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Sample records for brightly fluorescent carbon

  1. Fluorescence brightness and photostability of individual copper (I) oxide nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohora, Nafisa; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Orth, Antony; Brown, Hannah M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Gibson, Brant C

    2017-12-04

    Conventional organic fluorophores lose their ability to fluoresce after repeated exposure to excitation light due to photobleaching. Therefore, research into emerging bright and photostable nanomaterials has become of great interest for a range of applications such as bio-imaging and tracking. Among these emerging fluorophores, metal oxide-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention as a potential multifunctional material with photocatalytic and angeogenisis abilities in addition to fluorescnce applications. However, most of these applications are highly dependent on size, morphology, and chemo-physical properties of individual particles. In this manuscript, we present a method to study the intrinsic optical characteristics of individual copper (I) oxide (Cu 2 O) nanocubes. When excited at 520 nm using only 11 µW excitation power (1.7 W/cm2), individual nanocubes were observed to emit light with peak wavelengths ~760 nm which is conveniently within the near-infrared 1 (NIR1) biological window where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Bright and photostable fluorescence was observed with intensities up to 487 K counts/s under constant illumination for at least 2 minutes with a brightness approximately four times higher than the autofluorescence from a fixed cumulus-oocyte complex. With near-IR emission, high fluorescence brightness, and outstanding photostability, Cu 2 O nanocubes are attractive candidates for long-term fluorescent bioimaging applications.

  2. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  3. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  4. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  5. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    OpenAIRE

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is der...

  6. Bright and photostable nitrogen-vacancy fluorescence from unprocessed detonation nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, P; Capelli, M; Lau, D W M; Jeske, J; Field, M R; Ohshima, T; Greentree, A D; Gibson, B C

    2017-01-05

    Bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is demonstrated in unprocessed detonation nanodiamond particle aggregates. The optical properties of these particles is analyzed using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence decay measurements, and optically detected magnetic resonance experiments. Two particle populations with distinct optical properties are identified and compared to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) fluorescent nanodiamonds. We find that the brightness of one detonation nanodiamond particle population is on the same order as that of highly processed fluorescent 100 nm HPHT nanodiamonds. Our results may open the path to a simple and up-scalable route for the production of fluorescent NV nanodiamonds for use in bioimaging applications.

  7. Bright field microscopy as an alternative to whole cell fluorescence in automated analysis of macrophage images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Selinummi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity.We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells.The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining.

  8. Model for the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo; Gao, Youtang; Si, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The three elements of photoelectrical cathode, microchannel plate and fluorescence screen are important parts to imaging quality of low light and ultraviolet Image intensifier. To do research and analysis work on the Fluorescence screen parameter testing have practical significance to the understanding of the performance of fluorescence screen and then can help to know where improvement should be made and then achieve a best performance entire tube, This article mainly introduce the testing theory of the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of Image Intensifier and how to build a mathematic model.

  9. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Gruber

    Full Text Available We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp., two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II. We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  10. Ambient light effect on the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Sun, LianJun; Zhang, JunJu; Gao, YouTang; Fu, RongGuo

    2008-02-01

    When testing the uniformity of Image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness, the million scale CCD brightness meter is used. Due to the distance between the meter and fluorescence screen, the effect of ambient light on the testing result is essential to the design of testing system. Test with super second generation tube, input a constant voltage to insure the fluorescence screen brightness to be constant. Collect the brightness of the same fluorescence screen in different ambient luminance environment of 1×102Lx, 1×101Lx, 1Lx, 1×10-1Lx, 1×10-2Lx, 1×10-3Lx. Study the results with software MATLAB. It is concluded as: In ambient luminance environment of 1×10-1Lx the CCD has the best result. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of above 1×103Lx show untrue image. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of below 1×10-3Lx shows its own noise image and is unbelievable either.

  11. Observations of neutral carbon in the NGC 1977 bright rim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, A.; Phillips, T.G.; Beichman, C.A.; Frerking, M.

    1982-01-01

    Strong neutral carbon emission at 610 μm (429 GHz) has been detected from a bright-rimmed cloud abutting and H II region NGC 1977. The similarity of velocity and width between 13 CO and C I lines suggests both lines originate in the same region. A model for the density and temperature structure of the cloud, based on 13 CO and 12 CO observations, has been used to estimate the carbon abundance. the abundances of both C I and 13 CO increase with depth into the cloud away from the rim. The carbon abundance reaches its peak value nearer the rim than does the 13 CO abundance. This variation in the relative abundance distributions of CO and C I confirms the importance of photodissociation in the chemistry of molecular clouds, and the C I line to studies of the interaction of hot stars with clouds

  12. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David G J; Abercrombie, Laura L; Rudis, Mary R; Millwood, Reggie J; Dunlap, John R; Stewart, C Neal

    2012-05-03

    The expression of fluorescent protein (FP) genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully) appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their "brightness" and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  13. Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots as a dual fluorescent-MRI probe

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots as dual fluorescence-MRI probes for biomedical applications. The derived Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots show uniform particle size (3-4 nm) and gadolinium distribution and form stable dispersions in water. More importantly, they exhibit bright fluorescence, strong T1-weighted MRI contrast and low cytotoxicity. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  14. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  15. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann David GJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their “brightness” and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. Results The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. Conclusions From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  16. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R; Gainer, Christian F; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  17. Research on testing instrument and method for correction of the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo

    2011-09-01

    To test the parameters of image intensifier screen is the precondition for researching and developing the third generation image intensifier. The picture of brightness uniformity of tested fluorescence screen shows bright in middle and dark at edge. It is not so direct to evaluate the performance of fluorescence screen. We analyze the energy and density distribution of the electrons, After correction, the image in computer is very uniform. So the uniformity of fluorescence screen brightness can be judged directly. It also shows the correction method is reasonable and close to ideal image. When the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness is corrected, the testing instrument is developed. In a vacuum environment of better than 1×10-4Pa, area source electron gun emits electrons. Going through the electric field to be accelerated, the high speed electrons bombard the screen and the screen luminize. By using testing equipment such as imaging luminance meter, fast storage photometer, optical power meter, current meter and photosensitive detectors, the screen brightness, the uniformity, light-emitting efficiency and afterglow can be tested respectively. System performance are explained. Testing method is established; Test results are given.

  18. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  19. Bright Stuff on Ceres = Sulfates and Carbonates on CI Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Fries, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of the DAWN spacecraft's observations of the surface of Ceres indicate that there are bright areas, which can be explained by large amounts of the Mg sulfate hexahydrate (MgSO4•6(H2O)), although the identification appears tenuous. There are preliminary indications that water is being evolved from these bright areas, and some have inferred that these might be sites of contemporary hydro-volcanism. A heat source for such modern activity is not obvious, given the small size of Ceres, lack of any tidal forces from nearby giant planets, probable age and presumed bulk composition. We contend that observations of chondritic materials in the lab shed light on the nature of the bright spots on Ceres

  20. Quantum-dot-tagged reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for bright fluorescence bioimaging and photothermal therapy monitored in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Chen, Yu-Wei; Hung, Wen-Ting; Chen, I-Wei; Chen, San-Yuan

    2012-04-03

    Quantum-dot-tagged reduced graphene oxide (QD-rGO) nanocomposites (left) internalized into targeted tumor cells display bright fluorescence from the QDs (right); by absorbing NIR radiation incident on the rGO and converting it into heat, they also cause simultaneous cell death and fluorescence reduction (bottom). The nanocomposite is thus capable of tumor imaging, photothermal therapy and in situ monitoring of treatment in progress. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Green Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Selective Detection of Tartrazine in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Yang, Xiupei; Li, Gu; Zhao, Chuan; Liao, Xiangjun

    2015-08-05

    A simple, economical, and green method for the preparation of water-soluble, high-fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-dots) has been developed via hydrothermal process using aloe as a carbon source. The synthesized C-dots were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectrophotometer, UV-vis absorption spectra as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results reveal that the as-prepared C-dots were spherical shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and emit bright yellow photoluminescence (PL) with a quantum yield of approximately 10.37%. The surface of the C-dots was rich in hydroxyl groups and presented various merits including high fluorescent quantum yield, excellent photostability, low toxicity and satisfactory solubility. Additionally, we found that one of the widely used synthetic food colorants, tartrazine, could result in a strong fluorescence quenching of the C-dots through a static quenching process. The decrease of fluorescence intensity made it possible to determine tartrazine in the linear range extending from 0.25 to 32.50 μM, This observation was further successfully applied for the determination of tartrazine in food samples collected from local markets, suggesting its great potential toward food routine analysis. Results from our study may shed light on the production of fluorescent and biocompatible nanocarbons due to our simple and environmental benign strategy to synthesize C-dots in which aloe was used as a carbon source.

  2. Highly surface functionalized carbon nano-onions for bright light bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasconi, Marco; Maffeis, Viviana; Bartelmess, Juergen; Giordani, Silvia; Echegoyen, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials functionalized with fluorescent and water-soluble groups have emerged as platforms for biological imaging because of their low toxicity and ability to be internalized by cells. The development of imaging probes based on carbon nanomaterials for biomedical studies requires the understanding of their biological response as well as the efficient and safety exposition of the nanomaterial to the cell compartment where it is designed to operate. Here, we present a fluorescent probe based on surface functionalized carbon nano-onions (CNOs) for biological imaging. The modification of CNOs by chemical oxidation of the defects on the outer shell of these carbon nanoparticles results in an extensive surface functionalization with carboxyl groups. We have obtained fluorescently labelled CNOs by a reaction involving the amide bond formation between fluoresceinamine and the carboxylic acids groups on the surface of the CNOs. The functionalized CNOs display high emission properties and dispersability in water due to the presence of high surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups that translate in an efficient fluorescent probe for in vitro imaging of HeLa cells, without significant cytotoxicity. The resulting nanomaterial represents a promising platform for biological imaging applications due to the high dispersability in water, its efficient internalization by cancer cells and localization in specific cell compartments. (paper)

  3. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mann David GJ; Abercrombie Laura L; Rudis Mary R; Millwood Reggie J; Dunlap John R; Stewart C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP) genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully) appear to be the colors with maximum utility i...

  4. Facile and eco-friendly synthesis of green fluorescent carbon nanodots for applications in bioimaging, patterning and staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Yang, Jun; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-04-28

    We report a facile and eco-friendly strategy for the fabrication of green fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for bio-imaging, patterning, and staining. A one-pot hydrothermal method using various plant petals yields bright green-emitting CDs, providing an easy way for the production of green fluorescent CDs without the need for a tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. The as-prepared CDs show small size distribution and excellent dispersibility. Their strong green fluorescence is observed when the excitation wavelength is between 430 nm and 490 nm. Moreover, they exhibit high tolerance to various external conditions, such as pH values, external cations, and continuous excitation. Due to minimum toxicity as well as good photoluminescence properties, these CDs can be applied to in vitro and in vivo imaging, patterning, and staining. According to confocal fluorescence imaging of human uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, CDs penetrate into the cell and enter the cytoplasm and the nucleus. More strikingly, carp is directly fed with CDs for in vivo imaging and shows bright green fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 470 nm. In addition, the obtained CDs are used as fluorescent inks for drawing luminescence patterns. Finally, we also apply the CDs as a fluorescent dye. Interestingly, the absorbent filter paper with staining emits dramatic fluorescence under 470 nm excitation.

  5. Expression profiling of Plasmodium berghei HSP70 genes for generation of bright red fluorescent parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Hliscs

    Full Text Available Live cell imaging of recombinant malarial parasites encoding fluorescent probes provides critical insights into parasite-host interactions and life cycle progression. In this study, we generated a red fluorescent line of the murine malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei. To allow constitutive and abundant expression of the mCherry protein we profiled expression of all members of the P. berghei heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family. We identified PbHSP70/1, an invariant ortholog of Plasmodium falciparum HSP70-1, as the protein with the highest expression levels during Plasmodium blood, mosquito, and liver infection. Stable allelic insertion of a mCherry expression cassette into the PbHsp70/1 locus created constitutive red fluorescent P. berghei lines, termed Pbred. We show that these parasites can be used for live imaging of infected host cells and organs, including hepatocytes, erythrocytes, and whole Anopheles mosquitoes. Quantification of the fluorescence intensity of several Pbred parasite stages revealed significantly enhanced signal intensities in comparison to GFP expressed under the control of the constitutive EF1alpha promoter. We propose that systematic transcript profiling permits generation of reporter parasites, such as the Pbred lines described herein.

  6. Zwitterionic Silane Copolymer for Ultra-Stable and Bright Biomolecular Probes Based on Fluorescent Quantum Dot Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Fatimata; Tasso, Mariana; Trapiella-Alfonso, Laura; Xu, Xiangzhen; Hanafi, Mohamed; Lequeux, Nicolas; Pons, Thomas

    2017-05-31

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit several unique properties that make them suitable candidates for biomolecular sensing, including high brightness, photostability, broad excitation, and narrow emission spectra. Assembling these QDs into robust and functionalizable nanosized clusters (QD-NSCs) can provide fluorescent probes that are several orders of magnitude brighter than individual QDs, thus allowing an even greater sensitivity of detection with simplified instrumentation. However, the formation of compact, antifouling, functionalizable, and stable QD-NSCs remains a challenging task, especially for a use at ultralow concentrations for single-molecule detection. Here, we describe the development of fluorescent QD-NSCs envisioned as a tool for fast and sensitive biomolecular recognition. First, QDs were assembled into very compact 100-150 nm diameter spherical aggregates; the final QD-NSCs were obtained by growing a cross-linked silica shell around these aggregates. Hydrolytic stability in several concentration and pH conditions is a key requirement for a potential and efficient single-molecule detection tool. However, the hydrolysis of Si-O-Si bonds leads to desorption of monosilane-based surface groups at very low silica concentrations or in a slightly basic medium. Thus, we designed a novel multidentate copolymer composed of multiple silane as well as zwitterionic monomers. Coating silica beads with this multidentate copolymer provided a robust surface chemistry that was demonstrated to be stable against hydrolysis, even at low concentrations. Copolymer-coated silica beads also showed low fouling properties and high colloidal stability in saline solutions. Furthermore, incorporation of additional azido-monomers enabled easy functionalization of QD-NSCs using copper-free bio-orthogonal cyclooctyne-azide click chemistry, as demonstrated by a biotin-streptavidin affinity test.

  7. Direct Synthesis of Multicolor Fluorescent Hollow Carbon Spheres Encapsulating Enriched Carbon Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao-Ling; Ji, Wen-Qing; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Multicolor fluorescent hollow carbon spheres (HCSs) are fabricated by an easy one-step route of in situ pyrolysis process with the use of natural scales and collagen powders as the precursor. The gas blow forming mechanism and photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanism of HCSs have been thoroughly discussed and proved that HCSs represent the first examples of three-dimensional multicolor fluorescent nanomaterials based on carbon dots (CDs). The HCSs encapsulate enriched carbon dots with high quantum yields (QYs) of 38%, and thus are applied in inkjet printing and sensitized solar cells. This strategy offers a promising avenue for preparing multicolor fluorescent hollow carbon materials on an industrial scale.

  8. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Hostettler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression.

  9. A novel fluorescent carbon dots derived from tamarind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha Jhonsi, Mariadoss; Thulasi, Sekar

    2016-09-01

    Herein, a novel fluorescent carbon dots (TCDs) is synthesized from tamarind by a simple one pot hydrothermal method. The synthesized TCDs are completely characterized by vital techniques. TCDs exhibit an excitation-dependent emission with the quantum yield of 4% and storage stability of more than three months without any stabilizer. Further, fluorescence quenching of TCDs by acceptors such as methyl viologen and hydroxy TEMPO are studied. Quenching of TCDs is due to electron transfer as evidenced by the decrease in fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  10. Cyclodextrin-carbon nanotube composites for fluorescent detection of cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simeon; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Dowben, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    The efficiency of cyclodextrin-carbon nanotube composites (CD-CNT) for cholesterol detection was investigated using their fluorescent yields in the presence of rhodamine 6G (R6G). The CD-CNT composites using α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin (x-CD) all showed strong fluorescent responses to cholesterol when in the presence of R6G. The α-CD based composites, however, exhibit more dramatic fluorescent changes in response to cholesterol, over a wider range of cholesterol concentrations, and also display the highest binding constant of 2.98 × 105 M-1 with cholesterol. The effectiveness of these fluorescent responses for the detection of cholesterol depends primarily on the concentration and cavity size of the CD.

  11. Photochemical Creation of Fluorescent Quantum Defects in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojian; Kim, Mijin; Kwon, Hyejin; Wang, YuHuang

    2018-01-15

    Quantum defects are an emerging class of synthetic single-photon emitters that hold vast potential for near-infrared imaging, chemical sensing, materials engineering, and quantum information processing. Herein, we show that it is possible to optically direct the synthetic creation of molecularly tunable fluorescent quantum defects in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube hosts through photochemical reactions. By exciting the host semiconductor with light that resonates with its electronic transition, we find that halide-containing aryl groups can covalently bond to the sp 2 carbon lattice. The introduced quantum defects generate bright photoluminescence that allows tracking of the reaction progress in situ. We show that the reaction is independent of temperature but correlates strongly with the photon energy used to drive the reaction, suggesting a photochemical mechanism rather than photothermal effects. This type of photochemical reactions opens the possibility to control the synthesis of fluorescent quantum defects using light and may enable lithographic patterning of quantum emitters with electronic and molecular precision. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Mechanochemical synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots from cellulose powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ari; Ram Choi, Bo; Choi, Yujin; Jo, Seongho; Kang, Eun Bi; Lee, Hyukjin; Park, Sung Young; In, Insik

    2018-04-01

    A novel mechanochemical method was firstly developed to synthesize carbon nanodots (CNDs) or carbon nano-onions (CNOs) through high-pressure homogenization of cellulose powders as naturally abundant resource depending on the treatment times. While CNDs (less than 5 nm in size) showed spherical and amorphous morphology, CNOs (10-50 nm in size) presented polyhedral shape, and onion-like outer lattice structure, graphene-like interlattice spacing of 0.36 nm. CNOs showed blue emissions, moderate dispersibility in aqueous media, and high cell viability, which enables efficient fluorescence imaging of cellular media.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Raster image correlation spectroscopy and Number & Brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D.J.; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb (Magde et al., 1972). Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope has been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) and Number & Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs). We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS and Number & Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters in order to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. PMID:20734406

  14. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and number and brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D J; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb. Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope have been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work, we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low-cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), and Number and Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles. We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS, and Number and Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-21

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis.

  16. Graphitic Nitrogen Triggers Red Fluorescence in Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holá, Kateřina; Sudolská, Mária; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Nachtigallová, Dana; Rogach, Andrey L; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2017-12-26

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a stable and highly biocompatible fluorescent material offering great application potential in cell labeling, optical imaging, LED diodes, and optoelectronic technologies. Because their emission wavelengths provide the best tissue penetration, red-emitting CDs are of particular interest for applications in biomedical technologies. Current synthetic strategies enabling red-shifted emission include increasing the CD particle size (sp 2 domain) by a proper synthetic strategy and tuning the surface chemistry of CDs with suitable functional groups (e.g., carboxyl). Here we present an elegant route for preparing full-color CDs with well-controllable fluorescence at blue, green, yellow, or red wavelengths. The two-step procedure involves the synthesis of a full-color-emitting mixture of CDs from citric acid and urea in formamide followed by separation of the individual fluorescent fractions by column chromatography based on differences in CD charge. Red-emitting CDs, which had the most negative charge, were separated as the last fraction. The trend in the separation, surface charge, and red-shift of photoluminescence was caused by increasing amount of graphitic nitrogen in the CD structure, as was clearly proved by XPS, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. Importantly, graphitic nitrogen generates midgap states within the HOMO-LUMO gap of the undoped systems, resulting in significantly red-shifted light absorption that in turn gives rise to fluorescence at the low-energy end of the visible spectrum. The presented findings identify graphitic nitrogen as another crucial factor that can red-shift the CD photoluminescence.

  17. Presence of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles in Baked Lamb: Their Properties and Potential Application for Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Xie, Yisha; Liu, Shan; Cong, Shuang; Song, Yukun; Xu, Xianbing; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-08-30

    The presence of nanoparticles in food has drawn much attention in recent years. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles are a new class of nanostructures; however, the distribution and physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles in food remain unclear. Herein, the presence of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles in baked lamb was confirmed, and their physicochemical properties were investigated. The fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from baked lamb emit strong blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light with a 10% fluorescent quantum yield. The nanoparticles are roughly spherical in appearance with a diameter of around 2.0 nm. Hydroxyl, amino, and carboxyl groups exist on the surface of nanoparticles. In addition, the nanoparticles could serve as a fluorescence sensor for glucose detection through an oxidation-reduction reaction. This work is the first report on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles present in baked lamb, which provides valuable insight into the physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles and their potential application in sensors.

  18. One-pot synthesis of gold nanoclusters with bright red fluorescence and good biorecognition abilities for visualization fluorescence enhancement detection of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiali; Lu, Lili; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2015-03-01

    A facile one-pot strategy was developed for the synthesis of lysozyme functionalized fluorescence gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). The lysozymes added to reduce Au(3+) ions and stabilize the AuNCs during the synthesis were coated on the AuNCs surface and retained their specific recognition ability for bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli). Based on such ability, these AuNCs were specifically attached onto the surface of E. coli, which resulted in great red fluorescence enhancement. Nevertheless, the bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilized AuNCs could not recognize E. coli and no fluorescence enhancement was observed. Upon the addition of E. coli, the red fluorescence intensity of lysozyme-AuNCs was enhanced linearly over the range of 2.4×10(4) -6.0×10(6) CFU/mL of E. coli with high sensitivity (LOD=2.0×10(4) CFU/mL, S/N=3). The visualization fluorescence evolution may enable the rapid and real-time detection of bacteria. This study may be extended to other functional proteins such as antibody, enzyme, and peptide functionalized nanoclusters while retaining the bioactivity of coating proteins and find wide applications in the fields of biochemistry and biomedicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eco-friendly carbon-nanodot-based fluorescent paints for advanced photocatalytic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Young Park, So; Uk Lee, Hyun; Lee, Young-Chul; Choi, Saehae; Hyun Cho, Dae; Sik Kim, Hee; Bang, Sunghee; Seo, Soonjoo; Chang Lee, Soon; Won, Jonghan; Son, Byung-Chul; Yang, Mino; Lee, Jouhahn

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials, especially zero-dimensional (0D) carbon nanodots (CDs), are widely used in broad biological and optoelectronic applications. CDs have unique characteristics such as strong fluorescence, biocompatibility, sun-light response, and capability of mass-production. Beyond the previous green CD obtained from harmful natural substances, we report a new type of fluid-based fluorescent CD paints (C-paints) derived from polyethylene glycol (PEG; via simple ultrasound irr...

  20. Source brightness and useful beam current of carbon nanotubes and other very small emitters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.; Bezuijen, M.; Barth, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The potential application of carbon nanotubes as electron sources in electron microscopes is analyzed. The resolution and probe current that can be obtained from a carbon nanotube emitter in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope are calculated and compared to the state of the art using Schottky

  1. Tuning Selectivity of Fluorescent Carbon Nanotube-Based Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Florian A; Herrmann, Niklas; Meyer, Daniel; Kruss, Sebastian

    2017-06-28

    Detection of neurotransmitters is an analytical challenge and essential to understand neuronal networks in the brain and associated diseases. However, most methods do not provide sufficient spatial, temporal, or chemical resolution. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used as building blocks for sensors/probes that detect catecholamine neurotransmitters, including dopamine. This approach provides a high spatial and temporal resolution, but it is not understood if these sensors are able to distinguish dopamine from similar catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as epinephrine or norepinephrine. In this work, the organic phase (DNA sequence) around SWCNTs was varied to create sensors with different selectivity and sensitivity for catecholamine neurotransmitters. Most DNA-functionalized SWCNTs responded to catecholamine neurotransmitters, but both dissociation constants ( K d ) and limits of detection were highly dependent on functionalization (sequence). K d values span a range of 2.3 nM (SWCNT-(GC) 15 + norepinephrine) to 9.4 μM (SWCNT-(AT) 15 + dopamine) and limits of detection are mostly in the single-digit nM regime. Additionally, sensors of different SWCNT chirality show different fluorescence increases. Moreover, certain sensors (e.g., SWCNT-(GT) 10 ) distinguish between different catecholamines, such as dopamine and norepinephrine at low concentrations (50 nM). These results show that SWCNTs functionalized with certain DNA sequences are able to discriminate between catecholamine neurotransmitters or to detect them in the presence of interfering substances of similar structure. Such sensors will be useful to measure and study neurotransmitter signaling in complex biological settings.

  2. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata K. K. Upadhyayula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies. The Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant (k for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9×108 and 2×108 ml/g, respectively. The visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen. The results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability. This is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.

  3. Spatially controlled fabrication of a bright fluorescent nanodiamond-array with enhanced far-red Si-V luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sonal; Thomas, Vinoy; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Catledge, Shane A; Martyshkin, Dmitry; Kozlovskaya, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach to precisely pattern fluorescent nanodiamond-arrays with enhanced far-red intense photostable luminescence from silicon-vacancy (Si-V) defect centers. The precision-patterned pre-growth seeding of nanodiamonds is achieved by a scanning probe ‘dip-pen’ nanolithography technique using electrostatically driven transfer of nanodiamonds from ‘inked’ cantilevers to a UV-treated hydrophilic SiO 2 substrate. The enhanced emission from nanodiamond dots in the far-red is achieved by incorporating Si-V defect centers in a subsequent chemical vapor deposition treatment. The development of a suitable nanodiamond ink and mechanism of ink transport, and the effect of humidity and dwell time on nanodiamond patterning are investigated. The precision patterning of as-printed (pre-CVD) arrays with dot diameter and dot height as small as 735 nm ± 27 nm and 61 nm ± 3 nm, respectively, and CVD-treated fluorescent ND-arrays with consistently patterned dots having diameter and height as small as 820 nm ± 20 nm and, 245 nm ± 23 nm, respectively, using 1 s dwell time and 30% RH is successfully achieved. We anticipate that the far-red intense photostable luminescence (∼738 nm) observed from Si-V defect centers integrated in spatially arranged nanodiamonds could be beneficial for the development of next generation fluorescence-based devices and applications. (paper)

  4. Kinetic Effect on the Freezing of Ammonium-Sodium-Carbonate-Chloride Brines and Implications for Origin of Ceres' Bright Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyss, R. P.; Thomas, E. C.; Vu, T. H.; Johnson, P. V.; Choukroun, M.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface brines on Ceres containing natrite (Na2CO3) and smaller amounts of NH4Cl or NH4HCO3 have been proposed to reach the dwarf planet's surface from an internal reservoir, where the brines freeze and result in bright spots across Ceres. Kinetically frozen solutions containing the likely constituents of Ceres' subsurface brines (ammonium, sodium, carbonate, and chloride ions) were studied via infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy, where the flash-frozen mixtures were found to preferentially form ammonium chloride and ammonium bicarbonate, even in sodium-dominated solutions. Additionally, sodium chloride only formed when sodium or chloride (or both) were present in excess in the brine solutions. Raman spectroscopy was further employed to analyze the effect of vacuum exposure on these frozen brines over longer periods of time to simulate the surface conditions of Ceres.

  5. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  6. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging in the Second Near-Infrared Window Using Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II window, 1000-1700 nm) is a powerful imaging technique that emerged in recent years. This imaging tool allows for noninvasive, deep-tissue visualization and interrogation of anatomical features and functions with improved imaging resolution and contrast at greater tissue penetration depths than traditional fluorescence imaging. Here, we present the detailed protocol for conducting NIR-II fluorescence imaging in live animals, including the procedures for preparation of biocompatible and NIR-II fluorescent carbon nanotube solution, live animal administration and NIR-II fluorescence image acquisition.

  7. Synthesis and properties of core–shell fluorescent hybrids with distinct morphologies based on carbon dots

    KAUST Repository

    Markova, Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent core-shell nanohybrids with the shells derived from carbon dots and cores differing in the chemical nature and morphology were synthesized. Hybrid nanoparticles combine fluorescence with other functionalities such as magnetic response on a single platform. These hybrids can be used in various bioapplications as demonstrated with labeling of stem cells. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  8. Identification Of (Bright) Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars With J-Plus Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placco, Vinicius

    2017-10-01

    The chemical composition of our bodies, the Earth, the Sun, and the Universe is complex, and the end result of the formation and evolution of numerous stellar generations that contributed all of the elements heavier than helium. One way to understand the possible pathways that led to such complexity is to determine the chemical abundance patterns of ancient low-metallicity stars in the Halo of our Galaxy. However, it is impossible to observe each of the 100 billion stars in the Milky Way in sufficient detail to assess its chemical composition. Hence, astronomers have developed efficient ways to pre-select the most interesting stars for further high-resolution follow-up, based on the understanding that the colors of stars in specific regions of the optical spectrum are affected in predictable ways by changes in their chemical composition. I will discuss the importance of the J-PLUS photometry in selecting low-metallicity and carbon-enhanced stars, using its 12 magnitudes, which will fully exploit this approach, in a manner superior to all previous such efforts.

  9. Graphitic Nitrogen Triggers Red Fluorescence in Carbon Dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, K.; Sudolská, M.; Kalytchuk, S.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Rogach, A. L.; Otyepka, M.; Zbořil, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 12 (2017), s. 12402-12410 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nitrogen-doped * graphene dots * red fluorescence * fluorescence mechanism * band-gap tuning Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  10. Monosodium glutamate derived tricolor fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for cell-imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nannan; Ding, Sha; Zhou, Xingping

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN) is a new type of carbon-based materials. Because of its wide raw material sources, excellent optical properties and good biocompatibility, FCN is getting more and more attentions. However, its synthesis from resources at low cost under mild conditions is still a challenge. Here we report a novel and simple method derived from monosodium glutamate carbonization to make tricolor fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with an average size below 10nm, a high yield up to 35.2% based on the carbon content in the resource, a long life-time of 3.71ns, and a high fluorescence quantum yield up to 51.5% by using quinine sulfate as the standard substance. We discovered that the fluorescent stability of the FCNs was very excellent under UV irradiation for hours in aqueous solutions of pH ranged from 2.0 to 9.0. The cell viability tested under a pretty high concentration of FCNs indicated their safety for biological applications. Based on their high fluorescence quantum efficiency and the advantages mentioned above, these FCNs were then used for cell imaging and exhibited a perfect performance under 3 kinds of excitation bands (UV, blue, and green lights). Thus, they can be practically applied to immune labeling and imaging in vivo in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Eco-friendly carbon-nanodot-based fluorescent paints for advanced photocatalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Park, So; Uk Lee, Hyun; Lee, Young-Chul; Choi, Saehae; Hyun Cho, Dae; Sik Kim, Hee; Bang, Sunghee; Seo, Soonjoo; Chang Lee, Soon; Won, Jonghan; Son, Byung-Chul; Yang, Mino; Lee, Jouhahn

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials, especially zero-dimensional (0D) carbon nanodots (CDs), are widely used in broad biological and optoelectronic applications. CDs have unique characteristics such as strong fluorescence, biocompatibility, sun-light response, and capability of mass-production. Beyond the previous green CD obtained from harmful natural substances, we report a new type of fluid-based fluorescent CD paints (C-paints) derived from polyethylene glycol (PEG; via simple ultrasound irradiation at room temperatures) and produced in quantum yields of up to ~14%. Additionally, C-paints possess a strong, UV- and visible-light-responsive photoluminescent (PL) property. Most especially, C-paints, by incorporation into a photocatalytic system, show additional roles in the emission of fluorescent light for activation of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) and the resultant detoxification of most organic dyes, thus further enabling embarkation in advanced water purification.

  12. Eco-friendly carbon-nanodot-based fluorescent paints for advanced photocatalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Young-Chul; Choi, Saehae; Cho, Dae Hyun; Kim, Hee Sik; Bang, Sunghee; Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Soon Chang; Won, Jonghan; Son, Byung-Chul; Yang, Mino; Lee, Jouhahn

    2015-07-23

    Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials, especially zero-dimensional (0D) carbon nanodots (CDs), are widely used in broad biological and optoelectronic applications. CDs have unique characteristics such as strong fluorescence, biocompatibility, sun-light response, and capability of mass-production. Beyond the previous green CD obtained from harmful natural substances, we report a new type of fluid-based fluorescent CD paints (C-paints) derived from polyethylene glycol (PEG; via simple ultrasound irradiation at room temperatures) and produced in quantum yields of up to ~14%. Additionally, C-paints possess a strong, UV- and visible-light-responsive photoluminescent (PL) property. Most especially, C-paints, by incorporation into a photocatalytic system, show additional roles in the emission of fluorescent light for activation of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) and the resultant detoxification of most organic dyes, thus further enabling embarkation in advanced water purification.

  13. Fluorescent carbon dots and nanodiamonds for biological imaging: preparation, application, pharmacokinetics and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Haifang

    2012-10-01

    The rapid advancement of nanotechnology has brought us some new types of fluorescent probes, which are indispensable for bioimaging in life sciences. Because of their innate biocompatibility, good resistance against photobleaching, long fluorescence lifetime and wide fluorescence spectral region, fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-Dots) and nanosized diamonds (nanodiamonds, NDs) are gradually evolving into promising reagents for bioimaging. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in fluorescent C-Dots and NDs with emphases on their preparation, properties, imaging application, pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Perspectives on further investigations and opportunities to develop C-Dots and NDs into the safer and more sensitive imaging probes for both living cells and animal models are discussed.

  14. Determination of norfloxacin or ciprofloxacin by carbon dots fluorescence enhancement using magnetic nanoparticles as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jianhao; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Meng; Yang, Yaling

    2018-01-27

    The authors describe a method for the determination of norfloxacin (NOR) or ciprofloxacin (CIP). It is making use of a combination of fluorescence enhancement and magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). Sulfur-doped carbon dots (S-CDs) are used as a fluorescent probe. They were prepared by a one-pot method using poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSMA) as a source for carbon and sulfur. NOR or CIP act as sensitizers of fluorescence (with excitation/emission maxima at 324/412 nm), probably due to strong hydrogen bond interaction and charge transfer with the S-CDs. The S-CDs were characterized by using TEM, XRD, XPS, FT-IR, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Response is linear in the 0.02-1.25 μM NOR concentration range, and the detection limit is 4.6 nM. The respective data for CIP are 0.02-1.0 μM and 6.7 nM. The average recoveries of NOR and CIP residues from spiked bovine raw milk are 96.2%~105.2% and 92.3%~102.5%. Graphical abstract Sulfur doped carbon dots (S-CDs) were synthesized by a hydrothermal method using poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSMA). Norfloxacin (NOR) or ciprofloxacin (CIP) was extracted by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), they were detected by carbon dots fluorescence enhancement.

  15. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lyuliang University, Lyuliang 033001 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yaling [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Feng [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) from ammonia solution and citric acid were synthesized at different temperatures. • Quantum yield (QY) of NCDs depends largely on the amount of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), more FPC gives higher QY. • The law of QY of NCDs first increase and then decrease with the reaction temperature increased is found and explained. • Nitrogen doping plays significant role in getting increased UV–vis absorption and QY. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV–vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  16. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  17. A graphitic carbon nitride based fluorescence resonance energy transfer detection of riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Zou, Hong Yan; Gao, Ming Xuan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), which occurs between two luminescent chromophores, can greatly improve the selectivity and sensitivity of a fluorescent assay when a ratiometric signaling with the fluorescence enhancement of the acceptor at the expense of the donor is adopted. In this study, a fluorescence ratiometric detection (FRD) of riboflavin (RF) has been made based on FRET, as the strong overlap occurred between the emission spectrum of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and absorption spectrum of RF, in which g-C3N4 acts as the energy donor and RF as the energy acceptor. With increasing concentration of RF, the fluorescence intensity of g-C3N4 emission at 444 nm decreased and the fluorescence peak at 523 nm for RF increased regularly, making the fluorescence intensity ratio of 523 nm to 444 nm linearly dependent on the concentration of RF in the range from 0.4 μM to 10 μM, giving a limit of the detection of 170 nM. This method can be used to quantify RF in complex systems such as milk and drink, showing that the novel FRET-based fluorescence ratiometric detection can enable an attractive assay platform for analytes of interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  19. Fluorescent carbon dots from mono- and polysaccharides: synthesis, properties and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Stephen; Galan, M Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs) are an emerging class of nanomaterials made from carbon sources that have been hailed as potential non-toxic replacements to traditional semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Particularly in the areas of live imaging and drug delivery, due to their water solubility, low toxicity and photo- and chemical stability. Carbohydrates are readily available chiral biomolecules in nature which offer an attractive and cheap starting material from which to synthesise FCDs with ...

  20. A ratiometric nanoprobe based on silver nanoclusters and carbon dots for the fluorescent detection of biothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuming; Lin, Bixia; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Manli; Shui, Lingling

    2018-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent probes could eliminate the influence from experimental factors and improve the detection accuracy. In this article, a ratiometric nanoprobe was constructed based on silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) with nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) and used for the detection of biothiols. The fluorescence peak of AgNCs was observed at 650 nm with excitation wavelength at 370 nm. In order to construct the ratiometric fluorescent probe, NCDs with the excitation and emission wavelengths at 370 nm and 450 nm were selected. After adding AgNCs, the fluorescence of NCDs was quenched. The mechanism of the fluorescence quenching was studied by fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption and the fluorescence lifetime spectra. The results indicated that the quenching could be ascribed to the inner filter effect (IFE). With the addition of biothiols, the fluorescence of AgNCs at 650 nm decreased due to the breakdown of AgNCs, and the fluorescence of NCDs at 450 nm recovered accordingly. Thus, the relationship between the ratio of the fluorescence intensities (I450/I650) and biothiol concentration was used to establish the determination method for biothiols. Cysteine (Cys) was taken as the model of biothiols, and the working curve for Cys was I450/I650 = 0.60CCys - 1.86 (CCys: μmol/L) with the detection limit of 0.14 μmol/L (S/N = 3). Then, the method was used for the detection of Cys in human urine and serum samples with satisfactory accuracy and recovery ratios. Furthermore, the probe could be applied for the visual semi-quantitative determination of Cys by naked eyes.

  1. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  2. Facile and Scalable Preparation of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Multifunctional Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of fluorescent nanomaterials has received considerable attention due to the great potential of these materials for a wide range of applications, from chemical sensing through bioimaging to optoelectronics. Herein, we report a facile and scalable approach to prepare fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs via a one-pot reaction of citric acid with ethylenediamine at 150 °C under ambient air pressure. The resultant FCDs possess an optical bandgap of 3.4 eV and exhibit strong excitation-wavelength-independent blue emission (λEm = 450 nm under either one- or two-photon excitation. Owing to their low cytotoxicity and long fluorescence lifetime, these FCDs were successfully used as internalized fluorescent probes in human cancer cell lines (HeLa cells for two-photon excited imaging of cells by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a high-contrast resolution. They were also homogenously mixed with commercial inks and used to draw fluorescent patterns on normal papers and on many other substrates (e.g., certain flexible plastic films, textiles, and clothes. Thus, these nanomaterials are promising for use in solid-state fluorescent sensing, security labeling, and wearable optoelectronics.

  3. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, S Shashank; Praneetha, S; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A Vadivel

    2016-05-18

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale "sustainable" MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI).

  4. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI).

  5. Carbon quantum dots as fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensors for organophosphate pesticides determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Song, Yang; Yan, Xu; Zhu, Chengzhou; Ma, Yongqiang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-08-15

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) obtained from natural organics attract significant attention due to the abundance of carbon sources, varieties of heteroatom doping (such as N, S, P) and good biocompatibility of precursor. In this study, tunable fluorescence emission CQDs originated from chlorophyll were synthesized and characterized. The fluorescence emission can be effectively quenched by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Thiocholine, which was produced from acetylthiocholine (ATC) by the hydrolysis of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), could cause the aggregation of Au NPs and the corresponding recovery of FRET-quenched fluorescence emission. The catalytic activity of BChE could be irreversibly inhibited by organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), thus, the recovery effect was reduced. By evaluating the fluorescence emission intensity of CQDs, a FRET-based sensing platform for OPs determination was established. Paraoxon was studied as an example of OPs. The sensing platform displayed a linear relationship with the logarithm of the paraoxon concentrations in the range of 0.05-50μgL -1 and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05μgL -1 . Real sample study in tap and river water revealed that this sensing platform was repeatable and accurate. The results indicate that the OP sensor is promising for applications in food safety and environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  7. Imaging of Bacterial and Fungal Cells Using Fluorescent Carbon Dots Prepared from Carica papaya Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasibabu, Betha Saineelima B; D'souza, Stephanie L; Jha, Sanjay; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we have described a simple hydrothermal method for preparation of fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) using Carica papaya juice as a precursor. The synthesized C-dots show emission peak at 461 nm with a quantum yield of 7.0 %. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on E. coli. The C-dots were used as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacterial (Bacillus subtilis) and fungal (Aspergillus aculeatus) cells and emitted green and red colors under different excitation wavelengths, which indicates that the C-dots can be used as a promising material for cell imaging.

  8. Water Soluble Fluorescent Carbon Nanodots from Biosource for Cells Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud Malika Tripathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanodots (CNDs derived from a green precursor, kidney beans, was synthesized with high yield via a facile pyrolysis technique. The CND material was easily modified through simple oxidative treatment with nitric acid, leading to a high density “self-passivated” water soluble form (wsCNDs. The synthesized wsCNDs have been extensively characterized by using various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and were crystalline in nature. The highly carboxylated wsCNDs possessed tunable-photoluminescence emission behavior throughout the visible region of the spectrum, demonstrating their application for multicolor cellular imaging of HeLa cells. The tunable-photoluminescence properties of “self-passivated” wsCNDs make them a promising candidate as a probe in biological cell-imaging applications.

  9. LaB6 nanoparticles with carbon-doped silica coating for fluorescence imaging and near-IR photothermal therapy of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, B-H; Chen, D-H

    2013-07-01

    In this study, LaB6 nanoparticles are used as a novel nanomaterial for near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy because they are cheaper than nanostructured gold, are easy to prepare and have an excellent NIR photothermal conversion property. Furthermore, the surface of LaB6 nanoparticles is coated with a carbon-doped silica (C-SiO2) shell to introduce a fluorescent property and improve stability and biocompatibility. The resulting LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles retain the excellent NIR photothermal conversion property and exhibit a bright blue emission under UV irradiation or a green emission under visible irradiation. Using a HeLa cancer cell line, it is demonstrated that LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles have no significant cytotoxicity, but their presence leads to remarkable cell death after NIR irradiation. In addition, from the observation of cellular uptake, the fluorescence labeling function of LaB6@SiO2 (LaB6 core/SiO2 shell) nanoparticles is also confirmed. These results suggest that LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles may potentially serve as an efficient multifunctional nano-platform for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and NIR-triggered photothermal therapy of cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 1.8 Å bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C.; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C.

    2006-01-01

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62–Tyr63–Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) β-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis–trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis–trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis–trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs. PMID:17117927

  11. 1.8 A bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C

    2007-02-15

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62-Tyr63-Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) b-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis-trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis-trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs.

  12. Chemical analysis of surface oxygenated moieties of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Deming, Christopher P.; Song, Yang; Kang, Xiongwu; Zhou, Zhi-You; Chen, Shaowei

    2012-01-01

    Water-soluble carbon nanoparticles were prepared by refluxing natural gas soot in concentrated nitric acid. The surface of the resulting nanoparticles was found to be decorated with a variety of oxygenated species, as suggested by spectroscopic measurements. Back potentiometric titration of the nanoparticles was employed to quantify the coverage of carboxylic, lactonic, and phenolic moieties on the particle surface by taking advantage of their vast difference of acidity (pKa). The results were largely consistent with those reported in previous studies with other carbonaceous (nano)materials. Additionally, the presence of ortho- and para-quinone moieties on the nanoparticle surface was confirmed by selective labelling with o-phenylenediamine, as manifested in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and electrochemical measurements. The results further supported the arguments that the surface functional moieties that were analogous to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone were responsible for the unique photoluminescence of the nanoparticles and the emission might be regulated by surface charge state, as facilitated by the conjugated graphitic core matrix.

  13. Chemical analysis of surface oxygenated moieties of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Deming, Christopher P; Song, Yang; Kang, Xiongwu; Zhou, Zhi-You; Chen, Shaowei

    2012-02-07

    Water-soluble carbon nanoparticles were prepared by refluxing natural gas soot in concentrated nitric acid. The surface of the resulting nanoparticles was found to be decorated with a variety of oxygenated species, as suggested by spectroscopic measurements. Back potentiometric titration of the nanoparticles was employed to quantify the coverage of carboxylic, lactonic, and phenolic moieties on the particle surface by taking advantage of their vast difference of acidity (pK(a)). The results were largely consistent with those reported in previous studies with other carbonaceous (nano)materials. Additionally, the presence of ortho- and para-quinone moieties on the nanoparticle surface was confirmed by selective labelling with o-phenylenediamine, as manifested in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and electrochemical measurements. The results further supported the arguments that the surface functional moieties that were analogous to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone were responsible for the unique photoluminescence of the nanoparticles and the emission might be regulated by surface charge state, as facilitated by the conjugated graphitic core matrix. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. Fluorescent Carbon Dots Derived from Maillard Reaction Products: Their Properties, Biodistribution, Cytotoxicity, and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Na, Xiaokang; Wang, Haitao; Xie, Yisha; Cong, Shuang; Song, Yukun; Xu, Xianbing; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Tan, Mingqian

    2018-02-14

    Food-borne nanoparticles have received great attention because of their unique physicochemical properties and potential health risk. In this study, carbon dots (CDs) formed during one of the most important chemical reactions in the food processing field, the Maillard reaction from the model system including glucose and lysine, were investigated. The CDs purified from Maillard reaction products emitted a strong blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light with a fluorescent quantum yield of 16.30%. In addition, they were roughly spherical, with sizes of around 4.3 nm, and mainly composed of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Their surface groups such as hydroxyl, amino, and carboxyl groups were found to possibly enable CDs to scavenge DPPH and hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity assessment of CDs showed that they could readily enter HepG2 cells while causing negligible cell death at low concentration. However, high CDs concentrations were highly cytotoxic and led to cell death via interference of the glycolytic pathway.

  15. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Dots by Gastrointestinal Fluid Treatment of Mongolia Har Gabur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegexibaiyin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Har Gabur is the carbide obtained from pig manure by burning. The fluorescent carbon dots (CDs of Har Gabur were successfully synthesized through simulating the digestion process of human gastrointestinal tract. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM analysis showed that the average size of the prepared Har Gabur CDs was 4 nm, with good solubility in water and strong fluorescence under UV irradiation. The X-ray and Raman results showed that the Har Gabur CDs were mainly composed of oxygen “O” and carbon “C” elements, in the forms of “C=O” and “C-O.” The bond energy results showed that the nitrogen “N” atom presented as “C-N” form, which indicated that Har Gabur CDs also contain “N.” In photobleaching assay, Har Gabur CDs showed excellent light stability compared with ordinary organic dye, fluorescein, and Rhodamine B. The fluorescence intensity of Har Gabur CDs was fairly stable within a wide pH range of 3–10. When L-lysine and L-cysteine were applied for the passivation stage, the relative quantum yields were improved by 1.53 and 3.68 times, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence properties of Har Gabur CDs were tested in cells and zebrafish, illustrating that Har Gabur CD has potential in the application of biological labeling and imaging.

  17. Multiphoton-induced fluorescence and ionization of B1μ+ carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loge, G.W.; Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.

    1983-01-01

    The B 1 μ + state of carbon monoxide was created by a two-photon absorption of 230-nm laser radiation. The B 1 μ + state was identified by the positions of the 0-0 absorption band Q-branch and the vibrational bands of B 1 μ + → A 1 PI fluorescence occurring in the 525-nm region. Collision-induced b 3 μ + → a 3 PI emission in the 350-nm region was also observed. The lifetimes of both the B 1 μ + state and the b 3 μ + state were measured as well as the self-quenching rate constants and the B 1 μ + quenching rate by N 2 . In addition to the two-photon-induced fluorescence of B 1 μ + carbon monoxide, a three-photon ionization was observed. Laser power-dependence studies indicated that ionization of the B 1 μ + state is readily saturated, implying that most B 1 μ + state CO is ionized rather than fluorescing. Measurement of the polarization ratio for circularly and linearly polarized excitation of fluorescence and ionization suggests that another three-photon process is occurring and occurs more efficiently for linear polarization

  18. A fluorescent carbon-dots-based mitochondria-targetable nanoprobe for peroxynitrite sensing in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxue; Sun, Shan; Wang, Yuhui; Zhu, Jiali; Jiang, Kai; Leng, Yumin; Shu, Qinghai; Lin, Hengwei

    2017-04-15

    Mitochondria, the power generators in cell, are a primary organelle of oxygen consumption and a main source of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), known as a kind of RNS, has been considered to be a significant factor in many cell-related biological processes, and there is great desire to develop fluorescent probes that can sensitively and selectively detect peroxynitrite in living cells. Herein, we developed a fluorescent carbon-dots (C-dots) based mitochondria-targetable nanoprobe with high sensitivity and selectivity for peroxynitrite sensing in living cells. The C-dots with its surface rich in amino groups was synthesized using o-phenylenediamine as carbon precursor, and it could be covalently conjugated with a mitochondria-targeting moiety, i.e. triphenylphosphonium (TPP). In the presence of peroxynitrite, the fluorescence of the constructed nanoprobe (C-dots-TPP) was efficiently quenched via a mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer (PET). The nanoprobe exhibited relatively high sensitivity (limit of detection: 13.5nM) and selectivity towards peroxynitrite in aqueous buffer. The performance of the nanoprobe for fluorescence imaging of peroxynitrite in mitochondria was investigated. The results demonstrated that the nanoprobe showed fine mitochondria-targeting ability and imaging contrast towards peroxynitrite in living cells. We anticipate that the proposed nanoprobe will provide a facile tool to explore the role played by peroxynitrite in cytobiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus doped carbon dots for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Karmakar, Parimal; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus-doped carbon dots with a quantum yield 59% have been successfully synthesized from citric acid and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate by single step hydrothermal method. The synthesized carbon dots have high solubility as well as stability in aqueous medium. The as-obtained carbon dots are well monodispersed with particle sizes 1.5-4 nm. Owing to a good tunable fluorescence property and biocompatibility, the carbon dots were applied for intercellular sensing of Fe(3+) ions as well as cancer cell imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Green synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots from sugarcane bagasse pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thambiraj, S. [Nano-Bio Materials and Sensors Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore, 641 004, Tamil Nadu (India); Ravi Shankaran, D., E-mail: dravishankaran@hotmail.com [Nano-Bio Materials and Sensors Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore, 641 004, Tamil Nadu (India); National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of CQDs from sugarcane bagasse carbon. - Highlights: • CQDs were synthesised from sugarcane bagasse waste with top down approaches. • Synthesis method is green, simple and efficient process. • CQDs possess high quantum yield, good stability and highly fluorescent in nature. • The morphological and topographical study of CQDs was done by HR-TEM and AFM and was observed that the average size is 4.1 ± 0.17 nm and surface thickness is 5 nm. - Abstract: Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have great potential due to its advantageous characteristics of highly fluorescent nature and good stability. In this study, we aimed to develop a simple and efficient method for the green synthesis of fluorescent CQDs from sugarcane bagasse, a renewable and sustainable resource. The process involves the top down approach of chemical oxidation followed by exfoliation of sugarcane carbon. The synthesized CQDs was characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, Spectrofluorophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The synthesized CQDs possess stable fluorescent properties, good bio-compatibility and high quantum yield. The CQDs are highly crystalline with longitudinal dimensions of 4.1 ± 0.17 nm with an average roughness of around 5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicates that the synthesized CQDs possess face centred cubic crystal structure. The results suggest that the proposed CQDs could be utilized for bio-sensor, bio-imaging and drug delivery applications.

  1. A Precisely Assembled Carbon Source to Synthesize Fluorescent Carbon Quantum Dots for Sensing Probes and Bioimaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yiqiang; Luo, Dan; Yu, Min; Zhang, Ting; Cao, Xuanping; Zhou, Yanheng; Liu, Yan

    2018-02-09

    A broad range of carbon sources have been used to fabricate varieties of carbon quantum dots (CQDs). However, the majority of these studies concern the influence of primary structures and chemical compositions of precursors on the CQDs; it is still unclear whether or not the superstructures of carbon sources have effects on the physiochemical properties of the synthetic CQDs. In this work, the concept of molecular assembly is first introduced into the design of a new carbon source. Compared with the tropocollagen molecules, the hierarchically assembled collagen scaffolds, as a new carbon source, immobilize functional groups of the precursors through hydrogen bonds, electrostatic attraction, and hydrophobic forces. Moreover, the accumulation of functional groups in collagen self-assembly further promotes the covalent bond formation in the obtained CQDs through a hydrothermal process. Both of these two chemical superiorities give rise to high quality CQDs with enhanced emission. The assembled collagen scaffold-based CQDs with heteroatom doping exhibit superior stability, and could be further applied as effective fluorescent probes for Fe 3+ detection and cellular cytosol imaging. These findings open a wealth of possibilities to explore more nanocarbons from precursors with assembled superstructures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Economical and green synthesis of bagasse-derived fluorescent carbon dots for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Fengyi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Li, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Xinyi; Li, Zhang; Hua, Ye; Shao, Genbao; Jin, Jie; Shao, Qixiang; Gong, Aihua; Li, Jianan; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) are promising nanomaterials in biomedical, photocatalytical and photoelectronic applications. However, determining how to explore an ideal precursor for a renewable carbon resource is still an interesting challenge. Here, for the first time, we report that renewable wastes of bagasse as a new precursor were prepared for fluorescent CDs by a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process. The characterization results show that such bagasse-derived CDs are monodispersed, contain quasi spherical particles with a diameter of about 1.8 nm and exhibit favorable photoluminescence properties, super-high photostability and good dispersibility in water. Most importantly, bagasse-derived CDs have good biocompatibility and can be easily and quickly internalized by living cancer cells; they can also be used for multicolour biolabeling and bioimaging in cancer cells. It is suggested that bagasse-derived CDs might have potential applications in biomedical and photoelectronic fields. (paper)

  3. Green synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots from sugarcane bagasse pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have great potential due to its advantageous characteristics of highly fluorescent nature and good stability. In this study, we aimed to develop a simple and efficient method for the green synthesis of fluorescent CQDs from sugarcane bagasse, a renewable and sustainable resource. The process involves the top down approach of chemical oxidation followed by exfoliation of sugarcane carbon. The synthesized CQDs was characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Spectrofluorophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The synthesized CQDs possess stable fluorescent properties, good bio-compatibility and high quantum yield. The CQDs are highly crystalline with longitudinal dimensions of 4.1 ± 0.17 nm with an average roughness of around 5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicates that the synthesized CQDs possess face centred cubic crystal structure. The results suggest that the proposed CQDs could be utilized for bio-sensor, bio-imaging and drug delivery applications.

  4. A review on syntheses, properties, characterization and bioanalytical applications of fluorescent carbon dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Pengli; Lu, Xiuhua; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Yuhan; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) are a kind of fluorescent nanoparticles that are strongly fluorescent, non-blinking, and can be easily synthesized at low cost. Their emission color can be tuned by varying the excitation wavelength. Their properties make them strong competitors to semiconductor quantum dots. Synthetic approaches for C-dots can be classified into two categories, viz. top-down and bottom-up methods. Surface passivated and functionalized C-dots can be utilized to sense pH values, metal ions and organic molecules. Owing to their low cytotoxicity, biocompatibility and impressive photostability, long-term observations become possible. C-dots also show promise as labels and for bioimaging. This review (with 142 refs.) is divided into several sections. The first covers commonly used methods for preparation of C-dots including laser ablation, arc discharge, electrochemical methods, pyrolytic processes, template based methods, microwave assisted methods, chemical oxidation methods, reverse micelle based methods, etc. The first section also covers methods for surface functionalization and passivation. We continue by discussing the spectroscopic properties and other physical and chemical properties of C-dots (fluorescence, up-conversion fluorescence, methods for enhancing photoluminescence, effects of pH value, cytotoxicity, etc.). Another section covers the characterization including TEM and XRD. Applications in biology are summarized and subdivided into in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, chemical probe, quantitation of biomacromolecules, but also in drug delivery, photoacoustic imaging and anticancer therapy. We finally discuss current challenges and perspectives in this promising field. (author)

  5. Presence and formation of fluorescence carbon dots in a grilled hamburger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Bi, Jingran; Liu, Shan; Wang, Haitao; Yu, Chenxu; Li, Dongmei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-07-19

    The presence of nanomaterials during food processing has attracted significant concern due to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials. In this study, the presence and formation of nitrogen-containing fluorescence carbon dots (C-dots) in a grilled hamburger at different temperatures (220, 260, and 300 °C) were investigated during the pyrolysis process. The size and morphology of the C-dots were found to be highly dependent on the heating temperatures, which again affected the functional groups on their surface. The C-dots are strongly fluorescent with multicolor emission accompanied by a gradual decrease in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence quantum yield of the C-dots produced at 260 °C was measured to be 23.25%. The potential cytotoxicity and biodistribution of the C-dots within live organisms were examined with the mouse osteoblasts cell line and mung bean sprout, respectively. The cell viability after 24 h incubation remained 79% for the C-dots obtained at 300 °C at a concentration of 3.2 mg mL -1 , and no obvious phytotoxicity in the growing mung bean sprout was observed. The results showed an increased cytotoxicity of the C-dots formed at higher temperatures.

  6. Direct comparison of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in fluorescence quenching phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2018-03-01

    Here, we report the fluorescence quenching ability of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-wrapped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ssDNA-SWNTs and ssDNA-MWNTs, respectively) using fluorescein dye-labeled ssDNA (Fluor-ssDNA). To compare the quenching abilities of SWNTs and MWNTs, we measured the quenching ratios of fluorescence emission from fluorescein when Fluor-ssDNA reacted with the hybrids of 30-mers of thymine (T30) and SWNTs or MWNTs (T30-SWNTs and T30-MWNTs, respectively). The fluorescence quenching ratios of Fluor-T30 in SWNT and MWNT samples were 28 ± 3.1 and 36 ± 2.0% relative to free fluorescein at the same concentration, respectively. On the other hand, those of Fluor-A30 with SWNT and MWNT hybrids were 11 ± 1.9 and 32 ± 1.9%, respectively. Our results suggest that although the fluorescence quenching ability of MWNT was greater than that of SWNT, SWNT quenching ratios were more sensitive to the base sequences of Fluor-ssDNA.

  7. Carbon nano-onions as fluorescent on/off modulated nanoprobes for diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lettieri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multishell fullerenes, known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs, have emerged as a platform for bioimaging because of their cell-penetration properties and minimal systemic toxicity. Here, we describe the covalent functionalization of CNOs with a π-extended distyryl-substituted boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY dye with on/off modulated fluorescence emission activated by an acidic environment. The switching properties are linked to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET characteristics of the dimethylamino functionalities attached to the BODIPY core. The on/off emission of the fluorescent CNOs is fast and reversible both in solution and in vitro, making this nanomaterial suitable as pH-dependent probes for diagnostic applications.

  8. Mn(II)-coordinated Fluorescent Carbon Dots: Preparation and Discrimination of Organic Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Wang, Tianren; Chen, Xi; Xu, Yang; Li, Huanrong

    2018-04-01

    Herein, we prepared a Mn(II)-coordinated carbon dots (CDs) with fluorescence and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) bimodal properties by a one-pot solvothermal method and separated via silica column chromatography. The quantum yield of the CDs increased greatly from 2.27% to 6.75% with increase of Mn(II) doping, meanwhile the CDs exhibited a higher MR activity (7.28 mM-1s-1) than that of commercial Gd-DTPA (4.63 mM-1s-1). In addition, white light emitting CDs were obtained by mixing the different types of CDs. Notably, these CDs exhibited different fluorescence emissions in different organic solvents and could be used to discriminate organic solvents based on the polarity and protonation of the solvents.

  9. Fluorescent carbon nanodots facilely extracted from Coca Cola for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiming; Chen, Qiaoling; Cai, Zhixiong; Lin, Fangyuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2017-12-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of carbon nanodots (CDs) is introduced: extracting CDs from the well-known soft drink Coca Cola via dialysis. The obtained CDs are of good monodispersity with a narrow size distribution (average diameter of 3.0 nm), good biocompatibility, high solubility (about 180 mg ml-1) and stable fluorescence even at a high salt concentration. Furthermore, they are sensitive to the temperature change with a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and temperature from 5 °C-95 °C. The CDs have been applied in high stable temperature sensing. This protocol is quite simple, green, cost-effective and technologically simple, which might be used for a range of applications including sensing, catalysts, drug and gene delivery, and so on.

  10. Green synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots for sensitive detection of Fe2+ and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Ni, Gang; Tu, Jinchun; Jin, Xiaoyong; Peng, Juan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the green synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) via one-step hydrothermal treatment of cornstalk was investigated. This approach is facile, economical, and effective. The obtained CDs with an average diameter of 5.2 nm possess many excellent properties such as emitting blue fluorescence under UV light (365 nm), high monodispersity, good stability, excellent water dispersibility, and absolute quantum yield of 7.6%. Then, these CDs were used as sensing probes for the detection of Fe2+ and H2O2 with detection limits as low as 0.18 and 0.21 μM, respectively. This sensing platform shows advantages such as high selectivity, good precision, rapid operation, and avoiding the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides.

  11. Quick synthesis of 2-propanol derived fluorescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angamuthu, Raja; Palanisamy, Priya; Vasudevan, Vasanthakumar; Nagarajan, Sedhu; Rajendran, Ramesh; Vairamuthu, Raj

    2018-04-01

    Herein, for the first time, we present a one-pot ingenious preparative method for fluorescent carbon dots from 2-propanol (2P-CDs) without external treatments. Structure, morphology, chemical composition and fluorescence properties of the 2P-CDs were examined. These results confirm that the as-synthesized 2P-CDs are amorphous, monodispersed, spherical and the average particle size is 2.5 ± 0.7 nm. Most importantly, excitation-dependent emission properties were observed, which suggest that these 2P-CDs may be used in multicolor bioimaging applications. When incubated with HeLa cells, the 2P-CDs exhibit low cytotoxicity, and positive biocompatibility. Confocal microscopy image shows the uptake of 2P-CDs by HeLa cells and the application of probable biomarker is demonstrated.

  12. Phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets as fluorescence probe for the detection of baicalein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Li, Xuebing; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Rulin; Bian, Wei; Choi, Martin M F

    2018-02-24

    Phosphorus doped graphitic carbon nitride (P-g-C 3 N 4 ) nanosheets were synthesized by calcination. P-g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The fluorescence of the P-g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets was gradually quenched with the increase in the concentration of baicalein at room temperature. The proposed probe was used for the determination of baicalein in the concentration 2.0-30μM with a detection limit of 53nM. The quenching mechanism was discussed. The P-g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets have been successfully applied for effective and selective detection of baicalein in human urine samples and blood samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbon dots prepared from citric acid and urea as fluorescent probes for hypochlorite and peroxynitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simões, Eliana F. C.; Leitão, João M. M.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from citric acid and urea, and their fluorescence was found to be quenched by hypochlorite and peroxynitrite. Microwave based synthesis gives CDs with excitation/emission wavelength-dependent quantum yields (8 % at 400/520 nm; 10 % at 360/451 nm; 12 % at 350/420 nm). Quenching of fluorescence depends on pH values, and response is most selective and sensitive to hypochlorite at pH 4, and to peroxynitrite at pH 9. The lower detection limits are 0.5 and 1.5 μM, respectively. The method was successfully applied to quantify hypochlorite and peroxynitrite in standard solutions and in spiked dilute serum samples. (author)

  14. Liquid nitrogen-assisted synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots from Blueberry and their performance in Fe3+ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslandaş, Ayşe Merve; Balcı, Neslihan; Arık, Mustafa; Şakiroğlu, Halis; Onganer, Yavuz; Meral, Kadem

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) were synthesized by a facile method containing liquid N2 treatment and centrifuge processes. The photophysical properties of the C-dots in an aqueous solution were examined at various conditions such as concentration, temperature, pH and excitation wavelength by using UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The C-dots emitted a broad fluorescence between approximately 350-550 nm and their fluorescence was tuned by changing excitation wavelength. The as-prepared C-dots were applied to Fe3+ detection from aqueous solution. Spectroscopic data revealed that the as-prepared C-dots were used to detect Fe3+ in the range of 12.5 μM to 100 μM as a fluorescence sensor.

  15. Combination of hollow fluorescent carbon and gold nanoparticles: A super-catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Kakali; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2018-02-01

    Hollow fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (HFCNs) have been combined with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to produce a special catalyst. The catalytic properties of HFCNs and AuNPs were exploited to conceptualize the new catalytic functionality. The AuNP-embedded-HFCNs produced in situ were found to massively enhance the rate of reduction of 4-nitrophenol (a model reaction) in presence of sodium borohydride. Comparison with functioning of other nanoparticulate catalysts on the same reaction proved our product to be an extremely efficient catalyst.

  16. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  17. Removal of a cryptic intron and subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein are required to mark transgenic Arabidopsis plants brightly

    OpenAIRE

    Haseloff, Jim; Siemering, Kirby R.; Prasher, Douglas C.; Hodge, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is finding wide use as a genetic marker that can be directly visualized in the living cells of many heterologous organisms. We have sought to express GFP in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but have found that proper expression of GFP is curtailed due to aberrant mRNA processing. An 84-nt cryptic intron is efficiently recognized and excised from transcripts of the GFP coding sequence. The cryptic intron contains seq...

  18. Fluorescent carbon dots from mono- and polysaccharides: synthesis, properties and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hill

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (FCDs are an emerging class of nanomaterials made from carbon sources that have been hailed as potential non-toxic replacements to traditional semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. Particularly in the areas of live imaging and drug delivery, due to their water solubility, low toxicity and photo- and chemical stability. Carbohydrates are readily available chiral biomolecules in nature which offer an attractive and cheap starting material from which to synthesise FCDs with distinct features and interesting applications. This mini-review article will cover the progress in the development of FCDs prepared from carbohydrate sources with an emphasis on their synthesis, functionalization and technical applications, including discussions on current challenges.

  19. Fluorescence spectrometry of the interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Cai, H.; Miao, J.; Yang, Q.; Li, Y.; Li, J.; Fu, D.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process. (authors)

  20. Self-Targeting Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Diagnosis of Brain Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Ruan, Shaobo; Liu, Shi; Sun, Tingting; Qu, Dan; Zhao, Haifeng; Xie, Zhigang; Gao, Huile; Jing, Xiabin; Sun, Zaicheng

    2015-11-24

    A new type of carbon dots (CD-Asp) with targeting function toward brain cancer glioma was synthesized via a straightforward pyrolysis route by using D-glucose and L-aspartic acid as starting materials. The as-prepared CD-Asp exhibits not only excellent biocompatibility and tunable full-color emission, but also significant capability of targeting C6 glioma cells without the aid of any extra targeting molecules. In vivo fluorescence images showed high-contrast biodistribution of CD-Asp 15 min after tail vein injection. A much stronger fluorescent signal was detected in the glioma site than that in normal brain, indicating their ability to freely penetrate the blood-brain barrier and precisely targeting glioma tissue. However, its counterparts, the CDs synthesized from D-glucose (CD-G), L-asparic acid (CD-A), or D-glucose and L-glutamic acid (CD-Glu) have no or low selectivity for glioma. Therefore, CD-Asp could act as a fluorescence imaging and targeting agent for noninvasive glioma diagnosis. This work highlights the potential application of CDs for constructing an intelligent nanomedicine with integration of diagnostic, targeting, and therapeutic functions.

  1. A Simple Approach for Synthesizing of Fluorescent Carbon Quantum Dots from Tofu Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hong; Xiao, Yiming; Tang, Ju; Liang, Changneng; Li, Fengyan; Dong, Haiming; Xu, Wen

    2017-11-01

    We present an investigation on carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized from wastewater induced during the production of tofu. We find that tofu wastewater is a good source of raw material in making fluorescent CQDs. The corresponding CQDs can be fabricated simply via hydrothermal reaction to carbonize the organic matter in the yellow serofluid of tofu wastewater. Two sorts of CQDs can be obtained within the deionized water and NaOH solution, respectively, where the CQDs in water (NaOH solution) can emit blue (green) light under the UV irradiation. It is found from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the basic difference between these two sorts of CQDs is the contents of C-O and C=O bonds on the surface of the CQDs. This difference can cause different features of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the CQDs. On the basis of the obtained results from the XPS and PL measurements, we propose a mechanism in understanding and explaining the photon-induced light emission from CQDs. This study is relevant to the fabrication and application of fluorescent CQDs as, e.g., light display materials.

  2. Micro-RNA detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer of DNA-carbon quantum dots probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakbaz, Faeze; Mahani, Mohamad

    2017-04-15

    Carbon quantum dots have been proposed as an effective platform for miRNA detection. Carbon dots were synthesized by citric acid. The synthesized dots were characterized by dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and FT-IR spectrophotometry. The fluorescence quantum yield of the synthesized dots was determined using quinine sulfate as the standard. The FAM-labeled single stranded DNA, as sensing element, was adsorbed on dots by π-π interaction. The quenching of the dots fluorescence due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used for mir 9-1 detection. In the presence of the complementary miRNA, the FRET did not take place and the fluorescence was recovered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of graphite carbon nitride based fluorescent immune sensor for detection of alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yike; Dong, Lingyu; Wang, Xiangfeng; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Hailing; Xie, Mengxia

    2018-05-01

    A novel fluorescent immunosensor for determination of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) in serum samples has been developed based on the nano graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as fluorophore and immunomagnetic beads (MBs) as separation material. The bulk g-C3N4 was obtained by thermal polymerization of melamine, and then carboxylated and exfoliated to acquire the carboxylated nano g-C3N4 (c-n-g-C3N4), which has been characterized and the results showed that it had excellent fluorescent properties. The antibodies of AFP (Ab1, Ab2) were conjugated to the MBs and the c-n-g-C3N4, respectively. In assay of AFP detection, the magnetic part of the immunosensor, MBs-Ab1, would form the sandwich type complex with the signal part of the sensor, c-n-g-C3N4-Ab2. The developed immunosensor could simplify the process of separation due to the MBs. The results illustrated that proposed approach held a good linearity between the fluorescence intensity of the sensor and the AFP concentration ranging from 5-600 ng/mL with the limit of detection as low as 0.43 ng/mL, and its spiking recoveries ranged from 98.2% to 105.9% with RSD from 2.1% to 3.5%. The fabricated fluorescent immunosensor possesses the merits of good sensitivity, excellent selectivity, high biocompatibility and low cost, and the results provide a novel clue to develop immunosensor for determination of the biomarkers in complex matrices.

  4. Green synthesis of fluorescence carbon nanoparticles from yum and application in sensitive and selective detection of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zixuan; Cai, Jiao; Wang, Qi; Su, Yingying; Zhang, Lichun; Lv, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CPs), a fascinating class of recently discovered nanocarbons, have been widely known as some of the most promising sensing probes in biological or chemical analysis. In this study, we demonstrate a green synthetic methodology for generating water-soluble CPs with a quantum yield of approximately 24% via a simple heating process using yum mucilage as a carbon source. The prepared carbon nanoparticles with an ~10 nm size possessed excellent fluorescence properties, and the fluorescence of the CPs was strongly quenched by Fe(3+), and recovered by adenosine triphosphate (ATP), thus, an 'off' and 'on' system can be easily established. This 'CPs-Fe(3+)-ATP' strategy was sensitive and selective at detecting ATP with the linear range of 0.5 µmol L(-1) to 50 µmol L(-1) and with a detection limit of 0.48 µmol L(-1). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Microwave assisted one-step green synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from ionic liquids and their application as novel fluorescence probe for quercetin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Deli; Yuan, Danhua [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Mengmeng [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-08-15

    In this study, a new sensitive and convenient method for the determination of quercetin based on the fluorescence quenching of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) was developed. The CNPs derived from ionic liquids were prepared using a green and rapid microwave-assisted synthetic approach for the first time. The one-step green preparation process is simple and effective, neither a strong acid solvent nor surface modification reagent is needed, which makes this approach very suitable for large-scale production. The prepared CNPs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, elemental analysis and spectrofluorometry. In NH{sub 3}–NH{sub 4}Cl buffer solution (pH 9.47), the fluorescence signals of CNPs decreased obviously with increase of the quercetin concentration. The effect of other coexisting foreign substances on the intensity of CNPs showed a low interference response. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity presented a linear response versus quercetin concentration according to the Stern–Volmer equation with an excellent 0.9989 correlation coefficient. The linearity ranged from 2.87×10{sup −6} to 31.57×10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} with the detection limit (3σ) of 9.88×10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The recovery of this method was in the range of 93.3–105.1%. Therefore, the CNPs could to be a promising candidate as a fluorescence probe for the detection of trace levels of quercetin due to their advantages in low-cost production, low cytotoxicity, strong fluorescence and excellent biocompatibility. -- Highlights: ► Fluorescent CNPs were synthesized with microwave pyrolysis approach. ► Ionic liquids were used as sources of carbon and nitrogen for the first time. ► The formation and functionalization of CNPs were accomplished simultaneously. ► CNPs were used as fluorescent probes for the determination of quercetin. ► A sensitive and convenient method based

  6. Prospects for Chlorophyll Fluorescence Remote Sensing from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, Christian; Odell, Chris; Berry, Joseph; Guanter, Luis; Joiner, Joanna; Kohler, Philipp; Pollock, Randy; Taylor, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), scheduled to launch in July 2014, is a NASA mission designed to measure atmospheric CO2. Its main purpose is to allow inversions of net flux estimates of CO2 on regional to continental scales using the total column CO2 retrieved using high-resolution spectra in the 0.76, 1.6, and 2.0 nm ranges. Recently, it was shown that solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), a proxy for gross primary production (GPP, carbon uptake through photosynthesis), can be accurately retrieved from space using high spectral resolution radiances in the 750 nm range from the Japanese GOSAT and European GOME-2 instruments. Here, we use real OCO-2 thermal vacuum test data as well as a full repeat cycle (16 days) of simulated OCO-2 spectra under realistic conditions to evaluate the potential of OCO-2 for retrievals of chlorophyll fluorescence and also its dependence on clouds and aerosols. We find that the single-measurement precision is 0.3-0.5 Wm(exp -2)sr(exp -1) nm(exp -1) (15-25% of typical peak values), better than current measurements from space but still difficult to interpret on a single-sounding basis. The most significant advancement will come from smaller ground-pixel sizes and increased measurement frequency, with a 100-fold increase compared to GOSAT (and about 8 times higher than GOME-2). This will largely decrease the need for coarse spatial and temporal averaging in data analysis and pave the way to accurate local studies.We also find that the lack of full global mapping from the OCO-2 only incurs small representativeness errors on regional averages. Eventually, the combination of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) derived from CO2 source/sink inversions and SIF as proxy for GPP from the same satellite will provide a more process-based understanding of the global carbon cycle.

  7. An improved pyrolysis route to synthesize carbon-coated CdS quantum dots with fluorescence enhancement effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kejie; Liu Xiaoheng

    2011-01-01

    Well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS (CdS-C) quantum dots were successfully prepared via the improved pyrolysis of bis(1-dodecanethiol)-cadmium(II) under nitrogen atmosphere. This simple method effectively solved the sintered problem resulted from conventional pyrolysis process. The experimental results indicated that most of the as-prepared nanoparticles displayed well-defined core-shell structures. The CdS cores with diameter of ∼5 nm exhibited hexagonal crystal phase, the carbon shells with thickness of ∼2 nm acted as a good dispersion medium to prevent CdS particles from aggregation, and together with CdS effectively formed a monodisperse CdS-Carbon nanocomposite. This composite presented a remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect, which indicated that the prepared nanoparticles might be a promising photoresponsive material or biosensor. This improved pyrolysis method might also offer a facile way to prepare other carbon-coated semiconductor nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: We demonstrated a facile approach to synthesize well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS quantum dots. The as-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect. Highlights: → Carbon-coated CdS quantum dots were synthesized by an one-step pyrolysis method. → Well-dispersed CdS-carbon nanoparticles were obtained by an acid treatment process. → As-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect.

  8. Sulfur and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots sensors for nitric oxide fluorescence quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, Eliana F.C. [Centro de Investigação em Química da Universidade do Porto (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra, Pólo das Ciências da Saúde, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro de Investigação em Química da Universidade do Porto (CIQ-UP), Departamento de Geociências, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Território, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Leitão, João M.M., E-mail: jleitao@ff.uc.pt [Centro de Investigação em Química da Universidade do Porto (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra, Pólo das Ciências da Saúde, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigação em Química da Universidade do Porto (CIQ-UP), Departamento de Geociências, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Território, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2017-04-01

    Microwave synthetized sulfur and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots responded selectively to nitric oxide (NO) at pH 7. Citric acid, urea and sodium thiosulfate in the proportion of 1:1:3 were used respectively as carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources in the carbon dots microwave synthesis. For this synthesis, the three compounds were diluted in 15 mL of water and exposed for 5 min to a microwave radiation of 700 W. It is observed that the main factor contributing to the increased sensitivity and selectivity response to NO at pH 7 is the sodium thiosulfate used as sulfur source. A linear response range from 1 to 25 μM with a sensitivity of 16 μM{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.3 μM were obtained. The NO quantification capability was assessed in standard and in fortified serum solutions. - Highlights: • S,N co-doped CDs were microwave synthetized from citric acid, urea and sodium thiosulfate. • The NO fluorescence sensing was evaluated at pH 7. • The selective and sensitive detection of NO at pH 7 was achieved. • Good NO quantification results in serum samples were obtained.

  9. Semi-Quantitative Evaluation of Secondary Carbonates via Portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Weindorf, David; Weindorf, Camille; Duda, Bogdan; Pennington, Sarah; Ortiz, Rebekah

    2017-04-01

    Secondary calcium carbonate commonly occurs in subsoils of semi-arid soils worldwide. In US Soil Taxonomy, such horizons are frequently described as Bk, Bkk, Bkm, Bkkm, or Ck horizons at variable stages of development. Specifically, the Soil Survey Staff uses a qualitative scale of one through six to indicate differential developmental stages. However, considerable disagreement exists even among experienced soil scientists. Evaluating 75 soil samples from across four US states, a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer was used to quantify the total soil Ca content and compare it to average developmental stage scores as determined by a panel of Soil Survey Staff personnel. Samples were evaluated both as intact aggregates as well as ground (soil Ca concentration steadily increased under both conditions as developmental stage progressed. However, minimal difference was observed between stage five and six carbonate accumulation. Stage three showed the widest variability in total soil Ca. Given than PXRF cannot distinguish between primary and secondary CaCO3 in soils, interpretation by the analyst remains essential. Nonetheless, PXRF provides an important tool for assessing carbonate laden subsoils providing elemental differentiation beyond that perceived by the human eye.

  10. Strong constraint on modelled global carbon uptake using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBean, Natasha; Maignan, Fabienne; Bacour, Cédric; Lewis, Philip; Peylin, Philippe; Guanter, Luis; Köhler, Philipp; Gómez-Dans, Jose; Disney, Mathias

    2018-01-31

    Accurate terrestrial biosphere model (TBM) simulations of gross carbon uptake (gross primary productivity - GPP) are essential for reliable future terrestrial carbon sink projections. However, uncertainties in TBM GPP estimates remain. Newly-available satellite-derived sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) data offer a promising direction for addressing this issue by constraining regional-to-global scale modelled GPP. Here, we use monthly 0.5° GOME-2 SIF data from 2007 to 2011 to optimise GPP parameters of the ORCHIDEE TBM. The optimisation reduces GPP magnitude across all vegetation types except C4 plants. Global mean annual GPP therefore decreases from 194 ± 57 PgCyr -1 to 166 ± 10 PgCyr -1 , bringing the model more in line with an up-scaled flux tower estimate of 133 PgCyr -1 . Strongest reductions in GPP are seen in boreal forests: the result is a shift in global GPP distribution, with a ~50% increase in the tropical to boreal productivity ratio. The optimisation resulted in a greater reduction in GPP than similar ORCHIDEE parameter optimisation studies using satellite-derived NDVI from MODIS and eddy covariance measurements of net CO 2 fluxes from the FLUXNET network. Our study shows that SIF data will be instrumental in constraining TBM GPP estimates, with a consequent improvement in global carbon cycle projections.

  11. Green synthesis of carbon dots originated from Lycii Fructus for effective fluorescent sensing of ferric ion and multicolor cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohan; He, Jiang; Yang, Shenghong; Zheng, Mingda; Wang, Yingying; Ma, Shuang; Zheng, Haipeng

    2017-10-01

    Green, economical and effective method was developed for synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots (CDs), using one-pot hydrothermal treatment of Lycii Fructus. Optical and structural properties of the CDs have been extensively studied by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic, x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM). Surface functionality and composition of CDs has been illustrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra and elemental analysis. The fabricated CDs possess stable fluorescent properties. The fluorescent quantum yield of the CDs can reach 17.2%. The prepared CDs emitted a broad fluorescence between 415 and 545nm and their fluorescence was tuned by changing excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the fluorescence intensity of the CDs could be significantly quenched by Fe 3+ (turn-off). The CDs exhibit captivating sensitivity and selectivity toward Fe 3+ with a linear range from 0 to 30μM and a detection limit of 21nM. The prepared CDs were successfully applied to the determination of Fe 3+ in the urine samples, the water samples from the from the Yellow River and living HeLa (Henrietta Lacks) cells. Moreover, the low-toxicity and excellent biocompatibility of the CDs were evaluated through MTT assay on HeLa cells. The CDs were also employed as fluorescent probes for multicolor imaging of HeLa cells successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-Capacitance Hybrid Supercapacitor Based on Multi-Colored Fluorescent Carbon-Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Rukan; Alas, Melis Ozge; Harputlu, Ersan; Repp, Sergej; Kremer, Nora; Castellano, Mike; Colak, Suleyman Gokhan; Ocakoglu, Kasim; Erdem, Emre

    2017-09-11

    Multi-colored, water soluble fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-Dots) with quantum yield changing from 4.6 to 18.3% were synthesized in multi-gram using dated cola beverage through a simple thermal synthesis method and implemented as conductive and ion donating supercapacitor component. Various properties of C-Dots, including size, crystal structure, morphology and surface properties along with their Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra were analyzed and compared by means of their fluorescence and electronic properties. α-Manganese Oxide-Polypyrrole (PPy) nanorods decorated with C-Dots were further conducted as anode materials in a supercapacitor. Reduced graphene oxide was used as cathode along with the dicationic bis-imidazolium based ionic liquid in order to enhance the charge transfer and wetting capacity of electrode surfaces. For this purpose, we used octyl-bis(3-methylimidazolium)diiodide (C8H16BImI) synthesized by N-alkylation reaction as liquid ionic membrane electrolyte. Paramagnetic resonance and impedance spectroscopy have been undertaken in order to understand the origin of the performance of hybrid capacitor in more depth. In particular, we obtained high capacitance value (C = 17.3 μF/cm 2 ) which is exceptionally related not only the quality of synthesis but also the choice of electrode and electrolyte materials. Moreover, each component used in the construction of the hybrid supercapacitor is also played a key role to achieve high capacitance value.

  13. Probing Energy and Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Fluorescence Quenching of Biomass Carbon Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zicheng; Kang, Mijeong; Payne, Gregory F; Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Runcang

    2016-07-13

    The recent discovery of biomass-derived carbon quantum dots (CQDs) offers the potential to extend the sensing and imaging capabilities of quantum dots (QDs) to applications that require biocompatibility and environmental friendliness. Many studies have confirmed the exciting optical properties of CQDs and suggested a range of applications, but realizing the potential of CQDs will require a deeper fundamental understanding of their photophysical behavior. Here, biomass-derived CQDs were synthesized by hydrothermal processing methods from the aminopolysaccharide chitosan, and their fluorescence quenching behaviors were investigated. A family of nitroaromatics with different ring substituents was used to generate systematically varying CQD-quenching behaviors. Experimental evidence including a correlation between quenching constant and spectral overlap, fluorescence lifetime decay, and donor-acceptor distance all demonstrate that the primary mechanism for QCD-quenching is Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and not electron transfer. Spectroelectrochemical studies with redox-dependent quenching molecules and studies with complex dye molecules further support this conclusion. We envision this fundamental understanding of CQDs will facilitate the application of these emerging nanomaterials for sensing and imaging.

  14. X-ray fluorescence analysis of strontium in environmental water by using barium carbonate coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Akio; Maeda, Yoshimichi; Azumi, Takatugu

    1986-01-01

    Determination of strontium in environmental water was studied by a coprecipitation method with barium carbonate and the subsequent X-ray fluorescence analysis. Fifty mg of barium ion and 1 g of sodium carbonate were added to sample water, which was then mixed for one hour by a magnetic stirrer. Precipitate was gathered onto a membrane filter paper to measure its XF intensity. The amount of strontium from 2 to 150 μg could be repeatedly determined by means of the calibration curve method, and the limit of detection was found to be 0.6 μg of strontium. A large amount of calcium and magnesium ions was found to interfere with the coprecipitation of strontium ion. However, this interference could be eliminated by using a small amount of sample water. Strontium in several environmental waters was determined by the above method. The results obtained from the calibration curve method and the standard addition method agreed with each other, and also agreed with those from the atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  15. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs was achieved using the extract of unripe P. mume fruit as a carbon precursor by a one-pot simple hydrothermal-carbonization method. The resulting N-CDs were used as a staining agent for the fluorescence imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs using the extract of unripe P. mume. • The N-CDs were synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal-carbonization method. • This method of synthesis is a simple, cost effective and eco-friendly route. • N-CDs will be a good alternative for fluorescent dyes and SQDs for bio-applications. - Abstract: Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  16. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of); Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan, E-mail: mgsethu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamilnadu (India); Lee, Yong Rok, E-mail: yrlee@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs was achieved using the extract of unripe P. mume fruit as a carbon precursor by a one-pot simple hydrothermal-carbonization method. The resulting N-CDs were used as a staining agent for the fluorescence imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs using the extract of unripe P. mume. • The N-CDs were synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal-carbonization method. • This method of synthesis is a simple, cost effective and eco-friendly route. • N-CDs will be a good alternative for fluorescent dyes and SQDs for bio-applications. - Abstract: Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  17. Magnetic porous carbon nanocomposites derived from metal-organic frameworks as a sensing platform for DNA fluorescent detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Hongliang, E-mail: hltan@jxnu.edu.cn; Tang, Gonge; Wang, Zhixiong; Li, Qian; Gao, Jie; Wu, Shimeng

    2016-10-12

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as very fascinating functional materials due to their tunable nature and diverse applications. In this work, we prepared a magnetic porous carbon (MPC) nanocomposite by employing iron-containing MOFs (MIL-88A) as precursors through a one-pot thermolysis method. It was found that the MPC can absorb selectively single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe to form MPC/ssDNA complex and subsequently quench the labelled fluorescent dye of the ssDNA probe, which is resulted from the synergetic effect of magnetic nanoparticles and carbon matrix. Upon the addition of complementary target DNA, however, the absorbed ssDNA probe could be released from MPC surface by forming double-stranded DNA with target DNA, and accompanied by the recovery of the fluorescence of ssDNA probe. Based on these findings, a sensing platform with low background signal for DNA fluorescent detection was developed. The proposed sensing platform exhibits high sensitivity with detection limit of 1 nM and excellent selectivity to specific target DNA, even single-base mismatched nucleotide can be distinguished. We envision that the presented study would provide a new perspective on the potential applications of MOF-derived nanocomposites in biomedical fields. - Highlights: • A MOF-derived magnetic porous carbon-based DNA fluorescent sensor was developed. • The MPC can absorb selectively single-stranded DNA probe and subsequently quench its labelled fluorescent dye. • The DNA fluorescent sensor showed excellent selectivity and high sensitivity.

  18. Resonance energy transfer based electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence sensing of riboflavin using graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huan [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); The Phytochemistry Key Laboratory of Tibetan Plateau of Qinghai Province, College of Pharmacy, Qinghai Nationalities University, Xining, Qinghai 810007 (China); Ma, Qin; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Caihe; Qin, Dongdong; Shan, Duoliang; Chen, Jing [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China); Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: luxq@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bioelectrochemistry & Environmental Analysis of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730070 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) are rarely used in the field of electrochemiluminescence. In this paper, g-CNQDs have a strong and stable electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal generated in the presence of co-reactant K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ECL signal of g-CNQDs was quenched by the mechanism of resonance energy transfer (RET) between donor g-CNQDs and receptor riboflavin (RF) that is proved by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence emission spectroscopy analysis technology. Therefore, we achieved detection of the riboflavin content in the drug tablets of vitamin B{sub 2} using ECL and FL. The determination results of ECL showed that the riboflavin content of the drug vitamin B{sub 2} (VB{sub 2}) tablets was consistent with the fluorescence (FL) analysis, with wider linear range of 0.02–11 μM and lower minimum detection limit of 0.63 nM (S/N = 3) than FL. Hence, the riboflavin content in human serum was further detected using ECL. The relative standard deviation is less than 6.5%, with an acceptable recovery of 95.33%–104.22%, which means that this sensor has potential applications in the actual sample analysis. As a new ECL luminary, g-CNQDs have opened a new field for the development and application of ECL sensor. - Highlights: • G-CNQDs proposed as a new luminophore for ECL. • ECL signal was strong and stable in the presence of co-reactant K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}. • Based on the resonance energy transfer between g-CNQDs and riboflavin. • ECL has wider linear range and lower detection limit than FL.

  19. Resonance energy transfer based electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence sensing of riboflavin using graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huan; Ma, Qin; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Caihe; Qin, Dongdong; Shan, Duoliang; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2017-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) are rarely used in the field of electrochemiluminescence. In this paper, g-CNQDs have a strong and stable electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal generated in the presence of co-reactant K 2 S 2 O 8 . The ECL signal of g-CNQDs was quenched by the mechanism of resonance energy transfer (RET) between donor g-CNQDs and receptor riboflavin (RF) that is proved by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, electrochemiluminescence and fluorescence emission spectroscopy analysis technology. Therefore, we achieved detection of the riboflavin content in the drug tablets of vitamin B 2 using ECL and FL. The determination results of ECL showed that the riboflavin content of the drug vitamin B 2 (VB 2 ) tablets was consistent with the fluorescence (FL) analysis, with wider linear range of 0.02–11 μM and lower minimum detection limit of 0.63 nM (S/N = 3) than FL. Hence, the riboflavin content in human serum was further detected using ECL. The relative standard deviation is less than 6.5%, with an acceptable recovery of 95.33%–104.22%, which means that this sensor has potential applications in the actual sample analysis. As a new ECL luminary, g-CNQDs have opened a new field for the development and application of ECL sensor. - Highlights: • G-CNQDs proposed as a new luminophore for ECL. • ECL signal was strong and stable in the presence of co-reactant K 2 S 2 O 8 . • Based on the resonance energy transfer between g-CNQDs and riboflavin. • ECL has wider linear range and lower detection limit than FL.

  20. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Highly Sensitive Detection of H2O2 and Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Wen; Luo, Ying; Wang, Yu-Min; Duan, Lu-Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-12-14

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanosheets, an emerging graphene-like carbon-based nanomaterial with high fluorescence and large specific surface areas, hold great potential for biosensor applications. Current g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets based fluorescent biosensors majorly rely on single fluorescent intensity reading through fluorescence quenching interactions between the nanosheets and metal ions. Here we report for the first time the development of a novel g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets-based ratiometric fluorescence sensing strategy for highly sensitive detection of H 2 O 2 and glucose. With o-phenylenediamine (OPD) oxidized by H 2 O 2 in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the oxidization product can assemble on the g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking, which effectively quenches the fluorescence of g-C 3 N 4 while delivering a new emission peak. The ratiometric signal variations enable robust and sensitive detection of H 2 O 2 . On the basis of the glucose converting into H 2 O 2 through the catalysis of glucose oxidase, the g-C 3 N 4 -based ratiometric fluorescence sensing platform is also exploited for glucose assay. The developed strategy is demonstrated to give a detection limit of 50 nM for H 2 O 2 and 0.4 μM for glucose, at the same time, it has been successfully used for glucose levels detection in human serum. This strategy may provide a cost-efficient, robust, and high-throughput platform for detecting various species involving H 2 O 2 -generation reactions for biomedical applications.

  1. A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with a diamond-like carbon coated X-ray reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2012-01-21

    A diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated quartz glass sample holder is used in a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer. A spot area of a water sample on the DLC sample holder becomes smaller than that on a quartz glass sample holder usually used in TXRF analysis because DLC is more hydrophobic. Therefore, the use of the DLC sample holder enhances fluorescent X-rays reaching a detector compared with the use of a quartz glass sample holder, leading to improvement in detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 28 pg is achieved for Cr in a river water sample when using the DLC sample holder.

  2. pH-Responsible fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for tumor selective theranostics via pH-turn on/off fluorescence and photothermal effect in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Bi; Lee, Jung Eun; Mazrad, Zihnil Adha Islamy; In, Insik; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung Young

    2018-02-01

    We developed nanoparticles comprising a photothermal dye (IR825)-loaded carbonized zwitterionic polymer [FNP-I] as "switch-on" pH-responsive fluorescence probes to sense intracellular cancer cells and for near-infrared (NIR) controllable photothermal therapy (PTT) in vivo and in vitro. The fluorescent "off" of FNP-I was activated after reaching the cancer cell environment, where the zwitterionic compartment of FNP lost its hydrophobicity to induce PTT-mediated heat release of IR825 under NIR irradiation in the tumor. Approximately 100% of the IR825 was released from the FNP core to generate high thermal conversion to completely kill the cancer cells. Furthermore, after intravenous treatment of FNP-I into MDAMB-231-cell bearing mice, pH-responsive photothermal therapy was observed, achieving marked ablation of tumor cells with release of IR825 under tumor environment conditions. In addition, fluorescent signals were clearly found at the tumor site after 3 h, decreasing at the 6 h time point. The in vitro and in vivo detection system demonstrated good cellular uptake and biocompatibility as a potential imaging-guided photothermal therapy nanotool for cancer treatment. Interestingly, the synergism of the biosensor and PTT in single FNP-I platform led to more effective cancer cell killing than either monotherapy, providing a new approach for cancer treatment.

  3. Magnetic and fluorescent carbon-based nanohybrids for multi-modal imaging and magnetic field/NIR light responsive drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2016-07-21

    Carbon nanomaterials have gained significant momentum as promising candidate materials for biomedical applications due to their unique structure and properties. After functionalization with magnetic and fluorescent components, the resultant carbon-based nanohybrids can serve not only as magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging contrast agents, but also as photothermally/magneto-thermally responsive drug carriers for combined photothermo/chemotherapy. This mini-review summarizes the latest developments and applications and addresses the future perspectives of carbon-based magnetic and fluorescent nanohybrids in the biomedical field.

  4. Estimation of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Based on Dissolved Organic Carbon, UV Absorption, and Fluorescence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Kwak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of 5-d biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 is the most commonly practiced test to assess the water quality of surface waters and the waste loading. However, BOD5 is not a good parameter for the control of water or wastewater treatment processes because of its long test period. It is very difficult to produce consistent and reliable BOD5 results without using careful laboratory quality control practices. This study was performed to develop software sensors to predict the BOD5 of river water and wastewater. The software sensors were based on the multiple regression analysis using the dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration, UV light absorbance at 254 nm, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. River water samples and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents were collected at 1-hour interval to evaluate the feasibility of the software sensors. In short, the software sensors developed in this study could well predict the BOD5 of river water (r=0.78 and for the WWTP effluent (r=0.90.

  5. Ultrastable green fluorescence carbon dots with a high quantum yield for bioimaging and use as theranostic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Thomsen, Rasmus Peter; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    to widely used semiconductor quantum dots. However, it remains a great challenge to prepare highly stable, water-soluble green luminescent Cdots with a high quantum yield. Herein we report a new synthesis route for green luminescent Cdots imbuing these desirable properties and demonstrate their potential......Carbon dots (Cdots) have recently emerged as a novel platform of fluorescent nanomaterials. These carbon nanoparticles have great potential in biomedical applications such as bioimaging as they exhibit excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical inertness and low cytotoxicity in comparison...... in biomedical applications. Oligoethylenimine (OEI)–β-cyclodextrin (βCD) Cdots were synthesised using a simple and fast heating method in phosphoric acid. The synthesised Cdots showed strong green fluorescence under UV excitation with a 30% quantum yield and exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range. We...

  6. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-05-04

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O 2 , emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on the removal of dissolved O 2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  7. Soy flour-derived carbon dots: facile preparation, fluorescence enhancement, and sensitive Fe{sup 3+} detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liyang; Xu, Qian [China University of Petroleum, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing (China); Zheng, Xing [Bei Jing Sinen En-Tech Co., Ltd (China); Zhang, Weina; Zheng, Jingtang, E-mail: jtzheng03@163.com; Wu, Mingbo, E-mail: wumb@upc.edu.cn; Wu, Wenting, E-mail: wuwt@upc.edu.cn [China University of Petroleum, State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Soy flour-derived carbon quantum dots (C-dots) were successfully synthesized via a facile one-step hydrothermal approach. The as-prepared C-dots exhibit an average diameter of 2.5 nm and the crystalline lattices are consistent with graphitic carbons. Meanwhile, they show strong photoluminescence (quantum yield is 7.85 %), good water solubility, and high photostability. Importantly, structural defects of the C-dots were designed to obtain controllable fluorescence, which was achieved by changing the contents of N defects and O defects of C-dots. Our results indicate that N defects can more effectively enhance the fluorescence emission than O defects. As the preparation temperature increases, the N defects are fine-tuned by substituting for partial O defects, reducing nonradiative recombination and enhancing fluorescence intensity, which is further confirmed by surface passivation. Due to its fine photostability, high sensitivity, and good selectivity for Fe{sup 3+}, the as-prepared C-dots were used as fluorescence probes for detection of ferric ion. The detection limitation comes to 0.021 µM.

  8. Detection of Hg2+ ion using fluorescent carbon dots derived from elephant foot yum via green-chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Raksha; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2017-05-01

    We have synthesized a fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) in an eco-friendly and cost effective manner through the combination of microwave plus hydrothermal process using elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius) as carbon precursor. Combination of two processes was used to save time as well as energy with less use of harsh chemicals. The resultant CDs has good photostability, high quantum yield, excellent water dispersibility and high storage ability. Further, CDs was applied for the detection of Hg2+ ion from aqueous and real samples.

  9. Fluorescent carbon dots nanosensor for label-free determination of vitamin B12 based on inner filter effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Longhua; Yang, Hongmei; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2018-03-01

    A simple and effective fluorescent assay for the determination of vitamin B12 was developed. In this study, carbon dots (CDs) were prepared by one-pot hydrothermal method and directly used as a fluorophore in the inner filter effect (IFE). Both of the maximum absorption peak of vitamin B12 and excitation maxima of CDs are located at 360 nm, hence, the excited light of CDs can be absorbed by vitamin B12, resulting in the fluorescence reduction of CDs. And the fluorescence intensity of CDs decreases with the increasing concentration of vitamin B12. This IFE-based sensing strategy shows a good linear relationship between the normalized fluorescence intensity and the concentration of vitamin B12 ranging from 0 to 60 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Furthermore, this proposed approach was successfully applied to vitamin B12 sensing in injections. This IFE sensing platform based on various fluorescent nanomaterials has a high promise for the detection of other biomolecules due to its inherent convenience.

  10. A sensitive turn on fluorescent probe for detection of biothiols using MnO2@carbon dots nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Dimple; Mehta, Akansha; Mishra, Amit; Basu, Soumen

    2018-03-01

    Presently, the combination of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and metal oxide nanostructures in one frame are being considered for the sensing of purine compounds. In this work, a combined system of CQDs and MnO2 nanostructures was used for the detection of anticancer drugs, 6-Thioguanine (6-TG) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP). The CQDs were synthesized through microwave synthesizer and the MnO2 nanostructures (nanoflowers and nanosheets) were synthesized using facile hydrothermal technique. The CQDs exhibited excellent fluorescence emission at 420 nm when excited at 320 nm wavelength. By combining CQDs and MnO2 nanostructures, quenching of fluorescence was observed which was attributed to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, where CQDs act as electron donor and MnO2 act as acceptor. This fluorescence quenching behaviour disappeared on the addition of 6-TG and 6-MP due to the formation of Mn-S bond. The detection limit for 6-TG (0.015 μM) and 6-MP (0.014 μM) was achieved with the linear range of concentration (0-50 μM) using both MnO2 nanoflowers and nanosheets. Moreover, the as-prepared fluorescence-sensing technique was successfully employed for the detection of bio-thiol group in enapril drug. Thus a facile, cost-effective and benign chemistry approach for biomolecule detection was designed.

  11. Detection of trace tetracycline in fish via synchronous fluorescence quenching with carbon quantum dots coated with molecularly imprinted silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji; Lin, Zheng-Zhong; Nur, A.-Zha; Lu, Yan; Wu, Ming-Hui; Zeng, Jun; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Huang, Zhi-Yong

    2018-02-01

    A novel fluorescence-based sensor combining synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was fabricated with reverse microemulsion method. Tetracycline (TC), (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and carbon quantum dots (CDs) were used as template, functional monomer, cross-linker and signal sources respectively in the probe preparation. A synchronous fluorescence emission (λem) at 355 nm was observed for the prepared MIP-coated CDs (MIP@CDs) particles when the wavelength interval (Δλ) was set as 70 nm, and the synchronous fluorescence intensity could be rapidly and efficiently quenched by TC based on inner filter effect (IFE). The quenching efficiencies of synchronous fluorescence intensity was linearly fitted with tetracycline (TC) concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 50 μmol L- 1 with a detection limit (DL) of 9 nmol L- 1 (3σ, n = 9). The MIP@CDs was used as a probe to detect TC in fish samples with the recoveries ranging from 98.4% to 103.1% and the relative standard deviation less than 6.0%. The results illustrated that the as-prepared MIP@CDs could be applied to the detection of trace TC in fish samples with rapidity, high sensitivity and accuracy.

  12. Carbon nanotube signal amplification for ultrasensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA methyltransferase activity and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Limin; Zhao, Shulin; Hu, Kun; Chen, Zheng-Feng; Chen, Jia; Liang, Hong

    2014-04-15

    A versatile sensing platform based on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) signal amplification and fluorescence polarization (FP) is developed for the simple and ultrasensitive monitoring of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and inhibition in homogeneous solution. This method uses a dye-labeled DNA probe that possess a doubled-stranded DNA (dsDNA) part for Mtase and its corresponding restriction endonuclease recognition, and a single-stranded DNA part for binding MWCNTs. In the absence of MTase, the dye-labeled DNA is cleaved by restriction endonuclease, and releases very short DNA carrying the dye that cannot bind to MWCNTs, which has relatively small FP value. However, in the presence of MTase, the specific recognition sequence in the dye-labeled DNA probe is methylated and not cleaved by restriction endonuclease. Thus, the dye-labeled methylated DNA product is adsorbed onto MWCNTs via strong π-π stacking interactions, which leads to a significant increase in the FP value due to the enlargement of the molecular volume of the dye-labeled methylated DNA/MWCNTs complex. This provides the basic of a quantitative measurement of MTase activity. By using the MWCNT signal amplification approach, the detection sensitivity can be significantly improved by two orders of magnitude over the previously reported methods. Moreover, this method also has high specificity and a wide dynamic range of over five orders of magnitude. Additionally, the suitability of this sensing platform for MTase inhibitor screening has also been demonstrated. This approach may serve as a general detection platform for sensitive assay of a variety of DNA MTases and screening potential drugs. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  14. Atmospheric CO2 Observations Reveal Strong Correlation Between Regional Net Biospheric Carbon Uptake and Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Yoichi P.; Tadić, Jovan M.; Qiu, Xuemei; Yadav, Vineet; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Berry, Joseph A.; Michalak, Anna M.

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the promise of remotely sensed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) in informing terrestrial carbon exchange, but analyses have been limited to either plot level ( 1 km2) or hemispheric/global ( 108 km2) scales due to the lack of a direct measure of carbon exchange at intermediate scales. Here we use a network of atmospheric CO2 observations over North America to explore the value of SIF for informing net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at regional scales. We find that SIF explains space-time NEE patterns at regional ( 100 km2) scales better than a variety of other vegetation and climate indicators. We further show that incorporating SIF into an atmospheric inversion leads to a spatial redistribution of NEE estimates over North America, with more uptake attributed to agricultural regions and less to needleleaf forests. Our results highlight the synergy of ground-based and spaceborne carbon cycle observations.

  15. Pentosan-derived water-soluble carbon nano dots with substantial fluorescence: Properties and application as a photosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanjiao; Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin, E-mail: liushouxin@126.com

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Water-soluble carbon nano dots (CNDs) with high fluorescence are synthesized from liquid by-products of hydrothermal carbonization of pentosan, the by-products of pulp refining. CNDs can be effectively used as photo sensitizer in the CNDs/TiO{sub 2} system for methyl blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation, spectral response range of CNDs/TiO{sub 2} system can be widen from only UV region to part visible-light region (400–550 nm). - Highlights: • Water-soluble CNDs with abundant oxygen-containing groups can be obtained from the liquid by-products of hydrothermal carbonization of pentosan. • CNDs show excellent photoluminescence, pH sensitivity as well high stability. • CNDs/TiO{sub 2} system can be used as visible-light catalysts for the degradation of MB effectively. - Abstract: The hydrothermal carbonization of monosaccharides and polysaccharides is widely used in the production of carbonaceous material with a desired structure. However, the liquid products are regarded as waste and discarded. Here, we report a facile approach for the synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano dots (CNDs) with substantial fluorescence from the liquid by-products of the hydrothermal carbonization of pentosan, thus the by-products of pulp refining. The synthesized CNDs are monodispersed spheres with abundant oxygen-containing groups and they have an average size of 30 nm. Quantum yield measurements revealed CNDs with substantial green photoluminescence (PL) without passivation. Additionally, excitation was independent, pH-sensitive and stable. The use of CNDs as a photosensitizer in the CNDs/TiO{sub 2} system for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation is attractive. The spectral response range of the CNDs/TiO{sub 2} system can be widened from the UV region to a part of the visible light region (400–550 nm)

  16. Tunable Carbon-Dot-Based Dual-Emission Fluorescent Nanohybrids for Ratiometric Optical Thermometry in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Lin, Huihui; Xu, Zhenzhu; Huang, Yijun; Humphrey, Mark G; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    The use of carbon-dot-based dual-emission fluorescent nanohybrids (DEFNs) as versatile nanothermometry devices for spatially resolved temperature measurements in living cells is demonstrated. The carbon dots (CDs) are prepared in the organic phase and display tunable photoluminescence (PL) across a wide visible range by adjusting the excitation wavelengths and extend of N-doping. DEFNs are formed in a straightforward fashion from CDs (emitting blue PL) and gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, emitting red PL). The DEFNs display ideal single-excitation, dual-emission with two well-resolved, intensity-comparable fluorescence peaks, and function in optical thermometry with high reliability and accuracy by exploiting the temperature sensitivity of their fluorescence intensity ratio (blue/red). Furthermore, the DEFNs have been introduced into cells, exhibiting good biocompatibility, and have facilitated physiological temperature measurements in the range of 25-45 °C; the DEFNs can therefore function as "non-contact" tools for the accurate measurement of temperature and its gradient inside a living cell.

  17. l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots for the sensitive and selective fluorescence detection of mercury ion in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Xuejuan; Li, Shifeng; Zhuang, Lulu; Tang, Jiaoning, E-mail: tjn@szu.edu.cn [Shenzhen University, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-07-15

    l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots (l-CQDs) were facilely synthesized through “green” methodology, and the obtained material was utilized as a sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor for mercury ion (Hg{sup 2+}) in pure aqueous solutions. Carboxyl-functionalized CQDs were first green synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal route, and l-tryptophan was then attached to CQDs via direct surface condensation reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-synthesized l-CQDs had an average size of ca. 5 nm with a good dispersity in water, and exhibited a favorable selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} ions over a range of other common metal cations in aqueous solution (10 mM PBS buffer, pH 6.0). Upon the addition of Hg{sup 2+}, a complete fluorescence quenching (ON–OFF switching) of l-CQDs was evident from the fluorescence titration experiment, and the fluorescence detection limit of Hg{sup 2+} was calculated to be 11 nM, which indicated that the obtained environmentally friendly l-CQDs had sensitive detection capacity for Hg{sup 2+} in aqueous solution.

  18. Carbon dots as fluorescent probes for "off-on" detection of Cu2+ and L-cysteine in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jie; Yang, Xiaoling; Trinchi, Adrian; Hardin, Simon; Cole, Ivan; Zhu, Yihua; Li, Chunzhong; Muster, Tim; Wei, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Copper ion (Cu(2+)) and L-cysteine (L-Cys) detection is critically important since an abnormal level of Cu(2+) or L-Cys is an indicator for many diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate an "off-on" approach for highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+) and L-Cys using carbon dots (CDs) as fluorescent probes. CDs were prepared by using mesoporous silica (MS) spheres as nanoreactors. The binding ability of CDs towards metal ions was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of CDs before and after the addition of the metal ions. The addition of Cu(2+) cations leads to their absorption on the surface of CDs and the significant fluorescence quench of CDs (turn-off). The resulting in CDs-Cu(2+) system was found to be sensitive to L-Cys. The addition of L-Cys not only serves to shelter the CDs effectively from being quenched, but also to reverse the quenching and restore the fluorescence (turn-on) due to its ability to remove Cu(2+) from the surface of CDs. This method is facile, rapid, low cost, and environment-friendly. A detection limit as low as 2.3×10(-8) M for Cu(2+) and 3.4×10(-10) M for L-Cys is obtained, which is promising for biological applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Morphological study of fluorescent carbon Nanoparticles (F-CNPs) from ground coffee waste soot oxidation by diluted acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, S.; Tjandra, S.; Joshua, J.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    Coffee ground waste utilization for fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) through soot oxidation with diluted HNO3 has been conducted. Soot was obtained through three different treatments to coffee ground waste; which was burned in furnaceat 550°C and 650°C and directly burned in a heat-proofcontainer. Then they were analyzed morphologically with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) instrument. Soot from direct burning indicated the optimum result where it has denser pores compared to other two soots. Soot obtained from direct burning was refluxed in diluted HNO3 for 12 hours to perform the oxidation. Yellowish brown supernatant was later observed which lead to green fluorescent under the UV light. F-CNPs characterization was done in Transmission Electron Microscopy, which showed that 7.4-23.4 nm of particle size were distributed.

  20. The Seasonal Cycle of Satellite Chlorophyll Fluorescence Observations and its Relationship to Vegetation Phenology and Ecosystem Atmosphere Carbon Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Schaefer, K.; Jung, M.; Guanter, L.; Zhang, Y; Garrity, S.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Mapping of terrestrial chlorophyll uorescence from space has shown potentialfor providing global measurements related to gross primary productivity(GPP). In particular, space-based fluorescence may provide information onthe length of the carbon uptake period that can be of use for global carboncycle modeling. Here, we examine the seasonal cycle of photosynthesis asestimated from satellite fluorescence retrievals at wavelengths surroundingthe 740nm emission feature. These retrievals are from the Global OzoneMonitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) flying on the MetOp A satellite. Wecompare the fluorescence seasonal cycle with that of GPP as estimated froma diverse set of North American tower gas exchange measurements. Because the GOME-2 has a large ground footprint (40 x 80km2) as compared with that of the flux towers and requires averaging to reduce random errors, we additionally compare with seasonal cycles of upscaled GPP in the satellite averaging area surrounding the tower locations estimated from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC) machine learning algorithm. We also examine the seasonality of absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation(APAR) derived with reflectances from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Finally, we examine seasonal cycles of GPP as produced from an ensemble of vegetation models. Several of the data-driven models rely on satellite reflectance-based vegetation parameters to derive estimates of APAR that are used to compute GPP. For forested sites(particularly deciduous broadleaf and mixed forests), the GOME-2 fluorescence captures the spring onset and autumn shutoff of photosynthesis as delineated by the tower-based GPP estimates. In contrast, the reflectance-based indicators and many of the models tend to overestimate the length of the photosynthetically-active period for these and other biomes as has been noted previously in the literature. Satellite fluorescence measurements therefore show potential for

  1. BrightFocus Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... announcement by Bill Gates of his $50 million investment in the Dementia Discovery Fund. A charitable act ... under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of the United States.Copyright 2017 BrightFocus ...

  2. CA 19-9 Pancreatic Tumor Marker Fluorescence Immunosensing Detection via Immobilized Carbon Quantum Dots Conjugated Gold Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarfaj, Nawal Ahmad; El-Tohamy, Maha Farouk; Oraby, Hesham Farouk

    2018-04-11

    The clinical detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), a tumor marker in biological samples, improves and facilitates the rapid screening and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A simple, low cost, fast, and green synthesis method to prepare a viable carbon quantum dots/gold (CQDs/Au) nanocomposite fluorescence immunosensing solution for the detection of CA 19-9 was reported. The present method is conducted by preparing glucose-derived CQDs using a microwave-assisted method. CQDs were employed as reducing and stabilizing agents for the preparation of a CQDs/Au nanocomposite. The immobilized anti-CA 19-9-labeled horseradish peroxidase enzyme (Ab-HRP) was anchored to the surface of a CQDs/Au nanocomposite by a peptide interaction between the carboxylic and amine active groups. The CA 19-9 antigen was trapped by another monoclonal antibody that was coated on the surface of microtiter wells. The formed sandwich capping antibody-antigen-antibody enzyme complex had tunable fluorescence properties that were detected under excitation and emission wavelengths of 420 and 530 nm. The increase in fluorescence intensities of the immunoassay sensing solution was proportional to the CA 19-9 antigen concentration in the linear range of 0.01-350 U mL -1 and had a lower detection limit of 0.007 U mL -1 . The proposed CQDs/Au nanocomposite immunoassay method provides a promising tool for detecting CA 19-9 in human serum.

  3. Facile green synthesis of fluorescent N-doped carbon dots from Actinidia deliciosa and their catalytic activity and cytotoxicity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arul, Velusamy; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan

    2018-04-01

    Green synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen doped carbon dots (N-CDs) using Actinidia deliciosa (A. deliciosa) fruit extract as a carbon precursor and aqueous ammonia as a nitrogen dopant is reported here. The synthesized N-CDs were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The average size of the N-CDs was approximately 3.59 nm and the calculated inter layer distance was found to be 0.21 nm. Raman spectroscopy and SAED pattern revealed the graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs. The N-CDs were found to emit intense blue color at 405 nm under the excitation of 315 nm. The doping of nitrogen over the surface of the N-CDs was confirmed by EDS, FT-IR and XPS studies. The synthesized N-CDs were found to exhibit excellent catalytic activity in the reduction of Rhodamine-B using sodium borohydrate. The MTT assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of N-CDs towards L-929 and MCF-7 cells. From the results obtained, it was found that the N-CDs exhibit low cytotoxicity and superior biocompatibility on both L-929 and MCF-7 cells.

  4. [Determination of carmine in carbonated beverages using 3-D fluorescence spectra coupled with second-order calibration algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run; Chen, Guo-qing; Zhu, Chun; Kong, Fan-biao; Hu, Yang-jun

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra combined with second-order calibration algorithm based on alternate a weighted residual (ANWE) was applied to the direct concentration determination of carmine in carbonated beverages. Firstly, 3-D fluorescence spectra of carmine and sunset yellow mixed solutions with different concentrations were obtained by employing spectrometer, and analyzed by using ANWE, the correlation coefficient between calibration concentration and the actual concentration was 0.9917, and the average recovery was 100.92%±2.71%. The results show that the ANWE algorithm is reliable. Then, the commercial carbonated soft drinks in 8, 9, 12 and 13 times diluted concentration were detected by using ANWE algorithm, the correlation coefficient between relative concentration and the actual concentration were 0.9930, 0.9930, 0.9932 and 0.7932, respectively, and the contents of carmine in beverage were 38.88, 37.71, 37.68 and 39.65 μg · mL(-1), respectively. The average concentration was (38.48±0.96) μg · mL(-1). Finally, the standard addition method was applied to estimate the prediction accuracy between calibration concentration and the actual concentration was 0.9935, and the average recovery was 102.99%±2.15%. The results can provide a new idea for the rapid content determination of food pigments in commercial beverages.

  5. A novel and simple fluorescent and colorimetric primary chemosensor based on Congo-Red for sulfite and resultant complex as secondary fluorescent chemosensor towards carbonate ions: Fluorescent probe mimicking INHIBIT logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Parhami, Abolfath; Lohrasbi, Sajedeh

    2016-03-01

    A simple receptor based on Congo-Red (CR) was prepared by complexation of CR into two equivalents of Cu (II) ([CR-(Cu)2]) and it has been designed for detection of sulfite and carbonate ions. This chemosensor exhibits high sensitivity for sulfite over other anions in aqueous buffer solution. It exhibits colorimetric 'naked eye' and fluorometric responses to SO3(2-) which results from the addition of SO3(2)(-) to CR diazo moiety. Hereupon, CO3(2-) greatly limits the fluorescence of the resultant sulfite-receptor complex via a hydrogen bonding interaction ([CR-(Cu)2]-SO3). This system can be applied for selective detection of CO3(2-) in the presence of other anions. The detection limits of SO3(2-), calculated by the colorimetric and fluorometric methods, were found to be 0.07 and 0.09µmolL(-)(1), respectively. The sulfite-receptor complex also displayed the ability to detect up to 0.06µmolL(-)(1) CO3(2-). The fluorescence output mimicked 'INHIBIT' logic gate function. The output was exhibited by the intramolecular charge transfer of the [CR-(Cu)2] probe, and was provided by chemical inputs (SO3(2-) and CO3(2-)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Using satellite fluorescence data to drive a global carbon cycle model: Impacts on atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, G. J.; Joiner, J.; Kawa, S. R.; Ivanoff, A.; Liu, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Berry, J. A.; Badgley, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 variability is markedly influenced by biospheric fluxes (photosynthesis and respiration) from the land surface at seasonal, to annual, to decadal time scales. Process models of photosynthesis and respiration have considerable uncertainty as only the sum of these fluxes can be constrained on the bases of atmospheric CO2 measurements alone. An independent proxy for photosynthesis or gross primary productivity (GPP) has recently become available from measurement of solar induced fluorescence (SIF). We report here on the first (to our knowledge) simulations of global atmospheric CO2 concentration driven by GPP estimated from observations of SIF. A baseline model uses satellite derived FPAR, incident solar radiation, temperature, and moisture stress scalars to estimate net primary productivity (NPP). The fluorescence driven model uses only fluorescence from GOME-2 scaled to the mean annual NPP at every grid cell and assumes a constant NPP/GPP ratio. Respiration was modeled identically in the two simulations. This preserves the spatial distribution of production capacity but allows for independent seasonal cycle and interannual variability from the baseline model. The flux models were run at ½ degree monthly resolution for 2007-2012 and fluxes were reaggregated along with fossil fuel and ocean fluxes to 3-hourly, 1 x 1.25 degree resolution for the atmospheric transport model. Here, we compare the model's skill at predicting CO2 variability at 40 NOAA CO2 flask network sites. The baseline model shows good skill at matching the seasonal cycle at the flask sites but is not as good at producing monthly and interannual anomalies. The fluorescence model shows similar (or even improved) performance even though solar radiation, FPAR, precipitation and temperature effects on GPP are not included in the simulation. The results demonstrate the capability of the fluorescence data to integrate physiological and biophysical controls on GPP into a single measured

  7. Fluorescent probes for "off-on" highly sensitive detection of Hg²⁺ and L-cysteine based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Cui, Peipei; Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Wang, Yaling; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were synthesized by a facile, and low-cost one-step hydrothermal strategy using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source for the first time. The obtained NCDs show stable blue fluorescence with a high quantum yield of 35.4%, along with the fluorescence lifetime of ca. 6.75 ns. Most importantly, Hg(2+) can completely quench the fluorescence of NCDs as a result of the formation of a non-fluorescent stable NCDs-Hg(2+) complex. Static fluorescence quenching towards Hg(2+) is proved by the Stern-Volmer equation, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, temperature dependent quenching and fluorescence lifetime measurements. Subsequently, the fluorescence of the NCDs-Hg(2+) system is completely recovered with the addition L-cysteine (L-Cys) owing to the dissociation of NCDs-Hg(2+) complex to form a more stable Hg(2+)-L-Cys complex by Hg(2+)-S bonding. Therefore, such NCDs can be used as an effective fluorescent "turn-off" probe for rapid, rather highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg(2+), with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 1.48 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM. Interestingly, NCDs-Hg(2+) system can be conveniently employed as a fluorescent "turn-on" sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of L-Cys with a low LOD of 0.79 nM and a wide linear detection range of 0-50 μM. Further, the sensitivity of NCDs to Hg(2+) is preserved in tap water with a LOD of 1.65 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pentosan-derived water-soluble carbon nano dots with substantial fluorescence: Properties and application as a photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanjiao; Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-10-01

    The hydrothermal carbonization of monosaccharides and polysaccharides is widely used in the production of carbonaceous material with a desired structure. However, the liquid products are regarded as waste and discarded. Here, we report a facile approach for the synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano dots (CNDs) with substantial fluorescence from the liquid by-products of the hydrothermal carbonization of pentosan, thus the by-products of pulp refining. The synthesized CNDs are monodispersed spheres with abundant oxygen-containing groups and they have an average size of 30 nm. Quantum yield measurements revealed CNDs with substantial green photoluminescence (PL) without passivation. Additionally, excitation was independent, pH-sensitive and stable. The use of CNDs as a photosensitizer in the CNDs/TiO2 system for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation is attractive. The spectral response range of the CNDs/TiO2 system can be widened from the UV region to a part of the visible light region (400-550 nm).

  9. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Ju, Huixiang; Zhang, Li; Sun, Mingzhong; Zhou, Zhongwei; Dai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lirong; Gong, Aihua; Wu, Chaoyao; Du, Fengyi

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs) as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm) with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis.

  10. Formation of N, S-codoped fluorescent carbon dots from biomass and their application for the selective detection of mercury and iron ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qianghua; Yan, Fanyong; Luo, Yunmei; Wang, Yinyin; Zhou, Xuguang; Chen, Li

    2017-02-01

    Biomass is regarded as an excellent candidate for the preparation of heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials. We have developed a simple and facile one-pot synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur codoped fluorescent carbon dots from pigeon feathers, egg and manure via the pyrolysis carbonization method. The as-prepared four PCDs have high fluorescence quantum yield about 24.87% (PCDs-f), 17.48% (PCDs-w), 16.34% (PCDs-y), 33.50% (PCDs-m), respectively, which is higher than the other carbon dots preparing from biomass. We found that the preparation of PCDs-m with pigeon manure has no favourable selectively with heavy metal ions. However, other PCDs exhibit highly sensitive and selective detection behavior of Hg2 +/Fe3 + ions with a low detection limit of 10.3 and 60.9 nM. They were applied to imaging of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, showing low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility.

  11. A “Turn-On” thiol functionalized fluorescent carbon quantum dot based chemosensory system for arsenite detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooja, D., E-mail: poojaiitr@csio.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Saini, Sonia; Thakur, Anupma; Kumar, Baban; Tyagi, Sachin [Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Nayak, Manoj K. [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Sectro-30 C, Chandigarh 160030 (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Environmental friendly carbon quantum dots grafted with thiol moieties. • The functionalized CQDs demonstrated for optical detection of arsenite in water. • High analytical performance in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and detection limit (0.086 ppb). - Abstract: Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have emerged out as promising fluorescent probes for hazardous heavy metals detection in recent past. In this study, water soluble CQDs were synthesized by facile microwave pyrolysis of citric acid & cysteamine, and functionalized with ditheritheritol to impart thiol functionalities at surface for selective detection of toxic arsenite in water. Microscopic analysis reveals that the synthesized CQDs are of uniform size (diameter ∼5 nm) and confirmed to have surface −SH groups by FT-IR. The functionalized probe is then demonstrated for arsenite detection in water by “Turn-On” read out mechanism, which reduces the possibility of false positive signals associated with “turn off’ probes reported earlier. The blue luminescent functionalized CQDs exhibit increase in fluorescence intensity on arsenite addition in 5–100 ppb wide detection range. The probe can be used for sensitive detection of arsenite in environmental water to a theoretical detection limit (3s) of 0.086 ppb (R{sup 2} = 0.9547) with good reproducibility at 2.6% relative standard deviation. The presented reliable, sensitive, rapid fCQDs probe demonstrated to exhibit high selectivity towards arsenite and exemplified for real water samples as well. The analytical performance of the presented probe is comparable to existing organic & semiconductor based optical probes.

  12. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Miaomiao Zhang,1,* Huixiang Ju,2,* Li Zhang,1,* Mingzhong Sun,2 Zhongwei Zhou,2 Zhenyu Dai,3 Lirong Zhang,1 Aihua Gong,1 Chaoyao Wu,1 Fengyi Du1 1School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Radiology Department, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis. Keywords: carbon dots, contrast agents, iodine-doped, CT imaging

  13. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC; Kondakova, Marina [OLEDWorks LLC; Boroson, Michael [OLEDWorks LLC; Hamer, John [OLEDWorks LLC

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  14. Field-scale fluorescence fingerprinting of biochar-borne dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar continues to receive worldwide enthusiasm as means of augmenting recalcitrant organic carbon in agricultural soils. Realistic biochar amendment rate (typically less than 1 wt%) in the field scale, and loss by sizing, rain, and other transport events demand reliable methods to quantify the r...

  15. M13 phage-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as nanoprobes for second near-infrared window fluorescence imaging of targeted tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hyunjung; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Barone, Paul W; Strano, Michael S; Belcher, Angela M

    2012-03-14

    Second near-infrared (NIR) window light (950-1400 nm) is attractive for in vivo fluorescence imaging due to its deep penetration depth in tissues and low tissue autofluorescence. Here we show genetically engineered multifunctional M13 phage can assemble fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and ligands for targeted fluorescence imaging of tumors. M13-SWNT probe is detectable in deep tissues even at a low dosage of 2 μg/mL and up to 2.5 cm in tissue-like phantoms. Moreover, targeted probes show specific and up to 4-fold improved uptake in prostate specific membrane antigen positive prostate tumors compared to control nontargeted probes. This M13 phage-based second NIR window fluorescence imaging probe has great potential for specific detection and therapy monitoring of hard-to-detect areas. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. Sulfur and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots sensors for nitric oxide fluorescence quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Eliana F C; Leitão, João M M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2017-04-01

    Microwave synthetized sulfur and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots responded selectively to nitric oxide (NO) at pH 7. Citric acid, urea and sodium thiosulfate in the proportion of 1:1:3 were used respectively as carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources in the carbon dots microwave synthesis. For this synthesis, the three compounds were diluted in 15 mL of water and exposed for 5 min to a microwave radiation of 700 W. It is observed that the main factor contributing to the increased sensitivity and selectivity response to NO at pH 7 is the sodium thiosulfate used as sulfur source. A linear response range from 1 to 25 μM with a sensitivity of 16 μM -1 and a detection limit of 0.3 μM were obtained. The NO quantification capability was assessed in standard and in fortified serum solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Random-modulation CW lidar system for space-borne carbon dioxide remote sensing based on a high-brightness semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivias, I.; Pérez-Serrano, A.; Tijero, J. M. G.; Faugeron, M.; Van Dijk, F.; Krakowski, M.; Kochem, G.; Traub, M.; Barbero, J.; Adamiec, P.; Ai, X.; Rarity, J.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.

    2017-11-01

    The accurate determination of the atmospheric distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) on planetary scale is a key requirement for setting up modeling tools able to make reliable predictions of Earth climate dynamics which are essential for the understanding of such important issues as climate change and global warming. Nowadays, the concentrations of CO2 are mainly measured in-situ at a number of surface stations that are unevenly distributed over the planet. Air-borne and space-borne missions have the potential to provide a denser and better distributed set of observations to complement those provided by the surface network.

  18. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippidis, Aggelos; Stefanakis, Dimitrios; Anglos, Demetrios; Ghanotakis, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  19. Large Bright Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    3 February 2004 Wind is the chief agent of change on Mars today. Wind blows dust and it can move coarser sediment such as sand and silt. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows bright ripples or small dunes on the floors of troughs northeast of Isidis Planitia near 31.1oN, 244.6oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  20. A high brightness probe of polymer nanoparticles for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sirong; Zhu, Jiarong; Li, Yaping; Feng, Liheng

    2018-03-01

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs) with high brightness in long wavelength region were prepared by the nano-precipitation method. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, the high brightness property of the CPNs was realized by four different emission polymers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) displayed that the CPNs possessed a spherical structure and an average diameter of 75 nm. Analysis assays showed that the CPNs had excellent biocompatibility, good photostability and low cytotoxicity. The CPNs were bio-modified with a cell penetrating peptide (Tat, a targeted element) through covalent link. Based on the entire wave fluorescence emission, the functionalized CPNs1-4 can meet multichannel and high throughput assays in cell and organ imaging. The contribution of the work lies in not only providing a new way to obtain a high brightness imaging probe in long wavelength region, but also using targeted cell and organ imaging.

  1. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  2. Single-molecule detection of protein efflux from microorganisms using fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita Patricia; Ando, Hiroki; Chen, Allen Y.; Cao, Jicong; Kottadiel, Vishal Isaac; Chio, Linda; Yang, Darwin; Dong, Juyao; Lu, Timothy K.; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-05-01

    A distinct advantage of nanosensor arrays is their ability to achieve ultralow detection limits in solution by proximity placement to an analyte. Here, we demonstrate label-free detection of individual proteins from Escherichia coli (bacteria) and Pichia pastoris (yeast) immobilized in a microfluidic chamber, measuring protein efflux from single organisms in real time. The array is fabricated using non-covalent conjugation of an aptamer-anchor polynucleotide sequence to near-infrared emissive single-walled carbon nanotubes, using a variable chemical spacer shown to optimize sensor response. Unlabelled RAP1 GTPase and HIV integrase proteins were selectively detected from various cell lines, via large near-infrared fluorescent turn-on responses. We show that the process of E. coli induction, protein synthesis and protein export is highly stochastic, yielding variability in protein secretion, with E. coli cells undergoing division under starved conditions producing 66% fewer secreted protein products than their non-dividing counterparts. We further demonstrate the detection of a unique protein product resulting from T7 bacteriophage infection of E. coli, illustrating that nanosensor arrays can enable real-time, single-cell analysis of a broad range of protein products from various cell types.

  3. Fluorescent carbon quantum dots synthesized by chemical vapor deposition: An alternative candidate for electron acceptor in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bo; Yan, Lingpeng; Gu, Huimin; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Ma, Chang-Qi; Chen, Yongkang; Jia, Husheng

    2018-01-01

    Excitation-wavelength-dependent blue-greenish fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with graphite structure were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In comparison with those synthesized by hydrothermal method (named H-CQDs), C-CQDs have less hydrophilic terminal groups, showing good solubility in common organic solvents. Furthermore, these synthesized C-CQDs show a low LUMO energy level (LUMO = -3.84 eV), which is close to that of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM, LUMO = -4.01 eV), the most widely used electron acceptor in polymer solar cells. Photoluminescence quenching of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):C-CQDs blended film (P3HT:C-CQDs) indicated that a photo-induced charge transfer between P3HT and C-CQDs occurs in such a composite film. Bulk heterojunction solar cells using C-CQDs as electron acceptors or doping materials were fabricated and tested. High fill factors were achieved for these C-CQDs based polymer solar cells, demonstrating that CQDs synthesized by CVD could be alternative to the fullerene derivatives for applying in polymer solar cells.

  4. A Ratiometric Sensor Using Single Chirality Near-Infrared Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes: Application to In Vivo Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Juan P; Landry, Markita P; Kwak, Seon-Yeong; Jain, Rishabh M; Wong, Min Hao; Iverson, Nicole M; Ben-Naim, Micha; Strano, Michael S

    2015-08-26

    Advances in the separation and functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by their electronic type have enabled the development of ratiometric fluorescent SWCNT sensors for the first time. Herein, single chirality SWCNT are independently functionalized to recognize either nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), or no analyte (remaining invariant) to create optical sensor responses from the ratio of distinct emission peaks. This ratiometric approach provides a measure of analyte concentration, invariant to the absolute intensity emitted from the sensors and hence, more stable to external noise and detection geometry. Two distinct ratiometric sensors are demonstrated: one version for H(2)O(2), the other for NO, each using 7,6 emission, and each containing an invariant 6,5 emission wavelength. To functionalize these sensors from SWCNT isolated from the gel separation technique, a method for rapid and efficient coating exchange of single chirality sodium dodecyl sulfate-SWCNT is introduced. As a proof of concept, spatial and temporal patterns of the ratio sensor response to H(2)O(2) and, separately, NO, are monitored in leaves of living plants in real time. This ratiometric optical sensing platform can enable the detection of trace analytes in complex environments such as strongly scattering media and biological tissues. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Selective fluorescent sensing of α-amanitin in serum using carbon quantum dots-embedded specificity determinant imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liming; Tan, Lei; Li, He; Xu, Zhiguang; Shen, Guixian; Tang, Youwen

    2015-07-15

    α-amanitin could make patients die of acute liver failure within a short time if suitable treatment is not provided in a timely fashion. This paper demonstrates a new strategy for direct detection of α-amanitin in serum using carbon quantum dots-embedded specificity determinant imprinted polymers. According to the structure of α-amanitin, we selected a proper moiety of α-amanitin as specificity determinant to synthesize template to prepare the MIPs. The computer simulation was used to screen out acidic methacrylic acid (MAA) and basic 4-vinyl pyridine (4-Vpy) together as functional monomers, and the experiments further proved that synergistic interaction of MAA and 4-Vpy was beneficial to enhance the recognition capability of MIPs for α-amanitin. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity showed good linear correlations with the concentration of α-amanitin from 0.05 to 4.0μgmL(-1). The detection limit for α-amanitin was 15ngmL(-1). The nanoparticles were employed to directly detect α-amanitin in serum without any pretreatment with recoveries of 97.8-100.9%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bright point study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F.; Harvey, K.; Bruner, M.; Kent, B.; Antonucci, E.

    1982-01-01

    Transition region and coronal observations of bright points by instruments aboard the Solar Maximum Mission and high resolution photospheric magnetograph observations on September 11, 1980 are presented. A total of 31 bipolar ephemeral regions were found in the photosphere from birth in 9.3 hours of combined magnetograph observations from three observatories. Two of the three ephemeral regions present in the field of view of the Ultraviolet Spectrometer-Polarimeter were observed in the C IV 1548 line. The unobserved ephemeral region was determined to be the shortest-lived (2.5 hr) and lowest in magnetic flux density (13G) of the three regions. The Flat Crystal Spectrometer observed only low level signals in the O VIII 18.969 A line, which were not statistically significant to be positively identified with any of the 16 ephemeral regions detected in the photosphere. In addition, the data indicate that at any given time there lacked a one-to-one correspondence between observable bright points and photospheric ephemeral regions, while more ephemeral regions were observed than their counterparts in the transition region and the corona

  7. Luminescent colloidal carbon dots: optical properties and effects of doping [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckmeier, C J; Schneider, J; Susha, A S; Rogach, A L

    2016-01-25

    We review the effect of doping on the optical properties of luminescent colloidal carbon dots. They are considered as a hybrid material featuring both molecular and semiconductor-like characteristics, where doping plays an important role. Starting from the short overview of synthetic strategies, we consider the evolution of carbon dots from molecular precursors to fluorescent nanoparticles, and the relevant structural properties of carbon dots. Choice of the reactant materials, dopant atoms and reaction parameters provide carbon dots with varying optical properties. High chemical stability, bright luminescence and customizable surface functionalization of carbon dots open their use in a broad range of applications, which are exemplary presented at the end of this review.

  8. Dual Functional Core-Shell Fluorescent Ag2S@Carbon Nanostructure for Selective Assay of E. coli O157:H7 and Bactericidal Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Wei, Xing; Zheng, An-Qi; Yang, Ting; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2017-03-24

    A dual functional fluorescent core-shell Ag 2 S@Carbon nanostructure is prepared by a hydrothermally assisted multi-amino synthesis approach with folic acid (FA), polyethylenimine (PEI), and mannoses (Mans) as carbon and nitrogen sources (FA-PEI-Mans-Ag 2 S nanocomposite shortly as Ag 2 S@C). The nanostructure exhibits strong fluorescent emission at λ ex /λ em = 340/450 nm with a quantum yield of 12.57 ± 0.52%. Ag 2 S@C is bound to E. coli O157:H7 via strong interaction with the Mans moiety in Ag 2 S@C with FimH proteins on the fimbriae tip in E. coli O157:H7. Fluorescence emission from Ag 2 S@C/E. coli conjugate is closely related to the content of E. coli O157:H7. Thus, a novel procedure for fluorescence assay of E. coli O157:H7 is developed, offering a detection limit of 330 cfu mL -1 . Meanwhile, the Ag 2 S@C nanostructure exhibits excellent antibacterial performance against E. coli O157:H7. A 99.9% sterilization rate can be readily achieved for E. coli O157:H7 at a concentration of 10 6 -10 7 cfu mL -1 with 3.3 or 10 μg mL -1 of Ag 2 S@C with an interaction time of 5 or 0.5 min, respectively.

  9. A Ratiometric Fluorescence Universal Platform Based on N, Cu Codoped Carbon Dots to Detect Metabolites Participating in H2O2-Generation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunsu; Cen, Yao; Sohail, Muhammad; Xu, Guanhong; Wei, Fangdi; Shi, Menglan; Xu, Xiaoman; Song, Yueyue; Ma, Yujie; Hu, Qin

    2017-09-27

    In this work, a new kind of N, Cu codoped carbon dots (N/Cu-CDs) was prepared via a facile one-pot hydrothermal method by using citric acid monohydrate, copper acetate monohydrate and diethylenetriamine. The prepared N/Cu-CDs with a high quantum yield (50.1%) showed excitation-independent emission at 460 nm. The structure and fluorescence properties of N/Cu-CDs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectrofluorometer, FT-IR spectrometer, UV-visible spectrophotometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. N/Cu-CDs were applied to establishing a ratiometric fluorescence probe toward H 2 O 2 based on the inner filter effect (IFE) between N/Cu-CDs and DAP (2,3-diaminophenazine, the oxidative product of o-phenylenediamine (OPD)), and provided a ratiometric fluorescence universal platform for detection of the metabolites participating in H 2 O 2 -generation reactions (cholesterol and xanthine). The proposed method was demonstrated to be ultrasensitive and highly selective for cholesterol and xanthine assay with detection limits of 0.03 and 0.10 μM, respectively. The fluorescence probe built was applied to the determination of cholesterol and xanthine in human serum with satisfactory results.

  10. A Novel “Off-On” Fluorescent Probe Based on Carbon Nitride Nanoribbons for the Detection of Citrate Anion and Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescent “off-on” probe based on carbon nitride (C3N4 nanoribbons was developed for citrate anion (C6H5O73− detection. The fluorescence of C3N4 nanoribbons can be quenched by Cu2+ and then recovered by the addition of C6H5O73−, because the chelation between C6H5O73− and Cu2+ blocks the electron transfer between Cu2+ and C3N4 nanoribbons. The turn-on fluorescent sensor using this fluorescent “off-on” probe can detect C6H5O73− rapidly and selectively, showing a wide detection linear range (1~400 μM and a low detection limit (0.78 μM in aqueous solutions. Importantly, this C3N4 nanoribbon-based “off-on” probe exhibits good biocompatibility and can be used as fluorescent visualizer for exogenous C6H5O73− in HeLa cells.

  11. High brightness electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10{sup {minus}8} torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given.

  12. High brightness electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of accelerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity. 5 figs

  13. An “on-off-on” fluorescent nanoprobe for recognition of chromium(VI) and ascorbic acid based on phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped carbon quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xiaojuan, E-mail: gxj1124@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Liu, Yang; Yang, Zhenhua; Shuang, Shaomin [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Zhang, Zeyu [Faculty of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2017-05-22

    Chromium (VI) [Cr(VI)] is a harsh environmental contaminates and has been proved to be highly toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Therefore, developing an inexpensive, good selective and highly sensitive nanoprobe for the detection of Cr(VI) is in urgent demand. Recently, the highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have been successfully utilized as efficient fluorescent nanoprobes for the detection of ions, pH and molecular substances. In this work, an “on-off” fluorescence phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) probe was developed for the determination of Cr(VI) based on inner filter effect (IFE). The proposed PNCQDs nanoprobe shows its distinct merits of simplicity, convenience, fast implementation, good selectivity and high sensitivity towards Cr(VI), allowing its potential application in the determination of Cr(VI) in environment and biosystem. In addition, the chelation effect of the functional groups in reductant and Cr(VI), and the easy-conversion of Cr(VI) to reduced states (i.e. Cr(III) and Cr(0)) by reductants makes the minimization of IFE with a concomitant recovery of PNCQDs fluorescence possible. Hence, the PNCQDs/Cr(VI) hybrid was used as an “off-on” fluorescence probe for sensing ascorbic acid (AA), which is a model reductant. For the detection of Cr(VI), the linear range and the limit of detection achieved were 1.5–30 μmol/L and 23 nmol/L, respectively. For the detection of AA, the linear range and the limit of detection obtained were 5.0–200 μmol/L and 1.35 μmol/L, respectively. The as-constructed “on-off-on” PNCQDs fluorescent nanoprobe was successfully applied for detecting Cr(VI) and AA in biosystem. Furthermore, the as-constructed fluorescent sensing system was successfully applied to the analyses of AA in fresh fruits and in commercial fruit juices with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • Fast synthesis of phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) by acid-base neutralization carbonization method.

  14. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below. The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans. Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide. Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  15. Mixotrophic growth of two thermophilic Methanosarcina strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1997-01-01

    Two thermophilic strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, were capable of mixotrophic growth on methanol and H-2/CO2. Activated carbon was, however, found to be necessary to support good growth. Both strains used hydrogen and methanol simultaneously. When methanol...... was depleted, hydrogen utilization continued and methane was further produced with concurrent cell growth. UV epifluorescence microscopy revealed that aggregates of both strains exhibited a bright red fluorescence besides the usual blue-green fluorescence....

  16. Visual in vivo degradation of injectable hydrogel by real-time and non-invasive tracking using carbon nanodots as fluorescent indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Baoqiang; Xu, Feng; Li, Ying; Xu, Zheheng; Wei, Daqing; Feng, Yujie; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2017-11-01

    Visual in vivo degradation of hydrogel by fluorescence-related tracking and monitoring is crucial for quantitatively depicting the degradation profile of hydrogel in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, the commonly used fluorescent imaging usually encounters limitations, such as intrinsic photobleaching of organic fluorophores and uncertain perturbation of degradation induced by the change in molecular structure of hydrogel. To address these problems, we employed photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CNDs) with low photobleaching, red emission and good biocompatibility as fluorescent indicator for real-time and non-invasive visual in vitro/in vivo degradation of injectable hydrogels that are mixed with CNDs. The in vitro/in vivo toxicity results suggested that CNDs were nontoxic. The embedded CNDs in hydrogels did not diffuse outside in the absence of hydrogel degradation. We had acquired similar degradation kinetics (PBS-Enzyme) between gravimetric and visual determination, and established mathematical equation to quantitatively depict in vitro degradation profile of hydrogels for the predication of in vivo hydrogel degradation. Based on the in vitro data, we developed a visual platform that could quantitatively depict in vivo degradation behavior of new injectable biomaterials by real-time and non-invasive fluorescence tracking. This fluorescence-related visual imaging methodology could be applied to subcutaneous degradation of injectable hydrogel with down to 7 mm depth in small animal trials so far. This fluorescence-related visual imaging methodology holds great potentials for rational design and convenient in vivo screening of biocompatible and biodegradable injectable hydrogels in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic/NIR-responsive drug carrier, multicolor cell imaging, and enhanced photothermal therapy of gold capped magnetite-fluorescent carbon hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Cao, Guixin; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2015-05-07

    This paper reports a type of multifunctional hybrid nanoparticle (NP) composed of gold nanocrystals coated on and/or embedded in a magnetite-fluorescent porous carbon core-shell NP template (Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au) for biomedical applications, including magnetic/NIR-responsive drug release, multicolor cell imaging, and enhanced photothermal therapy. The synthesis of the Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs firstly involves the preparation of core-shell template NPs with magnetite nanocrystals clustered in the cores and fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) embedded in a porous carbon shell, followed by an in situ reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) loaded in the porous carbon shell and a subsequent replacement of Ag NPs with Au NPs through a galvanic replacement reaction using HAuCl4 as a precursor. The Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs can enter the intracellular region and light up mouse melanoma B16F10 cells in multicolor mode. The porous carbon shell, anchored with hydrophilic hydroxyl/carboxyl groups, endows the Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs with excellent stability in the aqueous phase and a high loading capacity (719 mg g(-1)) for the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). The superparamagnetic Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs with a saturation magnetization of 23.26 emu g(-1) produce localized heat under an alternating magnetic field, which triggers the release of the loaded drug. The combined photothermal effects of the Au nanocrystals and the CDs on/in the carbon shell can not only regulate the release rate of the loaded drug, but also efficiently kill tumor cells under NIR irradiation. Benefitting from their excellent optical properties, their magnetic field and NIR light-responsive drug release capabilities and their enhanced photothermal effect, such nanostructured Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au hybrid NPs are very promising for simultaneous imaging diagnostics and high efficacy therapy.

  18. One-step synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets with the help of melamine and its application for fluorescence detection of mercuric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qianfen; Sun, Liming; Ni, Yongnian

    2017-03-01

    A facile, simple, and relatively environment-friendly hydrothermal approach was developed for one-step synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (GCNNs) using melamine and sodium citrate as the precursors. The prepared GCNNs emit strong fluorescence with a high quantum yield of 48.3%. The GCNNs were then characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. In addition, the fluorescence quenching behavior of the GCNNS by mercuric ions (Hg 2+ ) was exploited to fabricate a label-free fluorescence quenching sensor for sensitive and selective detection of Hg 2+ . The results showed that there existed a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Hg 2+ from 0.001 to 1.0μM with a detection limit of 0.3nM. Finally, the sensor was successfully used to detection of Hg 2+ in water and milk samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescence sensing of nanomolar Zn2+ions in aqueous medium using Calix[4]arene passivated Carbon Quantum Dots based on fluorescence enhancement: Real-time monitoring and intracellular investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harpreet; Raj, Pushap; Sharma, Hemant; Verma, Meenakshi; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet

    2018-06-07

    Carbon Quantum Dots (CDs) owing to its unique photophysical properties have attracted immense consideration of the researchers in last decade to explore its applications in the fields of bio-imaging and sensing. In the present work, we have developed a novel CDs functionalized with Calix[4]arene derivative by hydrothermal route to detect biologically pertinent Zn 2+ ions. Surface modification of CDs enhances fluorescence efficiency apart from introducing active surface sites broadening its sensor capabilities. The obtained surface-functionalized CDs exhibits a strong blue fluorescence under UV light (365 nm) with a quantum yield (Φ) of 56% which is appreciably good. Zn 2+ ions get apprehended in the cavity formed due to passivation by Calix[4]arene moeity on the exterior of CDs having profuse -NH 2 groups. Addition of Zn 2+ ions into the solution of CDs results in remarkable enhancement in the fluorescence intensity attributed to Photo-induced Electron Transfer (PET) "OFF" phenomenon. The CDs based nanosensor exhibited a wide linear response with a detection limit of 7.34 nM. Significantly, CDs were shown to display insignificant cytotoxicity, decent biocompatibility, and virtuous resistance to photo-bleaching, good stability over a wide range of pH, insignificant variation in the emission intensity in the presence of high concentration of salt and excellent bio-labeling ability when tested on E. coli cell lines. Additionally, the detection results of Zn 2+ ions obtained in real samples were in complete agreement with that obtained by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS), signifying the prospective application of the proposed probe as a selective and sensitive sensor for Zn 2+ ions. The proposed sensor was also applied for fluorescence imaging of intracellular Zn 2+ ions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of methotrexate conjugated fluorescent carbon nanoparticles as drug delivery system for human lung cancer targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Yunus, Uzma; Matin, Abdul; Haq, Noaman Ul

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology based cancer therapeutics have rapidly advanced towards the solution of many limitations associated with other drug delivery agents such as nonspecific distribution within the body, low water solubility and non-biocompatibility. Carbon nanoparticles have demonstrated unique properties that are useful to combat with these issues, including their properties dependent on size, high stability in different solvents, compatible size for drug delivery and ease of surface modifications. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with good water solubility were obtained from a carbohydrate source by acid assisted ultrasonic treatment at 35kHz for 4h. This simple and economical method can be used for large scale production. Electron microscopic, spectroscopic and thermo gravimetric analysis techniques were used to characterize these carbon nanoparticles. Functionalized CNPs were further conjugated with anticancer drug-methotrexate and used as fluorescent nano-carriers. In this research work, we determined the in vitro bioactivity of CNPs-methotrexate conjugates by lactate dehydrogenase assay, cell adhesion assay and sulforhodamine B assay in human lung carcinoma cell line (H157). The CNPs showed promising biocompatibility and CNPs-MTX conjugates demonstrated potent cytotoxic effects and high anticancer activities in human lung cancer cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. New era of satellite chlorophyll fluorescence and soil moisture observations leads to advances in the predictive understanding of global terrestrial coupled carbon-water cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, B.; Xue, Y.; Fisher, J.; Guo, W.

    2017-12-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle and water cycle are coupled through a multitude of connected processes among soil, roots, leaves, and the atmosphere. The strength and sensitivity of these couplings are not yet well known at the global scale, which contributes to uncertainty in predicting the terrestrial water and carbon budgets. For the first time, we now have synchronous, high fidelity, global-scale satellite observations of critical terrestrial carbon and water cycle components: sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) and soil moisture. We used these observations within the framework of a well-established global terrestrial biosphere model (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model version 2.0, SSiB2) to investigate carbon-water coupling processes. We updated SSiB2 to include a mechanistic representation of SIF and tested the sensitivity of model parameters to improve the simulation of both SIF and soil moisture with the ultimate objective of improving the first-order terrestrial carbon component, gross primary production (GPP). Although several vegetation parameters, such as leaf area index (LAI) and green leaf fraction, improved the simulated SIF, and several soil parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, improved simulated soil moisture, their effects were mainly limited to their respective cycles. One parameter emerged as the key coupler between the carbon and water cycles: the wilting point. Updates to the wilting point significantly improved the simulations for both soil moisture and SIF, as well as GPP. This study demonstrates the value of synchronous global measurements of the terrestrial carbon and water cycles in improving the understanding of coupled carbon-water cycles.

  3. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiheng [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Di [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xia, Lian [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Chen, Xuefeng [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Li, Guoliang, E-mail: 61254368@163.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Qiu, Nannan [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10{sup −8} M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  4. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon FluxMeasurements ofMontanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ač, Alexander; Malenovský, Z.; Urban, Otmar; Hanuš, Jan; Zitová, Martina; Navrátil, M.; Vráblová, M.; Olejníčková, Julie; Špunda, V.; Marek, Michal V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 1-13 ISSN 1537-744X R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * carbon flux * forest ecosystems * Norway Spruce * temperate zone Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012

  5. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, record brightness levels for direct diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  6. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Facile synthesis of carbon dot and residual carbon nanobeads: Implications for ion sensing, medicinal and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Rohit Ranganathan; Mukherjee, Sudip; Punugupati, Neelambaram; Vasudevan, D; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Narayan, Ramanuj; Vsn Kothapalli, Raju

    2017-04-01

    Synthesis of carbon dots (Cdots) via chemical route involves disintegration of carbon materials into nano-domains, wherein, after extraction of Cdots, the remaining carbon material is discarded. The present work focuses on studying even the leftover carbon residue namely, carbon nanobeads (CNBs) as an equally important material for applications on par with that of carbon dot. It employs oxidative treatment of carbonised gum olibanum resin (GOR) to produce the carbons namely Cdots and CNBs (as the residue). The Cdots (~5-10nm) exhibit blue-green fluorescence with an optical absorption at ~300nm unlike the CNBs (40-50nm) which fail to exhibit fluorescence. The fluorescence behaviour exhibited by Cdots were utilized for heavy metal ion sensing of Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ and Cd 2+ ions in aqueous media. Interestingly, both Cdots and CNBs are biocompatible to normal cell lines but cytotoxic to cancer cell lines, observed during several in vitro experiments (cell viability assay, cell cycle assay, apoptosis assay, ROS determination assay, caspase-9 activity assay). Additionally, Cdots exhibit bright green fluorescence in B16F10 cells. The Cdots and CNB's demonstrate multifunctional activities (sensor, cellular imaging and cancer therapy) in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On Variability in Satellite Terrestrial Chlorophyll Fluorescence Measurements: Relationships with Phenology and Ecosystem-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange, Vegetation Structure, Clouds, and Sun-Satellite Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Guanter, L.; Zhang, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Schaefer, K. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Middleton, E.; Koehler, P.; Jung, M.; Tucker, C. J.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Frankenberg, C.; Berry, J. A.; Koster, R. D.; Reichle, R. H.; Lee, J. E.; Kawa, S. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Walker, G. K.; Van der Tol, C.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been several breakthroughs in our ability to detect the very small fluorescence emitted by chlorophyll in vegetation globally from space. There are now multiple instruments in space capable of measuring this signal at varying temporal and spatial resolutions. We will review the state-of-the-art with respect to these relatively new satellite measurements and ongoing studies that examine the relationships with photosynthesis. Now that we have a data record spanning more than seven years, we can examine variations due to seasonal carbon uptake, interannual variability, land-use changes, and water and temperature stress. In addition, we examine how clouds and satellite viewing geometry impact the signal. We compare and contrast these variations with those from popular vegetation indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), related to the potential photosynthesis as well as with measurements from flux tower gas exchange measurements and other model-based estimates of Global Primary Productivity (GPP). Vegetation fluorescence can be simulated in global vegetation models as well as with 1D canopy radiative transport models. We will describe how the satellite fluorescence data are being used to evaluate and potentially improve these models.

  9. Determination of absorbed dose to water in a clinical carbon ion beam by means of fluorescent nuclear track detectors, ionization chambers, and water calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga-Blaettermann, Julia-Maria

    2016-12-20

    Until now, dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the threefold higher uncertainty of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor of ionization chambers, which is derived by calculations due to a lack of experimental data. The current thesis comprises two major aims with respect to the dosimetry of carbon ion beams: first, the investigation of the potential of fluorescent nuclear track detectors for fluence-based dosimetry and second, the experimental determination of the k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factor. The direct comparison of fluence- and ionization-based measurements has shown a significant discrepancy of 4.5 %, which re-opened the discussion on the accuracy of calculated k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}-factors. Therefore, absorbed dose to water measurements by means of water calorimetry have been performed allowing for the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus for the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}}. For the first time it could be shown that the experimental determination of k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for carbon ion beams is achievable with a standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8 %. This corresponds to a threefold reduction of the uncertainty compared to calculated values and therefore enables to significantly decrease the overall uncertainty related to ionization-based dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams.

  10. An investigation into the role of macromolecules of different polarity as passivating agent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of fluorescent carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Melis Ozge; Genc, Rukan

    2017-05-01

    In this study, comparative evaluation of fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-Dots) prepared using carob molasses was reported by screening various biocompatible macromolecules as passivating agent (PA). Incorporation of PAs with different molecular weight, polarity, and chemical structure was examined, and compared with the polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mn = 10 kN) passivated and pristine C-Dots. Not only the fluorescence properties but also many other features including size, crystal structure, colloidal conductivity, resistance to photobleaching, quantum yield, and UV-modulated surface interaction of them with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as ROS production were investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) capacity of C-Dots was found to be associated with the number of surface alkyl groups and polymeric hydrogen bounding present on the C-Dot surface (increased number is associated with decreased PL) while surface conductivity of C-Dots in water was proportional to the PL intensity. More importantly, C-Dots with relatively poorer fluorescent were investigated in various organic solvents (hexane, methanol, acetone, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), and DMSO). As happens with the fluorescent dyes, their PL intensities were significantly enhanced (even for pristine C-Dots) depending on the solvent characteristics. All of the C-Dots synthesized were further evaluated by means of UV-induced generation of ROS and inhibition of ROS by using H2O2 as model. In contrary to other carbonaceous nanomaterials, they did not show any ROS generation, on the contrary, they showed ROS scavenging activity that can be modulated by UV-irradiation ( λ exc = 365 nm). PEG and alginate passivated C-Dots inhibited H2O2 activity at LC50 values below 10 mg/mL.

  11. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin; Gao, Tangling; Yao, Tai; Han, Jiecai; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Qiong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C 3 N 4 as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe 3+ detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe 3+ ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  12. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gao, Tangling [Institute of Petrochemistry, Heilongjiang Academy of Sciences, Harbin 150040 (China); Yao, Tai [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Jiecai [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Zhengbin, E-mail: hanzhengbin@hit.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Zhihua [Liaoning Key Materials Laboratory for Railway, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Wu, Qiong [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe{sup 3+} detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe{sup 3+} ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  13. The determination, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, of gold, silver, and base metals on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, G.; Jacobs, J.J.; Dixon, K.

    1980-01-01

    The method proposed involves ashing of the sample at a low temperature in a muffle furnace, mixing of the ash with alumina and boric acid in a Siebtechnik mill, and briquetting of the mixture. The elements are measured in the briquette by the use of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The detailed laboratory method is given in an appendix [af

  14. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  15. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  16. Bright Light Treatment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bright light treatment is a treatment modality that leads elevation of mood due to attenuation in depressive symptoms, regulation in circadian rhythm activity, increase the effect of antidepressants and amelioration in sleep quality. Bright light treatment is considered among the first-line treatments for seasonal affective disorder because of high response rates. Additionally, bright light treatment being extended to other conditions, including non-seasonal mood disorders, Alzheimer's disease, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other behavioral syndromes is likely to have a far reached use. Side effects are often temporary and can generally be overcome by reducing exposure time. The central focus on this paper is to review the action mechanisms, efficacy, usage areas, the ways of administration and side effects of the light treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(2.000: 177-188

  17. Novel fluorescent nanoparticles for ultrasensitive identification of nucleic acids by optical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulberg, Mads Westergaard; Taskova, Maria; Thomsen, Rasmus P.

    2017-01-01

    aimed at developing efficient tools for amplification-free nucleic acid detection. The result of simple and inexpensive polymerization in the presence of fluorescent dyes and additional functionalization reagents was ultra-bright fluorescent nanoparticles modified with additional groups...

  18. A spectral k-means approach to bright-field cell image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Laura; Wan, Justin W L

    2010-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of bright-field cell images is important to cell biologists, but difficult to complete due to the complex nature of the cells in bright-field images (poor contrast, broken halo, missing boundaries). Standard approaches such as level set segmentation and active contours work well for fluorescent images where cells appear as round shape, but become less effective when optical artifacts such as halo exist in bright-field images. In this paper, we present a robust segmentation method which combines the spectral and k-means clustering techniques to locate cells in bright-field images. This approach models an image as a matrix graph and segment different regions of the image by computing the appropriate eigenvectors of the matrix graph and using the k-means algorithm. We illustrate the effectiveness of the method by segmentation results of C2C12 (muscle) cells in bright-field images.

  19. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Christopher; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Bob; Heppert, Jennifer; Dickinson, Daniel; Pani, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo . Recent advances in genome editing have enabled precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments, and they facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent p...

  20. Detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in sooting hydrocarbon flames using femtosecond two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TPLIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse, femtosecond (fs)-duration, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TPLIF) measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) are reported in rich, sooting hydrocarbon flames. CO-TPLIF detection using conventional nanosecond or picosecond lasers are often plagued by photochemical interferences, specifically under fuel-rich flames conditions. In the current study, we investigate the commonly used CO two-photon excitation scheme of the B1Σ+ ← X1Σ+ electronic transition, using approximately 100-fs-duration excitation pulses. Fluorescence emission was observed in the Ångström band originating from directly populated B1Σ+ upper state, as well as, in the third positive band from collisionally populated b3Σ+ upper state. The current work was focused on the Ångström band emission. Interference from nascent C2 emissions originating from hot soot particles in the flame could be reduced to a negligible level using a narrower detection gate width. In contrast, avoiding interferences from laser-generated C2 Swan-band emissions required specific narrowband spectral filtering in sooting flame conditions. The observed less than quadratic laser pulse energy dependence of the TPLIF signal suggests the presence of strong three-photon ionization and stimulated emission processes. In a range of CH4/air and C2H4/air premixed flames investigated, the measured CO fluorescence signals agree well with the calculated equilibrium CO number densities. Reduced-interference CO-TPLIF imaging in premixed C2H4/O2/N2 jet flames is also reported.

  1. Electronic setup for fluorescence emission measurements and long-time constant-temperature maintenance of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes in water solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Rosa Matteo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In our previous research we have observed that the fluorescence emission from water solutions of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (SWCNT, excited by a laser with a wavelength of 830nm, diminishes with the time. We have already proved that such a fading is a function of the storage time and the storage temperature. In order to study the emission of the SWCNT as a function of these two parameters we have designed and realized a special measurement compartment with a cuvette holder where the SWCNT solutions can be measured and stored at a fixed constant temperature for periods of time as long as several weeks. To maintain the measurement setup under a constant temperature we have designed special experimental setup based on two Peltier cells with electronic temperature control.

  2. Antibacterial and Antibiofouling Properties of Light Triggered Fluorescent Hydrophobic Carbon Quantum Dots Langmuir-Blodgett Thin Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stanković, N. K.; Bodik, M.; Šiffalovič, P.; Kotlár, M.; Mičušik, M.; Špitalsky, Z.; Danko, M.; Milivojević, D. D.; Kleinová, A.; Kubát, Pavel; Capáková, Z.; Humpolíček, P.; Lehocký, M.; Todorović Marković, B. M.; Marković, Z. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2018), s. 4154-4163 ISSN 2168-0485 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05095S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Hydrophobic carbon quantum dots * Langmuir-Blodgett thin films * Photodynamic therapy * Singlet oxygen Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.951, year: 2016

  3. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  4. A simplistic approach to green future with eco-friendly luminescent carbon dots and their application to fluorescent nano-sensor 'turn-off' probe for selective sensing of copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Poushali; Ganguly, Sayan; Bose, Madhuparna; Mondal, Subhadip; Das, Amit Kumar; Banerjee, Susanta; Das, Narayan Chandra

    2017-06-01

    Zero-dimensional fluorescent nanoparticles having specificity as molecular probe appears to be strategically balanced fluorescent nano-probes. In this work, purified lemon extract and l-arginine have been thermally coupled for the extremely acute detection of Cu 2+ in aqueous medium. The Cu 2+ ions may be captured by the amino groups on the surface of the nano-sensor to form cupric ammine complex resulting in quenched fluorescence via an inner filter effect. Our proposed nano-probe is N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) which are efficiently selective as fluorescent chemosensor due to enormous binding affinity towards Cu 2+ in a wide range of concentration (0.05-300μM) within a few minutes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, J M; McDonald, G S; Chamorro-Posada, P

    2007-01-01

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts

  6. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  7. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  8. Quantitative Image Restoration in Bright Field Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Sánchez Miranda, Manuel de Jesús

    2017-11-07

    Bright field (BF) optical microscopy is regarded as a poor method to observe unstained biological samples due to intrinsic low image contrast. We introduce quantitative image restoration in bright field (QRBF), a digital image processing method that restores out-of-focus BF images of unstained cells. Our procedure is based on deconvolution, using a point spread function modeled from theory. By comparing with reference images of bacteria observed in fluorescence, we show that QRBF faithfully recovers shape and enables quantify size of individual cells, even from a single input image. We applied QRBF in a high-throughput image cytometer to assess shape changes in Escherichia coli during hyperosmotic shock, finding size heterogeneity. We demonstrate that QRBF is also applicable to eukaryotic cells (yeast). Altogether, digital restoration emerges as a straightforward alternative to methods designed to generate contrast in BF imaging for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of molecular carbon radical concentrations by saturated laser-induced fluorescence in hydrocarbon flames at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Michele; D'Apice, Massimo; Giammartini, Stefano; Magaldi, M.; Romano, G. P.

    2003-09-01

    The C2 abundance in flames at atmospheric pressure is reported for three fuel-rich combustion environments: acetylene/oxygen, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)/air and methane/air flames. Measurements have been based on spectrographic and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of the Δv = -1 d3IIg-a3IIu band. The oxyacetylene flame was utilized to establish a comparison with literature data and absolute values, calibrated through Rayleigh scattering, were found to be distributed within the 1014 cm-3 range. The induced emission from two Bunsen flames fed with LPG/air or methane/air was also investigated. Accumulated acquisitions were necessary to detect small C2 quantities in the order of 1010 cm-3 concentrated on the flame front.

  10. Bright triplet excitons in caesium lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael A.; Vaxenburg, Roman; Nedelcu, Georgian; Sercel, Peter C.; Shabaev, Andrew; Mehl, Michael J.; Michopoulos, John G.; Lambrakos, Samuel G.; Bernstein, Noam; Lyons, John L.; Stöferle, Thilo; Mahrt, Rainer F.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Norris, David J.; Rainò, Gabriele; Efros, Alexander L.

    2018-01-01

    Nanostructured semiconductors emit light from electronic states known as excitons. For organic materials, Hund’s rules state that the lowest-energy exciton is a poorly emitting triplet state. For inorganic semiconductors, similar rules predict an analogue of this triplet state known as the ‘dark exciton’. Because dark excitons release photons slowly, hindering emission from inorganic nanostructures, materials that disobey these rules have been sought. However, despite considerable experimental and theoretical efforts, no inorganic semiconductors have been identified in which the lowest exciton is bright. Here we show that the lowest exciton in caesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3, with X = Cl, Br or I) involves a highly emissive triplet state. We first use an effective-mass model and group theory to demonstrate the possibility of such a state existing, which can occur when the strong spin–orbit coupling in the conduction band of a perovskite is combined with the Rashba effect. We then apply our model to CsPbX3 nanocrystals, and measure size- and composition-dependent fluorescence at the single-nanocrystal level. The bright triplet character of the lowest exciton explains the anomalous photon-emission rates of these materials, which emit about 20 and 1,000 times faster than any other semiconductor nanocrystal at room and cryogenic temperatures, respectively. The existence of this bright triplet exciton is further confirmed by analysis of the fine structure in low-temperature fluorescence spectra. For semiconductor nanocrystals, which are already used in lighting, lasers and displays, these excitons could lead to materials with brighter emission. More generally, our results provide criteria for identifying other semiconductors that exhibit bright excitons, with potential implications for optoelectronic devices.

  11. Does low surface brightness mean low density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1996-01-01

    We compare the dynamical properties of two galaxies at identical positions on the Tully-Fisher relation, but with different surface brightnesses. We find that the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 128 has a higher mass-to-light ratio, and yet has lower mass densities than the high surface brightness

  12. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Correlations between optical surface brightness and the radio properties of spiral galaxies are investigated. It is found that galaxies with high surface brightness are more likely to be strong continuum radio sources and that galaxies with low surface brightness have high 21-cm line emission. (author)

  13. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines

  14. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  15. A facile method to prepare fluorescent carbon dots and their application in selective colorimetric sensing of silver ion through the formation of silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; P, Suresh Kumar; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a laboratory convenient method for the preparation of blue color emitting fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) in 60 min by boiling the alkaline solution of pectin. The C-dots derived from pectin detects selectively silver ion by forming silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) without any irradiation or heating or additional reducing agents. As prepared AgNPs appears yellow in color and showed the characteristic surface plasmon resonance maximum at 410 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed crystalline, spherical AgNPs with size range from 10–15 nm. Cyclic voltammetry study revealed that the lower reduction potential of C-dots than that of silver ion favors the reduction of Ag + to Ag°. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed the charge transfer value for the redox reaction of C-dots as 200 Ωcm 2 . In the presence of Ag + , C-dots fluorescence emission was turned from blue to cyan to green to colorless, accompanying the quenching and red shift in emission maximum at 450 nm. Interference study clearly showed that the C-dots have high preference for Ag + ion than the other interfering metal ions. The proposed sensor system selectively senses Ag + ion in water at micromolar concentration and also offers an easy procedure to prepare AgNPs in the presence of other interfering metal ions. - Highlights: • Blue color emitting C-dots was prepared by boiling alkaline pectin solution. • C-dots sense silver ion at micromolar concentration. • C-dots recognize silver ion in the presence of interfering metal ions. • Reduction potential of C-dots was estimated by cyclic voltammeter as – 0.2 V.

  16. Low surface brightness spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanishin, W.

    1980-01-01

    This dissertation presents an observational overview of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies. The sample galaxies were chosen to have low surface brightness disks and indications of spiral structure visible on the Palomar Sky Survey. They are of sufficient angular size (diameter > 2.5 arcmin), to allow detailed surface photometry using Mayall 4-m prime focus plates. The major findings of this dissertation are: (1) The average disk central surface brightness of the LSB galaxies is 22.88 magnitude/arcsec 2 in the B passband. (2) From broadband color measurements of the old stellar population, we infer a low average stellar metallicity, on the order of 1/5 solar. (3) The spectra and optical colors of the HII regions in the LSB galaxies indicate a lack of hot ionizing stars compared to HII regions in other late-type galaxies. (4) The average surface mass density, measured within the radius containing half the total mass, is less than half that of a sample of normal late-type spirals. (5) The average LSB galaxy neutral hydrogen mass to blue luminosity ratio is about 0.6, significantly higher than in a sample of normal late-type galaxies. (6) We find no conclusive evidence of an abnormal mass-to-light ratio in the LSB galaxies. (7) Some of the LSB galaxies exhibit well-developed density wave patterns. (8) A very crude calculation shows the lower metallicity of the LSB galaxies compared with normal late-type spirals might be explained simply by the deficiency of massive stars in the LSB galaxies

  17. High-brightness electron injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators and synchrotron light sources require pulse trains of high peak brightness and, in some applications, high-average power. Recent developments in the technology of photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for electron-linac injector applications offer promising advances over conventional electron injectors. Reduced emittance growth in high peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by using high field strengths and by linearizing the radial component of the cavity electric field at the expense of lower shunt impedance

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  19. Evaluating the relationships between solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence from Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 and gross primary productivity from eddy covariance flux towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Xiao, J.; He, B.

    2017-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) opens a new perspective on the monitoring of vegetation photosynthesis from space, and has been recently used to estimate gross primary productivity (GPP). However, previous studies on SIF were mainly based on satellite observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2), and the evaluation of these coarse-resolution SIF measurements using GPP derived from eddy covariance (EC) flux towers has been hindered by the scale mismatch between satellite and tower footprints. We use new far-red SIF observations from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite with much finer spatial resolution and GPP data from EC flux towers from 2014 to 2016 to examine the relationship between GPP and SIF for temperate forests. The OCO-2 SIF tracked tower GPP fairly well, and had strong correlation with tower GPP at both retrieval bands (757nm and 771nm) and both instantaneous (mid-day) and daily timescales. Daily SIF at 757nm (SIF757) exhibited much stronger correlation with tower GPP compared to MODIS enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) derived from either Terra or Aqua and had a similarly strong relationship as EVI based on the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) corrected reflectance product (Terra+Aqua). Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) explained 85% of the variance in SIF757, while the product of APAR and two environmental scalars - fTmin and fVPD (representing minimum temperature stress and water stress) explained slightly higher variance (92%) in SIF757. This suggests that SIF mainly depends on APAR and also contains information on light use efficiency (LUE) reflecting environmental stresses and physiological or biochemical variations of vegetation. The hyperbolic model based on SIF757 estimated GPP well (R2=0.81, pforests and its potential in future ecosystem functioning and carbon

  20. Determination of trace elements in calcium rich carbonate rocks by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry for environmental and geological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashina, T Yu; Shtel'makh, S I; Pashkova, G V

    2017-12-01

    A simple, rapid and non destructive Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (WDXRFS) was developed for the determination of trace elements such as V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, and Nb in carbonate rocks with high calcium content. Samples of marble, limestone, fluorite ore and carbonatite-like rocks were chosen as objects under investigation. These samples have wide ranges of major and trace element contents, and high concentration of calcite (70-98%) in calcium rich carbonates. The sample mass required for infinite thickness was calculated for each element. In order to determine V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba, La, Nd, Ce, sample weighting 1g was pressed with a pressure of 100kN. For the determination of Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Pb, the sample mass was increased up to 5g. The calibration curves were constructed by employing the International Certified reference materials (ICRMs) and in-house standard reference materials (HSRMs) of various types of rocks and sediments, and the matrix effects were taken into account using the influence coefficients (α-correction equations). Analytical figures of merit have also been assessed. The calculated values of the instrumental limit of the detection were within the interval from 0.5 to 4.0mgkg -1 . The repeatability and reproducibility were found to be satisfactory with the relative standard deviations lower than 5%. The accuracy was evaluated by the analysis of two reference materials and the comparison with the ICP-MS results. A good agreement was achieved between the reference and measured values with recoveries ranging from 85% to 115%. The relative disagreements between the XRF and ICP-MS results were less than 10%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of Cancer Cell-Based pH-Sensitive Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles of Cross-Linked Polydopamine by Fluorescence Sensing of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity on Coated Surfaces and Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Bi; Choi, Cheong A; Mazrad, Zihnil Adha Islamy; Kim, Sung Han; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2017-12-19

    The tumor-specific sensitive fluorescence sensing of cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on the basis of host-guest specific and pH sensitivity was conducted on coated surfaces and aqueous states. Cross-linked fluorescent nanoparticles (C-FNP) consisting of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)/boronic acid (BA) and fluorescent hyaluronic acid [FNP(HA)] were conjugated to fluorescent polydopamine [FNP(pDA)]. To determine the quenching effect of this system, hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP) to 4-nitrophenol (NP) was performed in the cavity of β-CD in the presence of ALP activated photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between NP and C-FNP. At an ALP level of 30-1000 U/L, NP caused off-emission of C-FNP because of their specific host-guest recognition. Fluorescence can be recovered under pH shock due to cleavage of the diol bond between β-CD and BA, resulting in release of NP from the fluorescent system. Sensitivity of the assays was assessed by confocal imaging not only in aqueous states, but also for the first time on coated surfaces in MDAMB-231 and MDCK cells. This novel system demonstrated high sensitivity to ALP through generation of good electron donor/acceptor pair during the PET process. Therefore, this fluorescence sensor system can be used to enhance ALP monitoring and cancer diagnosis on both coated surfaces and in aqueous states in clinical settings.

  3. The lowest surface brightness disc galaxy known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.I.; Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a galaxy with a prominent bulge and a dominant extremely low surface brightness disc component is reported. The profile of this galaxy is very similar to the recently discovered giant low surface brightness galaxy Malin 1. The disc central surface brightness is found to be ∼ 26.4 Rμ, some 1.5 mag fainter than Malin 1 and thus by far the lowest yet observed. (author)

  4. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguang Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of the tested square area was physically unchanged. The results show that when the black surround inducing brightness contrast suddenly became gray (i.e., vanished, the center gray square tended to look darker than a control gray square. Similarly, after viewing a subjective square consisting of black-line terminations, the square area tended to look darker than the control even though the afterimage of the lines could not be seen. These results indicate that induced or illusory brightness causes an aftereffect in brightness regardless of the appearance of negative afterimages of the illusion-inducing components.

  5. Structure of bright-rimmed molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootten, A.; Sargent, A.; Knapp, G.; Huggins, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Five bright-rimmed molecular clouds, NGC 1977, IC 1396, IC 1848 A, B35, and NGC 7822, have been mapped with 30'' resolution in the J = 2--1 lines of 12 co. For the first three, 13 CO maps have also been made. The spatial distributions of temperature, density, and molecular abundance in these clouds have been determined, particularly in the vicinity of the rims. In general, the gas densities increase close to the rims, but temperature enhancements occur over comparatively extended regions. Near the rims the gas kinematics is varied: velocity gradients are observed in several regions, and in IC 1396 line broadening is distinguishable. A detailed study of the excitation of 13 CO demonstrates that near the well-resolved rim in NGC 1977 where C I and carbon recombination lines have been observed, there is a definite decline in the CO abundance. These molecular clouds span a variety of stages of star formation, but in none does the interaction with the adjacent H II region appear to have substantially affected the course of the star-forming history of the cloud

  6. Understanding, improving and using green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, A B; Heim, R; Adams, S R; Boyd, A E; Gross, L A; Tsien, R Y

    1995-11-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are presently attracting tremendous interest as the first general method to create strong visible fluorescence by purely molecular biological means. So far, they have been used as reporters of gene expression, tracers of cell lineage, and as fusion tags to monitor protein localization within living cells. However, the GFP originally cloned from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has several nonoptimal properties including low brightness, a significant delay between protein synthesis and fluorescence development, and complex photoisomerization. Fortunately, the protein can be re-engineered by mutagenesis to ameliorate these deficiencies and shift the excitation and emission wavelengths, creating different colors and new applications.

  7. Kinematics of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, TE; Davies, JI; Impey, C; Phillipps, S

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity H I observations now exist for six giant low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies including the two prototypes, Malin 1 (Bothun et al. 1987; Impey & Bothun 1989) and F568-6 (also known as Malin 2; Bothun et al. 1990). Their H I surface brightnesses are generally low, but

  8. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies.

  9. Spectrophotometric study of five bright meteors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, K.Kh.; Zolowa, O.F.

    1971-01-01

    The results of 200 spectrophotometric study of five bright meteors and indentification of spectral lines are given. Distribution of energy for different points of the paths of meteors is found. Masses of meteor particles are determined on the base of integrated curves of brightness

  10. Infrared-Bright Interacting Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Ruiz, Sofia; Murphy, Eric Joseph; Armus, Lee; Smith, John-David; Bradford, Charles Matt; Stierwalt, Sabrina

    2018-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared spectral mapping of eight LIRG-class interacting galaxies: NGC 6670, NGC 7592, IIZw 96, IIIZw 35, Arp 302, Arp 236, Arp 238, Arp 299. The properties of galaxy mergers, which are bright and can be studied at high resolutions at low-z, provide local analogs for sources that may be important contributors to the Far Infrared Background (FIRB.) In order to study star formation and the physical conditions in the gas and dust in our sample galaxies, we used the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) to map the galaxies over the 5-35 μm window to trace the PAH, molecular hydrogen, and atomic fine structure line emission on scales of 1.4 – 5.3 kpc. Here we present the reduction for low and high-resolution data, and preliminary results in the analysis of fine structure line ratios and dust features in the two nuclei and interacting regions from one of our sample galaxies, NGC 6670.

  11. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  12. Preparation of the Water-Soluble Pyrene-Containing Fluorescent Polymer by One-Pot Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new water-soluble pyrene-containing fluorescent polymer, 1-{3′-S-[poly(acryloyl ethylene diamine hydrochloride-2′-methyl propionic acid]}propionyloxy hexyloxy pyrene (P3 with defined structure, was designed and synthesized using the click reaction between thiol and a carbon-carbon double bond. The intermediate products P1 (S-1-dodecyl-S′-[poly(N-Boc-acryloyl ethylene diamine-2′-methyl propionic acid]trithiocarbonate and AHP (1-(acryloyloxy hexyloxypyrene were prepared via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization and Williamson synthesis, respectively. Conjugating AHP with P1, P2 (1-{3′-S-[poly(N-butoxycarbonyl-acryloyl ethylene diamine-2″-methyl propionic acid]} propionyloxy hexyloxy pyrene was synthesized, adopting both the reduction reaction of a trithioester bond of P1 to thiol and the click reaction between thiol and the carbon-carbon double bond of AHP simultaneously. P3 was obtained by the deprotection of the resulting Boc-protected polymer (P2 with aqueous HCl. The experiment results showed that P2 exhibited a bright blue-violet emission band at approximately 387–429 nm. After deprotection, P3 displayed good solubility in water and not only exhibited a blue-violet fluorescence emission band at approximately 387–429 nm in aqueous solution but also had the similar photoluminescent spectra to those of AHP and P2 in dichloromethane. The fluorescence quantum yields of P2 in dilute tetrahydrofuran and P3 in a dilute aqueous solution were 0.44 and 0.39, respectively. This experiment provided a novel insight into the study of water-soluble fluorescent polymers.

  13. Examination of mercury and organic carbon dynamics from a constructed fen in the Athabasca oil sands region, Alberta, Canada using in situ and laboratory fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, C.; Carey, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    Hg results that will be used to assess the evolution of mercury dynamics in the fen as the hydrology and vegetation become established, we are investigating the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) using optical techniques in the water flowing through the fen peat and underlying tailing sand aquifer. During 2013, continuous in situ measurements of chromophoric DOM fluorescence (FDOM) were measured at the fen outlet to identify sources of C and their relative contribution to discharge waters. We compare these field measurements to laboratory measurements of FDOM on discrete water samples using a benchtop spectrofluorometer to develop relationships between FDOM, DOC and filtered THg and MeHg. The use of continuous in situ FDOM measurements as a proxy for DOC and mercury concentrations will improve our understanding of the effects of hydrologic management and natural seasonal variations in fen hydrology on DOC and Hg fluxes from different soil layers in the constructed system. Furthermore, we expect that the modeling of excitation-emission matrices using parallel factor analysis on discrete water samples will provide important information on the sources and reactivity of organic carbon being transported through different soil compartments in the fen.

  14. Designers predict a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statton, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    As power plant designers and builders, there is a bright future for the industry. The demand for electricity will continue to grow, and the need for new plants will increase accordingly. But companies that develop and supply these plants must adapt to new ways of doing business if they expect to see the dawn of this new age. Several factors will have a profound effect on the generation and use of electricity in future years. Instant communications now reach all corners of the globe, making people everywhere aspire to a higher standard of living. The economic surge needed to satisfy these appetites will, in turn, be fed by a network of suppliers who are themselves restructuring to serve global markets, unimpeded by past nationalistic barriers to trade. The strong correlation between economic progress and the growing demand for electricity is well recognized. A ready supply of affordable electricity is a necessary underpinning for any economic expansion. As economies advance and jobs increase, electric demand grows geometrically, fueled by an ever-improving quality of life. Coupled with increasing demand is the worldwide trend toward privatization of the generation industry. The reasons may vary in different parts of the world, but the effect is the same--companies are battling intensely for the right to build or purchase generating facilities. Those companies, like the industry they serve, are themselves in a period of transition. Once a closed, monopolistic group of owners in a predominantly services-based market, they are, thanks to competitive forces, being driven steadily toward a product-based structure

  15. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  16. Galaxy Selection and the Surface Brightness Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Bothun, Gregory D.; Schombert, James M.

    1995-08-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney [Nature, 263,573(1976)] suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman [ApJ, 160,811(1970)] was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (i.e., approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity function at L^*^. An intrinsically sharply peaked "Freeman law" distribution can be completely ruled out, and no Gaussian distribution can fit the data. Low surface brightness galaxies (those with central surface brightness fainter than 22 B mag arcsec^-2^) comprise >~ 1/2 the general galaxy population, so a representative sample of galaxies at z = 0 does not really exist at present since past surveys have been insensitive to this component of the general galaxy population.

  17. The structure of bright zinc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIODRAG STOJANOVIC

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The structures of bright zinc coatings obtained from acid sulfate solutions in the presence of dextrin/salicyl aldehyde mixture were examined. It was shown by the STM technique that the surfaces of bright zinc coatings are covered by hexagonal zinc crystals, the tops of planes of which are flat and mutually parallel and which exhibit smoothness on the atomic level. X-Ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the bright zinc coatings showed that the zinc crystallites are oriented in the (110 plane only.

  18. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  19. Quantification of caffeine in dietary supplements and energy drinks by solid-surface fluorescence using a pre-concentration step on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talio, María Carolina; Acosta, María Gimena; Alesso, Magdalena; Luconi, Marta O; Fernández, Liliana P

    2014-01-01

    A new method for the determination of caffeine, a non-fluorescent analyte, based on the enhancement of the fluorescence of Rhodamine B dye on a membrane filter modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. The method comprises pre-concentration of caffeine on a solid support by chemofiltration in buffered solution onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes previously oxidised and dispersed in cationic surfactant admicelles. The effect of experimental parameters, including the nature of the buffer and pH, the nature of the solid support, filtration flow rate, dye and carbon nanotube concentration, and the nature of the surfactant and concentration were investigated by means univariation assays. Under optimum experimental conditions, the pre-concentration system gave detection and quantification limits of 0.3 and 1.1 µg l(-1), respectively. A wide linear range was achieved varying from concentrations of 1.1 to 9.7 × 103 µg l(-1) (r(2) = 0.999). Satisfactory recovery values were obtained using the method of standard addition, confirming the feasibility of this method for caffeine determination in energising dietary supplements and energy drinks.

  20. Nimbus-5 ESMR Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) data set consists of gridded brightness temperature arrays for the Arctic and Antarctic, spanning 11...

  1. Time-resolved brightness measurements by streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Joshua S.; Speirs, Rory W.; McCulloch, Andrew J.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2018-03-01

    Brightness is a key figure of merit for charged particle beams, and time-resolved brightness measurements can elucidate the processes involved in beam creation and manipulation. Here we report on a simple, robust, and widely applicable method for the measurement of beam brightness with temporal resolution by streaking one-dimensional pepperpots, and demonstrate the technique to characterize electron bunches produced from a cold-atom electron source. We demonstrate brightness measurements with 145 ps temporal resolution and a minimum resolvable emittance of 40 nm rad. This technique provides an efficient method of exploring source parameters and will prove useful for examining the efficacy of techniques to counter space-charge expansion, a critical hurdle to achieving single-shot imaging of atomic scale targets.

  2. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN-Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  3. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is proposed that Freeman's discovery that the extrapolated central surface brightness of spiral galaxies is approximately constant can be simply explained if the galaxies contain a spheroidal component which dominates the light in their outer isophotes. Calculations of an effective central surface brightness indicate a wide spread of values. This requires either a wide spread in disc properties or significant spheroidal components or, most probably, both. (author)

  4. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, M.; Phillipps, S.

    1985-01-01

    The intrinsic surface brightness Ssub(e) of 500 disc galaxies (0<=T<=9) drawn from the Second Reference Catalogue is computed and it is shown that Ssub(e) does not correlate significantly with Msub(B), (B-V) or type. This is consistent with the notion that there is a heavy selection bias in favour of disc galaxies with that particular surface brightness which allows inclusion in the catalogue over the largest volume of space. (author)

  5. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  6. Raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle A; Stakic, Milka; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and number and molecular brightness (N&B) methods are used to measure molecular diffusion in complex biological environments such as the cell interior, detect the formation of molecular aggregates, establish the stoichiometry of the aggregates, spatially map the number of mobile molecules, and quantify the relative fraction of molecules participating in molecular complexes. These methods are based on correlation of fluorescence intensity fluctuations from microscope images that can be measured in a conventional laser-scanning confocal microscope. In this chapter, we discuss the mathematical framework used for data analysis as well as the parameters need for data acquisition. We demonstrate the information obtainable by the N&B method using simulation in which different regions of an image have different numbers of interacting molecules. Then, using an example of two interacting proteins in the cell, we show in a real case how the RICS and N&B analyses work step by step to detect the existence of molecular complexes to quantify their properties and spatially map their interactions. We also discuss common control experiments needed to rule out instrumental artifacts and how to calibrate the microscope in terms of relative molecular brightness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  8. Bright perspectives for nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.

    2014-05-01

    With the advent of new high-power, short-pulse laser facilities in combination with novel technologies for the production of highly brilliant, intense γ beams (like, e.g., Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Bucharest, MEGaRay in Livermore or a planned upgrade of the HIγS facility at Duke University), unprecedented perspectives will open up in the coming years for photonuclear physics both in basic sciences as in various fields of applications. Ultra-high sensitivity will be enabled by an envisaged increase of the γ-beam spectral density from the presently typical 102γ/eVs to about 104γ/eVs, thus enabling a new quality of nuclear photonics [1], assisted by new γ-optical elements [2]. Photonuclear reactions with highly brilliant γ beams will allow to produce radioisotopes for nuclear medicine with much higher specific activity and/or more economically than with conventional methods. This will open the door for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes [3]. The isotopic, state-selective sensitivity of the well-established technique of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) will be boosted by the drastically reduced energy bandwidth (nuclear materials, such as radioactive waste management, the detection of nuclear fissile material in the recycling process or the detection of clandestine fissile materials. Moreover, also secondary sources like low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beams of high intensity and high brilliance [4] or a new type of positron source with significantly increased brilliance, for the first time fully polarized [5], can be realized and lead to new applications in solid state physics or material sciences.

  9. Proxy magnetometry of the photosphere: why are G-band bright points so bright?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; Kiselman, Dan; Voort, Luc Rouppe van der; Plez, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the formation of G-band bright points in terms of standard uxtube modeling, in particular the 1D LTE models constructed by Solanki and coworkers. Combined with LTE spectral synthesis they explain observed G-band bright point contrasts quite well. The G-band contrast increase over the

  10. Apportioning bacterial carbon source utilization in soil using 14 C isotope analysis of FISH-targeted bacterial populations sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS): 14 C-FISH-FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougoulias, Christos; Meade, Andrew; Shaw, Liz J

    2018-02-19

    An unresolved need in microbial ecology is methodology to enable quantitative analysis of in situ microbial substrate carbon use at the population level. Here, we evaluated if a novel combination of radiocarbon-labelled substrate tracing, fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort the FISH-targeted population for quantification of incorporated radioactivity ( 14 C-FISH-FACS) can address this need. Our test scenario used FISH probe PSE1284 targeting Pseudomonas spp. (and some Burkholderia spp.) and salicylic acid added to rhizosphere soil. We examined salicylic acid- 14 C fate (mineralized, cell-incorporated, extractable and non-extractable) and mass balance (0-24 h) and show that the PSE1284 population captured ∼ 50% of the Nycodenz extracted biomass 14 C. Analysis of the taxonomic distribution of the salicylic acid biodegradation trait suggested that PSE1284 population success was not due to conservation of this trait but due to competitiveness for the added carbon. Adding 50KBq of 14 C sample -1 enabled detection of 14 C in the sorted population at ∼ 60-600 times background; a sensitivity which demonstrates potential extension to analysis of rarer/less active populations. Given its sensitivity and compatibility with obtaining a C mass balance, 14 C-FISH-FACS allows quantitative dissection of C flow within the microbial biomass that has hitherto not been achieved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. STARS4ALL Night Sky Brightness Photometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Zamorano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the main features of TESS-W, the first version of a series of inexpensive but reliable photometers that will be used to measure night sky brightness. The bandpass is extended to the red with respect of that of the Sky Quality Meter (SQM. TESS-W connects to a router via WIFI and it sends automatically the brightness values to a data repository using Internet of Things protocols. The device includes an infrared sensor to estimate the cloud coverage. It is designed for fixed stations to monitor the evolution of the sky brightness. The photometer could also be used in local mode connected to a computer or tablet to gather data from a moving vehicle. The photometer is being developed within STARS4ALL project, a collective awareness platform for promoting dark skies in Europe, funded by the EU. We intend to extend the existing professional networks to a citizen-based network of photometers. 

  12. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  13. Seasonal variation in chromophoric dissolved organic matter and relationships among fluorescent components, absorption coefficients and dissolved organic carbon in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Zhuo; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2018-04-01

    The absorption coefficient and fluorescent components of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Bohai Sea (BS), Yellow Sea (YS), and East China Sea (ECS) in spring and autumn were analyzed in this study. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) identified three components, namely, humic-like C1, tyrosine-like C2 and tryptophan-like C3. The seasonal variations in the vertical patterns of the CDOM absorption coefficient (aCDOM(355)) and fluorescent components were influenced by the seasonal water mass except for the terrestrial input. The relationship between aCDOM(355) and dissolved organic matter (DOC) was attributed to their own mixing behavior. The correlation of the fluorescent components with DOC was disturbed by other non-conservative processes during the export of CDOM to the open ocean. The different chemical compositions and origins of DOC and CDOM led to variability in carbon-specific CDOM absorption (a*CDOM(355)) and fluorescent component ratios (ICn/IC1). The relationship between a*CDOM(355) and aCDOM(355) demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the BS, but not in the ECS, highly contributed non-absorbing DOC to the total DOC concentration. The photodegradation of dominant terrestrially derived CDOM in the ECS contributed to the positive relationship between a*CDOM(355) and ICn/IC1. By contrast, the abundant autochthonous CDOM in the YS was negatively correlated with ICn/IC1 in autumn. Our established box models showed that water exchange is a potentially important source of the aromatic components in the BS, YS, and ECS. Hence, the seasonal variations in water exchange might contribute to the variability of CDOM chemical composition in the BS, YS, and ECS, and significantly influence the structure and function of their ecosystems.

  14. An amplified comparative fluorescence resonance energy transfer immunosensing of CA125 tumor marker and ovarian cancer cells using green and economic carbon dots for bio-applications in labeling, imaging and sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamd-Ghadareh, Somayeh; Salimi, Abdollah; Fathi, Fardin; Bahrami, Saman

    2017-10-15

    CA125, is a marker in the clinical diagnosis of several cancers and currently is the best serum-based tumor marker for ovarian cancer. Here, we developed an ultrasensitive antibody-ssDNA aptamer sandwich-type fluorescence immunosensor for CA125 detection. Based on a novel signal amplification strategy the carbon dots (CDs) functionalized with aptamer (CD-aptamer) used as detection probe and PAMAM-Dendrimers/AuNPs was used for covalent attachment of CA125-antibody and completing the sandwich assay method. By measuring of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals between CDs and AuNPs as nanoquenchers, the fluorescence signal quenched during sandwich complex formed between anti-CA125, CA125 and CDs-Aptamer and decreasing of fluorescence response signal is related to CA125 concentrations. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited an extremely low calculated detection limit of 0.5fg/mL with wide linear range 1.0fg/mL to 1.0ng/mL of CA 125. The application of the immunosensor for CA125 detection in serum samples and measuring of ovarian-cancer cells was also investigated. The immunosensor revealed good sensitivity and specificity with ovarian cell concentrations from 2.5×10 3 to 2×10 4 cells/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.9937 and detection limit of 400cells/mL (4 cell in 10μL), indicating potential application of immunosensor in clinical monitoring of tumor biomarkers. Furthermore, the cell viability was not changed upon treatment with CDs probe during 24h, showing the low cytotoxicity of the probe. More importantly, CDs-antibody hybrid was achieved in selective imaging of the cancer cells over the OVCAR-3 line cells, implying its potential applications in biosensing, as well as in cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  16. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  17. Spatio-temporal patterns of chlorophyll fluorescence and physiological and structural indices acquired from hyperspectral imagery as compared with carbon fluxes measured with eddy covariance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarco-Tejada, P.J.; Morales Sierra, A.; Testi, L.; Villalobos, F.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the assessment of the spatio-temporal trends of chlorophyll fluorescence, narrow-band physiological indices, and structural indices acquired with a hyperspectral imager flown over a flux tower in a canopy characterized by small seasonal structural changes and a

  18. Richard Bright and his neurological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J M S

    2009-01-01

    Richard Bright was one of the famous triumvirate of Guy's Hospital physicians in the Victorian era. Remembered for his account of glomerulonephritis (Bright's disease) he also made many important and original contributions to medicine and neurology. These included his work on cortical epileptogenesis, descriptions of simple partial (Jacksonian) seizures, infantile convulsions, and a variety of nervous diseases. Most notable were his reports of neurological studies including papers on traumatic tetanus, syringomyelia, arteries of the brain, contractures of spinal origin, tumours of the base of the brain, and narcolepsy. His career and these contributions are outlined. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Bright SHARC Survey: The Cluster Catalog

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, A. K; Nichol, R. C.; Holden, B. P.; Ulmer, M. P.; Pildis, R. A.; Merrelli, A. J.; Adami, C.; Burke, D. J.; Collins, C. A.; Metevier, A. J.; Kron, R. G.; Commons, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present the Bright SHARC (Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster) Survey, which is an objective search for serendipitously detected extended X-ray sources in 460 deep ROSAT PSPC pointings. The Bright SHARC Survey covers an area of 178.6 deg2 and has yielded 374 extended sources. We discuss the X-ray data reduction, the candidate selection and present results from our on-going optical follow-up campaign. The optical follow-up concentrates on the brightest 94 of the 374 extended ...

  20. 75 FR 48644 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ...: Effective Date: August 11, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Catherine Bertrand, AD/CVD Operations....; Fuzhou Taking Chemical; Fuzhou Yihuan Carbon; Great Bright Industrial; Hangzhou Hengxing Activated Carbon...

  1. Robust fitting of diurnal brightness temperature cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Udahemuka, G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper, diurnal brightness temperatures received from the METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) satellite were interpolated for missing data based on a model, and a performance test was performed by comparing a new approach based on robust modelling...

  2. A Magnetic Bright Point Case Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Utz, D.; Jurčák, Jan; Bellot Rubio, L.; del Toro Iniesta, J.C.; Thonhofer, S.; Hanslmeier, A.; Veronig, A.; Muller, R.; Lemmerer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 459-470 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB061109 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar magnetic field * magnetic bright points * sunrise/IMaX Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  3. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    material collected by former Soviet Union robots and Apollo astronauts. With the completion of the first round of lunar exploration by human beings, the study of lunar microwave brightness tempe- rature was completely forgotten. Accompanied by a new upcoming era of lunar exploration and the development of science and ...

  4. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells can be subdivided into various subsets based on the relative expression of CD16 and CD56. In particular, CD56(bright)CD16(-/dim) NK cells are the focus of interest. They are considered efficient cytokine producers endowed with immunoregulatory properties, but they can also become...

  5. A Bright Future for Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Does magnetic resonance have a bright future? Ever since magnetic resonance in condensed phase started in 1945, questions about its future prospects (or its imminent doom) have been asked time and again. Some, like Nicolaas Bloembergen, left the field at an early stage because they felt there was no hope to gather ...

  6. Dark Matter in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that

  7. Dark matter in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; Persic, M; Salucci, P

    1997-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that LSB

  8. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast. PMID:22179808

  9. Conservation of an ion beam brightness. Study of a non brightness disturbing lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, P.

    1966-11-01

    Experimental studies of ion sources prove that large initial brightnesses can be obtained by using the plasma expansion principle. However these brightnesses are usually spoiled by the beam focusing and accelerating systems. A high intensity focusing set up is first theoretically studied, then numerically determined by use of a 7094 IBM computer. Aberrations have been minimized. It has then been possible to construct a set up conserving the source initial brightness. For a 100 mA beam the focusing voltage is 150 kV, the beam study has been done for 350 keV beam final energy. Given is a discussion of results. (author) [fr

  10. The nature of solar brightness variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. I.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Cameron, R. H.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the sources of solar brightness variations1,2, often referred to as solar noise3, is important because solar noise limits the detection of solar oscillations3, is one of the drivers of the Earth's climate system4,5 and is a prototype of stellar variability6,7—an important limiting factor for the detection of extrasolar planets. Here, we model the magnetic contribution to solar brightness variability using high-cadence8,9 observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction (SATIRE)10,11 model. The brightness variations caused by the constantly evolving cellular granulation pattern on the solar surface were computed with the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS)/University of Chicago Radiative Magnetohydrodynamics (MURaM)12 code. We found that the surface magnetic field and granulation can together precisely explain solar noise (that is, solar variability excluding oscillations) on timescales from minutes to decades, accounting for all timescales that have so far been resolved or covered by irradiance measurements. We demonstrate that no other sources of variability are required to explain the data. Recent measurements of Sun-like stars by the COnvection ROtation and planetary Transits (CoRoT)13 and Kepler14 missions uncovered brightness variations similar to that of the Sun, but with a much wider variety of patterns15. Our finding that solar brightness variations can be replicated in detail with just two well-known sources will greatly simplify future modelling of existing CoRoT and Kepler as well as anticipated Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite16 and PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO)17 data.

  11. Aqueous origins of bright salt deposits on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2017-11-01

    Bright materials have been reported in association with impact craters on Ceres. The abundant Na2CO3 and some ammonium salts, NH4HCO3 and/or NH4Cl, were detected in bright deposits within Occator crater with Dawn near infrared spectroscopy. The composition and appearance of the salts suggest their aqueous mobilization and emplacement after formation of the crater. Here we consider origins of the bright deposits through calculation of speciation in the H-C-N-O-Na-Cl water-salt type system constrained by the mass balance of observed salts. Calculations of chemical equilibria show that initial solutions had the pH of ∼10. The temperature and salinity of solutions could have not exceeded ∼273 K and ∼100 g per kg H2O, respectively. Freezing models reveal an early precipitation of Na2CO3·10H2O followed by minor NaHCO3. Ammonium salts precipitate near eutectic from brines enriched in NH4+, Cl- and Na+. A late-stage precipitation of NaCl·2H2O is modeled for solution compositions with added NaCl. Calculated eutectics are above 247 K. The apparently unabundant ammonium and chloride salts in Occator's deposits imply a rapid emplacement without a compositional evolution of solution. Salty ice grains could have deposited from post-impact ballistic plumes formed through low-pressure boiling of subsurface solutions. Hydrated and ammonium salts are unstable at maximum temperatures of Ceres' surface and could decompose through space weathering. Occator's ice-free salt deposits formed through a post-depositional sublimation of ice followed by dehydration of Na2CO3·10H2O and NaHCO3 to Na2CO3. In other regions, excavated and exposed bright materials could be salts initially deposited from plumes and accumulated at depth via post-impact boiling. The lack of detection of sulfates and an elevated carbonate/chloride ratio in Ceres' materials suggest an involvement of compounds abundant in the outer solar system.

  12. Inorganic Carbon Utilization of the Freshwater Red Alga Compsopogon coeruleus (Balbis Montagne (Compsopogonaceae, Rhodophyta Evaluated by in situ Measurement of Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Lun Liu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available To explore the inorganic carbon utilization of the freshwater red alga Compsopogon coeruleus, photosynthetic rates in response to increasing of bicarbonate concentration, the addition of alkaline HEPES buffer (pH 8.8, acid HEPES buffer (pH 4.0 and the extracellular carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (acetazolamide, AZ, respectively, were examined in situ by using a submersible pulse amplitude modulated (PAM fluorometer. Among the treatments, adding acid HEPES buffer significantly reduced photosynthetic rates of the alga, while others showed no effect. Accordingly, we concluded that C. coeruleus had less or no inorganic carbon (Ci limitation in its natural habitat. The alga might have higher affinity for bicarbonate and directly uptake bicarbonate as main Ci source without the aid of extracellular carbonic anhydrase.

  13. Phosphorus ligand imaging with two-photon fluorescence spectroscopy: towards rational catalyst immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marras, F.; Kluwer, A.M.; Siekierzycka, J.R.; Vozza, A.; Brouwer, A.M.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2010-01-01

    Spotless catalysts: Ligand immobilization was studied by two-photon fluorescence microscopy with a fluorescent nixantphos ligand as probe (see picture). In the immobilization process ligand aggregates form in solution and are deposited on the support, where they appear as bright spots in

  14. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark R; Devlin, Tina M; Moore, Teresa A

    2016-02-26

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210-2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210-2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210-2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410-0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect.

  15. Performance of LED fluorescence microscopy for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) bright-field microscopy is time-consuming, with poor sensitivity, even under optimal conditions. Introduction of Primo Star iLED fluorescent microscopy (FM) may improve TB case finding at referral hospitals in Rwanda. The study aimed to determine the acceptability and effectiveness of iLED ...

  16. Females are the brighter sex: Differences in external fluorescence across sexes and life stages of a crab spider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Brandt

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is increasingly recognized to be widespread in nature. In particular, some arachnids fluoresce externally, and in spiders the hemolymph fluoresces. In this study, we examined the external fluorescence and the fluorophores of different sexes and life stages of the crab spider Misumena vatia (Clerk 1757, a sit-and-wait predator that feeds on insects as they visit flowers. We designed novel instrumentation to measure external fluorescence in whole specimens. We found that although males and females possess internal fluorophores with similar properties, the external expression of fluorescence varies across sexes and life stages. Spiders fluoresce brightly as immatures. Females maintain their brightness to adulthood, whereas males become increasingly dim as they mature. We suggest that external fluorescence likely contributes to visual signaling in these animals, and that it differs between the sexes as a result of differences in foraging ecology and behavior.

  17. Do Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Host Stellar Bars?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes Sodi, Bernardo; Sánchez García, Osbaldo

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of assessing if low surface brightness galaxies host stellar bars and by studying the dependence of the occurrence of bars as a function of surface brightness, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to construct a large volume-limited sample of galaxies and then segregate these galaxies as having low or high surface brightness in terms of their central surface brightness. We find that the fraction of low surface brightness galaxies hosting strong bars is systematically lower than that found for high surface brightness galaxies. The dependence of the bar fraction on the central surface brightness is mostly driven by a correlation of the surface brightness with the spin and the gas richness of the galaxies, showing only a minor dependence on the surface brightness. We also find that the length of the bars is strongly dependent on the surface brightness, and although some of this dependence is attributed to the gas content, even at a fixed gas-to-stellar mass ratio, high surface brightness galaxies host longer bars than their low surface brightness counterparts, which we attribute to an anticorrelation of the surface brightness with the spin.

  18. Relationships between brightness of nighttime lights and population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naizhuo, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Brightness of nighttime lights has been proven to be a good proxy for socioeconomic and demographic statistics. Moreover, the satellite nighttime lights data have been used to spatially disaggregate amounts of gross domestic product (GDP), fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission, and electric power consumption (Ghosh et al., 2010; Oda and Maksyutov, 2011; Zhao et al., 2012). Spatial disaggregations were performed in these previous studies based on assumed linear relationships between digital number (DN) value of pixels in the nighttime light images and socioeconomic data. However, reliability of the linear relationships was never tested due to lack of relative high-spatial-resolution (equal to or finer than 1 km × 1 km) statistical data. With the similar assumption that brightness linearly correlates to population, Bharti et al. (2011) used nighttime light data as a proxy for population density and then developed a model about seasonal fluctuations of measles in West Africa. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory used sub-national census population data and high spatial resolution remotely-sensed-images to produce LandScan population raster datasets. The LandScan population datasets have 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution which is consistent with the spatial resolution of the nighttime light images. Therefore, in this study I selected 2008 LandScan population data as baseline reference data and the contiguous United State as study area. Relationships between DN value of pixels in the 2008 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) stable light image and population density were established. Results showed that an exponential function can more accurately reflect the relationship between luminosity and population density than a linear function. Additionally, a certain number of saturated pixels with DN value of 63 exist in urban core areas. If directly using the exponential function to estimate the population density for the whole brightly

  19. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  20. TC4 AMPR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE (TB) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TC4 AMPR Brightness Temperature (TB) dataset consists of brightness temperature data from July 19, 2007 through August 8, 2007. The Tropical Composition, Cloud...

  1. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies: Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    1988-01-01

    Using measurements from IRAS correlations are found between optical surface brightness and both infrared-to-optical flux ratio and infrared colour temperature, in the sense that galaxies with high surface brightness have higher FIR emission and higher temperatures. (author)

  2. Australia 31-GHz brightness temperature exceedance statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor radiometer measurements were made at DSS 43 during an 18 month period. Brightness temperatures at 31 GHz were subjected to a statistical analysis which included correction for the effects of occasional water on the radiometer radome. An exceedance plot was constructed, and the 1 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 120 K. The 5 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 70 K, compared with 75 K in Spain. These values are valid for all of the three month groupings that were studied.

  3. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  4. High-brightness H/sup -/ accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) devices based on high-brightness H/sup -/ accelerators are an important component of proposed strategic defense systems. The basic rational and R and D program are outlined and examples given of the underlying technology thrusts toward advanced systems. Much of the research accomplished in the past year is applicable to accelerator systems in general; some of these activities are discussed

  5. Measuring night sky brightness: methods and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänel, Andreas; Posch, Thomas; Ribas, Salvador J.; Aubé, Martin; Duriscoe, Dan; Jechow, Andreas; Kollath, Zoltán; Lolkema, Dorien E.; Moore, Chadwick; Schmidt, Norbert; Spoelstra, Henk; Wuchterl, Günther; Kyba, Christopher C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the brightness of the night sky has become an increasingly important topic in recent years, as artificial lights and their scattering by the Earth's atmosphere continue spreading around the globe. Several instruments and techniques have been developed for this task. We give an overview of these, and discuss their strengths and limitations. The different quantities that can and should be derived when measuring the night sky brightness are discussed, as well as the procedures that have been and still need to be defined in this context. We conclude that in many situations, calibrated consumer digital cameras with fisheye lenses provide the best relation between ease-of-use and wealth of obtainable information on the night sky. While they do not obtain full spectral information, they are able to sample the complete sky in a period of minutes, with colour information in three bands. This is important, as given the current global changes in lamp spectra, changes in sky radiance observed only with single band devices may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding long term changes in sky brightness. The acquisition of all-sky information is desirable, as zenith-only information does not provide an adequate characterization of a site. Nevertheless, zenith-only single-band one-channel devices such as the "Sky Quality Meter" continue to be a viable option for long-term studies of night sky brightness and for studies conducted from a moving platform. Accurate interpretation of such data requires some understanding of the colour composition of the sky light. We recommend supplementing long-term time series derived with such devices with periodic all-sky sampling by a calibrated camera system and calibrated luxmeters or luminance meters.

  6. Companions of Bright Barred Shapley Ames Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Barreto, J. Antonio; Carrillo, Rene; Vera-Villamizar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Companion galaxy environment for a subset of 78 bright and nearby barred galaxies from the Shapley Ames Catalog is presented. Among spiral barred galaxies there are Seyfert galaxies, galaxies with circumnuclear structures, galaxies not associated with any large scale galaxy cloud structure, galaxies with peculiar disk morphology (crooked arms) and galaxies with normal disk morphology; the list includes all Hubble types. The companion galaxy list includes number of companion galaxies within 20...

  7. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  8. Fluorescence-Intensity Distribution Analysis and Its Application in Biomolecular Detection Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kask, Peet; Palo, Kaupo; Ullmann, Dirk; Gall, Karsten

    1999-11-01

    A methodology, fluorescence-intensity distribution analysis, has been developed for confocal microscopy studies in which the fluorescence intensity of a sample with a heterogeneous brightness profile is monitored. An adjustable formula, modeling the spatial brightness distribution, and the technique of generating functions for calculation of theoretical photon count number distribution serve as the two cornerstones of the methodology. The method permits the simultaneous determination of concentrations and specific brightness values of a number of individual fluorescent species in solution. Accordingly, we present an extremely sensitive tool to monitor the interaction of fluorescently labeled molecules or other microparticles with their respective biological counterparts that should find a wide application in life sciences, medicine, and drug discovery. Its potential is demonstrated by studying the hybridization of 5'-(6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine)-labeled and nonlabeled complementary oligonucleotides and the subsequent cleavage of the DNA hybrids by restriction enzymes.

  9. The Bright SHARC Survey: The Cluster Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, A. K.; Nichol, R. C.; Holden, B. P.; Ulmer, M. P.; Pildis, R. A.; Merrelli, A. J.; Adami, C.; Burke, D. J.; Collins, C. A.; Metevier, A. J.; Kron, R. G.; Commons, K.

    2000-02-01

    We present the Bright SHARC (Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster) Survey, which is an objective search for serendipitously detected extended X-ray sources in 460 deep ROSAT PSPC pointings. The Bright SHARC Survey covers an area of 178.6 deg2 and has yielded 374 extended sources. We discuss the X-ray data reduction, the candidate selection and present results from our on-going optical follow-up campaign. The optical follow-up concentrates on the brightest 94 of the 374 extended sources and is now 97% complete. We have identified 37 clusters of galaxies, for which we present redshifts and luminosities. The clusters span a redshift range of 0.0696Bright SHARC clusters have not been listed in any previously published catalog. We also report the discovery of three candidate ``fossil groups'' of the kind proposed by Ponman et al. Based on data taken at the European Southern Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Canada-France-Hawaii, and Apache Point Observatory.

  10. Possible Bright Starspots on TRAPPIST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brett M.; Agol, Eric; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2018-04-01

    The M8V star TRAPPIST-1 hosts seven roughly Earth-sized planets and is a promising target for exoplanet characterization. Kepler/K2 Campaign 12 observations of TRAPPIST-1 in the optical show an apparent rotational modulation with a 3.3-day period, though that rotational signal is not readily detected in the Spitzer light curve at 4.5 μm. If the rotational modulation is due to starspots, persistent dark spots can be excluded from the lack of photometric variability in the Spitzer light curve. We construct a photometric model for rotational modulation due to photospheric bright spots on TRAPPIST-1 that is consistent with both the Kepler and Spitzer light curves. The maximum-likelihood model with three spots has typical spot sizes of R spot/R ⋆ ≈ 0.004 at temperature T spot ≳ 5300 ± 200 K. We also find that large flares are observed more often when the brightest spot is facing the observer, suggesting a correlation between the position of the bright spots and flare events. In addition, these flares may occur preferentially when the spots are increasing in brightness, which suggests that the 3.3-day periodicity may not be a rotational signal, but rather a characteristic timescale of active regions.

  11. Personal audio with a planar bright zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Philip; Jackson, Philip J B; Olik, Marek; Pedersen, Jan Abildgaard

    2014-10-01

    Reproduction of multiple sound zones, in which personal audio programs may be consumed without the need for headphones, is an active topic in acoustical signal processing. Many approaches to sound zone reproduction do not consider control of the bright zone phase, which may lead to self-cancellation problems if the loudspeakers surround the zones. Conversely, control of the phase in a least-squares sense comes at a cost of decreased level difference between the zones and frequency range of cancellation. Single-zone approaches have considered plane wave reproduction by focusing the sound energy in to a point in the wavenumber domain. In this article, a planar bright zone is reproduced via planarity control, which constrains the bright zone energy to impinge from a narrow range of angles via projection in to a spatial domain. Simulation results using a circular array surrounding two zones show the method to produce superior contrast to the least-squares approach, and superior planarity to the contrast maximization approach. Practical performance measurements obtained in an acoustically treated room verify the conclusions drawn under free-field conditions.

  12. Brightness illusion in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    A long-standing debate surrounds the issue of whether human and nonhuman species share similar perceptual mechanisms. One experimental strategy to compare visual perception of vertebrates consists in assessing how animals react in the presence of visual illusions. To date, this methodological approach has been widely used with mammals and birds, while few studies have been reported in distantly related species, such as fish. In the present study we investigated whether fish perceive the brightness illusion, a well-known illusion occurring when 2 objects, identical in physical features, appear to be different in brightness. Twelve guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were initially trained to discriminate which rectangle was darker or lighter between 2 otherwise identical rectangles. Three different conditions were set up: neutral condition between rectangle and background (same background used for both darker and lighter rectangle); congruent condition (darker rectangle in a darker background and lighter rectangle in a lighter background); and incongruent condition (darker rectangle in a lighter background and lighter rectangle in a darker background). After reaching the learning criterion, guppies were presented with the illusory pattern: 2 identical rectangles inserted in 2 different backgrounds. Guppies previously trained to select the darker rectangle showed a significant choice of the rectangle that appears to be darker by human observers (and vice versa). The human-like performance exhibited in the presence of the illusory pattern suggests the existence of similar perceptual mechanisms between humans and fish to elaborate the brightness of objects. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  14. 7 CFR 51.2000 - Clean and bright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean and bright. 51.2000 Section 51.2000 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2000 Clean and bright. Clean and bright...

  15. Star formation and the surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    The (blue) surface brightness of spiral galaxies is significantly correlated with their Hα linewidth. This can be most plausibly interpreted as a correlation of surface brightness with star formation rate. There is also a significant difference in surface brightness between galaxies forming stars in a grand design spiral pattern and those with floc star formation regions. (author)

  16. Proposal for Testing and Validation of Vacuum Ultra-Violet Atomic Laser-Induced Fluorescence as a Method to Analyze Carbon Grid Erosion in Ion Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previous investigation under award NAG3-25 10 sought to determine the best method of LIF to determine the carbon density in a thruster plume. Initial reports from other groups were ambiguous as to the number of carbon clusters that might be present in the plume of a thruster. Carbon clusters would certainly affect the ability to LIF; if they were the dominant species, then perhaps the LIF method should target clusters. The results of quadrupole mass spectroscopy on sputtered carbon determined that minimal numbers of clusters were sputtered from graphite under impact from keV Krypton. There were some investigations in the keV range by other groups that hinted at clusters, but at the time the proposal was presented to NASA, there was no data from low-energy sputtering available. Thus, the proposal sought to develop a method to characterize the population only of atoms sputtered from a graphite target in a test cell. Most of the ground work had been established by the previous two years of investigation. The proposal covering 2003 sought to develop an anti-Stokes Raman shifting cell to generate VUW light and test this cell on two different laser systems, ArF and YAG- pumped dye. The second goal was to measure the lowest detectable amounts of carbon atoms by 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm LIF. If equipment was functioning properly, it was expected that these goals would be met easily during the timeframe of the proposal, and that is the reason only modest funding was requested. The PI was only funded at half- time by Glenn during the summer months. All other work time was paid for by Whitworth College. The college also funded a student, Charles Shawley, who worked on the project during the spring.

  17. Active Processes: Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 In a region of the south pole known informally as 'Ithaca' numerous fans of dark frost form every spring. HiRISE collected a time lapse series of these images, starting at Ls = 185 and culminating at Ls = 294. 'Ls' is the way we measure time on Mars: at Ls = 180 the sun passes the equator on its way south; at Ls = 270 it reaches its maximum subsolar latitude and summer begins. In the earliest image (figure 1) fans are dark, but small narrow bright streaks can be detected. In the next image (figure 2), acquired at Ls = 187, just 106 hours later, dramatic differences are apparent. The dark fans are larger and the bright fans are more pronounced and easily detectable. The third image in the sequence shows no bright fans at all. We believe that the bright streaks are fine frost condensed from the gas exiting the vent. The conditions must be just right for the bright frost to condense. Observation Geometry Image PSP_002622_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 16-Feb-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.2 degrees latitude, 181.5 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 246.9 km (154.3 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.4 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 05:46 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 88 degrees, thus the sun was about 2 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 185.1 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  18. Base motif recognition and design of DNA templates for fluorescent silver clusters by machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Bogdanov, Petko; Debord, Mark; Singh, Ambuj; Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2014-09-03

    Discriminative base motifs within DNA templates for fluorescent silver clusters are identified using methods that combine large experimental data sets with machine learning tools for pattern recognition. Combining the discovery of certain multibase motifs important for determining fluorescence brightness with a generative algorithm, the probability of selecting DNA templates that stabilize fluorescent silver clusters is increased by a factor of >3. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Controlling excitons. Concepts for phosphorescent organic LEDs at high brightness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2009-11-15

    This work focusses on the high brightness performance of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The use of phosphorescent emitter molecules in OLEDs is essential to realize internal electron-photon conversion efficiencies of 100 %. However, due to their molecular nature, the excited triplet states have orders of magnitude longer time constants compared to their fluorescent counterparts which, in turn, strongly increases the probability of bimolecular annihilation. As a consequence, the efficiencies of phosphorescent OLEDs decline at high brightness - an effect known as efficiency roll-off, for which it has been shown to be dominated by triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA). In this work, TTA of the archetype phosphorescent emitter Ir(ppy){sub 3} is investigated in time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. For the widely used mixed system CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 3}, host-guest TTA - an additional unwanted TTA channel - is experimentally observed at high excitation levels. By using matrix materials with higher triplet energies, this effect is efficiently suppressed, however further studies show that the efficiency roll-off of Ir(ppy)3 is much more pronounced than predicted by a model based on Foerster-type energy transfer, which marks the intrinsic limit for TTA. These results suggest that the emitter molecules show a strong tendency to form aggregates in the mixed film as the origin for enhanced TTA. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ir(ppy){sub 3} doped mixed films give direct proof of emitter aggregates. Based on these results, two concepts are developed that improve the high brightness performance of OLEDs. In a first approach, thin intrinsic matrix interlayers are incorporated in the emission layer leading to a one-dimensional exciton confinement that suppresses exciton migration and, consequently, TTA. The second concept reduces the efficiency roll-off by using an emitter molecule with slightly different chemical structure, i.e. Ir(ppy){sub 2

  20. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan Osipov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977. The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine.

  1. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Vinokurov, Alexei; Smetanina, Nadezhda; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977). The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2-fold higher slope coefficient (method sensitivity) compared to the Giemsa results. The unexpectedly high sensitivity of Giemsa staining for the comet assay is due to the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect, the stain photo-stability and the higher resolution of bright-field imaging compared to fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that Giemsa staining can effectively be used for measuring DNA damage by the comet assay. The low cost and availability of Giemsa stain makes this method affordable for any low budget research and will facilitate new applications of the comet assay in biology and medicine. PMID:24727376

  2. The Formation Mechanism of Fluorescent Metal Complexes at the LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ/Carbonate Ester Electrolyte Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarry, Angelique [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gottis, Sebastien [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, Young-Sang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Roque-Rosell, Josep [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Chunjoong [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Cabana, Jordi [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Kerr, John B [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kostecki, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    Electrochemical oxidation of carbonate esters at the LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ/electrolyte interface results in Ni/Mn dissolution and surface film formation, which negatively affect the electrochemical performance of Li-ion batteries. Ex situ X-ray absorption (XRF/XANES), Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopy, along with imaging of LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ positive and graphite negative electrodes from tested Li-ion batteries, reveal the formation of a variety of MnII/III and NiII complexes with β-diketonate ligands. These metal complexes, which are generated upon anodic oxidation of ethyl and diethyl carbonates at LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ, form a surface film that partially dissolves in the electrolyte. The dissolved MnIII complexes are reduced to their MnII analogues, which are incorporated into the solid electrolyte interphase surface layer at the graphite negative electrode. This work elucidates possible reaction pathways and evaluates their implications for Li+ transport kinetics in Li-ion batteries.

  3. The Formation Mechanism of Fluorescent Metal Complexes at the Li x Ni 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4-δ /Carbonate Ester Electrolyte Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarry, Angélique; Gottis, Sébastien; Yu, Young-Sang; Roque-Rosell, Josep; Kim, Chunjoong; Cabana, Jordi; Kerr, John; Kostecki, Robert

    2015-03-18

    Electrochemical oxidation of carbonate esters at the LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ/electrolyte interface results in Ni/Mn dissolution and surface film formation, which negatively affect the electrochemical performance of Li-ion batteries. Ex situ X-ray absorption (XRF/XANES), Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopy, along with imaging of LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ positive and graphite negative electrodes from tested Li-ion batteries, reveal the formation of a variety of MnII/III and NiII complexes with β-diketonate ligands. These metal complexes, which are generated upon anodic oxidation of ethyl and diethyl carbonates at LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ, form a surface film that partially dissolves in the electrolyte. The dissolved MnIII complexes are reduced to their MnII analogues, which are incorporated into the solid electrolyte interphase surface layer at the graphite negative electrode. This work elucidates possible reaction pathways and evaluates their implications for Li+ transport kinetics in Li-ion batteries.

  4. Brightness through Local Constraint-LNA-Enhanced FIT Hybridization Probes for In Vivo Ribonucleotide Particle Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Loibl, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the dynamics of RNA in living cells is usually performed by means of transgenic approaches that require modification of RNA targets and cells. Fluorogenic hybridization probes would also allow the analysis of wild-type organisms. We developed nuclease-resistant DNA forced intercalation (FIT...... acid (LNA) unit serves to introduce a local constraint. This closes fluorescence decay channels and thereby increases the brightness of the probe-target duplexes. As few as two probes were sufficient to enable the tracking of oskar mRNPs in wild-type living Drosophila melanogaster oocytes....

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency control in terahertz metasurfaces based on bright-bright mode coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, R.; Burrow, J. A.; Mekonen, S. M.; Sarangan, A.; Mathews, J.; Agha, I.; Searles, T. A.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a highly flexible planar terahertz metamaterial (MM) comprised of three-gap split-ring resonators. The keys to achieve EIT in this system are the frequency detuning and hybridization processes between two bright modes coexisting in the same unit cell as opposed to bright-dark modes. We present experimental verification of two bright modes coupling for a terahertz EIT-MM in the context of numerical results and theoretical analysis based on a coupled Lorentz oscillator model. In addition, a hybrid variation of the EIT-MM is proposed and implemented numerically to dynamically tune the EIT window by incorporating photosensitive silicon pads in the split gap region of the resonators. As a result, this hybrid MM enables the active optical control of a transition from the on state (EIT mode) to the off state (dipole mode).

  6. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics

  7. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  8. Selection effects in the bivariate brightness distribution for spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.

    1986-01-01

    The joint distribution of total luminosity and characteristic surface brightness (the bivariate brightness distribution) is investigated for a complete sample of spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The influence of selection and physical limits of various kinds on the apparent distribution are detailed. While the distribution of surface brightness for bright galaxies may be genuinely fairly narrow, faint galaxies exist right across the (quite small) range of accessible surface brightnesses so no statement can be made about the true extent of the distribution. The lack of high surface brightness bright galaxies in the Virgo sample relative to an overall RC2 sample (mostly field galaxies) supports the contention that the star-formation rate is reduced in the inner region of the cluster for environmental reasons. (author)

  9. Investigating the Bright End of LSST Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Elle; Pepper, Joshua; LSST Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will begin operations in 2022, conducting a wide-field, synoptic multiband survey of the southern sky. Some fraction of objects at the bright end of the magnitude regime observed by LSST will overlap with other wide-sky surveys, allowing for calibration and cross-checking between surveys. The LSST is optimized for observations of very faint objects, so much of this data overlap will be comprised of saturated images. This project provides the first in-depth analysis of saturation in LSST images. Using the PhoSim package to create simulated LSST images, we evaluate saturation properties of several types of stars to determine the brightness limitations of LSST. We also collect metadata from many wide-field photometric surveys to provide cross-survey accounting and comparison. Additionally, we evaluate the accuracy of the PhoSim modeling parameters to determine the reliability of the software. These efforts will allow us to determine the expected useable data overlap between bright-end LSST images and faint-end images in other wide-sky surveys. Our next steps are developing methods to extract photometry from saturated images.This material is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation through Cooperative Agreement 1258333 managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), and the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515 with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Additional LSST funding comes from private donations, grants to universities, and in-kind support from LSSTC Institutional Members.Thanks to NSF grant PHY-135195 and the 2017 LSSTC Grant Award #2017-UG06 for making this project possible.

  10. An exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Mateo, Mario; Fich, Michel; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies.

  11. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon Flux Measurements of Montanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ač

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored ability of reflectance vegetation indexes (VIs related to chlorophyll fluorescence emission (686/630, 740/800 and de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments (PRI, calculated as (531−570/(531−570 to track changes in the CO2 assimilation rate and Light Use Efficiency (LUE in montane grassland and Norway spruce forest ecosystems, both at leaf and also canopy level. VIs were measured at two research plots using a ground-based high spatial/spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy technique. No significant relationship between VIs and leaf light-saturated CO2 assimilation (MAX was detected in instantaneous measurements of grassland under steady-state irradiance conditions. Once the temporal dimension and daily irradiance variation were included into the experimental setup, statistically significant changes in VIs related to tested physiological parameters were revealed. ΔPRI and Δ(686/630 of grassland plant leaves under dark-to-full sunlight transition in the scale of minutes were significantly related to MAX (2=0.51. In the daily course, the variation of VIs measured in one-hour intervals correlated well with the variation of Gross Primary Production (GPP, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE, and LUE estimated via the eddy-covariance flux tower. Statistical results were weaker in the case of the grassland ecosystem, with the strongest statistical relation of the index 686/630 with NEE and GPP.

  12. In situ one-pot synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots and its 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yl)oxyl derivatives as fluorescent nanosensors for ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achadu, Ojodomo J; Nyokong, Tebello

    2017-10-23

    Graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (gCNQDs) when alone or containing embedded 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yl)oxyl) (4-AT) (gCNQDs-4-AT(embedded)) were synthesized via low temperature in situ one-pot process from diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN). The blue emission of both gCNQDs and gCNQDs-4-AT were excitation wavelength-dependent with very high fluorescence quantum yields of 43 and 51%, respectively. Further, the gCNQDs were covalently linked to 4-AT via an amide bond to give (gCNQDs-4-AT (linked)). gCNQDs were also non-covalently linked to 2,2,6,6-etramethyl(piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO, not containing amino groups) derivatized zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to form gCNQDs-TEMPO-ZnPc(π-π). The TEMPO-derivatized gCNQDs (gCNQDs-4-AT(embedded)), gCNQDs-4-AT(linked), or gCNQDs-TEMPO-ZnPc(π-π) were found to be highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid (AA) detection with limits of detection (LOD) in the nanomolar range. Hence, 4-AT (or TEMPO) functionality introduced into the gCNQDs (or ZnPc) afforded the derivation of selective and sensitive AA probes. Real samples were evaluated by the designed probes and satisfactory recoveries further confirmed the analytical applicability of the gCNQDs-based probes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. UBVR Imaging of UV Bright Interacting Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C. H.; Weistrop, D.; Angione, R.; Cruzen, S.; Kaiser, M. E.

    1997-12-01

    Interacting galaxies are often found to contain UV-bright knots which are the sites of very recent or ongoing star-formation. To investigate the stellar populations of these complexes we have obtained UBVR images of several interacting or morphologically disturbed UV bright galaxies (NGC 3395/6, NGC 3991/4/5, NGC 4194, NGC 6090). Images of IRAS 15179+3956, an interacting galaxy in the Bootes Void, were also obtained. The images were made with the 2048x 2048 CCD camera on the 1-meter telescope at the Mount Laguna Observatory. Colors and magnitudes of star-forming regions in these objects will be presented and used to study how their properties change with age and position within each galaxy and how star-formation propagates through the system. This is part of an ongoing study of starburst galaxies that will include STIS (Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph) longslit spectroscopy of a subset of these galaxies. Mount Laguna Observatory is operated jointly by San Diego State University and the University of Illinois. This research is supported in part by NASA under contract NAS 5-31231.

  14. Next generation diode lasers with enhanced brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, S.; Rauch, S.; Irmler, L.; Rikels, J.; Killi, A.; Papastathopoulos, E.; Sarailou, E.; Zimer, H.

    2018-02-01

    High-power diode lasers are nowadays well established manufacturing tools in high power materials processing, mainly for tactile welding, surface treatment and cladding applications. Typical beam parameter products (BPP) of such lasers range from 30 to 50 mm·mrad at several kilowatts of output power. TRUMPF offers a product line of diode lasers to its customers ranging from 150 W up to 6 kW of output power. These diode lasers combine high reliability with small footprint and high efficiency. However, up to now these lasers are limited in brightness due to the commonly used spatial and coarse spectral beam combining techniques. Recently diode lasers with enhanced brightness have been presented by use of dense wavelength multiplexing (DWM). In this paper we report on TRUMPF's diode lasers utilizing DWM. We demonstrate a 2 kW and a 4 kW system ideally suited for fine welding and scanner welding applications. The typical laser efficiency is in the range of 50%. The system offers plug and play exchange of the fiber beam delivery cable, multiple optical outputs and integrated cooling in a very compact package. An advanced control system offers flexible integration in any customer's shop floor environment and includes industry 4.0 capabilities (e.g. condition monitoring and predictive maintenance).

  15. Does Stevens's Power Law for Brightness Extend to Perceptual Brightness Averaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Stevens's power law ([Psi][infinity][Phi][beta]) captures the relationship between physical ([Phi]) and perceived ([Psi]) magnitude for many stimulus continua (e.g., luminance and brightness, weight and heaviness, area and size). The exponent ([beta]) indicates whether perceptual magnitude grows more slowly than physical magnitude ([beta] less…

  16. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  17. Synthesis and drug detection performance of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Jingjing [Functional and Environment Materials Research Institute, College of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nano Structure and Low Dimensional Physics Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gao, Hui, E-mail: hope@lzu.edu.cn [Functional and Environment Materials Research Institute, College of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Recently, nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) have attracted considerable interest since nitrogen (N) doping could effectively tailor the electronic properties and the chemical reactivity of carbon dots (CDs) for advanced potential applications. Herein, a one-step pyrolysis method was presented for synthesizing the NCDs with excellent water solubility, good stability and a high quantum yield of ca. 28%. The detection performance of NCDs for the antibacterial drugs was further explored, and it was proved to effectively enhance the fluorescence due to the strong interaction between the NCDs and antibacterial drugs. - Highlights: • A facile yet economic bottom-up pyrolysis method for synthesizing nitrogen (N)-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glutamic acid as the precursor. • Glutamic acid was the only starting material and used as a source of carbon and nitrogen; the formation and functionalization of NCDs were accomplished simultaneously. • The NCDs possess bright blue emission (with a high quantum yield of ca. 28%) and excellent excitation dependent on PL properties. • NCDs were used for the determination of antibacterial drugs based on the fluorescence enhancement.

  18. Real Time Monitoring of Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentration and Disinfection By-Product Formation Potential in a Surface Water Treatment Plant with Simulaneous UV-VIS Absorbance and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes a method based on simultaneous absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission mapping for rapidly and accurately monitoring dissolved organic carbon concentration and disinfection by-product formation potential for surface water sourced drinking water treatment. The method enables real-time monitoring of the Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), absorbance at 254 nm (UVA), the Specific UV Absorbance (SUVA) as well as the Simulated Distribution System Trihalomethane (THM) Formation Potential (SDS-THMFP) for the source and treated water among other component parameters. The method primarily involves Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) decomposition of the high and lower molecular weight humic and fulvic organic component concentrations. The DOC calibration method involves calculating a single slope factor (with the intercept fixed at 0 mg/l) by linear regression for the UVA divided by the ratio of the high and low molecular weight component concentrations. This method thus corrects for the changes in the molecular weight component composition as a function of the source water composition and coagulation treatment effects. The SDS-THMFP calibration involves a multiple linear regression of the DOC, organic component ratio, chlorine residual, pH and alkalinity. Both the DOC and SDS-THMFP correlations over a period of 18 months exhibited adjusted correlation coefficients with r2 > 0.969. The parameters can be reported as a function of compliance rules associated with required % removals of DOC (as a function of alkalinity) and predicted maximum contaminant levels (MCL) of THMs. The single instrument method, which is compatible with continuous flow monitoring or grab sampling, provides a rapid (2-3 minute) and precise indicator of drinking water disinfectant treatability without the need for separate UV photometric and DOC meter measurements or independent THM determinations.

  19. Application of carbon nanotubes modified with a Keggin polyoxometalate as a new sorbent for the hollow-fiber micro-solid-phase extraction of trace naproxen in hair samples with fluorescence spectrophotometry using factorial experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Ezzat; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Es'haghi, Zarrin; Bamoharram, Fatemeh Farrash

    2015-07-01

    A sensitive technique to determinate naproxen in hair samples was developed using hollow-fiber micro-solid-phase combined with fluorescence spectrophotometry. The incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified with a Keggin polyoxometalate into a silica matrix prepared by the sol-gel method was reported. In this research, the Keggin carbon nanotubes /silica composite was used in the pores and lumen of a hollow fiber as the hollow-fiber micro-solid-phase extraction device. The device was used for the microextraction of the analyte from hair and water samples under the optimized conditions. An orthogonal array experimental design with an OA24 (4(6) ) matrix was employed to optimize the conditions. The effect of six factors influencing the extraction efficiency was investigated: pH, salt, volume of donor and desorption phase, extraction and desorption time. The effect of each factor was estimated using individual contributions as response functions in the screening process. Analysis of variance was employed for estimating the main significant factors and their contributions in the extraction. Calibration curve plot displayed linearity over a range of 0.2-10 ng/mL with detection limits of 0.072 and 0.08 ng/mL for hair and aqueous samples, respectively. The relative recoveries in the hair and aqueous matrices ranged from 103-95%. The relative standard deviation for fiber-to-fiber repeatability was 3.9%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The liner brightness temperature measurement by two channel optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, M. I.; Dudin, S. V.; Ushnurtsev, A. E.; Mintsev, V. B.

    2018-01-01

    Measurability of liner inner surface brightness temperature by two channel optical pyrometer is shown. Liner is compressed by detonation products in large-scale experiment. Absolute radiant intensity values were obtained by measuring optical system channel calibration involving tungsten and xenon radiation sources. Three ways of surface brightness temperature measurement are presented at wavelengths of 620 and 850 nm. Using the developed procedure copper and steel liners behavior (brightness temperature, average speed) under compression by detonation products are evaluated.

  1. Very-High-Brightness Picosecond Electron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluem, H.

    2003-01-01

    Bright, RF photocathode electron guns are the source of choice for most high-performance research accelerator applications. Some of these applications are pushing the performance boundaries of the present state-of-the-art guns. Advanced Energy Systems is developing a novel photocathode RF gun that shows excellent promise for extending gun performance. Initial gun simulations with only a short booster accelerator easily break the benchmark emittance of one micron for 1 nC of bunch charge. The pulse length in these simulations is less than 2 ps. It is expected that with more detailed optimization studies, the performance can be further improved. The performance details of the gun will be presented. In addition, we will discuss the present design concept along with the status of the project

  2. Bioinspired bright noniridescent photonic melanin supraballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Hu, Ziying; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Tormo, Alejandro Diaz; Le Thomas, Nicolas; Wang, Boxiang; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Structural colors enable the creation of a spectrum of nonfading colors without pigments, potentially replacing toxic metal oxides and conjugated organic pigments. However, significant challenges remain to achieve the contrast needed for a complete gamut of colors and a scalable process for industrial application. We demonstrate a feasible solution for producing structural colors inspired by bird feathers. We have designed core-shell nanoparticles using high-refractive index (RI) (~1.74) melanin cores and low-RI (~1.45) silica shells. The design of these nanoparticles was guided by finite-difference time-domain simulations. These nanoparticles were self-assembled using a one-pot reverse emulsion process, which resulted in bright and noniridescent supraballs. With the combination of only two ingredients, synthetic melanin and silica, we can generate a full spectrum of colors. These supraballs could be directly added to paints, plastics, and coatings and also used as ultraviolet-resistant inks or cosmetics.

  3. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When viewing three-dimensional (3D images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the photographic principle is used in this study to measure metering values by capturing 2D and 3D images on television screens. By analyzing these images with statistical product and service solutions (SPSS software, the image brightness values can be estimated using the statistical regression model, which can also indicate the impact of various environmental factors or hardware on the image brightness. In analysis of the experimental results, comparison of the image brightness between 2D and 3D images indicates 60.8% degradation in the 3D image brightness amplitude. The experimental values, from 52.4% to 69.2%, are within the 95% confidence interval

  4. CLPX-Satellite: AMSR-E Brightness Temperature Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) passive microwave brightness temperatures gridded to the...

  5. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadir, Z.; Bulut, V. N.; Hidalgo, M.; Soylak, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 μg L- 1. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101-108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples.

  6. Water treatment by new-generation graphene materials: hope for bright future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Alharbi, Omar M L; Tkachev, Alexey; Galunin, Evgeny; Burakov, Alexander; Grachev, Vladimir A

    2018-03-01

    Water is the most important and essential component of earth's ecosystem playing a vital role in the proper functioning of flora and fauna. But, our water resources are contaminating continuously. The whole world may be in great water scarcity after few decades. Graphene, a single-atom thick carbon nanosheet, and graphene nanomaterials have bright future in water treatment technologies due to their extraordinary properties. Only few papers describe the use of these materials in water treatment by adsorption, filtration, and photodegradation methods. This article presents a critical evaluation of the contribution of graphene nanomaterials in water treatment. Attempts have been made to discuss the future perspectives of these materials in water treatment. Besides, the efforts are made to discuss the nanotoxicity and hazards of graphene-based materials. The suggestions are given to explore the full potential of these materials along with precautions of nanotoxicity and its hazards. It was concluded that the future of graphene-based materials is quite bright.

  7. Augmented anticancer activity of a targeted, intracellularly activatable, theranostic nanomedicine based on fluorescent and radiolabeled, methotrexate-folic Acid-multiwalled carbon nanotube conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manasmita; Datir, Satyajit R; Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog

    2013-07-01

    The present study reports the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel, intravenously injectable, theranostic prodrug based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) concomitantly decorated with a fluorochrome (Alexa-fluor, AF488/647), radionucleide (Technitium-99m), tumor-targeting module (folic acid, FA), and anticancer agent (methotrexate, MTX). Specifically, MTX was conjugated to MWCNTs via a serum-stable yet intracellularly hydrolyzable ester linkage to ensure minimum drug loss in circulation. Cell uptake studies corroborated the selective internalization of AF-FA-MTX-MWCNTs (1) by folate receptor (FR) positive human lung (A549) and breast (MCF 7) cancer cells through FR mediated endocytosis. Lysosomal trafficking of 1 enabled the conjugate to exert higher anticancer activity as compared to its nontargeted counterpart that was mainly restricted to cytoplasm. Tumor-specific accumulation of 1 in Ehlrich Ascites Tumor (EAT) xenografted mice was almost 19 and 8.6 times higher than free MTX and FA-deprived MWCNTs. Subsequently, the conjugate 1 was shown to arrest tumor growth more effectively in chemically breast tumor induced rats, when compared to either free MTX or nontargeted controls. Interestingly, the anticancer activities of the ester-linked CNT-MTX conjugates (including the one deprived of FA) were significantly higher than their amide-linked counterpart, suggesting that cleavability of linkers between drug and multifunctional nanotubes critically influence their therapeutic performance. The results were also supported by in silico docking and ligand similarity analysis. Toxicity studies in mice confirmed that all CNT-MTX conjugates were devoid of any perceivable hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity. Overall, the delivery property of MWCNTs, high tumor binding avidity of FA, optical detectability of AF fluorochromes, and radio-traceability of (99m)Tc could be successfully integrated and partitioned on a single CNT-platform to

  8. Morphing hydrogel patterns by thermo-reversible fluorescence switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat, Erhan; Lin, En-Wei; Saxer, Sina; Maynard, Heather D

    2014-07-01

    Stimuli responsive surfaces that show reversible fluorescence switching behavior in response to temperature changes were fabricated. Oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate thermoresponsive polymers with amine end-groups were prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The polymers were patterned on silicon surfaces by electron beam (e-beam) lithography, followed by conjugation of self-quenching fluorophores. Fluorophore conjugated hydrogel thin films were bright when the gels were swollen; upon temperature-induced collapse of the gels, self-quenching of the fluorophores led to significant attenuation of fluorescence. Importantly, the fluorescence was regained when the temperature was cooled. The fluorescence switching behavior of the hydrogels for up to ten cycles was investigated and the swelling-collapse was verified by atomic force microscopy. Morphing surfaces that change shape several times upon increase in temperature were obtained by patterning multiple stimuli responsive polymers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  10. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  11. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds. The best fit is confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. Johnson SB's distribution of histogram of infrared brightness temperatures clearly ...

  12. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Sabri, Nor Hazmin; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  13. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    And Johnson SB parameters are observed to be best in discriminating the Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures of deep convective systems for each season. Due to these properties of Johnson SB function, it can be utilized in the modelling of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of deep ...

  14. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation M. Das

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    galaxies: ISM—galaxies: spiral—cosmology: dark matter. 1. Introduction. Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are some of the largest spiral galax- ies in our nearby universe. However, for decades these galaxies remained undetected in galaxy surveys. This is because their optically dim stellar disks have a bright-.

  15. Edge integration and the perception of brightness and darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    How do induced brightness and darkness signals from local and remote surfaces interact to determine the final achromatic color percept of a target surface? An emerging theory of achromatic color perception posits that brightness and darkness percepts are computed by weighting and summing the

  16. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - III. 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holoien, T. W. -S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d......This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d...

  17. Henrietta Leavitt - A Bright Star of Astronomy; Resonance June 2001

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leavitt discovered around a thousand variable stars in these clouds. Among these, she found 25. Cepheid variables in the small Magellanic cloud and noted that the period of these variable stars were correlated with the peak brightness. The brighter the star was, the longer it took to vary its brightness. In other words, the.

  18. Lamp spectrum and spatial brightness at photopic levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Atli, Deniz; Cheal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Light sources are available in a variety of spectral power distributions (SPDs) and this affects spatial brightness in a manner not predicted by quantities such as illuminance. Tuning light source SPD to better match the sensitivity of visual perception may allow the same spatial brightness but a...

  19. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Barbier

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. Intrinsic brightness temperatures of blazar jets at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovatta Talvikki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to deconvolve light curves of blazars into individual flares, including proper estimation of the fit errors. We use the method to fit 15GHzlight curves obtained within the OVRO 40-m blazar monitoring program where a large number of AGN have been monitored since 2008 in support of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope mission. The time scales obtained from the fitted models are used to calculate the variability brightness temperature of the sources. Additionally, we have calculated brightness temperatures of a sample of these objects using Very Long Baseline Array data from the MOJAVE survey. Combining these two data sets enables us to study the intrinsic brightness temperature distribution in these blazars at 15 GHz. Our preliminary results indicate that the mean intrinsic brightness temperature in a sample of 14 sources is near the equipartition brightness temperature of ~ 1011K.

  1. Benchtop Fluorination of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds on a Preparative Scale: Toward Unusually Hydrophilic Bright Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlík, Jan; Raabová, Helena; Gulka, Michal; Petráková, Vladimíra; Krečmarová, M.; Mašek, V.; Louša, Petr; Štursa, Jan; Boyen, H. G.; Nesládek, M.; Cígler, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 23 (2016), s. 4134-4142 ISSN 1616-301X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33094A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16336S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : nitrogen-vacancy centers * catalyzed decarboxylative fluorination * surface modification Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  2. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bright fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for live cell imaging of host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E; Andrew, Peter W; van Strijp, Jos A G; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people, but at the same time one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells is poorly understood. One of the

  4. Bright Fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for Live-Cell Imaging of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people but, at the same time, one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells are poorly understood. One of the

  5. Bright patches on chernozems - from space to surface and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Burian, Libor; Holec, Juraj; Minár, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    located in areas with slope gradient between 3 and 6°, which is consider as the higher slope in this part of the hilly land. In 1949 the distribution of bright patches was more strongly related to higher slope gradient, the convex forms of profile curvature, and upslope position than in 2004. In the studied catchment, 34 soil profiles were described in the bright patches (identified in 2004), and 73% of them were situated on the convex forms of profile curvature. The most of the profiles were eroded (88%), the mean soil loss was 0.36 m (in the comparison with the reference soil profile), and in 55% of described soil profiles the entire mollic horizon was removed. The typical surface horizon contained 2.3% of humus and 21% of carbonates. The soil profiles were further compared with these situated in the areas neighbouring with the bright patches, and soil profiles on two valley cross-sections, in order to understand the soil redistribution in the catchment, and describe the differences between the bright and black patches in the chernozem landscape. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract ESF-EC-0006-07 and APVV-0625-11; Anna Smetanová has received the support of the AgreenSkills fellowship (under grant agreement n°267196).

  6. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Bright visible light emission from graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Duck; Kim, Hakseong; Cho, Yujin; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Pilkwang; Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Sunwoo; Li, Yilei; Park, Seung-Nam; Yoo, Yong Shim; Yoon, Duhee; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Sang Wook; Bae, Myung-Ho; Park, Yun Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here, we report the observation of bright visible light emission from electrically biased suspended graphene devices. In these devices, heat transport is greatly reduced. Hot electrons (∼2,800 K) therefore become spatially localized at the centre of the graphene layer, resulting in a 1,000-fold enhancement in thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be used to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realization of commercially viable large-scale, atomically thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low operation voltage and graphene-based on-chip ultrafast optical communications.

  8. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael; Matthews, Allison M.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Avilez, Ian; Beale, Luca; Bittle, Lauren E.; Bordenave, David; Finn, Molly; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Hughes, Paul; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Lewis, Hannah; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Liu, Mengyao; McNair, Shunlante; Murphy, Edward; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Richardson, Whitney; Song, Yiqing; Troup, Nicholas; Villadsen, Jackie; Wenger, Trey V.; Wilson, Robert Forrest

    2018-01-01

    We present updates from the ninth year of operation of Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) including new club content, continued assessments, and our seventh annual Star Party. DSBK is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. DSBK’s most fundamental program is an 8-10 week long after-school Astronomy camp at surrounding local elementary schools, where each week introduces new concepts through interactive hands-on activities. Over the past two summers, we have traveled to four rural Virginia locations to bring week-long Astronomy camps to otherwise overlooked elementary school districts. These programs aim to inspire a curiosity for science and include inquiry based activities in topics ranging from the electromagnetic spectrum to the classification and evolution of galaxies. We strive to be self-reflective in our mission to inspire scientific curiosity in the minds of underserved demographics. In this effort, we continually assess the effectiveness of each activity through feedback in student-kept journal pages and observed excitement levels. This self-reflection has initiated the development of new curriculum. In addition, differing from our normal collaboration with local elementary schools, we have found great success partnering with local youth organizations, who may better represent DSBK's target demographics and have infrastructure to support incoming outreach groups.

  9. Featured Image: Bright Dots in a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    This image of a sunspot, located in in NOAA AR 12227, was captured in December 2014 by the 0.5-meter Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode spacecraft. This image was processed by a team of scientists led by Rahul Yadav (Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory Dewali, India) in order to examine the properties of umbral dots: transient, bright features observed in the umbral region (the central, darkest part) of a sunspot. By exploring these dots, Yadav and collaborators learned how their properties relate to the large-scale properties of the sunspots in which they form for instance, how do the number, intensities, or filling factors of dots relate to the size of a sunspots umbra? To find out more about the authors results, check out the article below.Sunspot in NOAA AR 11921. Left: umbralpenumbral boundary. Center: the isolated umbra from the sunspot. Right: The umbra with locations of umbral dots indicated by yellow plus signs. [Adapted from Yadav et al. 2018]CitationRahul Yadav et al 2018 ApJ 855 8. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aaaeba

  10. Intercomparisons of Nine Sky Brightness Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Spoelstra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across the Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from −16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and −7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m2 on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m2 on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  11. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  12. Fluorescent nanodiamonds embedded in biocompatible translucent shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehor, Ivan; Slegerova, Jitka; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Petrakova, Vladimira; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Treussart, François; Turner, Stuart; Bals, Sara; Sacha, Pavel; Ledvina, Miroslav; Wen, Amy M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Cigler, Petr

    2014-03-26

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds (NDs) represent extremely promising materials for construction of fluorescent nanoprobes and nanosensors. However, some properties of bare NDs limit their direct use in these applications: they precipitate in biological solutions, only a limited set of bio-orthogonal conjugation techniques is available and the accessible material is greatly polydisperse in shape. In this work, we encapsulate bright 30-nm fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in 10-20-nm thick translucent (i.e., not altering FND fluorescence) silica shells, yielding monodisperse near-spherical particles of mean diameter 66 nm. High yield modification of the shells with PEG chains stabilizes the particles in ionic solutions, making them applicable in biological environments. We further modify the opposite ends of PEG chains with fluorescent dyes or vectoring peptide using click chemistry. High conversion of this bio-orthogonal coupling yielded circa 2000 dye or peptide molecules on a single FND. We demonstrate the superior properties of these particles by in vitro interaction with human prostate cancer cells: while bare nanodiamonds strongly aggregate in the buffer and adsorb onto the cell membrane, the shell encapsulated NDs do not adsorb nonspecifically and they penetrate inside the cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Systematic Review of Bright Light Therapy for Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Marshall T; Lundgren, Jennifer D

    2016-10-27

    Bright light therapy is a noninvasive biological intervention for disorders with nonnormative circadian features. Eating disorders, particularly those with binge-eating and night-eating features, have documented nonnormative circadian eating and mood patterns, suggesting that bright light therapy may be an efficacious stand-alone or adjunctive intervention. The purpose of this systematic literature review, using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, was (1) to evaluate the state of the empirical treatment outcome literature on bright light therapy for eating disorders and (2) to explore the timing of eating behavior, mood, and sleep-related symptom change so as to understand potential mechanisms of bright light therapy action in the context of eating disorder treatment. A comprehensive literature search using PsycInfo and PubMed/MEDLINE was conducted in April 2016 with no date restrictions to identify studies published using bright light therapy as a treatment for eating disorders. Keywords included combinations of terms describing disordered eating (eating disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating, binge, eating behavior, eating, and night eating) and the use of bright light therapy (bright light therapy, light therapy, phototherapy). After excluding duplicates, 34 articles were reviewed for inclusion. 14 published studies of bright light therapy for eating disorders met inclusion criteria (included participants with an eating disorder/disordered-eating behaviors; presented as a case study, case series, open-label clinical trial, or randomized/nonrandomized controlled trial; written in English; and published and available by the time of manuscript review). Results suggest that bright light therapy is potentially effective at improving both disordered-eating behavior and mood acutely, although the timing of symptom response and the duration of treatment effects remain unknown. Future research should

  14. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  15. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  16. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  17. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadir, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Giresun University, Giresun (Turkey); Bulut, V.N. [Macka Vocational School, Karadeniz Technical University, Macka, Trabzon (Turkey); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Girona (Spain); Soylak, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey); Marguí, E., E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Girona, Girona (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 μg L{sup −1}. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101–108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples. - Highlights: • A method using DMSPE and TXRF is proposed for Cr(VI) determination in water. • CNTs modified with a commercial anionic exchanger are used for the DMSPE. • The detection limit for hexavalent chromium is 3 μg L{sup −1}. • Accuracy and precision are suitable for the analysis of tap and mineral waters.

  18. The GPM Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, J.; Chou, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project will provide a core satellite carrying the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and will use microwave observations from a constellation of other satellites. Each partner with a satellite in the constellation will have a calibration that meets their own requirements and will decide on the format to archive their brightness temperature (Tb) record in GPM. However, GPM multi-sensor precipitation algorithms need to input intercalibrated Tb's in order to avoid differences among sensors introducing artifacts into the longer term climate record of precipitation. The GPM Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature Product is intended to address this problem by providing intercalibrated Tb data, called "Tc" data, where the "c" stands for common. The precipitation algorithms require a Tc file format that is both generic and flexible enough to accommodate the different passive microwave instruments. The format provides detailed information on the processing history in order to allow future researchers to have a record of what was done. The format is simple, including the main items of scan time, latitude, longitude, incidence angle, sun glint angle, and Tc. It also provides a quality flag, spacecraft orientation, spacecraft location, orbit, and instrument scan type (cross-track or conical). Another simplification is to store data in real numbers, avoiding the ambiguity of scaled data. Finally, units and descriptions will be provided in the product. The format is built on the concept of a swath, which is a series of scans that have common geolocation and common scan geometry. Scan geometry includes pixels per scan, sensor orientation, scan type, and incidence angles. The format includes 3 space saving methods: first rounding variables written as floats to their needed accuracy to achieve good compression, second writing sun glint angle as a one byte variable, and third storing only unique incidence angles but allowing access via a mapping

  19. Dark Skies, Bright Kids: Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Johnson, K.; Lynch, R.; Walker, L.; Beaton, R.; Corby, J.; de Messieres, G.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Jackson, L.; Kingery, A.; Layman, S.; Murphy, E.; Richardson, W.; Ries, P.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G.; Sokal, K.; Trammell, G.; Whelan, D.; Yang, A.; Zasowski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) outreach program brings astronomy education into local elementary schools in central Virginia's Southern Albemarle County through an after-school club. Taking advantage of the unusually dark night skies in the rural countryside, DSBK targets economically disadvantaged schools that tend to be underserved due to their rural locale. The goals of DSBK are to foster children's natural curiosity, demonstrate that science is a fun and creative process, challenge students' conceptions of what a scientist is and does, and teach some basic astronomy. Furthermore, DSBK works to assimilate families into students' education by holding family observing nights at the school. Now in its third semester, DSBK has successfully run programs at two schools with very diverse student populations. Working with these students has helped us to revise our activities and to create new ones. A by-product of our work has been the development of lesson plans, complete with learning goals and detailed instructions, that we make publically available on our website. This year we are expanding our repertoire with our new planetarium, which allows us to visualize topics in novel ways and supplements family observing on cloudy nights. The DSBK volunteers have also created a bilingual astronomy artbook --- designed, written, and illustrated by UVa students --- that we will publish and distribute to elementary schools in Virginia. Our book debuted at the last AAS winter meeting, and since then it has been extensively revised and updated with input from many individuals, including parents, professional educators, and a children's book author. Because the club is currently limited to serving a few elementary schools, this book will be part of our efforts to broaden our impact by bringing astronomy to schools we cannot go to ourselves and reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities at the same time.

  20. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R. L.; Borish, J.; Corby, J. F.; Dorsey, G.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Prager, B. J.; Ries, P. A.; Romero, C. E.; Sokal, K. R.; Tang, X.; Walker, L. M.; Yang, A. J.; Zasowski, G.

    2012-01-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a program that brings astronomy education to elementary schools throughout central Virginia. In a relaxed, out-of-classroom atmosphere, we are able to foster the innate curiosity that young students have about science and the world around them. We target schools that are under-served due to their rural locale or special needs students, demonstrating that science is a fun and creative process to a segment of the population that might not otherwise be exposed to astronomy. Families are included in the learning experience during semi-annual `star parties'. Since last January, we have expanded the breadth and depth of our educational capabilities. We have developed new programs for use in our digital planetarium. We held the first Central Virginia Star Party, providing an atmosphere where local children from multiple schools were able to share their love for astronomy. Local government and University officials were also invited so that they could experience our focused science outreach. Most recently, we have become part of Ivy Creek School's Club Day activities, bringing our program to a new segment of the elementary school system in Albemarle County: those that have `low-incidence' disabilities, requiring special attention. We continue to develop a curriculum for after-school programs that functions as either a series of one-time activities or several months of focused outreach at one school. Many of these activities are provided on our website, http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/, for the wider astronomical community, including the new planetarium work. We have extended our book project to include two bilingual astronomy books called `Snapshots of the Universe,' one in Spanish and English, the other in French and English. These books introduce young people to some of the many wonders of the Universe through art and captions developed by DSBK volunteers.

  1. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Borish, J.; Crawford, S. B.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Jackson, L.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Prager, B.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Walker, L.; Whelan, D. G.; Zucker, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to engage young children's natural excitement and curiosity, the outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to elementary schools in Virginia. We hope to enhance children's view and understanding of science while exploring the Universe using fun activities. DSBK focuses on rural and underserved schools in Albemarle County and offers a semester-long astronomy club for third through fifth grade students. We believe regular interactions foster personal relationships between students and volunteers that encourage a life-long interest in science. In our fourth year of hosting clubs, we returned to Ivy Creek Elementary School, where we saw wonderful responses from a special group of students with `low-incidence' disabilities. DSBK has grown to realize a broader reach beyond local astronomy clubs; we hope to ignite a spark of interest in astronomy and science more widely- in more children, their families, and their teachers. We also hosted the Second Annual Central Virginia Star Party with an open invitation to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Throughout the year, DSBK now holds 'one-off' programs (akin to astronomy field days) for elementary schools and children's groups throughout Virginia. Furthermore, we are in the final stages of a project to create two bilingual astronomy books called "Snapshots of the Universe", in Spanish and French with English translations. This art book will be made available online and we are working to get a copy in every elementary school in the state. DSBK has begun to reach out to elementary school teachers in order to provide them with useful and engaging classroom material. We have adapted our volunteer-created activities into useful and ready-to-use lessons, available online. After improvements based on research through interactions and feedback from teachers, we have explicitly identified the learning goals in terms of Virginia's Standards of Learning

  2. Optical microvariability of bright type 2 quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polednikova, Jana; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cepa, Jordi; de Diego Onsurbe, José Antonio; González-Serrano, José Ignacio

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a project focused on searching optical microvariabilty (also known as ``intra-night'' variability) in type 2 - obscured - quasars. Optical microvariability can be described as very small changes in the flux, typically in the order of hundredths of magnitude, which can be observed on timescales of hours. Such studies have been so far conducted for samples of blazars and type 1, unobscured, AGNs, where the optical microvariability was detected with success. We have focused on obscured targets which would pose a challenge to the AGN standard model. In the present work, however, we have observed a sample of three bright (g mag < 17) type 2 quasar, based on the catalog of type 2 quasars from SDSS of Reyes et al. (2008). The observations were carried out with the 1.5 meter telescope at San Pedro Martir observatory in Mexico. The sample was observed during an observation period of four days in Johnsons V filter, resulting in at least two continuous intervals of observations per target during the observational run. We have obtained differential light curves for our sources as well as for the comparison stars. They were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance statistical test (ANOVA), which has been repeatedly used in the past for studies of unobscured targets. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, we show that at least two out of three observed targets appear to be variable on time scales of hours. So far, this is the first study which confirmed existence of optical microvariability in type 2 quasars.

  3. Foveal to peripheral extrapolation of brightness within objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscani, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Valsecchi, Matteo

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral viewing is characterized by poor resolution and distortions as compared to central viewing; nevertheless, when we move our gaze around, the visual scene does not appear to change. One possible mechanism leading to perceptual uniformity would be that peripheral appearance is extrapolated based on foveal information. Here we investigate foveal-to-peripheral extrapolation in the case of the perceived brightness of an object's surface. While fixating a spot on the rendered object, observers were asked to adjust the brightness of a disc to match a peripherally viewed target area on the surface of the same object. Being forced to fixate a better illuminated point led to brighter matches as compared to fixating points in the shadow, indicating that foveal brightness information was extrapolated. When observers fixated additional points outside of the object on the scene's background, fixated brightness had no effect on the brightness match. Results indicate that our visual system uses the brightness of the foveally viewed surface area to estimate the brightness of areas in the periphery. However, this mechanism is selectively applied within an object's boundary.

  4. Functional surface engineering of C-dots for fluorescent biosensing and in vivo bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changqin; Zhu, Anwei; Tian, Yang

    2014-01-21

    Nanoparticles are promising scaffolds for applications such as imaging, chemical sensors and biosensors, diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, energy, photonics, medicine, and more. Surface functionalization of nanoparticles introduces an additional dimension in controlling nanoparticle interfacial properties and provides an effective bridge to connect nanoparticles to biological systems. With fascinating photoluminescence properties, carbon dots (C-dots), carbon-containing nanoparticles that are attracting considerable attention as a new type of quantum dot, are becoming both an important class of imaging probes and a versatile platform for engineering multifunctional nanosensors. In order to transfer C-dots from proof-of-concept studies toward real world applications such as in vivo bioimaging and biosensing, careful design and engineering of C-dot probes is becoming increasingly important. A comprehensive knowledge of how C-dot surfaces with various properties behave is essential for engineering C-dots with useful imaging properties such as high quantum yield, stability, and low toxicity, and with desirable biosensing properties such as high selectivity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Several reviews in recent years have reported preparation methods and properties of C-dots and described their application in biosensors, catalysis, photovoltatic cells, and more. However, no one has yet systematically summarized the surface engineering of C-dots, nor the use of C-dots as fluorescent nanosensors or probes for in vivo imaging in cells, tissues, and living organisms. In this Account, we discuss the major design principles and criteria for engineering the surface functionality of C-dots for biological applications. These criteria include brightness, long-term stability, and good biocompatibility. We review recent developments in designing C-dot surfaces with various functionalities for use as nanosensors or as fluorescent probes with fascinating analytical performance

  5. ECR Ion Source for a High-Brightness Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    New technology is being developed for high-brightness, high-current cyclotrons with performance benefits for accelerator-driven subcritical fission power, medical isotope production, and proton beam cancer therapy. This paper describes the design for a 65 kV electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source that will provide high-brightness beam for injection into the cyclotron. The ion source is modeled closely upon the one that is used at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Modifications are being made to provide enhanced brightness and compatibility for higher-current operation.

  6. Synergistic Combination of Unquenching and Plasmonic Fluorescence Enhancement in Fluorogenic Nucleic Acid Hybridization Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietz, Carolin; Lalkens, Birka; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-10-11

    Fluorogenic nucleic acid hybridization probes are widely used for detecting and quantifying nucleic acids. The achieved sensitivity strongly depends on the contrast between a quenched closed form and an unquenched opened form with liberated fluorescence. So far, this contrast was improved by improving the quenching efficiency of the closed form. In this study, we modularly combine these probes with optical antennas used for plasmonic fluorescence enhancement and study the effect of the nanophotonic structure on the fluorescence of the quenched and the opened form. As quenched fluorescent dyes are usually enhanced more by fluorescence enhancement, a detrimental reduction of the contrast between closed and opened form was anticipated. In contrast, we could achieve a surprising increase of the contrast with full additivity of quenching of the dark form and fluorescence enhancement of the bright form. Using single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that the additivity of the two mechanisms depends on the perfect quenching in the quenched form, and we delineate the rules for new nucleic acid probes for enhanced contrast and absolute brightness. Fluorogenic hybridization probes optimized not only for quenching but also for the brightness of the open form might find application in nucleic acid assays with PCR avoiding detection schemes.

  7. Bright luminescence of Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutants reveals a connection between citrate and the Gac/Csr regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Whistler, Cheryl; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    The Gac/Csr regulatory system is conserved throughout the γ-proteobacteria and controls key pathways in central carbon metabolism, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence in important plant and animal pathogens. Here we show that elevated intracellular citrate levels in a Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutant correlate with activation of the Gac/Csr cascade and induction of bright luminescence. Spontaneous or directed mutations in the gene that encodes citrate synthase reversed the bright luminescence of aconitase mutants, eliminated their citrate accumulation and reversed their elevated expression of CsrB. Our data elucidate a correlative link between central metabolic and regulatory pathways, and they suggest that the Gac system senses a blockage at the aconitase step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either through elevated citrate levels or a secondary metabolic effect of citrate accumulation, and responds by modulating carbon flow and various functions associated with host colonization, including bioluminescence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  9. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  10. DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NSIDC produces daily gridded brightness temperature data from orbital swath data generated by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) aboard the Defense...

  11. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  12. SMEX02 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) is a seven-channel, four-frequency, linearly polarized passive microwave radiometric system. Data are brightness...

  13. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. ... Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia ...

  14. Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer Brightness Temperatures, Wakasa Bay, Japan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes calibrated brightness temperatures measured over Wakasa Bay in the Sea of Japan in January and February 2003. The MIR was carried on a...

  15. CLEMENTINE LWIR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This volume contains the archive of Lunar brightness temperature data derived from images acquired by the Clementine Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) camera. The LWIR...

  16. Nimbus-1/HRIR Level 1 Brightness Temperature V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-1 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Level 1 Brightness Temperature Data Product (HRIRN1L1) contains infrared radiances converted to equivalent...

  17. CLPX-Satellite: AVHRR/HRPT Brightness Temperatures and Reflectances

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes AVHRR/HRPT (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/High Resolution Picture Transmission) brightness temperatures and reflectances over the...

  18. AMSR-E/Aqua Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This document pertains to two data sets: AMSR-E/Aqua Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures (NSIDC-0301) and AMSR-E/Aqua Daily Global Quarter-Degree Gridded...

  19. Nimbus-7 SMMR Pathfinder Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of brightness temperatures acquired from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus-7 Pathfinder satellite. The...

  20. SMAPVEX12 PALS Brightness Temperature Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains brightness temperature data obtained by the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) microwave aircraft instrument as a part of the Soil Moisture...

  1. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  2. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  3. Nimbus-5 ESMR Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) data set consists of gridded brightness temperature arrays for the Arctic and Antarctic, spanning 11...

  4. Identifying Bright X-Ray Beasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are astronomical sources of X-rays that, while dimmer than active galactic nuclei, are nonetheless brighter than any known stellar process. What are these beasts and why do they shine so brightly?Exceeding the LimitFirst discovered in the 1980s, ULXs are rare sources that have nonetheless been found in all types of galaxies. Though the bright X-ray radiation seems likely to be coming from compact objects accreting gas, theres a problem with this theory: ULXs outshine the Eddington luminosity for stellar-mass compact objects. This means that a stellar-mass object couldnt emit this much radiation isotropically without blowing itself apart.There are two alternative explanations commonly proposed for ULXs:Rather than being accreting stellar-mass compact objects, they are accreting intermediate-mass black holes. A hypothetical black hole of 100 solar masses or more would have a much higher Eddington luminosity than a stellar-mass black hole, making the luminosities that we observe from ULXs feasible.An example of one of the common routes the authors find for a binary system to become a ULX. In this case, the binary begins as two main sequence stars. As one star evolves off the main sequence, the binary undergoes a common envelope phase and a stage of mass transfer. The star ends its life as a supernova, and the resulting neutron star then accretes matter from the main sequence star as a ULX. [Wiktorowicz et al. 2017]They are ordinary X-ray binaries (a stellar-mass compact object accreting matter from a companion star), but they are undergoing a short phase of extreme accretion. During this time, their emission is beamed into jets, making them appear brighter than the Eddington luminosity.Clues from a New DiscoveryA few years ago, a new discovery shed some light on ULXs: M82 X-2, a pulsing ULX. Two more pulsing ULXs have been discovered since then, demonstrating that at least some ULXs contain pulsars i.e., neutron stars as the

  5. Fluorescence properties of 6-aryl-2‧-deoxy-furanouridine and –pyrrolocytidine and their derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Jong Jin; Go, Gui Han; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Hyean Kim, Byeang

    2018-01-01

    2‧-deoxyfuranouridine derivatives presenting various aryl groups have been synthesized through Cu(I)-catalyzed intramolecular cyclizations. Moreover, corresponding pyrrolo-dC derivatives have been synthesized and both families of compounds thoroughly characterized using UV/vis and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The photophysical characterization, show that our newly synthesized derivatives of the important pyrrolo-dC family have high fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) and brightness values. Pyrrolo-dC derivative, 3a, shows an environment sensitive QY of up to >60% and brightness of almost 3000, in low polarity solvents and excitation and emission maxima between 365–381 nm and 479–510 nm, respectively, in solvents of different polarities. Two other derivatives, 3b and 3c, show high QYs and brightness values of up to 3300 that are fairly insensitive to their microenvironment. These promising photophysical features suggest future applicability as fluorescent nucleobase analogs.

  6. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales

  7. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-04-26

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  8. The effect of bright lines in environmental risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.N.; Desvousges, W.H.; Smith, K.V.; Payne, J.

    1993-01-01

    Bright lines in environmental risk communication refer to the specific levels at which an environmental risk becomes a serious health threat and action should be taken to mitigate its effects. This study examined the effect of ''bright lines'' in risk communication by emphasizing the radon exposure threshold level of 4 picocuries per liter. Specifically, the authors developed a computer-assisted interview containing bright-line versions of risk information. The bright-line version contained a range of possible radon levels, the corresponding number of estimated lung cancer cases, the relative health risk from radon compared to other health risks, and the EPA guidelines for mitigating levels above 4 picocuries in the home. The non-bright line version was identical to the bright-line version, except it did not include the EPA's mitigation recommendations. Effect measures included respondents' change in perceived risk after reading their materials, intended testing behavior, and advice to their neighbor for a specified radon level either above or below the 4 picocury threshold level. This paper discusses broader policy implications for designing effective risk communication programs

  9. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  10. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  11. Intensity calibration and flat-field correction for fluorescence microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Standardization in fluorescence microscopy involves calibration of intensity in reproducible units and correction for spatial nonuniformity of illumination (flat-field or shading correction). Both goals can be achieved using concentrated solutions of fluorescent dyes. When a drop of a highly concentrated fluorescent dye is placed between a slide and a coverslip it produces a spatially uniform field, resistant to photobleaching and with reproducible quantum yield; it can be used as a brightness standard for wide-field and confocal microscopes. For wide-field microscopes, calibration can be further extended to absolute molecular units. This can be done by imaging a solution of known concentration and known depth; the latter can be prepared by placing a small spherical lens in a diluted solution of the same fluorophore that is used in the biological specimen. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R; Barnett, Lauren M; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-06

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  13. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  14. [AO distribution and fluorescence spectra in myoblasts and single muscle fibres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaeva, T N; Krolenko, S A; Leont'eva, E A; Mozhenok, T P; Salova, A V; Faddeeva, M D

    2009-01-01

    Using spectral scanning regime of Leica TCS SL confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) fluorescence spectra in nuclei and cytoplasms of living myoblasts L6J1 and frog single muscle fibres have been studied. AO fluorescence spectra in salt solutions dependent on free AO concentrations and in AO complexes with DNA have also been obtained for comparison. Myoblasts nuclei fluoresced in green spectral region with maximum at approximately 530 nm (corresponding AO monomers fluorescence), nucleoli fluoresced most brightly. Nuclear chromatin fluoresced not uniformly in these cells. We saw similar to myoblasts AO emission in nucleoli and nuclei of frog single muscle fibres. The uniformed weak green fluorescence was observed for myoblast cytoplasm. As to the muscle fibres sarcoplasm, we saw also AO green fluorescence in A-discs. In myoblasts and muscle fibre cytoplasm we saw the fluorescent red, yellow and green granules which were acidic organelles. The comparison of AO fluorescence spectra in living cells with fluorescence spectra of different AO concentrations and complexes of AO with DNA in buffer solutions allows estimation of AO concentration in acidic granules which is of interest in the investigation of cellular organelles functions in the processes of intracellular transport, adaptation, apoptosis and a number of pathological conditions.

  15. Beam brightness calculation for analytical and empirical distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Boulais, K.A.; O, Y.S.; Rhee, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The beam brightness, a figure of merit for a beam quality useful for high-current low-emittance beams, was introduced by van Steenbergen as B = I/V 4 , where I is the beam current and V 4 is the hypervolume in the four-dimensional trace space occupied by the beam particles. Customarily, the brightness is expressed in terms of the product of emittances ε x ε y as B = ηI/(π 2 ε x ε y ), where η is a form factor of order unity which depends on the precise definition of emittance and hypervolume. Recently, a refined definition of the beam brightness based on the arithmetic mean value defined in statistics is proposed. The beam brightness is defined as B triple-bond 4 > = I -1 ∫ ρ 4 2 dxdydx'dy', where I is the beam current given by I ∫ ρ 4 dxdydx'dy'. Note that in this definition, neither the hypervolume V 4 nor the emittance, are explicitly used; the brightness is determined solely by the distribution function. Brightnesses are unambiguously calculated and expressed analytically in terms of the respective beam current and effective emittance for a few commonly used distribution functions, including Maxwellian and water-bag distributions. Other distributions of arbitrary shape frequently encountered in actual experiments are treated numerically. The resulting brightnesses are expressed in the form B = ηI/(π 2 ε x ε y ), and η is found to be weakly dependent on the form of velocity distribution as well as spatial distribution

  16. Color and emotion: effects of hue, saturation, and brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Lisa; Oberfeld, Daniel

    2017-06-13

    Previous studies on emotional effects of color often failed to control all the three perceptual dimensions of color: hue, saturation, and brightness. Here, we presented a three-dimensional space of chromatic colors by independently varying hue (blue, green, red), saturation (low, medium, high), and brightness (dark, medium, bright) in a factorial design. The 27 chromatic colors, plus 3 brightness-matched achromatic colors, were presented via an LED display. Participants (N = 62) viewed each color for 30 s and then rated their current emotional state (valence and arousal). Skin conductance and heart rate were measured continuously. The emotion ratings showed that saturated and bright colors were associated with higher arousal. The hue also had a significant effect on arousal, which increased from blue and green to red. The ratings of valence were the highest for saturated and bright colors, and also depended on the hue. Several interaction effects of the three color dimensions were observed for both arousal and valence. For instance, the valence ratings were higher for blue than for the remaining hues, but only for highly saturated colors. Saturated and bright colors caused significantly stronger skin conductance responses. Achromatic colors resulted in a short-term deceleration in the heart rate, while chromatic colors caused an acceleration. The results confirm that color stimuli have effects on the emotional state of the observer. These effects are not only determined by the hue of a color, as is often assumed, but by all the three color dimensions as well as their interactions.

  17. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  18. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  19. A neurodynamical model of brightness induction in v1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Penacchio

    Full Text Available Brightness induction is the modulation of the perceived intensity of an area by the luminance of surrounding areas. Recent neurophysiological evidence suggests that brightness information might be explicitly represented in V1, in contrast to the more common assumption that the striate cortex is an area mostly responsive to sensory information. Here we investigate possible neural mechanisms that offer a plausible explanation for such phenomenon. To this end, a neurodynamical model which is based on neurophysiological evidence and focuses on the part of V1 responsible for contextual influences is presented. The proposed computational model successfully accounts for well known psychophysical effects for static contexts and also for brightness induction in dynamic contexts defined by modulating the luminance of surrounding areas. This work suggests that intra-cortical interactions in V1 could, at least partially, explain brightness induction effects and reveals how a common general architecture may account for several different fundamental processes, such as visual saliency and brightness induction, which emerge early in the visual processing pathway.

  20. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  1. A fluorescent microscopy study of biopsied muscles from infantile neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miike, T; Tamari, H; Ohtani, Y; Nakamura, H; Matsuda, I; Miyoshino, S

    1983-01-01

    The Acridine Orange (AO) stain for muscle biopsies is particularly useful to identify regenerating and ongoing hypertrophic muscle fibers under fluorescent microscopy. This method was applied to muscle biopsies from 65 patients who suffered from various childhood neuromuscular disorders. While normal fibers showed dull green cytoplasm with small green-yellow nuclei, striking fluorescent fibers were observed in eight cases of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) and 12 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD); these fibers were characterized as follows: (1) small fibers with big oval or spherical nuclei which fluoresced strongly with a bright orange color; (2) fibers of various sizes and different degrees of orange fluorescence; and (3) opaque fibers with bright yellow cytoplasm. The small diameter fibers in Werdnig-Hoffmann (WH) disease, nemaline myopathy, and congenital fiber type disproportion failed to show apparent AO-RNA fluorescence. Although all the atrophic fibers in Kugelberg-Welander (KW) disease showed a vague orange fluorescent color, this was obviously different from that of regenerating fibers seen in CMD and DMD. In addition to these findings, the hypertrophic fibers in a case of unclassified myopathy also showed moderate orange fluorescence around the entire periphery of the cytoplasm.

  2. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bright and Not-So-Bright Prospects for Women in Physics in China-Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-An; Yang, Zhongqin; Ma, Wanyun

    2009-04-01

    Science in China-Beijing is enjoying a healthy increase in funding year by year, so the prospects for physicists are also bright. However, employment discrimination against women, formerly unthinkable, is becoming more and more explicit as the country evolves toward a market economy. Some recruitment notices bluntly state that only men will be considered, or impose restrictions upon potential female candidates. Female associate professors in many institutions are forced to retire at age 55, compared with 60 for men. This double-pinching discrimination against both younger and older women threatens to lead to a "pincer" effect, more serious than the "scissors" effect. Indeed, the ratio of senior-level women physicists in general has dropped significantly in recent years in China. Ironically, the number of female students applying for graduate studies is on the rise, as it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to compete with men in the job market with just an undergraduate degree. The Chinese Physical Society has made certain efforts to promote the image of women physicists, but it will take time and effort to reverse the trend.

  4. Surface brightness parameters as tests of galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, B.M.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that surface brightness parameters defined in terms of an isophotal radius are insensitive to galactic evolution, because the effects of luminosity evolution on the flux and isophotal radius almost cancel each other. Surface brightness parameters defined in terms of a metric radius are able to give fairly direct information on evolution, but only if the metric scale of each galaxy in the sample is determined by photometry of the galaxy itself. If, instead, a metric radius is estimated by means of a fiducial value of q 0 , the brightness-redshift relation yields only a function of both evoluting and the unknown cosmological model, which is very similar to the function obtained from the Hubble diagram

  5. Low surface brightness galaxies in the cluster A1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.I.; Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have obtained deep CCD frames of apparently blank regions of sky in the hope of detecting very low surface brightness (LSB) objects in the cluster A1367. We discuss our data reduction, and image detection and selection techniques. If the galaxies detected are actually cluster members then they are dwarfs and the conclusions of a previous paper on the Fornax cluster are essentially confirmed. One area of variance is that the lowest surface brightness galaxies do not appear to be preferentially concentrated towards the cluster centre. This can be explained by there being a much larger density of dwarf galaxies over this bright galaxy-rich region of the universe. We find over our small area approximately four times as many LSB galaxies as would be expected from our Fornax data. We speculate on the possible origin and likely intensity of intergalactic light within clusters. (author)

  6. Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chinaru Nwosu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae. Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6% than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41% in 2008 [4.92=0.0001]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [>0.05; (>0.18=0.4286 and >0.28=0.3897]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.

  7. Effects of Bright Light Treatment on Psychomotor Speed in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Paavo Tulppo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days. A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both treatment was given every morning between 8–12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time x group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024 but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308. Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year.

  8. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  9. An adaptive brightness preserving bi-histogram equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongying; Sun, Shuifa; Lei, Bangjun; Zheng, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Based on mean preserving bi-histogram equalization (BBHE), an adaptive image histogram equalization algorithm for contrast enhancement is proposed. The threshold is gotten with adaptive iterative steps and used to divide the original image into two sub-images. The proposed Iterative of Brightness Bi-Histogram Equalization overcomes the over-enhancement phenomenon in the conventional histogram equalization. The simulation results show that the algorithm can not only preserve the mean brightness, but also keep the enhancement image information effectively from visual perception, and get a better edge detection result.

  10. Bluish green emitting carbon quantum dots synthesized from jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and its sensing applications of Hg (II) and Cr (VI) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Kalimuthu; Rajendiran, Nagappan

    2018-02-01

    A simple, economical, and green method for the preparation of water soluble, high fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) has been prepared via hydrothermal process using jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) as a carbon source. The optical properties of synthesized CQDs were characterized by UV- visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), x-ray Diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) techniques were used to study the composition and size of the CQDs. The prepared CQDs were spherical in shape with an average size of 2.5 nm along with uniform distribution and showed bright bluish green emission properties, without any further surface modification. The prepared CQDs were exhibit high stability at neutral pH and showed high photo-stability under UV light irradiation at 365 nm. The obtained CQDs were effectively utilized as fluorescent probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg2+ and Cr6+ ions in environmental samples with a limit of detection of about 8 and 10 nM respectively.

  11. Photo- and Bio-physical Studies of Lectin-Conjugated Fluorescent Nanoparticles: Reduced Sensitivity in High Density Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    Lectin conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies reve...

  12. Dimerization-dependent green and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Spencer C; Ding, Yidan; Simmen, Thomas; Campbell, Robert E

    2012-12-21

    Dimerization-dependent fluorescent proteins (ddFP) are a recently introduced class of genetically encoded reporters that can be used for the detection of protein interactions in live cells. The progenitor of this class of tools was a red fluorescent ddFP (ddRFP) derived from a homodimeric variant of Discosoma red fluorescent protein. Here, we describe the engineering and application of an expanded palette of ddFPs, which includes green (ddGFP) and yellow (ddYFP) variants. These optimized variants offer several advantages relative to ddRFP including increased in vitro contrast and brightness for ddGFP and increased brightness and a lowered pK a for ddYFP. We demonstrate that both variants are useful as biosensors for protease activity in live cells. Using the ddGFP tool, we generated a highly effective indicator of endomembrane proximity that can be used to image the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) interface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria.

  13. Dynamic brightness induction causes flicker adaptation, but only along the edges: Evidence against the neural filling-in of brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan E.; de Sa, Virginia R.

    2013-01-01

    Is brightness represented in a point-for-point neural map that is filled in from the response of small, contrast-sensitive edge detector cells? We tested for the presence of this filled-in map by adapting to illusory flicker caused by a dynamic brightness-induction stimulus. Thereafter flicker sensitivity was reduced when our test region was the same size as the induced region, but not for smaller, inset regions. This suggests induced brightness is represented by either small edge-selective cells with no filling-in stage, or by contrast-sensitive spatial filters at many different scales, but not by a population of filled-in neurons arranged in a point-for-point map. PMID:23729768

  14. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Extremely Low Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures Due to Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme events by their nature fall outside the bounds of routine experience. With imperfect or ambiguous measuring systems, it is appropriate to question whether an unusual measurement represents an extreme event or is the result of instrument errors or other sources of noise. About three weeks after the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite began collecting data in Dec 1997, a thunderstorm was observed over northern Argentina with 85 GHz brightness temperatures below 50 K and 37 GHz brightness temperatures below 70 K (Zipser et al. 2006). These values are well below what had previously been observed from satellite sensors with lower resolution. The 37 GHz brightness temperatures are also well below those measured by TRMM for any other storm in the subsequent 16 years. Without corroborating evidence, it would be natural to suspect a problem with the instrument, or perhaps an irregularity with the platform during the first weeks of the satellite mission. Automated quality control flags or other procedures in retrieval algorithms could treat these measurements as errors, because they fall outside the expected bounds. But the TRMM satellite also carries a radar and a lightning sensor, both confirming the presence of an intense thunderstorm. The radar recorded 40+ dBZ reflectivity up to about 19 km altitude. More than 200 lightning flashes per minute were recorded. That same storm's 19 GHz brightness temperatures below 150 K would normally be interpreted as the result of a low-emissivity water surface (e.g., a lake, or flood waters) if not for the simultaneous measurements of such intense convection. This paper will examine records from TRMM and related satellite sensors including SSMI, AMSR-E, and the new GMI to find the strongest signatures resulting from thunderstorms, and distinguishing those from sources of noise. The lowest brightness temperatures resulting from thunderstorms as seen by TRMM have been in Argentina in November and December. For

  17. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sloan, G. C.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online

  18. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Nicholson, Philip D. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Cornell Center for Astrophyics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hedman, Matthew M., E-mail: p.stewart@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online.

  19. Green synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet (g-C3N4) and using it as a label-free fluorosensor for detection of metronidazole via quenching of the fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamie, Amir; Marahel, Farzanh; Sharifat, Ali

    2018-01-01

    In this research, g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets were facilely fabricated by thermal polymerization and then exfoliated into ultrathin nanosheets through ultrasonication in water media. Low-cost C-N nanosheets prepared by melamine possessed a highly π-conjugated structure and fluorescence property. In the present study, the g-C 3 N 4 nanosheet was used as a switch-off fluorescence sensor for rapid and sensitive sensing of metronidazole in biological fluids. These nanosheets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The fluorescence of the solution of the g-C 3 N 4 nanosheets was quenched effectively by metronidazole through two mechanisms: fluorescence resonance energy transfer and the formation of a donor-acceptor charge-transfer complex between π-electron rich donors. Under optimal conditions, the detection linear range for metronidazole was found to be from 0.01 to 0.10μgml -1 , with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.008μgml -1 which can cover standard range of metronidazole in real samples. Moreover, the proposed method has offered a green, rapid, and sensitive probe for quantitative determination of metronidazole in drug and biological fluids. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Remote sensing vegetation status by laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günther, K.P.; Dahn, H.G.; Lüdeker, W.

    1994-01-01

    In November 1989 the EUREKA project LASFLEUR (EU 380) started as an European research effort to investigate the future application of far-field laser-induced plant fluorescence for synoptic, airborne environmental monitoring of vegetation. This report includes a brief introduction in a theoretically approach for the laser-induced fluorescence signals of leaves and their spectral and radiometric behaviour. In addition, a detailed description of the design and realization of the second generation of the far-field fluorescence lidar (DLidaR-2) is given with special regard to the optical and electronical setup, followed by a short explanation of the data processing. The main objectives of the far field measurements are to demonstrate the link between laser-induced fluorescence data and plant physiology and to show the reliability of remote single shot lidar measurements. The data sets include the typical daily cycles of the fluorescence for different global irradiation. As expected from biophysical models, the remotely sensed chlorophyll fluorescence is highly correlated with the carbon fixation rate, while the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 is only dependent on the chlorophyll concentration. Drought stress measurement of evergreen oaks Quercus pubescens confirm the findings of healthy plants with regard to the fluorescence ratio F685 / F730 while the fluorescence signals of stressed plants show a different behavior than nonstressed plants. Additionally, the corresponding physiological data (porometer and PAM data) are presented. (author)

  1. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  2. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  3. The bright optical afterglow of the long GRB 001007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, J.M.C.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present optical follow up observations of the long GRB 001007 between 6.14 hours and similar to468 days after the event. An unusually bright optical afterglow (OA) was seen to decline following a steep power law decay with index alpha = -2.03 +/- 0.11, possibly indicating a break in the light ...

  4. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature.

  5. The "Brightness Rules" Alternative Conception for Light Bulb Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Joel A.; Stuessy, Carol

    2006-01-01

    An alternative conception for the observed differences in light bulb brightness was revealed during an unguided inquiry investigation in which prospective elementary teachers placed identical bulbs in series, parallel, and combination direct current circuits. Classroom observations, document analyses, and video and audio transcriptions led to the…

  6. High-brightness fiber-coupled pump laser development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kirk; Karlsen, Scott; Leisher, Paul; Martinsen, Robert

    2010-02-01

    We report on the continued development of high brightness laser diode modules at nLIGHT Photonics. These modules, based on nLIGHT's PearlTM product platform, demonstrate excellence in output power, brightness, wavelength stabilization, and long wavelength performance. This system, based on 14 single emitters, is designed to couple diode laser light into a 105 μm fiber at an excitation NA of under 0.14. We demonstrate over 100W of optical power at 9xx nm with a diode brightness exceeding 20 MW/cm2-str with an operating efficiency of approximately 50%. Additional results show over 70W of optical coupled at 8xx nm. Record brilliance at wavelengths 14xx nm and longer will also be demonstrated, with over 15 W of optical power with a beam quality of 7.5 mm-mrad. These results of high brightness, high efficiency, and wavelength stabilization demonstrate the pump technology required for next generation solid state and fiber lasers.

  7. Beyond the Kepler/K2 bright limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Tim; Pope, B. J. S.; Antoci, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    very bright stars for asteroseismology and to search for transiting exoplanets. We apply this method to the seven brightest stars in the Pleiades open cluster. Each star exhibits variability; six of the stars show what are most likely slowly pulsating B-star pulsations, with amplitudes ranging from 20...

  8. 150 southern compact and bright-nucleus galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairall, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    Galaxies having regions of exceptionally high surface brightness have been selected from the ESO Quick Blue Survey and investigated by 'grating photography' -direct photography plus low-dispersion slitless spectroscopy. Two new Seyfert galaxies and a peculiar multiple system have been discovered. Differences in red continua are also noted. (author)

  9. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Database & Web-based Software Division, Space Applications Centre, Ahmedabad 380 015, India. ∗ ... temperatures clearly discriminates the cloud pixels of deep convective and non-deep convective cases. It ... that Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures for deep convective systems is differ-.

  10. Compact collimators for high brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, H.J.; Ma, H.; Ho, C.; Li, M.; Mu, C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes

  11. Protocol of networks using energy sharing collisions of bright solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 1009–1021. Protocol of networks using energy sharing collisions of bright solitons. K NAKAMURA1,2, T KANNA3,∗ and K SAKKARAVARTHI3. 1Faculty of Physics ... solitonic collisions is expected and therefore multiple soliton dynamics leads to a triv- ..... One can obtain various choices of αk which satisfy eq.

  12. Bright and dark soliton solutions of the (3+ 1)-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we obtain the 1-soliton solutions of the (3 + 1)-dimensional generalized Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (gKP) equation and the generalized Benjamin equation. By using two solitary wave ansatz in terms of sech p and tanh p functions, we obtain exact analytical bright and dark soliton solutions for the considered ...

  13. The star-bright hour : [poems] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2003-01-01

    Autori lühitutvustus lk. 231. Sisu: The star-bright hour ; The debt ; Not a dream ; Fog-bound ; Corals in an Ancient river ; Frou-frou 1-3. Orig.: Tähetund ; Vilepuhuja ; Võlg ; "Mitte viirastus, meelepett..." ; Udus ; Korallid Emajões ; Froufrou 1-3

  14. The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: The star-bright hour ; Not a dream ; The Piper ; Corals in an ancent river. Luuletused pärinevad kogumikust "Tuulelaeval valgusest on aerud = Windship with Oars of Light. (Tallinn : Huma, 2001). Orig.: Tähetund ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett ; Vilepuhuja ; Korallid Emajões

  15. Brightness perception in low resolution images of 3d textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Siteur, J.

    1996-01-01

    A first step towards the analysis of the appearance of 3 dimensional textures is presented in this paper. It is assumed that the scale of the texture is small relative to the resolution of the camera. Therefore, the texture itself is not distinguishable.However, the perceived brightness of the

  16. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and (ii) a linear and a nonlinear optical lattice. Effective potentials are found for the solitons in both ...

  17. The Skylab ten color photoelectric polarimeter. [sky brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Hahn, R. C.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    A 10-color photoelectric polarimeter was used during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3 to measure sky brightness and polarization associated with zodiacal light, background starlight, and the spacecraft corona. A description is given of the instrument and observing routines together with initial results on the spacecraft corona and polarization of the zodiacal light.

  18. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  19. Optical variability of the medium-bright quasar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K.; Mitchell, K.J.; Usher, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    A variability study of the 32-member Medium-Bright Quasar Sample is reported. It is found that the star US 1953 has undergone a noticeable variation in the course of 26 hr. Apparent variations in the extragalactic object US 3498 may be illusory, owing to its partially resolved appearance. No other evidence for variability was detected. 34 refs

  20. Near-infrared photometry of bright elliptical galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, R. F.; Valentijn, E. A.; Jameson, R. F.

    High-quality visual-infrared color profiles have been determined for elliptical galaxies for the first time. Surface photometry in J and K is presented for 12 bright elliptical galaxies, and the results have been combined with CCD data in visual passbands. It is shown that the galaxies become bluer

  1. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation M. Das

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are much lower than that of normal late type spirals (de Blok et al. 1996). The thinness of the HI distribution has ... 2000) but this is not suprising considering their low star forma- tion rates and low metallicities (Schombert ... normal galaxies in surface brightness and structure (Barth 2007). Galex UV obser- vations of the disks ...

  2. Brightness Rural Electrification Program: Renewable Energy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-04-01

    Fact sheet describes China's New Brightness Rural Electrification Program to provide electricity for 23 million people in remote areas of China using renewable energy such as wind energy and solar power (photovoltaics). Targets, results, and progress are described. Regions targeted are Inner Mongolia, Tibet, and Gansu.

  3. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Forward Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Peipmeier, Jeffrey; Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007) [1]. It is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. One of the spaceborne instruments is an L-band radiometer with a shared single feedhorn and parabolic mesh reflector. While the radiometer measures the emission over a footprint of interest, unwanted emissions are also received by the antenna through the antenna sidelobes from the cosmic background and other error sources such as the Sun, the Moon and the galaxy. Their effects need to be considered accurately, and the analysis of the overall performance of the radiometer requires end-to-end performance simulation from Earth emission to antenna brightness temperature, such as the global simulation of L-band brightness temperature simulation over land and sea [2]. To assist with the SMAP radiometer level 1B algorithm development, the SMAP forward brightness temperature simulator is developed by adapting the Aquarius simulator [2] with necessary modifications. This poster presents the current status of the SMAP forward brightness simulator s development including incorporating the land microwave emission model and its input datasets, and a simplified atmospheric radiative transfer model. The latest simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the ability of supporting the SMAP L1B algorithm development.

  4. Response of noctilucent cloud brightness to daily solar variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, P.; Pertsev, N.; Perminov, V.; Dubietis, A.; Zadorozhny, A.; Zalcik, M.; McEachran, I.; McEwan, T.; Černis, K.; Grønne, J.; Taustrup, T.; Hansen, O.; Andersen, H.; Melnikov, D.; Manevich, A.; Romejko, V.; Lifatova, D.

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, long-term data sets of ground-based observations of noctilucent clouds (NLC) around the globe have been analyzed in order to investigate a response of NLC to solar UV irradiance variability on a day-to-day scale. NLC brightness has been considered versus variations of solar Lyman-alpha flux. We have found that day-to-day solar variability, whose effect is generally masked in the natural NLC variability, has a statistically significant effect when considering large statistics for more than ten years. Average increase in day-to-day solar Lyman-α flux results in average decrease in day-to-day NLC brightness that can be explained by robust physical mechanisms taking place in the summer mesosphere. Average time lags between variations of Lyman-α flux and NLC brightness are short (0-3 days), suggesting a dominant role of direct solar heating and of the dynamical mechanism compared to photodissociation of water vapor by solar Lyman-α flux. All found regularities are consistent between various ground-based NLC data sets collected at different locations around the globe and for various time intervals. Signatures of a 27-day periodicity seem to be present in the NLC brightness for individual summertime intervals; however, this oscillation cannot be unambiguously retrieved due to inevitable periods of tropospheric cloudiness.

  5. Henrietta Leavitt–A Bright Star of Astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Henrietta Leavitt – A Bright Star of Astronomy. Biman Nath. Article-in-a-Box Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 2-3. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/06/0002-0003 ...

  6. Preparing Young Adolescents for a Bright Future--Right Now!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Paul D.; Martin, Kathryn L.; Buelow, Stephanie M.; Hoffman, Jennifer T.; Cameli, Sandy; Martin, Matt; Walker, Robert E.; O'Neill, Tara B.

    2016-01-01

    We must prepare young adolescents for a bright future by examining all of our educational practices in terms of their current and future relevance. The education we provide our students must prepare them to address enormously complex issues involving demographics and international relations, environmental and human health, and the development and…

  7. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  8. Jellyfish green fluorescent protein as a reporter for virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulcombe, D C; Chapman, S; Santa Cruz, S

    1995-06-01

    The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria was introduced into the expression cassette of a virus vector based on potato virus X (PVX). Host plants of PVX inoculated with PVX.GFP became systemically infected. Production of GFP in these plants was detected initially between 1 and 2 days postinoculation by the presence of regions on the inoculated leaf that fluoresced bright green under UV light. Subsequently, this green fluorescence was evident in systemically infected tissue. The fluorescence could be detected by several methods. The simplest of these was by looking at the UV-illuminated plants in a darkened room. The PVX.GFP-infected tissue has been analysed either by epifluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy. These microscopical methods allow the presence of the virus to be localized to individual infected cells. It was also possible to detect the green fluorescence by spectroscopy or by electrophoresis of extracts from infected plants. To illustrate the potential application of this reporter gene in virological studies a derivative of PVX.GFP was constructed in which the coat protein gene of PVX was replaced by GFP. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the inoculated tissue showed that the virus was restricted to the inoculated cells thereby confirming earlier speculation that the PVX coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell movement. It is likely that GFP will be useful as a reporter gene in transgenic plants as well as in virus-infected tissue.

  9. Diode lasers optimized in brightness for fiber laser pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, M.; Gilly, J.; Friedmann, P.; Hilzensauer, S.; Ogrodowski, L.; Kissel, H.; Biesenbach, J.

    2018-02-01

    In diode laser applications for fiber laser pumping and fiber-coupled direct diode laser systems high brightness becomes essential in the last years. Fiber coupled modules benefit from continuous improvements of high-power diode lasers on chip level regarding output power, efficiency and beam characteristics resulting in record highbrightness values and increased pump power. To gain high brightness not only output power must be increased, but also near field widths and far field angles have to be below a certain value for higher power levels because brightness is proportional to output power divided by beam quality. While fast axis far fields typically show a current independent behaviour, for broadarea lasers far-fields in the slow axis suffer from a strong current and temperature dependence, limiting the brightness and therefore their use in fibre coupled modules. These limitations can be overcome by carefully optimizing chip temperature, thermal lensing and lateral mode structure by epitaxial and lateral resonator designs and processing. We present our latest results for InGaAs/AlGaAs broad-area single emitters with resonator lengths of 4mm emitting at 976nm and illustrate the improvements in beam quality over the last years. By optimizing the diode laser design a record value of the brightness for broad-area lasers with 4mm resonator length of 126 MW/cm2sr has been demonstrated with a maximum wall-plug efficiency of more than 70%. From these design also pump modules based on 9 mini-bars consisting of 5 emitters each have been realized with 360W pump power.

  10. Progress in extremely high brightness LED-based light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelen, Christoph; Antonis, Piet; de Boer, Dick; Koole, Rolf; Kadijk, Simon; Li, Yun; Vanbroekhoven, Vincent; Van De Voorde, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Although the maximum brightness of LEDs has been increasing continuously during the past decade, their luminance is still far from what is required for multiple applications that still rely on the high brightness of discharge lamps. In particular for high brightness applications with limited étendue, e.g. front projection, only very modest luminance values in the beam can be achieved with LEDs compared to systems based on discharge lamps or lasers. With dedicated architectures, phosphor-converted green LEDs for projection may achieve luminance values up to 200-300 Mnit. In this paper we report on the progress made in the development of light engines based on an elongated luminescent concentrator pumped by blue LEDs. This concept has recently been introduced to the market as ColorSpark High Lumen Density LED technology. These sources outperform the maximum brightness of LEDs by multiple factors. In LED front projection, green LEDs are the main limiting factor. With our green modules, we now have achieved peak luminance values of 2 Gnit, enabling LED-based projection systems with over 4000 ANSI lm. Extension of this concept to yellow and red light sources is presented. The light source efficiency has been increased considerably, reaching 45-60 lm/W for green under practical application conditions. The module architecture, beam shaping, and performance characteristics are reviewed, as well as system aspects. The performance increase, spectral range extensions, beam-shaping flexibility, and cost reductions realized with the new module architecture enable a breakthrough in LED-based projection systems and in a wide variety of other high brightness applications.

  11. On the model of type 1 supernova near brightness maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustel', Eh.R.; Chugaj, N.N.

    1975-01-01

    Some photometric and spectrophotometric data about supernovae of 1 type CH-1 are analyzed. Colour /Tsub(c)/ and spectrophotmetric /T/ temperatures of SN1972-e compared. It has been concluded that at the maximum brightness tsub(m) and before the maximum Tsub(c) approximately TTsub(c) < T after the maximum brightness. A considerable deviation of Tsub(c) from T is connected with the significant role of metal lines in the attenuation of the short-wavelength region spectrum CH-1, which becomes essential when T < 10000 deg K. Behaviour of the radius of the photosphere Rp at CH-1 is investigated on the basis of the accepted dependence of T on time. It is shown that at the maximum brightness Rp, increases linearly at the rate of about 5000 km/sec, and reaches its highest value approximately in 30-35sup(d) after the maximum brightness tsub(m) and then rather quickly decreases. The rate of the expansion of the photosphere is twice lower than the mean expansion velocity of the shell CH-1. The initial moments of separation of these CH are -25sup(d) and -16sup(d) respectively (with respect to the maximum V) have been found using an extrapolation of the Rp(t) dependence for SN 1972-e and SN 1970-j. The role of the temperature dependence of non-transparency on the behavior of the photosphere Ch-1 is discussed. Bolomeic luminosity of CH-1 at the maximum brightness is investigated. Arguments supporting the conclusion that the bolometric maximum of CH-1 comes formerly to a visual one, are given

  12. Testing the utility of fluorescent proteins in Mimulus lewisii by an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Baoqing; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-04-01

    The Agrobacterium -mediated transient expression assay by leaf infiltration in Mimulus lewisii is robust. Fluorescent proteins EGFP, EYFP and DsRed give bright fluorescence signals in the infiltrated tissue. Mimulus lewisii is an emerging developmental genetic model system. Recently developed genomic and genetic resources and a stable transformation protocol have greatly facilitated the identification and functional characterization of genes controlling the development of ecologically important floral traits using this species. To further expedite gene and protein function analyses in M. lewisii, we adopted and simplified the Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression method routinely used in tobacco plants. With the validated transient assay, we examined the performance of fluorescent proteins EGFP, EYFP and DsRed in M. lewisii. All three proteins gave bright fluorescence signals when transiently expressed in agroinfiltrated leaves. Furthermore, we demonstrated the utility of fluorescent proteins in M. lewisii by showing the nuclear localization of Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), a recently discovered R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates carotenoid pigmentation during flower development. Both the transient assay and the fluorescent proteins are valuable additions to the M. lewisii toolbox, making this emerging genetic and developmental model system even more powerful.

  13. Fluorescent Staining of Tea Pathogenic Fungi in Tea Leaves Using Fluorescein-labeled Lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kengo; Yoshida, Katsuyuki; Sonoda, Ryoichi

    Fluorochrome-labeled lectin, fluorescein conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) was applied to stain tea pathogenic fungi in tea leaf tissue. Infected leaves were fixed and decolorized with a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid, and cleared with 10% KOH for whole mount before staining with F-WGA. Hyphae of Pestalotiopsis longiseta, Pseudocercospora ocellata, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum theae-sinensis fluoresced brightly in whole mount and sectioned samples of infected leaf tissue. In browned tissue, hyphae did not fluoresce frequently in whole mount sample. Autofluorescence of leaf tissue was strong in browned tissue of sections, it was removed by 10% KOH treatment before staining. Penetration hyphae of C. theae-sinensis in cell wall of trichome and hyphae in basal part of trichome did not fluoresced frequently. In whole mount samples of tea leaf infected with Exobasidium vexans and E. reticulatum, hymenia appeared on leaf surface fluoresced, but hyphae in leaf tissue did not fluoresce. In sectioned samples, hyphae fluoresced brightly when sections were treated with 10% KOH before staining.

  14. Determination of uranium in seawater by fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshi; Kawakubo, Senkichi; Minegishi, Hisako.

    1984-01-01

    A Fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of uranium in seawater has been developed. Anion exchange separation of uranium from seawater followed by preparation of NaF-carbonate cake and by spectrometry for ultraviolet ray excited fluorescence of uranium on the fluoride host provide the trace determinaton of uranium at the subnano gram level. Anion exchange behavior, excitation-emission behavior of the uranium on the host and effects of foreign ions to the fluorescence have been presented. Appling the method to 1 ml of seawater 3 ppb of uranium has been determined. (author)

  15. A study on materials of steels by high brightness X-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuzaki, K; Umezawa, O; Hara, T; Takahashi, T; Omura, T; Hayakawa, M; Yamauchi, Y

    2001-01-01

    As the survey study on materials analysis of steels using high brightness X-ray, under aiming to clarify direct experimental facts on deformations, failure phenomena, and metal textures forming at interior portions of bulk materials, feasibility on materials research and development using SPring-8 was surveyed. Its concrete items were summarized to fields shown as follows: 1) acquirement of foundation on synchrotron X-ray, 2) visualization of cracks and artificial cracks in metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging (point light source topography), 3) visualization of the second phase in the metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging, and 4) speciation of carbon elements in steel cords by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Together with clarifying problems more and more by the survey and some experiments, subjects and understandings vacantly considered at standpoints of materials researchers could be arranged and defined. (G.K.)

  16. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ( f licker ) of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested

  17. Red fluorescence increases with depth in reef fishes, supporting a visual function, not UV protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Melissa G; Anthes, Nils; Dangelmayer, Sandra; Alwany, Magdy A; Gerlach, Tobias; Schulte, Gregor; Sprenger, Dennis; Theobald, Jennifer; Michiels, Nico K

    2014-09-07

    Why do some marine fishes exhibit striking patterns of natural red fluorescence? In this study, we contrast two non-exclusive hypotheses: (i) that UV absorption by fluorescent pigments offers significant photoprotection in shallow water, where UV irradiance is strongest; and (ii) that red fluorescence enhances visual contrast at depths below -10 m, where most light in the 'red' 600-700 nm range has been absorbed. Whereas the photoprotection hypothesis predicts fluorescence to be stronger near the surface and weaker in deeper water, the visual contrast hypothesis predicts the opposite. We used fluorometry to measure red fluorescence brightness in vivo in individuals belonging to eight common small reef fish species with conspicuously red fluorescent eyes. Fluorescence was significantly brighter in specimens from the -20 m sites than in those from -5 m sites in six out of eight species. No difference was found in the remaining two. Our results support the visual contrast hypothesis. We discuss the possible roles fluorescence may play in fish visual ecology and highlight the possibility that fluorescent light emission from the eyes in particular may be used to detect cryptic prey.

  18. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  19. Photoluminescent carbon dots from 1,4-addition polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Nolan, Andrew; Walton, Jeffrey G A; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Zhang, Rong; Bradley, Mark

    2014-08-25

    Photoluminescent carbon dots were synthesised directly by thermopyrolysis of 1,4-addition polymers, allowing precise control of their properties. The effect of polymer composition on the properties of the carbon dots was investigated by TEM, IR, XPS, elemental analysis and fluorescence analysis, with carbon dots synthesised from nitrogen-containing polymers showing the highest fluorescence. The carbon dots with high nitrogen content were observed to have strong fluorescence in the visible region, and culture with cells showed that the carbon dots were non-cytotoxic and readily taken up by three different cell lines. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  1. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  2. Carbon-Dot and Quantum-Dot-Coated Dual-Emission Core-Satellite Silica Nanoparticles for Ratiometric Intracellular Cu(2+) Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chenchen; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Tan, Xuecai; Shao, Kang; Wu, Long; Lu, Zhicheng; Bahlol, Hagar Shendy; Han, Heyou

    2016-07-19

    Copper (Cu(2+)) is physiologically essential, but excessive Cu(2+) may cause potential risk to plants and animals due to the bioaccumulative properties. Hence, sensitive recognition is crucial to avoid overintake of Cu(2+), and visual recognition is more favored for practical application. In this work, a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe was developed possessing the required intensity ratio, which can facilitate the sensitive identification of Cu(2+) by the naked eye. The probe hybridizes two fluorescence nanodots (quantum dots (QDs) and carbon dots (CDs)). Although both of them can be viable fluorescence probes for metal ion detection, rarely research has coupled this two different kinds of fluorescence material in one nanosensor to fabricate a selectively ratiometric fluorescence probe for intracellular imaging. The red emitting CdTe/CdS QDs were capped around the silica microsphere to serve as the response signal label, and the blue-emitting CDs, which is insensitive to the analyte, were covalently attached to the QDs surface to act as the reference signal. This core-satellite hybrid sphere not only improves the stability and brightness of QDs significantly but also decreases the cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells tremendously. Moreover, the Cu(2+) could quench the QDs emission effectively but have no ability for reduction of the CDs emission. Accordingly, a simple, efficient, and precise method for tracing Cu(2+) was proposed. The increase of Cu(2+) concentration in the series of 0-3 × 10(-6) M was in accordance with linearly decrease of the F650/F425 ratio. As for practical application, this nanosensor was utilized to the ratiometric fluorescence imaging of copper ions in HeLa cells.

  3. Novel bright-emission small-molecule NIR-II fluorophores forin vivotumor imaging and image-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; Ding, Mingmin; Zeng, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuling; Wu, Huaping; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Bingbing; Qu, Chunrong; Hou, Wei; Er-Bu, Aga; Zhang, Yejun; Cheng, Zhen; Hong, Xuechuan

    2017-05-01

    Though high brightness and biocompatible small NIR-II dyes are highly desirable in clinical or translational cancer research, their fluorescent cores are relatively limited and their synthetic processes are somewhat complicated. Herein, we have explored the design and synthesis of novel NIR-II fluorescent materials ( H1 ) without tedious chromatographic isolation with improved fluorescence performance (QY ≈ 2%) by introducing 2-amino 9,9-dialkyl-substituted fluorene as a donor into the backbone. Several types of water-soluble and biocompatible NIR-II probes: SXH , SDH , and H1 NPs were constructed via different chemical strategies based on H1 , and then their potential to be used in in vivo tumor imaging and image-guided surgery in the NIR-II region was explored. High levels of uptake were obtained for both passive and active tumor targeting probes SXH and SDH . Furthermore, high resolution imaging of blood vessels on tumors and the whole body of living mice using H1 NPs for the first time has demonstrated precise NIR-II image-guided sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery.

  4. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-01-11

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  5. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-Ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  6. Electric field effects on fluorescence of the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-05-01

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for a mutant of UV-excited green fluorescent protein (GFPuv5) in a PVA film. The electrofluorescence spectrum of GFPuv5 is reproduced by a linear combination between the fluorescence spectrum and its second derivative spectrum, indicating the field-induced fluorescence quenching and the difference in electric dipole moment between the fluorescent state and the ground state. The direct measurements of the field-induced change in fluorescence decay show that the field-induced quenching results from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process from the fluorescent state.

  7. Bright breathers in nonlinear left-handed metamaterial lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Veldes, G. P.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; DiMarzio, D.; Lan, X.; Radisic, V.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, we examine a prototypical model for the formation of bright breathers in nonlinear left-handed metamaterial lattices. Utilizing the paradigm of nonlinear transmission lines, we build a relevant lattice and develop a quasi-continuum multiscale approximation that enables us to appreciate both the underlying linear dispersion relation and the potential for bifurcation of nonlinear states. We focus here, more specifically, on bright discrete breathers which bifurcate from the lower edge of the linear dispersion relation at wavenumber k=π . Guided by the multiscale analysis, we calculate numerically both the stable inter-site centered and the unstable site-centered members of the relevant family. We quantify the associated stability via Floquet analysis and the Peierls-Nabarro barrier of the energy difference between these branches. Finally, we explore the dynamical implications of these findings towards the potential mobility or lack thereof (pinning) of such breather solutions.

  8. VLA observations of the Palomar bright quasar survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, D.B.; Schmidt, M.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have optically surveyed some 10000 square degrees of the northern sky to search for bright quasars. Their final sample contains about 100 quasars. The B magnitudes of the sample range from 13.1 to 16.5, with most in the range 15.0-16.2. The redshifts range from 0.03 to over 2, considerably concentrated toward smaller values (median of 0.18). They observed 94 of these quasars with the partially complete VLA in November/December 1979, and detected radio emission from 27 of them, or 29%, to a limit of 1-2 mJy. It is concluded that bright quasars are definitely more likely to be detectable radio sources. (Auth.)

  9. Optical Observations of X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadun, Alberto C.; Aryan, N. S.; Ghosh, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    X-ray bright, optically normal galaxies (XBONGs) are galaxies that seem to have normal spectra and morphology, but are relatively bright x-ray sources. The large ratio of the x-ray to optical emission suggests that some activity, similar to that of active galactic nuclei (AGN), is occurring. Since the galaxies do not show any obvious sign of nuclear activity in their optical spectra, one possible explanation is that these galaxies do not have an optically thick accretion disk at small radii, as previously assumed. Previous data for NGC 7626 classifies it as an XBONG, and so we are studying optical features of this galaxy in order to determine better its features. After confirming an x-ray jet, we are now comparing this to optical features that we have found, including warped dust lanes and a possible optical jet.

  10. Improving the laser brightness of a commercial laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Darryl; Litvin, Igor; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the selection of a flat-top beam and a Gaussian beam inside a laser cavity on opposing mirrors. The concept is tested external to the laser cavity in a single pass and double pass regime where the latter mimics a single round trip in the laser. We implement this intra-cavity selection through the use of two 16 level diffractive optical elements. We consider a solid-state diode side-pumped laser resonator in a typical commercial laser configuration that consists of two planar mirrors where the DOEs are positioned at the mirrors. We out couple the Gaussian and flat-top distributions and we show that we improve the brightness of the laser with active mode control. We also demonstrate that the quality of the beam transformations determine the brightness improvement.

  11. Fluorescence imaging under background light with a self-reset complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor image sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamaguchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose and demonstrate the fluorescence imaging of green fluorescence protein (GFP expressed in a brain slice with a self-reset complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor image sensor under background light. By using a self-reset function to avoid pixel saturation, the weak fluorescence of GFP was successfully observed, even under background light. The result suggests that the sensor can be applied to in vivo imaging of laboratory animals during light–dark cycles, so that they can observe the different responses to bright and dark environments.

  12. Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperature product provides near-real-time brightness temperatures for both the Northern and...

  13. Manakins can produce iridescent and bright feather colours without melanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2016-06-15

    Males of many species often use colourful and conspicuous ornaments to attract females. Among these, male manakins (family: Pipridae) provide classic examples of sexual selection favouring the evolution of bright and colourful plumage coloration. The highly iridescent feather colours of birds are most commonly produced by the periodic arrangement of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) within barbules. Melanin increases the saturation of iridescent colours seen from optimal viewing angles by absorbing back-scattered light; however, this may reduce the wide-angle brightness of these signals, contributing to a dark background appearance. We examined the nanostructure of four manakin species (Lepidothrix isidorei, L. iris, L. nattereri and L. coeruleocapilla) to identify how they produce their bright plumage colours. Feather barbs of all four species were characterized by dense and fibrous internal spongy matrices that likely increase scattering of light within the barb. The iridescent, yet pale or whitish colours of L. iris and L. nattereri feathers were produced not by periodically arranged melanosomes within barbules, but by periodic matrices of air and β-keratin within barbs. Lepidothrix iris crown feathers were able to produce a dazzling display of colours with small shifts in viewing geometry, likely because of a periodic nanostructure, a flattened barb morphology and disorder at a microstructural level. We hypothesize that iridescent plumage ornaments of male L. iris and L. nattereri are under selection to increase brightness or luminance across wide viewing angles, which may potentially increase their detectability by females during dynamic and fast-paced courtship displays in dim light environments. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Thoughts About Nursing Curricula: Dark Clouds and Bright Lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, Marian C; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Amankwaa, Linda; Clarke, Pamela N; Dee, Vivien; Eustace, Rosemary; Hansell, Phyllis Shanley; Jones, Dorothy A; Smith, Marlaine C; Zahourek, Rothlyn

    2018-04-01

    In this essay, several nurse scholars who are particularly concerned about the contemporary state of nursing science present their concerns about the inclusion of nursing conceptual models and theories in the curricula of nursing programs (dark clouds) and ways in which the concerns have been addressed (bright lights). This essay is the second of two essays that were catalyzed by Barrett's paper, "Again, What Is Nursing Science?" The first essay was published in the previous issue of Nursing Science Quarterly.

  15. Spectrophotometry of four galaxies of high surface brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakelyan, M.A.; Magtesyap, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of emission lines for the nuclei of galaxies of high surface brightness Nos 428, 449, 454 and 532 from the Arakelyan (1975) list is carried out. Clouds of ionized gas are detected at the distances of approximately 2 kpc from the nuclei of the two former galaxies. Besides there seems to be a cloud moving along the line of sight with velocity approximately 1500 km/s in the galaxy No. 449

  16. High-brightness switchable multiwavelength remote laser in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zeng Bin; Li Guihua; Chu Wei; Ni Jielei; Zhang Haisu [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Xu Huailiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate a harmonic-seeded switchable multiwavelength laser in air driven by intense midinfrared femtosecond laser pulses, in which population inversion occurs at an ultrafast time scale (i.e., less than {approx}200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular nitrogen ions by strong-field ionization of inner-valence electrons. The bright multiwavelength laser in air opens the perspective for remote detection of multiple pollutants based on nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

  17. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRoncato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges.The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP. Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP. The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different grey shades.These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in are blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this solution by the visual system

  18. Facilitating the Transition from Bright to Dim Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    USAARL Report No. 2016-17 Facilitating the Transition from Bright to Dim Environments By David Walsh1, Morris R. Lattimore1, David L. Still1...constitute research as defined under the human subjects protection regulations , as it is not ’a systematic investigation, including research development...efficiently and rapidly transition from light to dark environments, then to function effectively. Second, to determine how best to facilitate Soldier

  19. GRB 990712 optical decay: indication of bright host galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, J.; Courbin, F.; Cuadra, J.; Minniti, D.

    We have obtained a 5-min R-band exposure of the optical afterglow of GRB 990712 (Frontera, GCN #385; Bakos et al., GCN #387) with the ESO 3.5-m NTT on 16.403 July 1999 UT. We detect an unresolved (seeing FWHM = 1.8") object at RA (2000) = 22 31 53.03, Dec (2000) = -73 24 28.3 (with a positional uncertainty of +- 0.6" relative to the USNO-A2.0 system), consistent with the position of the bright decaying source discovered by Bakos et al. (IAUC 7225). We have tied our photometry to the PLANET photometric zeropoint (K. Sahu, personal communication) and find that the object has continued to fade to R = 21.48 +- 0.02 (systematic) +- 0.05 (random). The combined SAAO data (Bakos et al., IAUC 7225) and NTT data indicate that the light curve is leveling off relative to a power law decline. Assuming that the light curve can be modeled as the combined effects of a power law decline of the OT and a constant contribution from the host galaxy we find an OT decay slope of -0.81 (i.e. a rather slow decay) and a bright host galaxy with R = 22.0. Such a bright host galaxy would be consistent with its fairly low redshift (z = 0.43) and would possibly even account for the prominent emission lines seen in the VLT spectrum (Galama et al., GCN #388). We caution however that the hypothesis of a bright host galaxy is based on just a few data points. To test this hypothesis continued monitoring of the system is therefore urged. The NTT image and the R-band light curve are posted at http://www.astro.ku.dk/~jens/grb990712/ .

  20. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  1. SMOS brightness temperature assimilation into the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Dominik; Han, Xujun; Lievens, Hans; Montzka, Carsten; Verhoest, Niko E. C.

    2017-11-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) brightness temperatures at a single incident angle are assimilated into the Community Land Model (CLM) across Australia to improve soil moisture simulations. Therefore, the data assimilation system DasPy is coupled to the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) as well as to the Community Microwave Emission Model (CMEM). Brightness temperature climatologies are precomputed to enable the assimilation of brightness temperature anomalies, making use of 6 years of SMOS data (2010-2015). Mean correlation R with in situ measurements increases moderately from 0.61 to 0.68 (11 %) for upper soil layers if the root zone is included in the updates. A reduced improvement of 5 % is achieved if the assimilation is restricted to the upper soil layers. Root-zone simulations improve by 7 % when updating both the top layers and root zone, and by 4 % when only updating the top layers. Mean increments and increment standard deviations are compared for the experiments. The long-term assimilation impact is analysed by looking at a set of quantiles computed for soil moisture at each grid cell. Within hydrological monitoring systems, extreme dry or wet conditions are often defined via their relative occurrence, adding great importance to assimilation-induced quantile changes. Although still being limited now, longer L-band radiometer time series will become available and make model output improved by assimilating such data that are more usable for extreme event statistics.

  2. Bright Soil Churned by Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove 22.7 meters (74 feet) toward the southwest on the 1,861st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (March 28, 2009). After the drive, the rover took this image with its front hazard-avoidance camera, looking back at the tracks from the drive. As usual since losing the use of its right-front wheel in 2006, Spirit drove backwards. The immobile right-front wheel churned up a long stripe of bright soil during this drive. Where Spirit has found such bright soil in the past, subsequent analysis of the composition found concentrations of sulfur or silica that testified to past action of water at the site. When members of the rover team saw the large quantity of bright soil exposed by the Sol 1861 drive, they quickly laid plans to investigate the composition with Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The Sol 1861 drive took the rover past the northwest corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate,' making progress on a route around the western side of Home Plate. The edge of Home Plate forms the horizon on the right side of this image. Husband Hill is on the horizon on the left side. For scale, the parallel rover wheel tracks are about 1 meter (40 inches) apart. The rover's hazard-avoidance cameras take 'fisheye' wide-angle images.

  3. On correct evaluation techniques of brightness enhancement effect measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukačka, Leoš; Dupuis, Pascal; Motomura, Hideki; Rozkovec, Jiří; Kolář, Milan; Zissis, Georges; Jinno, Masafumi

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to establish confidence intervals of the quantification of brightness enhancement effects resulting from the use of pulsing bright light. It is found that the methods used so far may yield significant bias in the published results, overestimating or underestimating the enhancement effect. The authors propose to use a linear algebra method called the total least squares. Upon an example dataset, it is shown that this method does not yield biased results. The statistical significance of the results is also computed. It is concluded over an observation set that the currently used linear algebra methods present many patterns of noise sensitivity. Changing algorithm details leads to inconsistent results. It is thus recommended to use the method with the lowest noise sensitivity. Moreover, it is shown that this method also permits one to obtain an estimate of the confidence interval. This paper neither aims to publish results about a particular experiment nor to draw any particular conclusion about existence or nonexistence of the brightness enhancement effect.

  4. SMOS brightness temperature assimilation into the Community Land Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rains

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission brightness temperatures at a single incident angle are assimilated into the Community Land Model (CLM across Australia to improve soil moisture simulations. Therefore, the data assimilation system DasPy is coupled to the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF as well as to the Community Microwave Emission Model (CMEM. Brightness temperature climatologies are precomputed to enable the assimilation of brightness temperature anomalies, making use of 6 years of SMOS data (2010–2015. Mean correlation R with in situ measurements increases moderately from 0.61 to 0.68 (11 % for upper soil layers if the root zone is included in the updates. A reduced improvement of 5 % is achieved if the assimilation is restricted to the upper soil layers. Root-zone simulations improve by 7 % when updating both the top layers and root zone, and by 4 % when only updating the top layers. Mean increments and increment standard deviations are compared for the experiments. The long-term assimilation impact is analysed by looking at a set of quantiles computed for soil moisture at each grid cell. Within hydrological monitoring systems, extreme dry or wet conditions are often defined via their relative occurrence, adding great importance to assimilation-induced quantile changes. Although still being limited now, longer L-band radiometer time series will become available and make model output improved by assimilating such data that are more usable for extreme event statistics.

  5. Preparation and characterization of fluorescent microtubes with high length/diameter ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Maoquan; Huang Jiasheng

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent microtubes were prepared by self-assembly of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) following calcination at 500 °C using silkworm silks as templates. The obtained microtubes exhibited high length/diameter ratios. The cross-sectional dimension of the microtubes was no more than 10 µm, but the length could be up to several millimeters. The microtube wall was mainly composed of CdO, Cd 3 TeO 6 , and CdCO 3 nanocrystals. Compared with the original red fluorescent CdTe QDs and the silk/QD core–shell structures, the microtubes exhibited a bright green-yellow fluorescence. The approach reported in this work opens the possibility of the large-scale preparation of fluorescent microtubes for both fundamental research and applications

  6. Generation of dark and bright pulses in an SOA-based Q-switched fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Honggang; Zhang, Ailing; Tong, Zhengrong

    2017-08-01

    Bright and dark pulses in a Q-switched optical fiber laser based on a semiconductor optical amplifier were demonstrated. By changing the setting of the polarization controllers, bright or dark pulses with differing pulse widths and frequency repetition rates can be obtained. The bright pulse and dark pulse are formed mainly by the effect of gain dispersion of the semiconductor optical amplifier.

  7. Comparative analysis of direct fluorescence, Zenon labeling, and quantum dot nanocrystal technology in immunofluorescence staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoling; He, Ju; Partin, James; Vafai, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity and efficiency of three fluorescent labeling techniques, including direct fluorescent-antibody staining (FA), Zenon labeling, and quantum dot (QD) nanocrystal technology. Two varicella-zoster virus immunoglobin (Ig) G forms, mAb 4F9 and mAb g62, were selected for these studies. The results indicated that: (1) All three methods demonstrated similar brightness and photostability; (2) the time required to conjugate the antibody varied, with Zenon labeling being the quickest; and (3) the stability of each conjugated complex was different, with FITC/rhodamine-conjugated antibody being the most stable.

  8. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  9. Characterization of the Fluorescence Properties of 4-Dialkylaminochalcones and Investigation of the Cytotoxic Mechanism of Chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixin; Lu, Junxuan; Xing, Chengguo

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the various biological activities of chalcones, particularly the direct cellular targets, presents an unmet challenge. Here, we prepared a series of fluorescent chalcone derivatives as chemical probes for their mechanistic investigation. Upon systematic physicochemical characterization, we explored their potential to elucidate the mode of action of chalcones' cytotoxicity. The fluorescence of the chalcones was found to be highly sensitive to structural and environmental factors. Structurally, a 4-dialkylamino group on the B ring, suitable electronic properties of the A ring substituents, and the planar conformation of the chalcone's core structure were essential for optimal fluorescence. Environmental factors influencing fluorescence included solvent polarity, pH, and the interactions of the chalcones with proteins and detergents. It was found that 18 chalcones showed a fluorescent brightness greater than 6000 M(-1)  cm(-1) in DMSO. However, water dramatically quenched the fluorescence, although it could be partially recovered in the presence of BSA or detergents. As expected, these fluorescent chalcones showed a sharp structure-activity relationship in their cellular cytotoxicity, leading to the identification of structurally similar cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic fluorescent chalcones as chemical probes. Confocal microscopy results revealed the co-localization of the cytotoxic probe C8 and tubulin in cells, supporting tubulin as the direct cellular target responsible for the cytotoxicity of chalcones. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  11. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  12. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  13. Crystal growth and characterization of fluorescent SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellmann, P.; Kaiser, M.; Hupfer, T.

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is widely used as substrate for nitride based light emitting diodes (LEDs). For today’s white LEDs mainly a sandwich structure of a blue or ultra violet LED and a yellowish phosphorus is used. In the frame of European project we study a concept to implement the functionality......-SiC co-doped with nitrogen and boron has been achieved [1][2]. The source is the rate determining step, and is expected to be determining the fluorescent properties by introducing dopants to the layer from the source. The optimization process of the polycrystalline, co-doped SiC:B,N source material...... and its impact on the FSPG epitaxial process, in particular the influence on the brightness of the is presented. In particular, the doping properties of the poly-SiC source material influence on the brightness of the fluorescent 6H-SiC. In addition we have investigated how the grain orientation...

  14. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  15. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  16. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  17. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  18. Label-free detection of cellular drug responses by high-throughput bright-field imaging and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Lei, Cheng; Wu, Yi; Mao, Ailin; Jiang, Yiyue; Guo, Baoshan; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-09-29

    In the last decade, high-content screening based on multivariate single-cell imaging has been proven effective in drug discovery to evaluate drug-induced phenotypic variations. Unfortunately, this method inherently requires fluorescent labeling which has several drawbacks. Here we present a label-free method for evaluating cellular drug responses only by high-throughput bright-field imaging with the aid of machine learning algorithms. Specifically, we performed high-throughput bright-field imaging of numerous drug-treated and -untreated cells (N = ~240,000) by optofluidic time-stretch microscopy with high throughput up to 10,000 cells/s and applied machine learning to the cell images to identify their morphological variations which are too subtle for human eyes to detect. Consequently, we achieved a high accuracy of 92% in distinguishing drug-treated and -untreated cells without the need for labeling. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that dose-dependent, drug-induced morphological change from different experiments can be inferred from the classification accuracy of a single classification model. Our work lays the groundwork for label-free drug screening in pharmaceutical science and industry.

  19. A new strategy for synthesizing AgInS2 quantum dots emitting brightly in near-infrared window for in vivo imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Lianjiang; Liu, Shuiping; Li, Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy for fabricating water-dispersible AgInS2 quantum dots (QDs) with bright near-infrared (NIR) emission is demonstrated. A type of multidentate polymer (MDP) was synthesized and utilized as a compact capping ligand for the AgInS2 QDs. Using silver nitrate, indium acetate and sulfur-hy...... cytotoxicity. Nude mice photoluminescence imaging shows that the MDP-capping AgInS2 QDs can be well applied to in vivo imaging. These readily prepared NIR fluorescent nanocrystals have huge potential for biomedical applications....

  20. Characterization by fluorescence of dissolved organic matter in rural drinking water storage tanks in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faissal; Ouazzani, Naaila; Mandi, Laila; Assaad, Aziz; Pontvianne, Steve; Poirot, Hélène; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2018-04-01

    Water storage tanks, fed directly from the river through opened channels, are particular systems used for water supply in rural areas in Morocco. The stored water is used as drinking water by the surrounding population without any treatment. UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence) have been tested as rapid methods to assess the quality of the water stored in the reservoirs as well as along the river feeding them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS50), collected with a difference of 50 nm between excitation and emission wavelengths, revealed a high tryptophan-like fluorescence, indicative of a pollution induced by untreated domestic and/or farm wastewater. The best correlations were obtained between the total SFS50 fluorescence and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and biological oxygen demand, showing that the contribution of humic-like fluorescent substances cannot be neglected to rapidly assess reservoir water quality in terms of DOC by fluorescence spectroscopy.