turning point in particle physics which led to numerous other theories and has been discussed by scientists all over the world. Anderson had photographed a 63 MeV, upward moving electron. The possible origin of such a positron has never before been discussed and is what this report will aim to explain. The report will include some evidence that the particle is...