WorldWideScience

Sample records for brightest cluster galaxies

  1. Herschel photometry of brightest cluster galaxies in cooling flow clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Edge, A C; Mittal, R; Allen, S W; Baum, S A; Boehringer, H; Bregman, J N; Bremer, M N; Combes, F; Crawford, C S; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Fabian, A C; Hamer, S L; Hatch, N A; Jaffe, W; Johnstone, R M; McNamara, B R; O'Dea, C P; Popesso, P; Quillen, A C; Salome, P; Sarazin, C L; Voit, G M; Wilman, R J; Wise, M W

    2010-01-01

    The dust destruction timescales in the cores of clusters of galaxies are relatively short given their high central gas densities. However, substantial mid-infrared and sub-mm emission has been detected in many brightest cluster galaxies. In this letter we present Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry of the brightest cluster galaxy in three strong cooling flow clusters, A1068, A2597 and Zw3146. This photometry indicates that a substantial mass of cold dust is present (>3 x 10^7 Mo) at temperatures significantly lower (20-28K) than previously thought based on limited MIR and/or sub-mm results. The mass and temperature of the dust appear to match those of the cold gas traced by CO with a gas-to-dust ratio of 80-120.

  2. KINEMATICS OF 13 BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FISHER, D; ILLINGWORTH, G; FRANX, M

    1995-01-01

    Velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves have been determined for a sample of 13 brightest duster galaxies (BCGs) in order to study their internal stellar kinematics and investigate their relationship to ellipticals. We find that BCGs generally display velocity dispersion profiles with gradi

  3. Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Core Gas Density in REXCESS Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B; Donahue, M; Bruch, S; Boehringer, H; Croston, J H; Pratt, G W; Voit, G M; Arnaud, M; Pierini, D

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters using a sample of nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS). The sample was imaged with the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in R band to investigate the mass of the old stellar population. Using a metric radius of 12h^-1 kpc, we find that the BCG luminosity depends weakly on overall cluster mass as L_BCG \\propto M_cl^0.18+-0.07, consistent with previous work. We found that 90% of the BCGs are located within 0.035 R_500 of the peak of the X-ray emission, including all of the cool core (CC) clusters. We also found an unexpected correlation between the BCG metric luminosity and the core gas density for non-cool core (non-CC) clusters, following a power law of n_e \\propto L_BCG^2.7+-0.4 (where n_e is measured at 0.008 R_500). The correlation is not easily explained by star formation (which is weak in non-CC clusters) or overall cluster mass (wh...

  4. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. III: Beyond Bimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William E.; Ciccone, Stephanie M.; Eadie, Gwendolyn M.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry; Bailin, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the rich globular cluster (GC) systems around the Brightest Cluster Galaxies UGC 9799 (Abell 2052) and UGC 10143 (Abell 2147), obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS and WFC3 cameras. For comparison, we also present new reductions of similar HST/ACS data for the Coma supergiants NGC 4874 and 4889. All four of these galaxies have huge cluster populations (to the radial limits of our data, comprising from 12,000 to 23,000 clusters per galaxy). The metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of the GCs can still be matched by a bimodal-Gaussian form where the metal-rich and metal-poor modes are separated by ≃ 0.8 dex, but the internal dispersions of each mode are so large that the total MDF becomes very broad and nearly continuous from [Fe/H] ≃ ‑2.4 to solar. There are, however, significant differences between galaxies in the relative numbers of metal-rich clusters, suggesting that they underwent significantly different histories of mergers with massive gas-rich halos. Last, the proportion of metal-poor GCs rises especially rapidly outside projected radii R≳ 4 {R}{eff}, suggesting the importance of accreted dwarf satellites in the outer halo. Comprehensive models for the formation of GCs as part of the hierarchical formation of their parent galaxies will be needed to trace the systematic change in structure of the MDF with galaxy mass, from the distinctly bimodal form in smaller galaxies up to the broad continuum that we see in the very largest systems.

  5. Brightest Cluster Galaxies and Core Gas Density in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, Luke; Donahue, Megan; Bruch, Seth; Böhringer, Hans; Croston, Judith H.; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Voit, G. Mark; Arnaud, Monique; Pierini, Daniele

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the relationship between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host clusters using a sample of nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey. The sample was imaged with the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research in R band to investigate the mass of the old stellar population. Using a metric radius of 12 h -1 kpc, we found that the BCG luminosity depends weakly on overall cluster mass as L BCG vprop M 0.18±0.07 cl, consistent with previous work. We found that 90% of the BCGs are located within 0.035 r 500 of the peak of the X-ray emission, including all of the cool core (CC) clusters. We also found an unexpected correlation between the BCG metric luminosity and the core gas density for non-cool-core (non-CC) clusters, following a power law of ne vprop L 2.7±0.4 BCG (where ne is measured at 0.008 r 500). The correlation is not easily explained by star formation (which is weak in non-CC clusters) or overall cluster mass (which is not correlated with core gas density). The trend persists even when the BCG is not located near the peak of the X-ray emission, so proximity is not necessary. We suggest that, for non-CC clusters, this correlation implies that the same process that sets the central entropy of the cluster gas also determines the central stellar density of the BCG, and that this underlying physical process is likely to be mergers.

  6. The Alignment effect of brightest cluster galaxies in the SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rita S.J.; Annis, Jim; Strauss, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gunn, James E.; Kepner, Jeremy V.; Postman, Marc

    2001-10-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z >~ 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z <~ 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We do not find strong evidence for (or against) redshift evolution between 0clusters). However, we have developed a framework by which we can examine many more clusters in an automated fashion for the upcoming SDSS cluster catalogs, which will provide us with better statistics for systematic investigations of the alignment with redshift, richness and morphology of both the cluster and the BCG.

  7. Stellar Mass Assembly of Brightest Cluster Galaxies at Late Times

    CERN Document Server

    Inagaki, Takahiro; Huang, Hung-Jin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation history of brightest cluster galaxies is an important topic in galaxy formation. Utilizing the Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster catalog, and applying the Ansatz that the most massive halos at one redshift remain among the most massive ones at a slightly later cosmic epoch, we have constructed cluster samples at redshift z~0.4 and z~0.2 that can be statistically regarded as progenitor-descendant pairs. This allows us to study the stellar mass assembly history of BCGs in these massive clusters at late times, finding the degree of growth between the two epochs is likely at only few percent level, which is far lower compared to the prediction from a state-of-the-art semi-analytic galaxy formation model.

  8. The Alignment Effect of Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, R S J; Strauss, M A; Lupton, R H; Bahcall, Neta A; Gunn, J E; Kepner, J V; Postman, M; Kim, Rita S. J.; Annis, Jim; Strauss, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gunn, James E.; Kepner, Jeremy V.; Postman, Marc

    2002-01-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z >~ 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z <~ 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We...

  9. Further definition of the mass-metallicity relation in globular cluster systems around brightest cluster galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cockcroft, R.; Harris, W.E.; Wehner, E.M.; Whitmore, B.C.; Rothberg, B.

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass–metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our c

  10. Detecting Star Formation in Brightest Cluster Galaxies with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia; Donahue, Megan

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of GALEX observations of 17 cool core (CC) clusters of galaxies. We show that GALEX is easily capable of detecting star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) out to $z\\ge 0.45$ and 50-100 kpc. In most of the CC clusters studied, we find significant UV luminosity excesses and colors that strongly suggest recent and/or current star formation. The BCGs are found to have blue UV colors in the center that become increasingly redder with radius, indicating that the UV signature of star formation is most easily detected in the central regions. Our findings show good agreement between UV star formation rates and estimates based on H$\\alpha$ observations. IR observations coupled with our data indicate moderate-to-high dust attenuation. Comparisons between our UV results and the X-ray properties of our sample suggest clear correlations between UV excess, cluster entropy, and central cooling time, confirming that the star formation is directly and incontrovertibly related to the cooling g...

  11. Angular momenta, dynamical masses, and mergers of brightest cluster galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Brough, Sarah [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Gebhardt, Karl [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Von der Linden, Anja [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Couch, Warrick J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Sharp, Rob [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-12-01

    Using the VIMOS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope, we have spatially mapped the kinematic properties of 10 nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and 4 BCG companion galaxies located within a redshift of z = 0.1. In the hierarchical formation model, these massive galaxies (10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} < M {sub dyn} < 10{sup 11.9} M {sub ☉}) are expected to undergo more mergers than lower mass galaxies, and simulations show that dry minor mergers can remove angular momentum. We test whether BCGs have low angular momenta by using the λ {sub Re} parameter developed by the SAURON and ATLAS{sup 3D} teams and combine our kinematics with Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry to analyze the BCGs' merger status. We find that 30% (3/10) of the BCGs and 100% of the companion galaxies (4/4) are fast rotators as defined by the ATLAS{sup 3D} criteria. Our fastest rotating BCG has a λ {sub Re} = 0.35 ± 0.05. We increase the number of BCGs analyzed from 1 in the combined SAURON and ATLAS{sup 3D} surveys to 11 BCGs total and find that above M {sub dyn} ∼ 11.5 M {sub ☉}, virtually all galaxies, regardless of environment, are slow rotators. To search for signs of recent merging, we analyze the photometry of each system and use the G – M {sub 20} selection criteria to identify mergers. We find that 40% ± 20% of our BCGs are currently undergoing or have recently undergone a merger (within 0.2 Gyr). Surprisingly, we find no correlation between galaxies with high angular momentum and morphological signatures of merging.

  12. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Postman, Marc [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  13. High Radio Frequency Properties and Variability of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Geach, J E; Grainge, K J B; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Hovatta, T; Karim, A; McNamara, B R; Rumsey, C; Russell, H R; Salomé, P; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Benford, D J; Fabian, A C; Readhead, A C S; Sadler, E M; Saunders, R D E

    2015-01-01

    We consider the high radio frequency (15 GHz - 353 GHz) properties and variability of 35 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs). These are the most core-dominated sources drawn from a parent sample of more than 700 X-ray selected clusters, thus allowing us to relate our results to the general population. We find that >6.0% of our parent sample (>15.1% if only cool-core clusters are considered) contain a radio-source at 150 GHz of at least 3mJy (~1x10^23 W/Hz at our median redshift of z~0.13). Furthermore, >3.4% of the BCGs in our parent sample contain a peaked component (Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum, GPS) in their spectra that peaks above 2 GHz, increasing to >8.5% if only cool-core clusters are considered. We see little evidence for strong variability at 15 GHz on short (week-month) time-scales although we see variations greater than 20% at 150 GHz over 6-month times-frames for 4 of the 23 sources with multi-epoch observations. Much more prevalent is long-term (year-decade time-scale) variability, with average annua...

  14. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  15. The evolution of Brightest Cluster Galaxies in a hierarchical universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Croton, Darren; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) from redshift z~1.6 to z~0. We use the semi-analytic model of Croton et al. (2006) with a new spectro-photometric model based on the Maraston (2005) stellar populations and a new recipe for the dust extinction. We compare the model predictions of the K-band luminosity evolution and the J-K, V-I and I-K colour evolution with a series of datasets, including Collins et al. (Nature, 2009) who argued that semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation cannot reproduce the red colours and high luminosity of BCGs at z>1. We show instead that the model is well in range of the observed luminosity and correctly reproduces the colour evolution of BCGs in the whole redshift range up to z~1.6. We argue that the success of the semi-analytic model is in large part due to the implementation of a more sophisticated spectro-photometric model. An analysis of the model BCGs shows an increase in mass by a factor ~2 since z~1, and star formation activity do...

  16. Pahs, Ionized Gas, and Molecular Hydrogen in Brightest Cluster Galaxies of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; O'Connell, Robert W; Voit, G Mark; Hoffer, Aaron; McNamara, Brian R; Nulsen, Paul E J

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of 5-25 {\\mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of 9 cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally-excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H2 rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as ...

  17. THE EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES IN A HIERARCHICAL UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonini, Chiara; Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC 3122 (Australia); Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from redshift z {approx} 1.6 to z = 0. We upgrade the hierarchical semi-analytic model of Croton et al. with a new spectro-photometric model that produces realistic galaxy spectra, making use of the Maraston stellar populations and a new recipe for the dust extinction. We compare the model predictions of the K-band luminosity evolution and the J - K, V - I, and I - K color evolution with a series of data sets, including those of Collins et al. who argued that semi-analytic models based on the Millennium simulation cannot reproduce the red colors and high luminosity of BCGs at z > 1. We show instead that the model is well in range of the observed luminosity and correctly reproduces the color evolution of BCGs in the whole redshift range up to z {approx} 1.6. We argue that the success of the semi-analytic model is in large part due to the implementation of a more sophisticated spectro-photometric model. An analysis of the model BCGs shows an increase in mass by a factor of 2-3 since z {approx} 1, and star formation activity down to low redshifts. While the consensus regarding BCGs is that they are passively evolving, we argue that this conclusion is affected by the degeneracy between star formation history and stellar population models used in spectral energy distribution fitting, and by the inefficacy of toy models of passive evolution to capture the complexity of real galaxies, especially those with rich merger histories like BCGs. Following this argument, we also show that in the semi-analytic model the BCGs show a realistic mix of stellar populations, and that these stellar populations are mostly old. In addition, the age-redshift relation of the model BCGs follows that of the universe, meaning that given their merger history and star formation history, the ageing of BCGs is always dominated by the ageing of their stellar populations. In a {Lambda}CDM universe, we define such evolution as &apos

  18. Globular Clusters and Spur Clusters in NGC 4921, the Brightest Spiral Galaxy in the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2016-01-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in Coma. Also we find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3x10^5 M_odot. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions (LF) of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70<(V-I)<1.05) in the halo are estimated to be V(max) =27.11+-0.09 mag and I(max)=26.21+-0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max)=26.25+-0.03 mag. Adopting M_I (max) = -8.56+-0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies, 91+-4 Mpc. Combining this and the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, ...

  19. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the Extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta; Cassano, Rossella; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, sandro; Dallacasa, Daniele; Zucca, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\\%). The fraction...

  20. Clusters of Galaxies in the last 5 Billion Years: from the Brightest Cluster Galaxy to the Intra-Cluster Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillepich, Annalisa

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the physical processes which shape the galaxy population in the high density environment of galaxy clusters as a function of cosmic time is a central open question in galaxy evolution studies. With the Frontier Field Initiative, HST will provide an ultra-deep view and an unprecedented multi-wavelength dataset to study the galaxy population in and around galaxy clusters at intermediate redshift. With our study, we aim at providing the first self-consistent theoretical framework based on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to understand the evolution of cluster galaxies: our analysis is designed to complement and aid the interpretation of the wealth of observational data within the LCDM Cosmology. In particular, we plan an in-depth analysis of a sample of 15 haloes with masses between 7x10^13 and 2x10^15 Msun at z=0, simulated with the gravity+hydrodynamics code Arepo. The numerical scheme and the galaxy formation model adopted in this study have already been successfully tested against a series of global measurements: they will allow us to follow the fate, within each cluster, of hundreds of well-resolved galaxies with stellar masses above 5x10^9 Msun. Our analysis will include the assembly properties of the central brightest galaxies as well as the demographics of the satellite populations and their cluster-centric gradients of colors, morphologies and star formation rates. Our setup is suitable to quantify the effects of environment on star formation, stripping, and quenching across an unprecedented range of galaxy masses, cluster masses and spatial scales, in addition to providing valuable clues about the diffuse intra-cluster light.

  1. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, I; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Arévalo, P; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2014-11-06

    The hot (10(7) to 10(8) kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius-it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies.

  2. CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF ABELL 1142: A COOL-CORE CLUSTER LACKING A CENTRAL BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Weeren, Reinout van [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buote, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Gastaldello, Fabio, E-mail: yuanyuan.su@cfa.harvard.edu [INAF-IASF-Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-04-10

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s{sup −1}. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous L{sub X}–T{sub X} scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  3. The K-band Hubble diagram for brightest cluster galaxies in X-ray clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, C; Collins, Chris; Mann, Bob

    1997-01-01

    This paper concerns the K band Hubble diagram for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of X-ray clusters covering the redshift range $0.05 2.3 \\times 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (in the 0.3 - 3.5 keV band) is no more than 0.22 mag, and is not significantly reduced by correcting for the BCG structure parameter, $\\alpha$, or for X-ray luminosity. This is the smallest scatter in the absolute magnitudes of any single class of galaxy and demonstrates the homogeneity of BCGs in high-$L_{\\rm X}$ clusters. By contrast, we find that the brightest members of low-$L_{\\rm X}$ systems display a wider dispersion ($\\sim 0.5$ mag) in absolute magnitude than commonly seen in previous studies, which arises from the inclusion, in X-ray flux-limited samples, of poor clusters and groups which are usually omitted from low redshift studies of BCGs in optically rich clusters....[abstract shortened].. The BCGs in our high-$L_{\\rm X}$ clusters yield a value of $\\Omega_{\\rm M}=0.28\\pm0.24$ if the cosmological constant with a 95 ...

  4. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND SPUR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4921, THE BRIGHTEST SPIRAL GALAXY IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    We resolve a significant fraction of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 4921, the brightest spiral galaxy in the Coma cluster. We also find a number of extended bright star clusters (star complexes) in the spur region of the arms. The latter are much brighter and bluer than those in the normal star-forming region, being as massive as 3 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙}. The color distribution of the GCs in this galaxy is found to be bimodal. The turnover magnitudes of the luminosity functions of the blue (metal-poor) GCs (0.70 < (V − I) ≤ 1.05) in the halo are estimated V(max) = 27.11 ± 0.09 mag and I(max) = 26.21 ± 0.11 mag. We obtain similar values for NGC 4923, a companion S0 galaxy, and two Coma cD galaxies (NGC 4874 and NGC 4889). The mean value for the turnover magnitudes of these four galaxies is I(max) = 26.25 ± 0.03 mag. Adopting M{sub I} (max) = −8.56 ± 0.09 mag for the metal-poor GCs, we determine the mean distance to the four Coma galaxies to be 91 ± 4 Mpc. Combining this with the Coma radial velocity, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 77.9 ± 3.6 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1}. We estimate the GC specific frequency of NGC 4921 to be S{sub N} = 1.29 ± 0.25, close to the values for early-type galaxies. This indicates that NGC 4921 is in the transition phase to S0s.

  5. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies: A Near-Universal Luminosity Function?

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William E; Gnedin, Oleg Y; O'Halloran, Heather; Blakeslee, John P; Whitmore, Bradley C; Cote, Patrick; Geisler, Douglas; Peng, Eric W; Bailin, Jeremy; Rothberg, Barry; Cockcroft, Robert; DeGraaff, Regina Barber

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results from our HST Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the GCLF turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (log L > 10^7 L_Sun) we find small numbers of "superluminous" objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of UCDs (Ultra-Compact Dwarfs). Lastly, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R > 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L_0 ~ R...

  6. Herschel observations of FIR emission lines in brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Edge, A C; Mittal, R; Allen, S W; Baum, S A; Boehringer, H; Bregman, J N; Bremer, M N; Combes, F; Crawford, C S; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Fabian, A C; Hamer, S L; Hatch, N A; Jaffe, W; Johnstone, R M; McNamara, B R; O'Dea, C P; Popesso, P; Quillen, A C; Salome, P; Sarazin, C L; Voit, G M; Wilman, R J; Wise, M W

    2010-01-01

    The question of how much gas cools in the cores of clusters of galaxies has been the focus of many, multiwavelength studies in the past 30 years. In this letter we present the first detections of the strongest atomic cooling lines, [C II], [O I] and [N I] in two strong cooling flow clusters, A1068 and A2597, using Herschel PACS. These spectra indicate that the substantial mass of cold molecular gas (>10^9 Mo) known to be present in these systems is being irradiated by intense UV radiation, most probably from young stars. The line widths of these FIR lines indicate that they share dynamics similar but not identical to other ionised and molecular gas traced by optical, near-infrared and CO lines. The relative brightness of the FIR lines compared to CO and FIR luminosity is consistent with other star-forming galaxies indicating that the properties of the molecular gas clouds in cluster cores and the stars they form are not unusual. These results provide additional evidence for a reservoir of cold gas that is fed...

  7. A triple nucleus in the Brightest Cluster Galaxy in Abell 193

    CERN Document Server

    Seigar, M S; Chorney, N E; Seigar, Marc S.; Lynam, Paul D.; Chorney, Nicole E.

    2003-01-01

    We present a ground-based near-infrared K-band image and an HST/WFPC2 image of the brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 193 (IC 1695). This object was selected as the central cluster galaxy using X-ray information. Both images reveal a triple nucleus structure. Previously, this galaxy was thought to have only 2 nuclei. We present colours and magnitudes and a colour plot of the three nuclei. The nuclear structure and colours of the nuclei in this galaxy suggest that a merger may have taken place in its recent history.

  8. Brightest cluster galaxy formation in the cluster C0037-2522: flattening of the dark matter cusp

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Treu, T; Rosati, P

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray cluster C0337-2522 at redshift $z=0.59$ hosts in its core a group of five elliptical galaxies. Using N-body simulations we show that a multiple merging event among the five galaxies is expected to take place in the next few Gyrs, forming a central brightest cluster galaxy. We also find indications that dynamical friction heating associated with this event is likely to modify the central slope of the cluster dark matter density profile.

  9. Turbulent Heating in Galaxy Clusters Brightest in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Arevalo, P; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2014-01-01

    The hot, X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales significantly shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM has remained open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep Chandra X-ray observatory data and a new data-analysis method that enables us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate due to the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset rad...

  10. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-Core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yuanyuan; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Abell~1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters with each containing one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ~1200 km/s. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ~ 2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous L_X--T_X scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched "cool core" of eith...

  11. AGN jet power and feedback controlled by Bondi accretion in brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Shlosman, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) We propose a new method to estimate the Bondi (hot gas) accretion rates onto the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the centres of elliptical galaxies. It can be applied even if the Bondi radius is not well-resolved in X-ray observations. This method is based on two simple assumptions: (1) hot gas outside the Bondi radius is in nearly a hydrostatic equilibrium in a gravitational potential, and (2) the gas temperature near the galaxy centre is close to the virial temperature of the galaxy. We apply this method to 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters (27 of them are the brightest cluster galaxies; BCGs). We find a strong correlation between the Bondi accretion rates and the power of jets associated with the SMBHs. For most galaxies, the accretion rates are large enough to account for the jet powers. Our results indicate that hot gas in the elliptical galaxies directly controls the feedback from the active galactic nuclei (AGN), which leads to a stable heating of the cluster cool c...

  12. SALT spectroscopic observations of galaxy clusters detected by ACT and a Type II quasar hosted by a brightest cluster galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Brian; Cress, Catherine; Crawford, Steven M; Hughes, John P; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J Richard; Burke, Claire; Gralla, Megan B; Hajian, Amir; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hincks, Adam D; Infante, Leopoldo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marriage, Tobias A; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Sievers, Jonathan L; Sifón, Cristóbal; Wilson, Susan; Wollack, Edward J; Zunckel, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We present Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) follow-up observations of seven massive clusters detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) on the celestial equator using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We conducted multi-object spectroscopic observations with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph in order to measure galaxy redshifts in each cluster field, determine the cluster line-of-sight velocity dispersions, and infer the cluster dynamical masses. We find that the clusters, which span the redshift range 0.3 < z < 0.55, range in mass from (5 -- 20) x 10$^{14}$ solar masses (M200c). Their masses, given their SZ signals, are similar to those of southern hemisphere ACT clusters previously observed using Gemini and the VLT. We note that the brightest cluster galaxy in one of the systems studied, ACT-CL J0320.4+0032 at z = 0.38, hosts a Type II quasar. To our knowledge, this is only the third such system discovered, and therefore may be a rare example of a very massive halo in which quasar-mode fe...

  13. A Comprehensive Study of the Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Grainge, K J B; Hamer, S L; Mahony, E K; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; McNamara, B R; Wilman, R J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the radio properties of the Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in a large sample of X-ray selected galaxy clusters comprising the Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS), the extended BCS (eBCS) and ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray (REFLEX) cluster catalogues. We have multi-frequency radio observations of the BCG using a variety of data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescopes. The radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these objects are decomposed into a component attributed to on-going accretion by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) that we refer to as the 'core', and a more diffuse, ageing component we refer to as the 'non-core'. These BCGs are matched to previous studies to determine whether they exhibit emission lines (principally H-alpha), indicative of the presence of a strong cooling cluster core. We consider how the radio properties of the BCGs vary with cluster environmental factors. Line emitting BCGs are shown...

  14. THE RELATION BETWEEN COOL CLUSTER CORES AND HERSCHEL-DETECTED STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Portouw, J.; Walth, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 {mu}m), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22{sup +6.2}{sub -5.3}% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing H{alpha} emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), only a small ({approx}<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(H{alpha}) to agree with SFR{sub FIR}. The relatively low H{alpha} extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss.

  15. The evolution in the stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    CERN Document Server

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifon, Cristobal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near infra-red with the ESO NTT, WIYN and WHT telescopes, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range $0.2clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billi...

  16. The evolution in the stellar mass of brightest cluster galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Lidman, Chris; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Guatelli, Susanna; Hill, Allison R.; Hoekstra, Henk; Kurinsky, Noah; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Z. Cemile; Safavi-Naeini, Mitra; Sifón, Cristóbal; Stefanon, Mauro; van de Sande, Jesse; van Dokkum, Pieter; Weigel, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Using a sample of 98 galaxy clusters recently imaged in the near-infrared with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope, WIYN telescope and William Herschel Telescope, supplemented with 33 clusters from the ESO archive, we measure how the stellar mass of the most massive galaxies in the universe, namely brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), increases with time. Most of the BCGs in this new sample lie in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.6, which has been noted in recent works to mark an epoch over which the growth in the stellar mass of BCGs stalls. From this sample of 132 clusters, we create a subsample of 102 systems that includes only those clusters that have estimates of the cluster mass. We combine the BCGs in this subsample with BCGs from the literature, and find that the growth in stellar mass of BCGs from 10 billion years ago to the present epoch is broadly consistent with recent semi-analytic and semi-empirical models. As in other recent studies, tentative evidence indicates that the stellar mass growth rate of BCGs may be slowing in the past 3.5 billion years. Further work in collecting larger samples, and in better comparing observations with theory using mock images, is required if a more detailed comparison between the models and the data is to be made.

  17. The XMM Cluster Survey: The interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intra-cluster medium via AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, John P; Edge, Alastair C; Collins, Chris A; Hilton, Matt; Harrison, Craig D; Romer, A Kathy; Rooney, Philip J; Kay, Scott T; Miller, Christopher J; Sahlen, Martin; Lloyd-Davies, Ed J; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew R; Viana, Pedro T P; McCarthy, Ian G; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of 123 X-ray clusters and groups drawn from the XMM-Cluster Survey first data release, we investigate the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), its black hole, and the intra-cluster/group medium (ICM). It appears that for groups and clusters with a BCG likely to host significant AGN feedback, gas cooling dominates in those with Tx > 2 keV while AGN feedback dominates below. This may be understood through the sub-unity exponent found in the scaling relation we derive between the BCG mass and cluster mass over the halo mass range 10^13 2 keV) and again co-located with an effective fuel supply of dense, cooling gas. This demonstrates that the most massive black holes appear to know more about their host cluster than they do about their host galaxy. The results lead us to propose a physically motivated, empirical definition of 'cluster' and 'group', delineated at 2 keV.

  18. Star Formation in Intermediate Redshift 0.2 < Z < 0.7 Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Kevin C; Baum, Stefi A; Tremblay, Grant R; Cox, Isabella G; Gladders, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength photometric and spectroscopic study of 42 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) in two samples of clusters of galaxies chosen for the study of gravitational lensing. The study's initial sample combines 25 BCGs from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) sample and 37 BCGs from the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS) with a total redshift range of 0.2 < Z < 0.7. Using archival GALEX, HST, WISE, Herschel, and VLA data we determine the BCGs' stellar mass, radio power, and star formation rates. The radio power is higher than expected if due to star formation, consistent with the BCGs being AGN-powered radio sources. This suggests that the AGN and star formation are both fueled by cold gas in the host galaxy. The specific star formation rate (sSFR) is low and constant with redshift. The mean sSFR is 9.42 * 10^-12 yr^-1 which corresponds to a mass doubling time of 105 billion years. These findings are consistent with models for hierarchical formation of BCGs which su...

  19. The Link Between Morphology and Structure of Brightest Cluster Galaxies: Automatic Identification of cDs

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Dongyao; Conselice, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    We study a large sample of 625 low-redshift brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and link their morphologies to their structural properties. We derive visual morphologies and find that ~57% of the BCGs are cD galaxies, ~13% are ellipticals, and ~21% belong to the intermediate classes mostly between E and cD. There is a continuous distribution in the properties of the BCG's envelopes, ranging from undetected (E class) to clearly detected (cD class), with intermediate classes (E/cD and cD/E) showing the increasing degrees of the envelope presence. A minority (~7%) of BCGs have disk morphologies, with spirals and S0s in similar proportions, and the rest (~2%) are mergers. After carefully fitting the galaxies light distributions by using one-component (Sersic) and two-component (Sersic+Exponential) models, we find a clear link between the BCGs morphologies and their structures and conclude that a combination of the best-fit parameters derived from the fits can be used to separate cD galaxies from non-cD BCGs. In par...

  20. A Stacked Analysis of Brightest Cluster Galaxies Observed with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Dutson, K L; Edge, A C; Hinton, J A; Hogan, M T

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from a large sample of galaxy clusters sharing the properties of three existing Fermi-LAT detections (in Perseus, Virgo and Abell 3392), namely a powerful radio source within their brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). From a parent, X-ray flux-limited sample of clusters, we select 114 systems with a core-dominated BCG radio flux above 50 or 75 mJy, stacking data from the first 45 months of the Fermi mission, to determine statistical limits on the gamma-ray fluxes of the ensemble of candidate sources. For a >300 MeV selection, the distribution of detection significance across the sample is consistent with that across control samples for significances 4 sigma signals which are not associated with previously identified gamma-ray emission. Modelling of the data in these fields results in the detection of four non-2FGL Fermi sources, though none appear to be unambiguously associated with the BCG candidate. A search at energies >3 GeV hints at emissio...

  1. The formation of the brightest cluster galaxies in cosmological simulations: the case for AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Martizzi, Davide; Moore, Ben

    2011-01-01

    We use 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a Virgo-like galaxy cluster to study the properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) that forms at the center of the halo. We compared two simulations; one incorporating only supernovae feedback and a second that also includes prescriptions for black hole growth and the resulting AGN feedback from gas accretion. As previous work has shown, with supernovae feedback alone we are unable to reproduce any of the observed properties of massive cluster ellipticals. The resulting BCG is rotating quickly, has a high Sersic index, a strong mass excess in the center and a total central density profile falling more steeply than isothermal. Furthermore, it is far too efficient at converting most of the available baryons into stars which is strongly constrained by abundance matching. With a treatment of black hole dynamics and AGN feedback the BCG properties are in good agreement with data: they rotate slowly, have a cored surface density profile, a flat or rising v...

  2. Ultraviolet Morphologies and Star-Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star-formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few s...

  3. THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN A85: THE LARGEST CORE KNOWN SO FAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Cruz, O.; Añorve, C.; Ibarra-Medel, H. J. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Astrofísica, Luis Enrique Erro No.1, Tonantzintla, Pue., C.P. 72840 (Mexico); Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M. [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Barkhouse, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Torres-Papaqui, J. P. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato (DAUG), Callejón Jalisco S/N Col. Valenciana, C.P. 36240 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Motta, V., E-mail: omarlx@inaoep.mx [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111 Varaíso (Chile)

    2014-11-10

    We have found that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in A85, Holm 15A, displays the largest core known so far. Its cusp radius, r {sub γ} = 4.57 ± 0.06 kpc (4.''26 ± 0.''06), is more than 18 times larger than the mean for BCGs and ≳ 1 kpc larger than A2261-BCG, hitherto the largest-cored BCG. Holm 15A hosts the luminous amorphous radio source 0039-095B and has the optical signature of a LINER. Scaling laws indicate that this core could host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass M {sub •} ∼ (10{sup 9}-10{sup 11}) M {sub ☉}. We suggest that cores this large represent a relatively short phase in the evolution of BCGs, whereas the masses of their associated SBMH might be set by initial conditions.

  4. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition...

  5. Radial gradients in initial mass function sensitive absorption features in the Coma brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.; Vaughan, Sam P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we trace radial variations of initial mass function (IMF)-sensitive absorption features of three galaxies in the Coma cluster. We obtain resolved spectroscopy of the central 5 kpc for the two central brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) NGC4889, NGC4874, and the BCG in the south-west group NGC4839, as well as unresolved data for NGC4873 as a low-σ* control. We present radial measurements of the IMF-sensitive features: sodium Na ISDSS, calcium triplet CaT, and iron-hydride FeH0.99, along with the magnesium Mg I0.88 and titanium oxide TiO0.89 features. We employ two separate methods for both telluric correction and sky subtraction around the faint FeH feature to verify our analysis. Within NGC4889 we find strong gradients of Na ISDSS and CaT but a flat FeH profile, which, from comparing to stellar population synthesis models, suggests an old, α-enhanced population with a Chabrier, or even bottom-light IMF. The age and abundance are in line with previous studies but the normal IMF is in contrast to recent results suggesting an increased IMF slope with increased velocity dispersion. We measure flat Na ISDSS and FeH profiles within NGC4874, and determine an old, possibly slightly α-enhanced and Chabrier IMF population. We find an α-enhanced, Chabrier IMF population in NGC4873. Within NGC4839 we measure both strong Na ISDSS and strong FeH, although with a large systematic uncertainty, suggesting a possible heavier IMF. The IMFs we infer for these galaxies are supported by published dynamical modelling. We stress that IMF constraints should be corroborated by further spectral coverage and independent methods on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis.

  6. Radial gradients in initial mass function sensitive absorption features in the Coma brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L; Vaughan, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph (SWIFT), we trace radial variations of initial mass function (IMF) sensitive absorption features of three galaxies in the Coma cluster. We obtain resolved spectroscopy of the central 5kpc for the two central brightest-cluster galaxies (BCGs) NGC4889, NGC4874, and the BCG in the south-west group NGC4839, as well as unresolved data for NGC4873 as a low-$\\sigma_*$ control. We present radial measurements of the IMF-sensitive features sodium NaI$_{\\rm{SDSS}}$, calcium triplet CaT and iron-hydride FeH0.99, along with the magnesium MgI0.88 and titanium oxide TiO0.89 features. We employ two separate methods for both telluric correction and sky-subtraction around the faint FeH feature to verify our analysis. Within NGC4889 we find strong gradients of NaI$_{\\rm{SDSS}}$ and CaT but a flat FeH profile, which from comparing to stellar population synthesis models, suggests an old, $\\alpha$-enhanced population with a Chabrier, or even bottom-light IMF. The age an...

  7. Observational Constraints on the Link Between the Intracluster Medium and Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Donahue, Megan; CLASH

    2017-01-01

    We use data from Chandra, HST, Spitzer, and Herschel to study the nature of feedback in the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of cool core galaxy clusters. Using the 16-band photometry HST available with CLASH in combination with observations taken with Spitzer, Herschel, and Chandra, we study the nature of the feedback mechanism required to offset cooling. While a great deal of progress has been made on this front, there is still much to learn from the feedback-affected stellar populations of cool core BCGs and X-ray observations of the intracluster medium (ICM).With UV through FIR SED fitting, we estimate the star formation rate, dust content, and starburst duration in UV-bright cool core BCGs in CLASH, and examine relationships between these findings and ICM cooling time and free-fall time profiles derived from Chandra X-ray imaging. We present observational evidence constraining the duration of feedback episodes and find a very tight relationship between the BCG star formation rate and the ratio of ICM cooling time to free-fall time (tcool/tff). Our observational results are fully consistent with a scenario where condensation of a depleting supply of thermally instable overdensities of the ICM gas are fueling long-duration (> 1 Gyr) BCG starbursts. We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical models of BCG-ICM interaction.

  8. Stellar population and the origin of intra-cluster stars around brightest cluster galaxies: the case of NGC 3311

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, L; Arnaboldi, M; Ventimiglia, G

    2011-01-01

    Context. We investigate the stellar population and the origin of diffuse light around brightest cluster galaxies. Aims. We study the stellar population of the dynamically hot stellar halo of NGC 3311, the brightest galaxy in the Hydra I cluster, and that of photometric substructures in the diffuse light to constrain the origin of these components. Methods. We analyze absorption lines in medium-resolution, long-slit spectra in the wavelength range 4800-5800 angstrom obtained with FORS2 at the Very Large Telescope. We measure the equivalent width of Lick indices out to 20 kpc from the center of NGC 3311 and fit them with stellar population models that account for the [alpha/Fe] overabundance. Results. Stars in the dynamically hot halo of NGC 3311 are old (age > 13 Gyr), metal-poor ([Z/H] ~ -0.35), and alpha-enhanced ([alpha/Fe] ~ 0.48). Together with the high velocity dispersion, these measurements indicate that the stars in the halo were accreted from the outskirts of other early-type galaxies, with a possible...

  9. Exploring the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies at z ˜ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongyao; Conselice, Christopher J.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Almaini, Omar; Hartley, William G.; Lani, Caterina; Mortlock, Alice; Old, Lyndsay

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method for tracing the evolution of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 0. We conclude on the basis of semi-analytical models that the best method to select BCG progenitors at z ˜ 2 is a hybrid environmental density and stellar mass ranking approach. Ultimately, we are able to retrieve 45 per cent of BCG progenitors. We apply this method on the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, Ultra Deep Survey data to construct a progenitor sample at high redshift. We furthermore populate the comparisons in local Universe by using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with statistically likely contamination to ensure a fair comparison between high and low redshifts. Using these samples we demonstrate that the BCG sizes have grown by a factor of ˜3.2 since z ˜ 2, and BCG progenitors are mainly late-type galaxies, exhibiting less concentrated profiles than their early-type local counterparts. We find that BCG progenitors have more disturbed morphologies. In contrast, local BCGs have much smoother profiles. Moreover, we find that the stellar masses of BCGs have grown by a factor of ˜2.5 since z ˜ 2, and the star formation rate of BCG progenitors has a median value of 13.5 M⊙ yr-1, much higher than their quiescent local descendants. We demonstrate that over z = 1-2 star formation and merging contribute equally to BCG mass growth. However, merging plays a dominant role in BCG assembly at z ≲ 1. We also find that BCG progenitors at high z are not significantly different from other galaxies of similar mass at the same epoch. This suggests that the processes which differentiate BCGs from normal massive elliptical galaxies must occur at z ≲ 2.

  10. Far Ultraviolet Emission in the A2597 and A2204 Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Oonk, J B R; Jaffe, W; Bremer, M N; van weeren, R J

    2011-01-01

    We use the Hubble Space Telescope ACS/SBC and Very Large Telescope FORS cameras to observe the Brightest Cluster Galaxies in Abell 2597 and Abell 2204 in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) F150LP and optical U, B, V, R, I Bessel filters. The FUV and U band emission is enhanced in bright, filamentary structures surrounding the BCG nuclei. These filaments can be traced out to 20 kpc from the nuclei in the FUV. Excess FUV and U band light is determined by removing emission due to the underlying old stellar population and mapped with 1 arcsec spatial resolution over the central 20 kpc regions of both galaxies. We find the FUV and U excess emission to be spatially coincident and a stellar interpretation requires the existence of a significant amount of 10000-50000 K stars. Correcting for nebular continuum emission and dust intrinsic to the BCG further increases the FUV to U band emission ratio and implies that stars alone may not suffice to explain the observations. However, lack of detailed information on the gas and dust...

  11. Spatial kinematics of Brightest Cluster Galaxies and their close companions from Integral Field Unit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brough, S; Sharp, R G; von der Linden, A; Couch, Warrick J

    2011-01-01

    We present Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy of four brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at z~0.1. Three of the BCGs have close companions within a projected radius of 20 kpc and one has no companion within that radius. We calculate the dynamical masses of the BCGs and their companions to be 1.4x10^11galaxies. The BCGs and their companions have simila...

  12. Evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies: the influence of morphology, stellar mass and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongyao; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Conselice, Christopher J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a sample of 425 nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from von der Linden et al., we study the relationship between their internal properties (stellar masses, structural parameters and morphologies) and their environment. More massive BCGs tend to inhabit denser regions and more massive clusters than lower mass BCGs. Furthermore, cDs, which are BCGs with particularly extended envelopes, seem to prefer marginally denser regions and tend to be hosted by more massive haloes than elliptical BCGs. cD and elliptical BCGs show parallel positive correlations between their stellar masses and environmental densities. However, at a fixed environmental density, cDs are, on average, ˜40 per cent more massive. Our results, together with the findings of previous studies, suggest an evolutionary link between elliptical and cD BCGs. We suggest that most present-day cDs started their life as ellipticals, which subsequently grew in stellar mass and size due to mergers. In this process, the cD envelope developed. The large scatter in the stellar masses and sizes of the cDs reflects their different merger histories. The growth of the BCGs in mass and size seems to be linked to the hierarchical growth of the structures they inhabit: as the groups and clusters became denser and more massive, the BCGs at their centres also grew. This process is nearing completion since the majority (˜60 per cent) of the BCGs in the local Universe have cD morphology. However, the presence of galaxies with intermediate morphological classes (between ellipticals and cDs) suggests that the growth and morphological transformation of some BCGs is still ongoing.

  13. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loubser, S I; Hoekstra, H; Mahdavi, A; Donahue, M; Bildfell, C; Voit, G M

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) shows bright emission in the UV and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broadband photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3, a subset from the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP) sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting Simple Stellar Populations (SSPs) as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (~200 Myr) stellar populations in 4 of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star forming BCG...

  14. Evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies: the influence of morphology, stellar mass and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Dongyao; Conselice, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 425 nearby Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) from von der Linden et al. (2007), we study the relationship between their internal properties (stellar masses, structural parameters and morphologies) and their environment. More massive BCGs tend to inhabit denser regions and more massive clusters than lower mass BCGs. Furthermore, cDs, which are BCGs with particularly extended envelopes, seem to prefer marginally denser regions and tend to be hosted by more massive halos than elliptical BCGs. cD and elliptical BCGs show parallel positive correlations between their stellar masses and environmental densities. However, at a fixed environmental density, cDs are, on average, ~40% more massive. Our results, together with the findings of previous studies, suggest an evolutionary link between elliptical and cD BCGs. We suggest that most present-day cDs started their life as ellipticals, which subsequently grew in stellar mass and size due to mergers. In this process, the cD envelope developed. The larg...

  15. A Suzaku Search for Dark Matter Emission Lines in the X-ray Brightest Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, O; Allen, S W; Simionescu, A; Kaastra, J S; Strigari, L E

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra for the central regions of the four X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We employ an optimized energy range for our analysis (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a baseline plasma emission model that incorporates the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this baseline model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy $3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$ keV with a flux of ~$2.87\\times10^{-7}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59+/-0.02 keV with a flux of ~$4.8\\times10^{-8}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. The energies and fluxes of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with standard dark matter (DM) model p...

  16. The XMM Cluster Survey: The build up of stellar mass in Brightest Cluster Galaxies at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, J P; Sahlen, M; Hilton, M; Lloyd-Davies, E; Capozzi, D; Hosmer, M; Liddle, A R; Mehrtens, N; Miller, C J; Romer, A K; Stanford, S A; Viana, P T P; Davidson, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S T; Nichol, R C

    2010-01-01

    We present deep J and Ks band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z=0.8-1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru Telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at ~9e11MSol since z~1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar ma...

  17. Starbursting Brightest Cluster Galaxy: a Herschel view of the massive cluster MACS J1931.8-2634

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, J S; Tozzi, P; Altieri, B; Valtchanov, I; Mercurio, A; Nonino, M; Yu, Heng; Rosati, P; Grillo, C; Medezinski, E; Biviano, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dust-obscured star formation properties of the massive, X-ray selected galaxy cluster MACS J1931.8-2634 at $z$=0.352. Using far-infrared (FIR) imaging in the range 100-500$\\mu$m obtained with the \\textit{Herschel} telescope, we extract 31 sources (2$\\sigma$) within $r\\sim$1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). Among these sources we identify six cluster members for which we perform an analysis of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We measure total infrared luminosity (L$_{IR}$), star formation rate (SFR) and dust temperature. The BCG, with L$_{IR}$=1.4$\\times$10$^{12}$L$_\\odot$ is an Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy and hosts a type II AGN. We decompose its FIR SED into AGN and starburst components and find equal contributions from AGN and starburst. We also recompute the SFR of the BCG finding SFR=150$\\pm$15 M$_\\odot$yr$^{-1}$. We search for an isobaric cooling flow in the cool core using {\\sl Chandra} X-ray data, and find no evidence for gas colder than 1.8 keV in the inner...

  18. Massive molecular gas flows in the Abell 1664 brightest cluster galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; Edge, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N; Combes, F; Fabian, A C; Murray, N; Salome, P; Wilman, R J; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G R; Voit, G M

    2013-01-01

    We report ALMA Early Science CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 1664. The BCG contains 1.1x10^{10} solar masses of molecular gas divided roughly equally between two distinct velocity systems: one from -250 to +250 km/s centred on the BCG's systemic velocity and a high velocity system blueshifted by 570 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. The BCG's systemic component shows a smooth velocity gradient across the BCG center with velocity proportional to radius suggestive of solid body rotation about the nucleus. However, the mass and velocity structure are highly asymmetric and there is little star formation coincident with a putative disk. It may be an inflow of gas that will settle into a disk over several 10^8 yr. The high velocity system consists of two gas clumps, each ~2 kpc across, located to the north and southeast of the nucleus. Each has a line of sight velocity spread of 250-300 km/s. The velocity of the gas in the high velocity system tends to incre...

  19. Where does the gas fueling star formation in brightest cluster galaxies originate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendi, S.; Tozzi, P.; Gaspari, M.; De Grandi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Ghizzardi, S.; Rossetti, M.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the relationship between X-ray cooling and star formation in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Methods: We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the inner regions, 10-40 kpc, of six nearby cool core clusters (z < 0.35) observed with Chandra ACIS. This sample is selected on the basis of the high star formation rate (SFR) observed in the BCGs. We restrict our search for cooling gas to regions that are roughly cospatial with the starburst. We fit single- and multi-temperature mkcflow models to constrain the amount of isobarically cooling intracluster medium. Results: We find that in all clusters, below a threshold temperature ranging between 0.9 and 3 keV, only upper limits can be obtained. In four out of six objects, the upper limits are significantly below the SFR and in two, namely A1835 and A1068, they are less than a tenth of the SFR. Conclusions: Our results suggests that a number of mechanisms conspire to hide the cooling signature in our spectra. In a few systems the lack of a cooling signature may be attributed to a relatively long delay time between the X-ray cooling and the star burst. However, for A1835 and A1068, where the X-ray cooling time is shorter than the timescale of the starburst, a possible explanation is that the region where gas cools out of the X-ray phase extends to very large radii, likely beyond the core of these systems.

  20. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  1. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the center of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 solar masses/yr. However, very few number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and e...

  2. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, M.; Whelan, John T.; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the centre of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 M⊙ yr-1. However, a very small number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and extinction law. We find that in the absence of any prior except that the maximum cooling rate Phoenix. The SFR dependence on the extinction is a reflection of the standard age-extinction degeneracy, which can be overcome by using a prior on one of the two quantities in question.

  3. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster, based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O II] emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available, finding 7 systems with SFR > 100 Msun/yr. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 Msun/yr in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1-5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z > 1, this fraction increases to 92(+6)(-31)%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific star formation rate in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z > 0.6, the correlation between cluster central entropy and BCG star formation - which is well established at z ~ 0 - is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs using data from the Hubble Space Telescope, finding complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50-60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy-galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  4. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Allen, S W; Applegate, D E; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Gonzalez, A H; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holzapfel, W L; Marrone, D P; Miller, E D; Reichardt, C L; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Schrabback, T; Stanford, S A; Stark, A A; Vieira, J D; Zenteno, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster, based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O II] emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available, finding 7 systems with SFR > 100 Msun/yr. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 Msun/yr in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 1, this fraction increases to 92(+6)(-31)%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific star formation rate in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z > 0.6, the correlation between cluster central entropy and BCG star formation - which is well established at z ~ 0 - i...

  5. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  6. Avoiding progenitor bias: The structural and mass evolution of Brightest Group and Cluster Galaxies in Hierarchical models since z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco; Rettura, Alessandro; Bouillot, Vincent; Moreno, Jorge; Licitra, Rossella; Bernardi, Mariangela; Huertas-Company, Marc; Mei, Simona; Ascaso, Begoña; Sheth, Ravi; Delaye, Lauriane; Raichoor, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The mass and structural evolution of massive galaxies is one of the hottest topics in galaxy formation. This is because it may reveal invaluable insights into the still debated evolutionary processes governing the growth and assembly of spheroids. However, direct comparison between models and observations is usually prevented by the so-called "progenitor bias", i.e., new galaxies entering the observational selection at later epochs, thus eluding a precise study of how pre-existing galaxies actually evolve in size. To limit this effect, we here gather data on high-redshift brightest group and cluster galaxies, evolve their (mean) host halo masses down to z=0 along their main progenitors, and assign as their "descendants" local SDSS central galaxies matched in host halo mass. At face value, the comparison between high redshift and local data suggests a noticeable increase in stellar mass of a factor of >2 since z~1, and of >2.5 in mean effective radius. We then compare the inferred stellar mass and size growth ...

  7. The Diverse Nature of Optical Emission Lines in Brightest Cluster Galaxies: IFU Observations of the Central Kiloparsecs

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, L O V; Mollá, M; McGee, S L

    2009-01-01

    We present integral field spectroscopy of the nebular line emission in a sample of 9 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The sample was chosen to probe both cooling flow and non-cooling flow clusters, as well as a range of cluster X-ray luminosities. The line emission morphology and velocity gradients suggest a great diversity in the properties of the line emitting gas. While some BGCs show evidence for filamentary or patchy emission (Abell 1060, Abell 1668 and MKW3s), others have extended emission (Abell 1204, Abell 2199), while still others have centrally concentrated emission (Abell 2052). We examine diagnostic line ratios to determine the dominant ionization mechanisms in each galaxy. Most of the galaxies show regions with AGN-like spectra, however for two BCGs, Abell 1060 and Abell 1204, the emission line diagnostics suggest regions which can be described by the emission from young stellar populations. The diversity of emission line properties in our sample of BCGs suggests that the emission mechanism is ...

  8. The importance of major mergers in the build up of stellar mass in brightest cluster galaxies at z=1

    CERN Document Server

    Lidman, C; Bauer, A E; Barrientos, L F; Cerulo, P; Couch, W J; Delaye, L; Demarco, R; Ellingson, E; Faloon, A J; Gilbank, D; Huertas-Company, M; Mei, S; Meyers, J; Muzzin, A; Noble, A; Nantais, J; Rettura, A; Rosati, P; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Strazzullo, V; Webb, T M A; Wilson, G; Yan, R; Yee, H K C

    2013-01-01

    Recent independent results from numerical simulations and observations have shown that brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have increased their stellar mass by a factor of almost two between z~0.9 and z~0.2. The numerical simulations further suggest that more than half this mass is accreted through major mergers. Using a sample of 18 distant galaxy clusters with over 600 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members between them, we search for observational evidence that major mergers do play a significant role. We find a major merger rate of 0.38 +/- 0.14 mergers per Gyr at z~1. While the uncertainties, which stem from the small size of our sample, are relatively large, our rate is consistent with the results that are derived from numerical simulations. If we assume that this rate continues to the present day and that half of the mass of the companion is accreted onto the BCG during these mergers, then we find that this rate can explain the growth in the stellar mass of the BCGs that is observed and predicted by...

  9. Feedback and Brightest Cluster Galaxy Formation: ACS Observations of the Radio Galaxy TN J1338-1942 at z = 4.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Overzier, R. A.; Miley, G. K.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Clampin, M.; De Breuck, C.; Demarco, R.; Ford, H. C.; Hartig, G. F.; Homeier, N.; Illingworth, G. D.; Martel, A. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Venemans, B.; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Benítez, N.; Bouwens, R. J.; Bradley, L. D.; Broadhurst, T. J.; Brown, R. A.; Burrows, C. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cross, N. J. G.; Feldman, P. D.; Franx, M.; Golimowski, D. A.; Goto, T.; Gronwall, C.; Holden, B.; Infante, L.; Kimble, R. A.; Krist, J. E.; Lesser, M. P.; Mei, S.; Menanteau, F.; Meurer, G. R.; Motta, V.; Postman, M.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; White, R. L.; Zheng, W.

    2005-09-01

    We present deep optical imaging of the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942, obtained using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as ground-based near-infrared imaging data from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT). The radio galaxy is known to reside within a large galaxy overdensity (both in physical extent and density contrast). There is good evidence that this ``protocluster'' region is the progenitor of a present-day rich galaxy cluster. TN J1338 is the dominant galaxy in the protocluster in terms of size and luminosity (in both the optical and near-infrared) and therefore seems destined to evolve into the brightest cluster galaxy. The high spatial resolution ACS images reveal several kiloparsec-scale features within and around the radio galaxy. The continuum light is aligned with the radio axis and is resolved into two clumps in the i775 and z850 bands. These components have luminosities ~109 Lsolar and sizes of a few kpc. The estimated nebular continuum, scattered light, synchrotron- and inverse Compton-scattering contributions to the aligned continuum light are only a few percent of the observed total, indicating that the observed flux is likely dominated by forming stars. The estimated star formation rate for the whole radio galaxy is ~200 Msolar yr-1. A simple model in which the jet has triggered star formation in these continuum knots is consistent with the available data. A striking, but small, linear feature is evident in the z850 aligned light and may be indicative of a large-scale shock associated with the advance of the radio jet. The rest of the aligned light also seems morphologically consistent with star formation induced by shocks associated with the radio source, as seen in other high-z radio galaxies (e.g., 4C 41.17). An unusual feature is seen in Lyα emission. A wedge-shaped extension emanates from the radio galaxy perpendicularly to the radio axis. This ``wedge

  10. Near-infrared adaptive optics imaging of infrared luminous galaxies: the brightest cluster magnitude - star formation rate relation

    CERN Document Server

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Vaisanen, Petri; Kankare, Erkki; Kotilainen, Jari; Mattila, Seppo; Ryder, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ~ 40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M_K ~ - 2.6 log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying...

  11. The High-Mass End of the Black Hole Mass Function: Mass Estimates in Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonta', E Dalla; Corsini, E M; Miralda-Escude', J; Coccato, L; Sarzi, M; Pizzella, A; Beifiori, A

    2008-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging and spectroscopic observations of three Brightest Cluster Galaxies, Abell 1836-BCG, Abell 2052-BCG, and Abell 3565-BCG, obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The data provide detailed information on the structure and mass profile of the stellar component, the dust optical depth, and the spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized gas within the innermost region of each galaxy. Dynamical models, which account for the observed stellar mass profile and include the contribution of a central supermassive black hole (SBH), are constructed to reproduce the kinematics derived from the Halpha and [N II](lambda 6548,6583) emission lines. Secure SBH detection with M_bh=3.61(+0.41,-0.50)x10^9 M_sun and M_bh=1.34(+0.21,-0.19)x10^9 M_sun, respectively, are obtained for Abell 1836-BCG and Abell 3565-BCG, which show regular rotation curves and strong central velocity gradients. In the ...

  12. A $10^{10}$ Solar Mass Flow of Molecular Gas in the Abell 1835 Brightest Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R; Nulsen, P E J; Edge, A C; Murray, N W; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N; Combes, F; Fabian, A C; Salome, P; Kirkpatrick, C C; Baum, S A; Bregman, J N; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Hamer, S; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G; Voit, G M

    2014-01-01

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the Abell 1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect $5\\times 10^{10}~\\rm M_\\odot$ of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its ensemble velocity profile width of $\\sim 130 ~\\rm km~s^{-1}$ FWHM is too narrow for the molecular cloud sto be supported in the galaxy by dynamic pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. Roughly $10^{10}~\\rm M_\\odot$ of molecular gas is projected $3-10 ~\\rm kpc$ to the north-west and to the east of the nucleus with line of sight velocities lying between $-250 ~\\rm km~s^{-1}$ to $+480 ~\\rm km~s^{-1}$ with respect to the systemic velocity. The high velocity gas may be either inflowing or outflowing. However, the absence of high velocity gas toward the nucleus that would be expected in a steady inflow, and its bipolar distribution on either side of the nucleus, are more naturally explained as outflow. Star formation and radiation from th...

  13. Radiative efficiency, variability and Bondi accretion onto massive black holes: from mechanical to quasar feedback in brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; Edge, A C; Hogan, M T; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N

    2012-01-01

    We examine unresolved nuclear X-ray sources in 57 brightest cluster galaxies to study the relationship between nuclear X-ray emission and accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs). The majority of the clusters in our sample have prominent X-ray cavities embedded in the surrounding hot atmospheres, which we use to estimate mean jet power and average accretion rate onto the SMBHs over the past several hundred Myr. We find that ~50% of the sample have detectable nuclear X-ray emission. The nuclear X-ray luminosity is correlated with average accretion rate determined using X-ray cavities, which is consistent with the hypothesis that nuclear X-ray emission traces ongoing accretion. The results imply that jets in systems that have experienced recent AGN outbursts, in the last ~10^7yr, are `on' at least half of the time. Nuclear X-ray sources become more luminous with respect to the mechanical jet power as the mean accretion rate rises. We show that nuclear radiation exceeds the jet power when the mean accreti...

  14. A NOVEL APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN THE MASS RATIO OF MINOR MERGERS IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES: APPLICATION TO NGC 4889, THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY IN COMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Meng; Huang Song [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ho, Luis C. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, 251 South Lake Avenue, Suite 300, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Minor mergers are thought to be important for the buildup and structural evolution of massive elliptical galaxies. In this work, we report the discovery of a system of four shell features in NGC 4889, one of the brightest members of the Coma cluster, using optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The shells are well aligned with the major axis of the host and are likely to have been formed by the accretion of a small satellite galaxy. We have performed a detailed two-dimensional photometric decomposition of NGC 4889 and of the many overlapping nearby galaxies in its vicinity. This comprehensive model allows us not only to firmly detect the low-surface brightness shells, but, crucially, also to accurately measure their luminosities and colors. The shells are bluer than the underlying stars at the same radius in the main galaxy. We make use of the colors of the shells and the color-magnitude relation of the Coma cluster to infer the luminosity (or mass) of the progenitor galaxy. The shells in NGC 4889 appear to have been produced by the minor merger of a moderate-luminosity (M{sub I} Almost-Equal-To -18.7 mag) disk (S0 or spiral) galaxy with a luminosity (mass) ratio of {approx}90:1 with respect to the primary galaxy. The novel methodology presented in this work can be exploited to decode the fossil record imprinted in the photometric substructure of other nearby early-type galaxies.

  15. The accretion histories of brightest cluster galaxies from their stellar population gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva-Altamirano, Paola; Jimmy,; Tran, Kim-Vy; Couch, Warrick J; McDermid, Richard M; Lidman, Chris; von der Linden, Anja; Sharp, Rob

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the spatially-resolved stellar populations of 9 local ($z 10^{11.3}$M$_{\\odot}$) from the ATLAS$^{3D}$ survey (median [Z/H] $= 0.04\\pm0.07$, $\\Delta$[Z/H] $= -0.19\\pm0.1$). However, massive early-type galaxies from ATLAS$^{3D}$ have consistently old ages (median Age $=12.0\\pm3.8$Gyr). We also analyse the close massive companion galaxies of two of the BCGs. These galaxies have similar stellar populations to their respective BCGs.

  16. A Ten Billion Solar Mass Outflow of Molecular Gas Launched by Radio Bubbles in the Abell 1835 Brightest Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R; Nulsen, P E J; Edge, A C; Murray, N W; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N; Combes, F; Fabian, A C; Salome, P; Kirkpatrick, C C; Baum, S A; Bregman, J N; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Hamer, S; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G; Voit, G M

    2013-01-01

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the Abell 1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5E10 solar masses of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its velocity width of ~130 km/s FWHM is too narrow to be supported by dynamical pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. The disk is forming stars at a rate of 100-180 solar masses per year. Roughly 1E10 solar masses of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the north-west and to the east of the nucleus with line of sight velocities lying between -250 km/s to +480 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. Although inflow cannot be ruled out, the rising velocity gradient with radius is consistent with a broad, bipolar outflow driven by radio jets or buoyantly rising X-ray cavities. The molecular outflow may be associated with an outflow of hot gas in Abell 1835 seen on larger scales. Molecular gas is flowing out of the BCG at a rate of approximately...

  17. A deep spectroscopic study of the filamentary nebulosity in NGC4696, the brightest cluster galaxy in the Centaurus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Johnstone, R M; Sanders, J S; Crawford, C S; Ferland, G J; Hatch, N A

    2011-01-01

    We present results of deep integral field spectroscopy observations using high resolution optical (4150-7200 A) VIMOS VLT spectra, of NGC 4696, the dominant galaxy in the Centaurus cluster (Abell 3526). After the Virgo cluster, this is the second nearest (z=0.0104) example of a cool core cluster. NGC 4696 is surrounded by a vast, luminous H alpha emission line nebula (L = 2.2 \\times 10^40 ergs per second). We explore the origin and excitation of the emission-line filaments and find their origin consistent with being drawn out, under rising radio bubbles, into the intracluster medium as in other similar systems. Contrary to previous observations we do not observe evidence for shock excitation of the outer filaments. Our optical spectra are consistent with the recent particle heating excitation mechanism of Ferland et al.

  18. A 10{sup 10} solar mass flow of molecular gas in the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Main, R. A.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Kirkpatrick, C. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nulsen, P. E. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Murray, N. W.; Hamer, S. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, M5S 3H8 ON (Canada); Combes, F.; Salome, P. [L' Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de L' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Baum, S. A.; O' Dea, C. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Bregman, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Donahue, M.; Voit, G. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 567 Wilson Road, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oonk, J. B. R. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Tremblay, G. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-04-10

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its ensemble velocity profile width of ∼130 km s{sup –1} FWHM is too narrow for the molecular clouds to be supported in the galaxy by dynamic pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. Roughly 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the northwest and to the east of the nucleus with line-of-sight velocities lying between –250 km s{sup –1} and +480 km s{sup –1} with respect to the systemic velocity. The high-velocity gas may be either inflowing or outflowing. However, the absence of high-velocity gas toward the nucleus that would be expected in a steady inflow, and its bipolar distribution on either side of the nucleus, are more naturally explained as outflow. Star formation and radiation from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) are both incapable of driving an outflow of this magnitude. The location of the high-velocity gas projected behind buoyantly rising X-ray cavities and favorable energetics suggest an outflow driven by the radio AGN. If so, the molecular outflow may be associated with a hot outflow on larger scales reported by Kirkpatrick and colleagues. The molecular gas flow rate of approximately 200 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is comparable to the star formation rate of 100-180 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in the central disk. How radio bubbles would lift dense molecular gas in their updrafts, how much gas will be lost to the BCG, and how much will return to fuel future star formation and AGN activity are poorly understood. Our results imply that radio-mechanical (radio-mode) feedback not only heats hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies and BCGs, but it is able to sweep higher density molecular gas away from their centers.

  19. Exploring the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies at $z\\sim 2$

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Dongyao; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Almaini, Omar; Hartley, William G; Lani, Caterina; Mortlock, Alice; Old, Lyndsay

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for tracing the evolution of BCGs from $z\\sim 2$ to $z\\sim 0$. We conclude on the basis of semi-analytical models that the best method to select BCG progenitors at $z\\sim 2$ is a hybrid environmental density and stellar mass ranking approach. Ultimately we are able to retrieve 45\\% of BCG progenitors. We apply this method on the CANDELS UDS data to construct a progenitor sample at high redshift. We furthermore populate the comparisons in local universe by using SDSS data with statistically likely contamination to ensure a fair comparison between high and low redshifts. Using these samples we demonstrate that the BCG sizes have grown by a factor of $\\sim 3.2$ since $z\\sim 2$, and BCG progenitors are mainly late-type galaxies, exhibiting less concentrated profiles than their early-type local counterparts. We find that BCG progenitors have more disturbed morphologies. In contrast, local BCGs have much smoother profiles. Moreover, we find that the stellar masses of BCGs have grown by a fac...

  20. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  1. The Look-back Time Evolution of Far-Ultraviolet Flux from the Brightest Cluster Elliptical Galaxies at z < 0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Ree, C H; Yi, S K; Yoon, S J; Rich, R M; Deharveng, J M; Sohn, Y J; Kaviraj, S; Rhee, J; Sheen, Y K; Schawinski, K; Rey, S C; Boselli, A; Donas, J; Seibert, M; Wyder, T K; Barlow, T A; Bianchi, L; Forster, K; Friedman, P G; Heckman, T M; Madore, B F; Martin, D C; Milliard, B; Morrissey, P; Neff, S G; Schiminovich, D; Small, T; Szalay, A S; Welsh, B Y; Ree, Chang H.; Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Sohn, Young-Jong; Kaviraj, Sugata; Rhee, Jonghwan; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Schawinski, Kevin; Rey, Soo-Chang; Boselli, Alessandro; Rhee, Jaehyon; Donas, Jose; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted K.; Barlow, Tom A.; Bianchi, Luciana; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Small, Todd; Szalay, Alex S.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2007-01-01

    We present the GALEX UV photometry of the elliptical galaxies in Abell clusters at moderate redshifts (z < 0.2) for the study of the look-back time evolution of the UV upturn phenomenon. The brightest elliptical galaxies (M_r < -22) in 12 remote clusters are compared with the nearby giant elliptical galaxies of comparable optical luminosity in the Fornax and Virgo clusters. The sample galaxies presented here appear to be quiescent without signs of massive star formation or strong nuclear activity, and show smooth, extended profiles in their UV images indicating that the far-UV (FUV) light is mostly produced by hot stars in the underlying old stellar population. Compared to their counterparts in nearby clusters, the FUV flux of cluster giant elliptical galaxies at moderate redshifts fades rapidly with ~ 2 Gyrs of look-back time, and the observed pace in FUV - V color evolution agrees reasonably well with the prediction from the population synthesis models where the dominant FUV source is hot horizontal-b...

  2. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  3. The statistical nature of the brightest group galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shiyin; Yang, Xiaohu [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Mo, Houjun [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Van den Bosch, Frank [Astronomy Department, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); More, Surhud, E-mail: ssy@shao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago 5640, S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We examine the statistical properties of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) by using a complete spectroscopic sample of groups/clusters of galaxies selected from the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We test whether BGGs and other bright members of groups are consistent with an ordered population among the total population of group galaxies. We find that the luminosity distributions of BGGs do not follow the predictions from the order statistics (OS). The average luminosities of BGGs are systematically brighter than OS predictions. On the other hand, by properly taking into account the brightening effect of the BGGs, the luminosity distributions of the second brightest galaxies are in excellent agreement with the expectations of OS. The brightening of BGGs relative to the OS expectation is consistent with a scenario that the BGGs on average have overgrown about 20% masses relative to the other member galaxies. The growth (ΔM) is not stochastic but correlated with the magnitude gap (G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) between the brightest and the second brightest galaxy. The growth (ΔM) is larger for the groups having more prominent BGGs (larger G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) and averagely contributes about 30% of the final G {sub 1,} {sub 2} of the groups of galaxies.

  4. A Multi-Wavelength Photometric Census of AGN and Star Formation Activity in the Brightest Cluster Galaxies of X-ray Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Green, T S; Stott, J P; Ebeling, H; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Metcalfe, N; Kaiser, N; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2016-01-01

    Despite their reputation as being "red and dead", the unique environment inhabited by Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and AGN activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of "active" BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and Mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3pi, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14% of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show...

  5. Sersic 159-03 discovery of the brightest soft X-ray excess emitting cluster of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonamente, M; Mittaz, J P D

    2001-01-01

    The soft X-ray excess emission in the southern cluster Sersic 159-03 represents hiterto the strongest effect of its kind. Emission in the ~0.2-0.4 keV passband is detected far in excess of the expected contribution from the hot phase of the intra-cluster medium, and extends to the X-ray signal limit of the cluster. Our analysis of ROSAT PSPC observations reveal that the soft excess can be interpreted as either a thermal or non-thermal effect, and the high data quality allows to place tight constraints on the two currently competing models. However, each model now implies major revisions to our understanding of clusters of galaxies: either `warm' gas masses in similar amounts to the hot gas, or relativistic particles in or above equipartition with the hot phase, appear to be unavoidable.

  6. Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Members

    CERN Document Server

    Andernach, H

    2009-01-01

    We searched the literature for radio images and fluxes of brightest cluster members (BCMs) in 1169 Abell clusters, selected on the basis of their BM or RS type or on textual notes in the Abell catalog indicating the presence of dominant galaxies. We inspected the images of existing radio surveys (NVSS, SUMSS, FIRST, WENSS, etc.) and used the CATS and VizieR catalog browsers, as well as additional literature, to collect radio fluxes and radio morphologies for 1423 BCMs. We found 578 (41%) of these BCMs with detected radio emission, of which 223 are detected at only a single frequency. Using the survey images and published high-resolution images, we estimated the best available position angle for the innermost radio structure and for the largest angular size of each source. DSS images were used to obtain the orientation of the optical major axis of the outer envelope of the BCMs, and the acute difference angle between major optical and radio axes was derived for 102 objects. Its distribution shows a similar bim...

  7. PS1-12sk IS A PECULIAR SUPERNOVA FROM A He-RICH PROGENITOR SYSTEM IN A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Drout, M. R.; Moe, M.; Berger, E.; Brown, W. R.; Lunnan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Fraser, M.; Kotak, R.; Magill, L.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Maths and Physics, Queens University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Huang, K. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Urata, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: nsanders@cfa.harvard.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-05-20

    We report on our discovery and observations of the Pan-STARRS1 supernova (SN) PS1-12sk, a transient with properties that indicate atypical star formation in its host galaxy cluster or pose a challenge to popular progenitor system models for this class of explosion. The optical spectra of PS1-12sk classify it as a Type Ibn SN (SN Ibn; cf. SN 2006jc), dominated by intermediate-width (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) and time variable He I emission. Our multi-wavelength monitoring establishes the rise time dt {approx} 9-23 days and shows an NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution with temperature {approx}> 17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} K and a peak magnitude of M{sub z} = -18.88 {+-} 0.02 mag. SN Ibn spectroscopic properties are commonly interpreted as the signature of a massive star (17-100 M{sub Sun }) explosion within an He-enriched circumstellar medium. However, unlike previous SNe Ibn, PS1-12sk is associated with an elliptical brightest cluster galaxy, CGCG 208-042 (z = 0.054) in cluster RXC J0844.9+4258. The expected probability of an event like PS1-12sk in such environments is low given the measured infrequency of core-collapse SNe in red-sequence galaxies compounded by the low volumetric rate of SN Ibn. Furthermore, we find no evidence of star formation at the explosion site to sensitive limits ({Sigma}{sub H{alpha}} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). We therefore discuss white dwarf binary systems as a possible progenitor channel for SNe Ibn. We conclude that PS1-12sk represents either a fortuitous and statistically unlikely discovery, evidence for a top-heavy initial mass function in galaxy cluster cooling flow filaments, or the first clue suggesting an alternate progenitor channel for SNe Ibn.

  8. The Non-Parametric Model for Linking Galaxy Luminosity with Halo/Subhalo Mass: Are First Brightest Galaxies Special?

    CERN Document Server

    Vale, A

    2007-01-01

    We revisit the longstanding question of whether first brightest cluster galaxies are statistically drawn from the same distribution as other cluster galaxies or are "special", using the new non-parametric, empirically based model presented in Vale&Ostriker (2006) for associating galaxy luminosity with halo/subhalo masses. We introduce scatter in galaxy luminosity at fixed halo mass into this model, building a conditional luminosity function (CLF) by considering two possible models: a simple lognormal and a model based on the distribution of concentration in haloes of a given mass. We show that this model naturally allows an identification of halo/subhalo systems with groups and clusters of galaxies, giving rise to a clear central/satellite galaxy distinction. We then use these results to build up the dependence of brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitudes on cluster luminosity, focusing on two statistical indicators, the dispersion in BCG magnitude and the magnitude difference between first and second bri...

  9. The 1000 Brightest HIPASS Galaxies Newly Cataloged Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan-Weber, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Jerjen, H; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Ryder, S D; Barnes, D G; De Blok, W J G; Kilborn, V A

    2002-01-01

    The HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) is a blind 21-cm survey for extragalactic neutral hydrogen, covering the whole southern sky. The HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog (BGC; Koribalski et al. 2002) is a subset of HIPASS and contains the 1000 HI-brightest (peak flux density) galaxies. Here we present the 138 HIPASS BGC galaxies, which had no redshift measured prior to the Parkes multibeam HI surveys. Of the 138 galaxies, 87 are newly cataloged. Newly cataloged is defined as no optical (or infrared) counterpart in the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Using the Digitized Sky Survey we identify optical counterparts for almost half of the newly cataloged galaxies, which are typically of irregular or magellanic morphological type. Several HI sources appear to be associated with compact groups or pairs of galaxies rather than an individual galaxy. The majority (57) of the newly cataloged galaxies lie within ten degrees of the Galactic Plane and are missing from optical surveys due to confusion with stars or dust extinc...

  10. Two-Color Surface Photometry of Brightest Cluster Members

    CERN Document Server

    Garilli, B; Andreon, S; MacCagni, D; Carrasco, L; Recillas, E; Garilli, Bianca; Sangalli, Giorgio; Andreon, Stefano; Maccagni, Dario; Carrasco, Luis; Recillas, Elsa

    1997-01-01

    The Gunn g, r and i CCD images of a representative sample of 17 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCM) have been analyzed in order to derive surface brightness and color profiles, together with geometrical parameters like eccentricity and position angle. The sample includes both X-ray and optically selected clusters, ranging in redshift from z=0.049 to z=0.191. We find that BCMs are substantially well described by de Vaucouleurs' law out to radii of cases we find a surface brightness excess with respect to the $r^{1/4}$ law, which for A150 is coupled with a change in the $g-r$ color. The rest frame colors of BCMs do not show any intrinsic dispersion. By parametrizing the environment with the local galaxy number density, we find that it is correlated with the BCM extension, i.e. BCMs with larger effective radii are found in denser environments.

  11. The Brightest Young Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetti, D; Adamo, A; Gallagher, J S; Andrews, J E; Smith, L J; Clayton, G C; Lee, J C; Sabbi, E; Ubeda, L; Kim, H; Ryon, J E; Thilker, D; Bright, S N; Zackrisson, E; Kennicutt, R C; de Mink, S E; Whitmore, B C; Aloisi, A; Chandar, R; Cignoni, M; Cook, D; Dale, D A; Elmegreen, B G; Elmegreen, D M; Evans, A S; Fumagalli, M; Gouliermis, D A; Grasha, K; Grebel, E K; Krumholz, M R; Walterbos, R; Wofford, A; Brown, T M; Christian, C; Dobbs, C; Herrero, A; Kahre, L; Messa, M; Nair, P; Nota, A; Oestlin, G; Pellerin, A; Sacchi, E; Schaerer, D; Tosi, M

    2015-01-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC5253 hosts a number of young, massive star clusters, the two youngest of which are centrally concentrated and surrounded by thermal radio emission (the `radio nebula'). To investigate the role of these clusters in the starburst energetics, we combine new and archival Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC5253 with wavelength coverage from 1500 Ang to 1.9 micron in 13 filters. These include H-alpha, P-beta, and P-alpha, and the imaging from the Hubble Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey). The extraordinarily well-sampled spectral energy distributions enable modeling with unprecedented accuracy the ages, masses, and extinctions of the 9 optically brightest clusters (M_V < -8.8) and the two young radio nebula clusters. The clusters have ages ~1-15 Myr and masses ~1x10^4 - 2.5x10^5 M_sun. The clusters' spatial location and ages indicate that star formation has become more concentrated towards the radio nebula over the last ~15 Myr. The most massive cluster ...

  12. Galaxy candidates at z ~ 10 in archival data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[z8]) survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, S R; Trenti, M; Oesch, P A; Wu, J F; Bradley, L D; Schmidt, K B; Bouwens, R J; Calvi, V; Mason, C A; Stiavelli, M; Treu, T

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) enabled the search for the first galaxies observed at z ~ 8 - 11 (500 - 700 Myr after the Big Bang). To continue quantifying the number density of the most luminous galaxies (M_AB ~ -22.0) at the earliest epoch observable with HST, we search for z ~ 10 galaxies (F125W-dropouts) in archival data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[z8]) survey, originally designed for detection of z ~ 8 galaxies (F098M-dropouts). By focusing on the deepest 293 arcmin^2 of the data along 62 independent lines of sight, we identify six z ~ 10 candidates satisfying the color selection criteria, detected at S/N > 8 in F160W with M_AB = -22.8 to -21.1 if at z = 10. Three of the six sources, including the two brightest, are in a single WFC3 pointing (~ 4 arcmin^2), suggestive of significant clustering, which is expected from bright galaxies at z ~ 10. However, the two brightest galaxies are too extended to be likely at z ~ 10, and one additional source is u...

  13. The Brightest Young Star Clusters in NGC 5253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetti, D.; Johnson, K. E.; Adamo, A.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Andrews, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Clayton, G. C.; Lee, J. C.; Sabbi, E.; Ubeda, L.; Kim, H.; Ryon, J. E.; Thilker, D.; Bright, S. N.; Zackrisson, E.; Kennicutt, R. C.; de Mink, S. E.; Whitmore, B. C.; Aloisi, A.; Chandar, R.; Cignoni, M.; Cook, D.; Dale, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Evans, A. S.; Fumagalli, M.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Krumholz, M. R.; Walterbos, R.; Wofford, A.; Brown, T. M.; Christian, C.; Dobbs, C.; Herrero, A.; Kahre, L.; Messa, M.; Nair, P.; Nota, A.; Östlin, G.; Pellerin, A.; Sacchi, E.; Schaerer, D.; Tosi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a number of young, massive star clusters, the two youngest of which are centrally concentrated and surrounded by thermal radio emission (the “radio nebula”). To investigate the role of these clusters in the starburst energetics, we combine new and archival Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC 5253 with wavelength coverage from 1500 Å to 1.9 μm in 13 filters. These include Hα, Pβ, and Pα, and the imaging from the Hubble Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey). The extraordinarily well-sampled spectral energy distributions enable modeling with unprecedented accuracy the ages, masses, and extinctions of the nine optically brightest clusters (MV < -8.8) and the two young radio nebula clusters. The clusters have ages ˜1-15 Myr and masses ˜1 × 104-2.5 × 105 M⊙. The clusters’ spatial location and ages indicate that star formation has become more concentrated toward the radio nebula over the last ˜15 Myr. The most massive cluster is in the radio nebula; with a mass ˜2.5 × 105 M⊙ and an age ˜1 Myr, it is 2-4 times less massive and younger than previously estimated. It is within a dust cloud with AV ˜ 50 mag, and shows a clear near-IR excess, likely from hot dust. The second radio nebula cluster is also ˜1 Myr old, confirming the extreme youth of the starburst region. These two clusters account for about half of the ionizing photon rate in the radio nebula, and will eventually supply about 2/3 of the mechanical energy in present-day shocks. Additional sources are required to supply the remaining ionizing radiation, and may include very massive stars. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  14. Galaxy Candidates at z ~ 10 in Archival Data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BORG[z8]) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, S. R.; Carrasco, D.; Trenti, M.; Oesch, P. A.; Wu, J. F.; Bradley, L. D.; Schmidt, K. B.; Bouwens, R. J.; Calvi, V.; Mason, C. A.; Stiavelli, M.; Treu, T.

    2016-08-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) enabled the search for the first galaxies observed at z ˜ 8-11 (500-700 Myr after the Big Bang). To continue quantifying the number density of the most luminous galaxies (M AB ˜ -22.0) at the earliest epoch observable with HST, we search for z ˜ 10 galaxies (F125W-dropouts) in archival data from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG[z8]) survey, originally designed for detection of z ˜ 8 galaxies (F098M-dropouts). By focusing on the deepest 293 arcmin2 of the data along 62 independent lines of sight, we identify six z ˜ 10 candidates satisfying the color selection criteria, detected at S/N > 8 in F160W with M AB = -22.8 to -21.1 if at z = 10. Three of the six sources, including the two brightest, are in a single WFC3 pointing (˜4 arcmin2), suggestive of significant clustering, which is expected from bright galaxies at z ˜ 10. However, the two brightest galaxies are too extended to be likely at z ˜ 10, and one additional source is unresolved and possibly a brown dwarf. The remaining three candidates have m AB ˜ 26, and given the area and completeness of our search, our best estimate is a number density of sources that is marginally higher but consistent at 2σ with searches in legacy fields. Our study highlights that z ˜ 10 searches can yield a small number of candidates, making tailored follow-ups of HST pure-parallel observations viable and effective.

  15. Super-Eight: The brightest z~8 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Benne; Bouwens, R.; Bradley, L.; Calvi, V.; Illingworth, G.; Labbe, I.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P.; Roberts-Borsani, G.; Smit, R.

    2016-08-01

    What are the properties of the most massive z~8 galaxies ('Super-Eights') and how luminous can these galaxies become at that epoch? Answering these questions is challenging due to the rarity of luminous z~8 galaxies and the large field-to-field variations in their volume densities. Indeed, the full wide-area CANDELS program only shows 3 z~8 galaxy candidates brighter than 25.5 mag and all of these candidates conspicuously lie in the same CANDELS field (EGS). One of our strongest new probes for particularly luminous z~8 galaxies are the WFC3 Pure-Parallel (PP) programs. Particularly intriguing are 8 bright z~8 candidates in these observations. These candidates have similar luminosities as the 3 brightest z~8 candidates from CANDELS (all spectroscopically confirmed). However, the uncertain contamination levels at extreme bright end of z~8 selection mean that follow-up observations are critical. We propose highly-efficient pointed HST and Spitzer/IRAC observations to determine if these candidates are indeed at z~8. We estimate that anywhere from 50 to 100% of the targeted sources will be confirmed to be at z~8 based on our results from CANDELS. The estimate is very uncertain due to very large cosmic variance in the CANDELS result and contamination from rare low-redshift sources. When combined with CANDELS, our observations would provide us the strongest current constraints on the volume density of bright, massive galaxies in the early Universe (serving as a guide to models of their build-up) and also provide valuable targets for future spectroscopy (e.g. with JWST), useful for probing the ionization state of the IGM.

  16. Distances to Galaxies from the Brightest Stars in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kudritzki, R -P

    2011-01-01

    Blue Supergiants (BSGs) are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light with absolute magnitudes up to Mv=-10 mag. They are ideal stellar objects for the determination of extragalactic distances, in particular, because the perennial uncertainties troubling most of the other stellar distance indicators, interstellar extinction and metallicity, do not affect them. The quantitative spectral analysis of low resolution spectra of individual BSGs provides accurate stellar parameters and chemical composition, which are then used to determine accurate reddening and extinction from photometry for each individual object. Accurate distances can be determined from stellar gravities and effective temperatures using the "Flux Weighted Gravity - Luminosity Relationship (FGLR)". Most recent results of the quantitative spectral analysis of BSGs in galaxies within and beyond the Local Group based on medium and low resolution spectra obtained with the ESO VLT and the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea are presented and distan...

  17. The Brightest Young Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calzetti, D.; Johnson, K.E.; Adamo, A.; Gallagher III, J.S.; Andrews, J.E.; Smith, L.J.; Clayton, G.C.; Lee, J.C.; Sabbi, E.; Ubeda, L.; Kim, H.; Ryon, J.E.; Thilker, D.; Bright, S.N.; Zackrisson, E.; Kennicutt, R.C.; de Mink, S.E.; Whitmore, B.C.; Aloisi, A.; Chandar, R.; Cignoni, M.; Cook, D.; Dale, D.A.; Elmegreen, B.G.; Elmegreen, D.M.; Evans, A.S.; Fumagalli, M.; Gouliermis, D.A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E.K.; Krumholz, M.R.; Waterbos, R.; Wofford, A.; Brown, T.M.; Christian, C.; Dobbs, C.; Herrero, A.; Kahre, L.; Messa, M.; Nair, P.; Nota, A.; Östlin, G.; Pellerin, A.; Sacchi, E.; Schaerer, D.; Tosi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a number of young, massive star clusters, the two youngest of which are centrally concentrated and surrounded by thermal radio emission (the "radio nebula"). To investigate the role of these clusters in the starburst energetics, we combine new and arc

  18. Clumpy and Extended Starbursts in the Brightest Unlensed Submillimeter Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, Daisuke; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lee, Minju; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Saito, Toshiki; Tamura, Yoichi; Ueda, Junko; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, Grant; Michiyama, Tomonari; Ando, Misaki

    2016-01-01

    The central structure in three of the brightest unlensed z=3-4 submillimeter galaxies are investigated through 0.015" - 0.05" (120 -- 360~pc) 860 micron continuum images obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The distribution in the central kpc in AzTEC1 and AzTEC8 are extremely complex, and they are composed of multiple ~200 pc clumps. AzTEC4 consists of two sources that are separated by ~1.5 kpc, indicating a mid-stage merger. The peak star formation rate densities in the central clumps are ~300 - 3000 Msun/yr/kpc^2, suggesting regions with extreme star formation near the Eddington Limit. By comparing the flux obtained by ALMA and Submillimeter Array (SMA), we find that 68-90% of the emission is extended (> 1 kpc) in AzTEC 4 and 8. For AzTEC1, we identify at least 11 additional compact (~200 pc) clumps in the extended 3 - 4 kpc region. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the luminosity surface densities observed at 1 kpc regions, some of which could also be clumpy...

  19. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  20. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara /LBL, Berkeley; Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Siegel, Seth R.; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Busha, Michael; /SLAC; Gerdes, David; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Fermilab; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  1. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  2. On the nature of the brightest globular cluster in M81

    CERN Document Server

    Mayya, Y D; Santiago-Cortes, M; Rodriguez-Merino, L H; Vega, O; Torres-Papaqui, J P; Bressan, A; Carrasco, L

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the photometric, chemical, star formation history and structural properties of the brightest globular cluster (GC) in M81, referred as GC1 in this work, with the intention of establishing its nature and origin. We find that it is a metal-rich ([Fe/H]=-0.60+/-0.10), alpha-enhanced ([Alpha/Fe]=0.20+/0.05), core-collapsed (core radius r_c=1.2 pc, tidal radius r_t = 76r_c), old (>13 Gyr) cluster. It has an ultraviolet excess equivalent of ~2500 blue horizontal branch stars. It is detected in X-rays indicative of the presence of low-mass binaries. With a mass of 10 million solar masses, the cluster is comparable in mass to M31-G1 and is four times more massive than Omega Cen. The values of r_c, absolute magnitude and mean surface brightness of GC1 suggest that it could be, like massive GCs in other giant galaxies, the left-over nucleus of a dissolved dwarf galaxy.

  3. Hot Outflows in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analyzed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using {\\it Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the "iron radius") and jet power is found with the form $R_{\\rm Fe} \\propto P_{\\rm jet}^{0.45}$. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed $100 ~\\rm M_\\odot ~yr^{-1}$ in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10% to 20% of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at ...

  4. Coma cluster of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  5. The XMM Cluster Survey: The Stellar Mass Assembly of Fossil Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Craig D; Richards, Joseph W; Lloyd-Davies, E J; Hoyle, Ben; Romer, A Kathy; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hilton, Matt; Stott, John P; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A; Deadman, Paul-James; Liddle, Andrew R; Sahlén, Martin; Stanford, S Adam; Viana, Pedro T P

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy are positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in fossil systems (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star-formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies. However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal brightest cluster galaxies, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain...

  6. Structures in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Escalera, E; Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mazure, A; Mezzetti, M

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the presence of substructures in 16 well-sampled clusters of galaxies suggests a stimulating hypothesis: Clusters could be classified as unimodal or bimodal, on the basis of to the sub-clump distribution in the {\\em 3-D} space of positions and velocities. The dynamic study of these clusters shows that their fundamental characteristics, in particular the virial masses, are not severely biased by the presence of subclustering if the system considered is bound.

  7. Measuring Gravitational Redshifts in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Wojtak {\\it et al} have stacked 7,800 clusters from the SDSS survey in redshift space. They find a small net blue-shift for the cluster galaxies relative to the brightest cluster galaxies, which agrees quite well with the gravitational redshift from GR. Zhao {\\it et al.} have pointed out that, in addition to the gravitational redshift, one would expect to see transverse Doppler (TD) redshifts, and that these two effects are generally of the same order. Here we show that there are other corrections that are also of the same order of magnitude. The fact that we observe galaxies on our past light cone results in a bias such that more of the galaxies observed are moving away from us in the frame of the cluster than are moving towards us. This causes the observed average redshift to be $\\langle \\delta z \\rangle = -\\langle \\Phi \\rangle + \\langle \\beta^2 \\rangle / 2 + \\langle \\beta_x^2 \\rangle$, with $\\beta_x$ is the line of sight velocity. That is if we average over galaxies with equal weight. If the galaxies in ea...

  8. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Craig D.; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Richards, Joseph W.; Deadman, Paul-James [Center for Time Domain Informatics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Kathy Romer, A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Liddle, Andrew R. [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Hoyle, Ben [Institute of Sciences of the Cosmos (ICCUB) and IEEC, Physics Department, University of Barcelona, Barcelona 08024 (Spain); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Stott, John P.; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Sahlen, Martin [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford, S. Adam [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-06-10

    This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.

  9. Correlation length of X-ray brightest Abell clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Abadi, M G; Muriel, H; Abadi, Mario G; Lambas, Diego G.; Muriel, Hernán

    1998-01-01

    We compute the cluster auto-correlation function $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ of an X-ray flux limited sample of Abell clusters (XBACs, \\cite{ebe}). For the total XBACs sample we find a power-law fit $\\xi_{cc}=(r/r_0)^{\\gamma}$ with $r_0=21.1$ Mpc h$^{-1}$and $\\gamma =-1.9$ consistent with the results of $R \\ge 1 $ Abell clusters. We also analyze $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ for subsamples defined by different X-ray luminosity thresholds where we find a weak tendency of larger values of $r_0$ with increasing X-ray luminosity although with a low statistical significance. In the different subsamples analyzed we find $21 < r_0 < 35 $ Mpc h$^{-1}$ and $-1.9< \\gamma < -1.6$. Our analysis suggests that cluster X-ray luminosities may be used for a reliable confrontation of cluster spatial distribution properties in models and observations.

  10. Constraints on the Alignment of Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters from $\\sim$14,000 Spectroscopic Members

    CERN Document Server

    Sifón, Cristóbal; Cacciato, Marcello; Viola, Massimo; Köhlinger, Fabian; van der Burg, Remco; Sand, David; Graham, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Torques acting on galaxies lead to physical alignments, but the resulting ellipticity correlations are difficult to predict. As they constitute a major contaminant for cosmic shear studies, it is important to constrain the intrinsic alignment signal observationally. We measure the alignments of satellite galaxies within 91 massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.05galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts with high-quality data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We use phase-space information to select 15,524 cluster members, 13,966 of which have shape measurements, and measure three different types of alignment: the radial alignment of satellite galaxies towards the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), the common orientations of satellite galaxies and BCGs, and the radial alignments of satellites with each other. Residual systematic effects are much smaller than the statistical uncertainties. We detect n...

  11. Searching the Sky for the Brightest Galaxies in the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven

    We propose to analyze a Spitzer/IRAC survey of nine independent sight-lines in the sky which have been identified to host plausible candidates for the brightest galaxies in the z > 9 universe. While the z > 9 universe is still a vast unknown, tremendous progress has been made with ultra-deep surveys such as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. However, these data only constrain the faint-end of the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function, while the bright-end is largely unconstrained. Attempts to search for bright z > 9 galaxies in the few well-studied deep fields have been met with discrepant results, dominated by cosmic variance uncertainties. We searched 80 fields from two Hubble Space Telescope pure parallel surveys for bright z > 9 galaxies, and found 16 candidates. However, the available imaging cannot discern between true z > 9 galaxies, and passive/dusty z~2.5 galaxies. The addition of IRAC imaging at 3.6um unambiguously breaks this degeneracy. Using a recently approved allocation of 77.2 hours of IRAC imaging over these nine fields, we will build the most robust sample of bright z > 9 galaxies. This dataset will place stringent constraints on the abundance of bright z~9 galaxies, robust against cosmic variance, which can be used to constrain the physics behind galaxy evolution in the distant universe. These observations will also roughly double the number of massive, UV bright galaxies at z=8, allowing us to increase the fidelity of the presently very rough z=8 stellar mass function. These observations highlight the remarkable utility of this 80cm telescope for studying galaxies at a time only 500 Myr removed from the Big Bang.

  12. A common colour-magnitude relation from giant elliptical galaxies to globular clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Richtler, T; Faifer, F; Forte, J C; Cellone, S A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the existence of a common colour-magnitude relation (CMR) of metal-poor globular clusters and early-type galaxies, i.e. giant ellipticals, normal ellipticals and lenticulars, dwarf ellipticals and lenticulars, and dwarf spheroidals. Such CMR would cover a range of ~ 14 mag, extending from the brightest galaxies, down to the globular clusters on the fainter side.

  13. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exits, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte-Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z<~0.1 with member galaxies selected from the SDSS DR10 spectroscopic database. We find that ~35% of our clusters are rotating when using a set of strict criteria, while loosening the criteria we find this fraction increasing to ~48%. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation that the significance and strength of their...

  14. Zooming in on star formation in the brightest galaxies of the early Universe discovered with the Planck and Herschel satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canameras, Raoul

    2016-09-01

    Strongly gravitationally lensed galaxies offer an outstanding opportunity to characterize the most intensely star-forming galaxies in the high-redshift universe. In the most extreme cases, one can probe the mechanisms that underlie the intense star formation on the scales of individual star-forming regions. This requires very fortuitous gravitational lensing configurations offering magnification factors >>10, which are particularly rare toward the high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies. The Planck's Dusty GEMS (Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimeter Sources) sample contains eleven of the brightest high-redshift galaxies discovered with the Planck submillimeter all-sky survey, with flux densities between 300 and 1000 mJy at 350 microns, factors of a few brighter than the majority of lensed sources previously discovered with other surveys. Six of them are above the 90% completeness limit of the Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS), suggesting that they are among the brightest high-redshift sources on the sky selected by their active star formation. This thesis comes within the framework of the extensive multi-wavelength follow-up programme designed to determine the overall properties of the high-redshift sources and to probe the lensing configurations. Firstly, to characterize the intervening lensing structures and calculate lensing models, I use optical and near/mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. I deduce that our eleven GEMS are aligned with intervening matter overdensities at intermediate redshift, either massive isolated galaxies or galaxy groups and clusters. The foreground sources exhibit evolved stellar populations of a few giga years, characteristic of early-type galaxies. Moreover, the first detailed models of the light deflection toward the GEMS suggest magnification factors systematically >10, and >20 for some lines-of-sight. Secondly, we observe the GEMS in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter domains in order to characterize the background

  15. Globular Clusters around Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, C D; Bolte, M; Ziegler, B L; Puzia, T

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained deep photometry of NGC 1199 (in the compact group HCG 22) and NGC 6868 (in the Telescopium loose group) with the Keck II and the VLT-I telescopes. Both galaxies are the optically brightest galaxy of their groups. NGC 1199 has two companion galaxies at a median projected distance of only 33 kpc and, based in its peculiar internal structure and large X-ray halo, NGC 6868 has been proposed to be a merger remnant. Our analysis of $B$ and $R$ images uncovered a population of globular clusters around both galaxies, with total (and local) specific frequency S_N = 3.6\\pm1.8 (3.4\\pm1.5) for NGC 1199 and S_N = 1.8\\pm1.1 (0.8\\pm0.4) for NGC 6868. The radial profile of the globulars of NGC 1199 follows the light distribution of the galaxy and can be fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' with a very steep slope (\\alpha = 2.5\\pm0.3). In the case of NGC 6868, the profile of the globulars is well fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' profile of slope 1.4\\pm0.3 and is shallower than the galaxy lig...

  16. The Dependence of Cluster Galaxy Properties on the Central Entropy of their Host Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Ko, Jongwan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Edge, Alastair C.; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the connection between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host galaxy clusters. Using galaxy clusters at 0.1Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), we confirm that BCGs in low central entropy clusters are well aligned with the X-ray center. Additionally, the magnitude difference between BCG and the second brightest galaxy also correlates with the central entropy of the intracluster medium. From the red-sequence (RS) galaxies, we cannot find significant dependence of RS color scatter and stellar population on the central entropy of the intracluster medium of their host cluster. However, BCGs in low-entropy clusters are systematically less massive than those in high-entropy clusters, although this is dependent on the method used to derive the stellar mass of BCGs. In contrast, the stellar velocity dispersion of BCGs shows no dependence on BCG activity and cluster central entropy. This implies that the potential of the BCG is established earlier and the activity leading to optical emission lines is dictated by the properties of the intracluster medium in the cluster core.

  17. The Assembly of Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-05-16

    We study the formation of fifty-three galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10{sup 14.0-14.76} M{sub {circle_dot}}) formed within a pair of cosmological {Lambda}CDM N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host {approx} 0.1L{sub *} galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'pre-processing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, {approx} 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; and less than {approx} 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past ({approx}< 6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local, cluster processes like ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass; and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with {approx} 20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and {approx} 20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate time-scale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be {approx} 6 Gyr.

  18. Fossil groups in the Millennium simulation. From the brightest to the faintest galaxies during the past 8 Gyr

    CERN Document Server

    Kanagusuku, Maria Jose; Zandivarez, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of bright and faint galaxies in fossil and non-fossil groups. We used mock galaxies constructed based on the Millennium run simulation II. We identified fossil groups at redshift zero according to two different selection criteria, and then built reliable control samples of non-fossil groups that reproduce the fossil virial mass and assembly time distributions. The faint galaxies were defined as having r-band absolute magnitudes in the range [-16,-11]. We analysed the properties of the bright and faint galaxies in fossil and non-fossil groups during the past 8 Gyr. We observed that the brightest galaxy in fossil groups is typically brighter and more massive than their counterparts in control groups. Fossil groups developed their large magnitude gap between the brightest galaxies around 3.5 Gyr ago. The brightest galaxy stellar masses of all groups show a notorious increment at that time. By analysing the behaviour of the magnitude gap between the first and the second, third, and fo...

  19. A Photometrically Selected Galaxy Cluster Catalog from the SDSS DR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, B. P.; McKay, T. A.; Evrard, A. E.; Becker, M.; Bleem, L.; Annis, J.; Wechsler, R. H.; Sheldon, E. S.; Johnston, D.; Scranton, R.; Miller, C. J.; Nichol, R. C.

    2005-12-01

    We present an overview of a new BCG/red-sequence galaxy cluster catalog drawn from the Data Release 4 sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. Galaxy clusters are selected by calculating the likelihood that each observed galaxy is a brightest cluster galaxy based on its color and magnitude, along with the degree to which galaxies cluster around it in color, magnitude, and space. This method provides a list of cluster locations together with estimates of their total galaxy content and accurate photometric redshifts (σ z X-ray clusters, optically-selected clusters, and massive halos in mock galaxy catalogs with a low false-positive rate. Further details of the cluster finding algorithm and its performance, together with a description of the properties of the derived catalog will be presented.

  20. The rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, Hrant M

    2015-01-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher of the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with $a/b>1.8$ and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy in which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60\\%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ~ 35%. The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not have merging with other clusters and groups of galaxies, in the result of which the rotation has been prevented.

  1. Outskirts of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reiprich, Thomas H; Ettori, Stefano; Israel, Holger; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Molendi, Silvano; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Roncarelli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, only about 10% of the total intracluster gas volume had been studied with high accuracy, leaving a vast region essentially unexplored. This is now changing and a wide area of hot gas physics and chemistry awaits discovery in galaxy cluster outskirts. Also, robust large-scale total mass profiles and maps are within reach. First observational and theoretical results in this emerging field have been achieved in recent years with sometimes surprising findings. Here, we summarize and illustrate the relevant underlying physical and chemical processes and review the recent progress in X-ray, Sunyaev--Zel'dovich, and weak gravitational lensing observations of cluster outskirts, including also brief discussions of technical challenges and possible future improvements.

  2. Massive star clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, William E

    2009-01-01

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCSs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GCS research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  3. On the distribution of dark matter in clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, David J.

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this thesis is to provide constraints on the dark matter density profile in galaxy clusters by developing and combining different techniques. The work is motivated by the fact that a precise measurement of the logarithmic slope of the dark matter on small scales provides a powerful test of the Cold Dark Matter paradigm for structure formation, where numerical simulations suggest a density profile r DM 0( r -1 or steeper in the innermost regions. We have obtained deep spectroscopy of gravitational arcs and the dominant brightest cluster galaxy in six carefully chosen galaxy clusters. Three of the clusters have both radial and tangential gravitational arcs while the other three display only tangential arcs. We analyze the stellar velocity dispersion for the brightest cluster galaxies in conjunction with axially symmetric lens models to jointly constrain the dark and baryonic mass profiles jointly. For the radial are systems we find the inner dark matter density profile is consistent with r DM 0( r -b , with [left angle bracket]b[right angle bracket] = [Special characters omitted.] (68% CL). Likewise, an upper limit on b for the tangential arc sample is found to be b work, we present a more elaborate two dimensional lens model of the cluster MS2137 using a new ly upgraded gravitational lensing code. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Riding the wake of a merging galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Hatch, N A; Fabian, A C; Zabludoff, A I; Crawford, C S; King, L J; McNamara, B R; Okamoto, S; Raimundo, S I

    2011-01-01

    Using WHT OASIS integral field unit observations, we report the discovery of a thin plume of ionised gas extending from the brightest cluster galaxy in Abell 2146 to the sub-cluster X-ray cool core which is offset from the BCG by ~37 kpc. The plume is greater than 15 kpc long and less than 3 kpc wide. This plume is unique in that the cluster it is situated in is currently undergoing a major galaxy cluster merger. The brightest cluster galaxy is unusually located behind the X-ray shock front and in the wake of the ram pressure stripped X-ray cool core and evidence for recent disruption to the BCG is observed. We examine the gas and stellar morphology, the gas kinematics of the BCG and their relation to the X-ray gas. We propose that a causal link between the ionised gas plume and the offset X-ray cool core provides the simplest explanation for the formation of the plume. An interaction or merger between the BCG and another cluster galaxy is probably the cause of the offset.

  5. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of the inner regions of the first and the second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of magnitude gap, using a Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based sample of 550 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity, and for Δ M_{12} up to 2.5 mag, and contains 59 large-gap groups (LGGs, with Δ M_{12} > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two different single stellar population models (which lead to important disagreements in SFHs), and also compute [α/Fe] from spectral indices. After removing the dependence with galaxy velocity dispersion or with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, [α/Fe], and SFHs. The lack of trends of BGG SFHs with magnitude gap suggests that BGGs in LGGs have undergone more mergers than those in small-gap groups, but these mergers are either dry or occurred at very high redshift, which in either case would leave no detectable imprint in their spectra. We show that SBGGs in LGGs lie significantly closer to the BGGs (in projection) than galaxies with similar stellar masses in normal groups, which appears to be a sign of the earlier entry of the former into their groups. Nevertheless, the stellar population properties of the SBGGs in LGGs are compatible with those of the general population of galaxies with similar stellar masses residing in normal groups.

  6. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  7. Simulations of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3376

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, Rubens E G

    2013-01-01

    Observed galaxy clusters often exhibit X-ray morphologies suggestive of recent interaction with an infalling subcluster. Abell 3376 is a nearby (z=0.046) massive galaxy cluster whose bullet-shaped X-ray emission indicates that it may have undergone a recent collision. It displays a pair of Mpc-scale radio relics and its brightest cluster galaxy is located 970 h_70^-1 kpc away from the peak of X-ray emission, where the second brightest galaxy lies. We attempt to recover the dynamical history of Abell 3376. We perform a set of N-body adiabatic hydrodynamical simulations using the SPH code Gadget-2. These simulations of binary cluster collisions are aimed at exploring the parameter space of possible initial configurations. By attempting to match X-ray morphology, temperature, virial mass and X-ray luminosity, we set approximate constraints on some merger parameters. Our best models suggest a collision of clusters with mass ratio in the range 1/6-1/8, and having a subcluster with central gas density four times hi...

  8. The luminosity function of cluster galaxies relations among M$_{1}$, M* and the morphological type

    CERN Document Server

    Trevese, D; Appodia, B

    1996-01-01

    A study of the luminosity function of 36 Abell clusters of galaxies has been carried out using photographic plates obtained with the Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt telescope. The relation between the magnitude M_1 of the brightest cluster member and the Schechter function parameter M* has been analyzed. A positive correlation between M* and M_1 is found. However clusters appear segregated in the M_1-M* plane according to their Rood & Sastry class in such a way that on average M_1 becomes brighter while M* becomes fainter going from late to early Rood & Sastry and also Bautz & Morgan classes. Also a partial correlation analysis involving the magnitude M_10 of the 10th brightest galaxy, shows a negative intrinsic correlation between M_1 and M*. These results agree with the cannibalism model for the formation of brightest cluster members, and provide new constraints for theories of cluster formation and evolution.

  9. Optical radii of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Girardi, M; Biviano, A; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the density profiles and virial radii for a sample of 90 nearby clusters, using galaxies with available redshifts and positions. Each cluster has at least 20 redshifts measured within an Abell radius, and all the results come from galaxy sets of at least 20 members. Most of the density profiles of our clusters are well fitted by hydrostatic-isothermal-like profiles. The slopes we find for many cluster density profiles are consistent with the hypothesis that the galaxies are in equilibrium with the binding cluster potential. The virial radii correlate with the core radii at a very high significance level. The observed relationship between the two size estimates is in agreement with the theoretical one computed by using the median values of the density profile parameters fitted on our clusters. After correcting for incompleteness in our cluster sample, we provide the universal distributions functions of core and virial radii (obtained within half an Abell radius).

  10. Dynamics of 10 clusters of galaxies with substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhchaura, Kiran; Singh, K. P., E-mail: kiran_astro@tifr.res.in [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We present a detailed Chandra study of a sample of 10 clusters of galaxies selected based on the presence of substructures in their optical images. The X-ray surface brightness maps of most of these clusters show anisotropic morphologies, especially in the central regions. A total of 22 well resolved significantly bright X-ray peaks (corresponding with high-density regions) are seen in the central parts (within r{sub c} /2) of the clusters. Multiple peaks are seen in central parts of six clusters. We found 11 peaks to have optical counterparts (10 coinciding with the brightest cluster galaxies of the 10 clusters and 1 coinciding with the second brightest galaxy in A539). For most of the clusters, the optical substructures detected in the previous studies are found to be outside the field of view of Chandra. In the spectroscopically produced two-dimensional temperature maps, significantly lower temperatures are seen at the locations of three peaks (two in A539 and one in A376). The centers of five clusters in our sample also host regions of higher temperature compared to the ambient medium, indicating the presence of galaxy scale mergers. The X-ray luminosity, gas mass, and central cooling time estimates for all the clusters are presented. The radial X-ray surface-brightness profiles of all but one of the clusters are found to be best-fitted with a double-β model, pointing toward the presence of double-phased central gas due to cool cores. The cooling time estimates of all the clusters, however, indicate that none of them hosts a strong cool core, although the possibility of weak cool cores cannot be ruled out.

  11. The maxBCG technique for finding galaxy clusters in SDSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J.; Kent, S.; Castander, F.; Eisenstein, D.; Gunn, J.; Kim, R.; Lupton, R.; Nichol, R.; Postman, M.; Voges, W.; SDSS Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    We present a new technique for finding galaxy clusters based on looking for a core of red, early type galaxies in the cluster center. These galaxies are known to have a small dispersion in color out to at least z=0.5. Further, the brightest of the ellipticals have near constant luminosity. In the maxBCG technique, one looks for objects whose appararent magnitudes and colors are consistent with their being brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). If one presumes that any such object is a BCG, one can estimate a redshift and then search an area a half megaparsec around the galaxy for other galaxies that have the colors of the E/S0 ridgeline. One obtains a good estimate of the redshift by jointly minimizing the difference from the mean restframe brightest cluster galaxy properties while maximizing the number of galaxies in the E/S0 ridgeline. We have run this algoritm on the Abell clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey commisioning data area with known redshifts, and find that the error in the estimated redshift z is only 0.02. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000.

  12. Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    gas, and that this gas must be less concentrated than the dark matter in such halos in order to remain consistent with X-ray observations. At the high-mass end, the measured SZ signal is 20% lower than found from observations of X-ray clusters, a difference consistent with Malmquist bias effects......We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo...... indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass...

  13. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, M; Khosroshahi, H G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of first and second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of the magnitude gap, {\\Delta}M_12, using an SDSS-based sample of 569 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity and for {\\Delta}M_12 up to 2.5 mag, and contains 75 optical fossil groups (FGs, with {\\Delta}M_12 > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two single stellar population (SSP) models, one of which (MILES) leads to significantly more extended SFHs than the other (BC03). After removing the dependence with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, and SFHs derived with the BC03 model. However, with the MILES model, the BGGs in FGs appear to have more extended SFHs than those in regular groups. But this signature with MILES is not seen in the colours, specific star formation rates nor in the 4000 A breaks, ...

  14. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  15. Velocity segregation effects in galaxy clusters at 0.4<~z<~1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Barsanti, S; Biviano, A; Borgani, S; Annunziatella, M; Nonino, M

    2016-01-01

    Our study is meant to extend our knowledge of the galaxy color and luminosity segregation in velocity space (VCS and VLS, resp.), to clusters at intermediate and high redshift. Our sample is a collection of 41 clusters in the 0.4=0.8. For the first time, we detect VLS in non-local clusters and confirm that VLS only affects the very luminous galaxies, with brighter galaxies having lower velocities. The threshold magnitude of VLS is ~m3+0.5, where m3 is the magnitude of the third brightest cluster galaxy, and current data suggest that the threshold value moves to fainter magnitudes at higher redshift. We also detect (marginal) evidence of VLS for blue galaxies. We conclude that the segregation effects, when their study is extended to distant clusters, can be important tracers of the galaxy evolution and cluster assembly and discuss the poor/no evidence of VCS at high redshift.

  16. The Galaxy Content of SDSS Clusters And Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Sarah M.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin S.; /CCPP, New York; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2007-11-09

    Imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to characterize the population of galaxies in groups and clusters detected with the MaxBCG algorithm. We investigate the dependence of Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) luminosity, and the distributions of satellite galaxy luminosity and satellite color, on cluster properties over the redshift range 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. The size of the dataset allows us to make measurements in many bins of cluster richness, radius and redshift. We find that, within r200 of clusters with mass above 3x10{sup 13}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}, the luminosity function of both red and blue satellites is only weakly dependent on richness. We further find that the shape of the satellite luminosity function does not depend on cluster-centric distance for magnitudes brighter than {sup 0.25}M{sub i} - 5log{sub 10}h = -19. However, the mix of faint red and blue galaxies changes dramatically. The satellite red fraction is dependent on cluster-centric distance, galaxy luminosity and cluster mass, and also increases by {approx}5% between redshifts 0.28 and 0.2, independent of richness. We find that BCG luminosity is tightly correlated with cluster richness, scaling as L{sub BCG} {approx} M{sup 0.3}{sub 200}, and has a Gaussian distribution at fixed richness, with {sigma}{sub log}L {approx} 0.17 for massive clusters. The ratios of BCG luminosity to total cluster luminosity and characteristic satellite luminosity scale strongly with cluster richness: in richer systems, BCGs contribute a smaller fraction of the total light, but are brighter compared to typical satellites. This study demonstrates the power of cross-correlation techniques for measuring galaxy populations in purely photometric data.

  17. Towards a realistic population of simulated galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Amandine M C Le; Schaye, Joop; Ponman, Trevor J

    2013-01-01

    We present a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations called cosmo-OWLS. They form an extension to the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project, and have been designed to help improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics and non-linear structure formation, which are now the limiting systematic errors when using clusters as cosmological probes. Starting from identical initial conditions in either the Planck or WMAP7 cosmologies, we systematically vary the most important 'sub-grid' physics, including feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We compare the properties of the simulated galaxy groups and clusters to a wide range of observational data, such as X-ray luminosity and temperature, gas mass fractions, entropy and density profiles, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, I-band mass-to-light ratio, dominance of the brightest cluster galaxy, and central massive black hole (BH) masses, by producing synthetic observations and mimicking observational analysis techniques...

  18. Gravitational redshift of galaxies in clusters from SDSS and BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeh, Iftach; Lahav, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    The gravitational redshift effect allows one to directly probe the gravitational potential in clusters of galaxies. As such, it provides a fundamental test of general relativity (GR), and may help to constrain alternative theories of gravity. Following up on Wojtak, Hansen & Hjorth (2011), we present a new measurement. We take advantage of new data from the tenth data release of SDSS and BOSS, covering a range of redshift between 0.05 and 0.6. After selection, our dataset includes 60k galaxies, matched to 12k clusters, with an average cluster mass of $10^{14} M_{\\odot}$. The analysis is focused on optimizing the selection method of clusters and of galaxies, taking into account possible systematic biases. We compare the light originating from the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), to that of galaxies at the outskirts of clusters. We find that BCGs have an average relative redshift of 11 km/s, with a standard deviation of +7 and -5 km/s. The result is consistent with the measurement of Wojtak et al. and is ...

  19. Distributions of Gas and Galaxies from Galaxy Clusters to Larger Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patej, Anna

    2017-01-01

    We address the distributions of gas and galaxies on three scales: the outskirts of galaxy clusters, the clustering of galaxies on large scales, and the extremes of the galaxy distribution. In the outskirts of galaxy clusters, long-standing analytical models of structure formation and recent simulations predict the existence of density jumps in the gas and dark matter profiles. We use these features to derive models for the gas density profile, obtaining a simple fiducial model that is in agreement with both observations of cluster interiors and simulations of the outskirts. We next consider the galaxy density profiles of clusters; under the assumption that the galaxies in cluster outskirts follow similar collisionless dynamics as the dark matter, their distribution should show a steep jump as well. We examine the profiles of a low-redshift sample of clusters and groups, finding evidence for the jump in some of these clusters. Moving to larger scales where massive galaxies of different types are expected to trace the same large-scale structure, we present a test of this prediction by measuring the clustering of red and blue galaxies at z 0.6, finding low stochasticity between the two populations. These results address a key source of systematic uncertainty - understanding how target populations of galaxies trace large-scale structure - in galaxy redshift surveys. Such surveys use baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) as a cosmological probe, but are limited by the expense of obtaining sufficiently dense spectroscopy. With the intention of leveraging upcoming deep imaging data, we develop a new method of detecting the BAO in sparse spectroscopic samples via cross-correlation with a dense photometric catalog. This method will permit the extension of BAO measurements to higher redshifts than possible with the existing spectroscopy alone. Lastly, we connect galaxies near and far: the Local Group dwarfs and the high redshift galaxies observed by Hubble and Spitzer. We

  20. Galaxy Distribution in Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, T.; Yachi, S.; Habe, A.

    beta-discrepancy have been pointed out from comparison of optical and X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies. To examine physical reason of beta-discrepancy, we use N-body simulation which contains two components, dark particles and galaxies which are identified by using adaptive-linking friend of friend technique at a certain red-shift. The gas component is not included here, since the gas distribution follows the dark matter distribution in dark halos (Jubio F. Navarro, Carlos S. Frenk and Simon D. M. White 1995). We find that the galaxy distribution follows the dark matter distribution, therefore beta-discrepancy does not exist, and this result is consistent with the interpretation of the beta-discrepancy by Bahcall and Lubin (1994), which was based on recent observation.

  1. Baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.

    2016-06-01

    We are carrying out a panchromatic observing program to study the baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters. In this talk, I will present results primarily from XMM-Newton observations of optically-selected clusters in the redshift range of 0.1-0.4. These clusters are selected because of their fortuitous alignment with background far-UV-bright QSOs, which thus allows for Ly-alpha and O VI absorption line spectroscopy with HST/COS, probing physical processes of the evolving intracluster medium, freshly accreted from the intergalactic medium and/or stripped out of individual galaxies, as well as the gaseous halos of individual cluster galaxies. Interestingly, such clusters tend to be dynamically young and often consist of merging subcluster pairs at similar redshifts. These subclusters themselves typically show substantial substructures, including strongly distorted radio lobes, as well as large position offsets between the diffuse X-ray centroids and the brightest galaxies. A comparison of the hot gas and stellar masses of each cluster with the expected cosmological baryonic mass fraction indicates a significant room for other gas components. I will also briefly examine the limitations of both optically and X-ray selected clusters, as well as how they may be used in a complementary fashion.

  2. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Youngsoo [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krause, Elisabeth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Jain, Bhuvnesh [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Amara, Adam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Becker, Matt [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bridle, Sarah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Clampitt, Joseph [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Crocce, Martin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gaztanaga, Enrique [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sanchez, Carles [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wechsler, Risa [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  3. Gas Dynamics in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Michael Kingsley, Jr.

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive structures in the universe and, in the hierarchical pattern of cosmological structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. Galaxy clusters are thus interesting objects for a number of reasons. Three examples relevant to this thesis are: 1. Constraining the properties of dark energy: Due to the hierarchical nature of structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. The cluster mass function is thus sensitive to the entire expansion history of the universe and can be used to constrain the properties of dark energy. This constraint complements others derived from the CMB or from Type Ia supernovae and provides an important, independent confirmation of such methods. In particular, clusters provide detailed information about the equation of state parameter w because they sample a large redshift range z ˜ 0 - 1. 2. Probing galaxy formation: Clusters contain the most massive galaxies in the uni- verse, and the most massive black holes; because clusters form so late, we can still witness the assembly of these objects in the nearby universe. Clusters thus provide a more detailed view of galaxy formation than is possible in studies of lower-mass ob- jects. An important example comes from x-ray studies of clusters, which unexpectedly found that star formation in massive galaxies in clusters is closely correlated with the properties of the hot, virialized gas in their halos. This correlation persists despite the enormous separation in temperature, in dynamical time-scales, and in length-scales between the virialized gas in the halo and the star-forming regions in the galaxy. This remains a challenge to interpret theoretically. 3. Developing our knowledge of dilute plasmas: The masses and sizes of galaxy clusters imply that the plasma which permeates them is both very hot (˜ 108 K) and very dilute (˜ 10 -2 cm-3). This plasma is collisional enough to be considered a fluid, but collisionless enough to

  4. Galaxy Evolution in Rich Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, U.; Hill, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    We present the first results of a study of the morphological and spectral evolution of galaxies within the dense cores of distant clusters at redshifts between z=0.4 and 1. The morphology, colors, concentration index, and asymmetry parameters of these cluster members are compared by using a combination of deep HST NICMOS and WFPC2 imaging, covering the rest-frame U and J bands. We also discuss the influence of dust obscuration on the derived measurements. Of particular interest is the morphology of galaxies at near-infrared wavelengths in rich clusters which show an excess of blue galaxies (Butcher-Oelmer effect), namely Abell 851 (z=0.4) and CL 1603+43 (z=0.92). We focus our study on optical/near-infrared measurements of galaxy asymmetry and central concentration, derived from a large number (>400) of objects detected within the core of Abell 851. The sensitivity and reliability of these parameters for galaxy classification and physical diagnostic purposes are tested. In conjunction with the use of recent source extraction software we are able to establish a fast, robust, and highly automated procedure of mapping the structural parameters of large galaxy samples. This work is supported by NASA, under contract NAS5-26555.

  5. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  6. Alignment of Red-Sequence Cluster Dwarf Galaxies: From the Frontier Fields to the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhouse, Wayne Alan; Archer, Haylee; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the universe. Due to their high density and mass, they are an excellent laboratory for studying the environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Numerical simulations have predicted that tidal torques acting on dwarf galaxies as they fall into the cluster environment will cause the major axis of the galaxies to align with their radial position vector (a line that extends from the cluster center to the galaxy's center). We have undertaken a study to measure the redshift evolution of the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope, and 64 clusters from the WINGS dataset. To supplement our low-redshift sample, we have included galaxies selected from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier fields. Leveraging the HST data allows us to look for evolutionary changes in the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies over a redshift range of 0 < z < 0.35. The alignment of the major axis of the dwarf galaxies is measured by fitting a Sersic function to each red-sequence galaxy using GALFIT. The quality of each model is checked visually after subtracting the model from the galaxy. The cluster sample is then combined by scaling each cluster by r200. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the red-sequence dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by the position of cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to individual dwarf galaxies. Our combined cluster sample is sub-divided into different radial regions and redshift bins.

  7. Cosmology with Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgani, Stefano

    I reviewed in my talk recent results on the cosmological constraints that can be obtained by following the evolution of the population of galaxy clusters. Using extended samples of X-ray selected clusters, I have shown how they can be used to trace this evolution out to redshift z ~ 1. This evolution can be compared to model predictions and, therefore, to constrain cosmological parameters, such as the density parameter Omega_m and the shape and amplitude of the power spectrum of density perturbations. I have emphasized that the robustness of such constraints is quite sensitive to the relation between cluster collapsed mass and X-ray luminosity and temperature. This demonstrates that our ability to place significant constraints on cosmology using clusters of galaxies relies on our capability to understand the physical processes, which determine the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). In this context, I have discussed how numerical simulations of cluster formation in cosmological context can play an important role in uderstanding the ICM physics. I have presented results from a very large cosmological simulation, which also includes the hydrodynamical description of the cosmic baryons, the processes of star formation and feedback from the stellar populations. The results from this simulation represent a unique baseline to describe the processes of formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies.

  8. A runaway collision in a young star cluster as the origin of the brightest supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F; van den Heuvel, Edward P J

    2007-11-15

    Supernova SN 2006gy in the galaxy NGC 1260 is the most luminous recorded. Its progenitor might have been a very massive (>100 Mo, where is the mass of the Sun) star, but that interpretation is incompatible with hydrogen in the spectrum of the supernova; stars >40 Moare believed to have shed their hydrogen envelopes several hundred thousand years before the explosion. Alternatively, the progenitor might have arisen from the merger of two massive stars. Here we show that the collision frequency of massive stars in a dense and young cluster (of the kind to be expected near the centre of a galaxy) is sufficient to provide a reasonable chance that SN 2006gy resulted from such a bombardment. If this is the correct explanation, then we predict that when the supernova fades (in a year or so) a dense cluster of massive stars will become visible at the site of the explosion.

  9. Density profiles of galaxy groups and clusters from SDSS galaxy-galaxy weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, R; Cool, R J; Blanton, M; Hirata, C M; Brinkmann, J; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Cool, Richard J.; Blanton, Michael; Hirata, Christopher M.; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a measurement of the shape of the density profile of galaxy groups and clusters traced by 43 335 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) with spectroscopic redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The galaxies are selected such that they are the brightest within a cylindrical aperture, split into two luminosity samples, and modeled as the sum of stellar and dark matter components. We present a detailed investigation of many possible systematic effects that could contaminate our signal and develop methods to remove them, including a detected intrinsic alignment for galaxies within 100 kpc/h of LRGs which we remove using photometric redshift information. The resulting lensing signal is consistent with NFW profile dark matter halos; the SIS profile is ruled out at the 96 (conservatively) and 99.96 per cent confidence level (CL) for the fainter and brighter lens samples (respectively) when we fit using lensing data between 40 kpc/h and 2 Mpc/h with total signal-to-noise of 19 and 25 for the ...

  10. Galaxy Clusters with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss Chandra results related to 1) cluster mergers and cold fronts and 2) interactions between relativistic plasma and hot cluster atmospheres. We describe the properties of cold fronts using NGC1404 in the Fornax cluster and A3667 as examples. We discuss multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the cooling flow cluster ZW3146. We review the supersonic merger underway in CL0657. Finally, we summarize the interaction between plasma bubbles produced by AGN and hot gas using M87 and NGC507 as examples.

  11. Jellyfish: Evidence of extreme ram-pressure stripping in massive galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ebeling, Harald; Edge, Alastair C

    2013-01-01

    Ram-pressure stripping by the gaseous intra-cluster medium has been proposed as the dominant physical mechanism driving the rapid evolution of galaxies in dense environments. Detailed studies of this process have, however, largely been limited to relatively modest examples affecting only the outermost gas layers of galaxies in nearby and/or low-mass galaxy clusters. We here present results from our search for extreme cases of gas-galaxy interactions in much more massive, X-ray selected clusters at $z>0.3$. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) snapshots in the F606W and F814W passbands, we have discovered dramatic evidence of ram-pressure stripping in which copious amounts of gas are first shock compressed and then removed from galaxies falling into the cluster. Vigorous starbursts triggered by this process across the galaxy-gas interface and in the debris trail cause these galaxies to temporarily become some of the brightest cluster members in the F606W passband, capable of outshining even the Brightest Cluster...

  12. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clustersis to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses.New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopeswill come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities,we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  13. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. To this end, we use a Halo Model framework complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD), and we work in full-sky. We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions, as the Gaussian part of the covariance can in fact become subdominant in certain configurations. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias, and demonstrating interesting mathematical properties. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeable better constraints, in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales....

  14. Strong Lensing Analysis of the Galaxy Cluster MACS J1319.9+7003 and the Discovery of a Shell Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Zitrin, Adi

    2016-01-01

    We present the first strong-lensing analysis of the massive galaxy cluster MACS J1319.9+7003 (z=0.33, also known as Abell 1722), as part of our ongoing effort to analyze massive clusters with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We identified and spectroscopically measured with Keck/MOSFIRE two galaxies multiply-imaged by the cluster. Our lensing analysis reveals a modest lens, with an effective Einstein radius of $\\theta_{e}(z=2)=12\\pm1"$, enclosing $2.1\\pm0.3\\times10^{13}$ $M_{\\odot}$. We briefly discuss the strong-lensing properties of the cluster, using two different modeling techniques, and make the mass models publicly-available. Independently, we identified a noteworthy, young Shell Galaxy system forming around two likely interacting cluster members, 20" north of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), with the smaller companion only 0.66" ($\\sim$3 kpc in projection) from the host galaxy's core. Shell galaxies are rare in galaxy clusters, and indeed, a simple estimate yields that they are only expected...

  15. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  16. Strong Lensing Analysis of the Galaxy Cluster MACS J1319.9+7003 and the Discovery of a Shell Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitrin, Adi

    2017-01-01

    We present a strong-lensing (SL) analysis of the galaxy cluster MACS J1319.9+7003 (z = 0.33, also known as Abell 1722), as part of our ongoing effort to analyze massive clusters with archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. We spectroscopically measured with Keck/Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration (MOSFIRE) two galaxies multiply imaged by the cluster. Our analysis reveals a modest lens, with an effective Einstein radius of {θ }e(z=2)=12+/- 1\\prime\\prime , enclosing 2.1+/- 0.3× {10}13 M⊙. We briefly discuss the SL properties of the cluster, using two different modeling techniques (see the text for details), and make the mass models publicly available (ftp://wise-ftp.tau.ac.il/pub/adiz/MACS1319/). Independently, we identified a noteworthy, young shell galaxy (SG) system forming around two likely interacting cluster members, 20″ north of the brightest cluster galaxy. SGs are rare in galaxy clusters, and indeed, a simple estimate reveals that they are only expected in roughly one in several dozen, to several hundred, massive galaxy clusters (the estimate can easily change by an order of magnitude within a reasonable range of characteristic values relevant for the calculation). Taking advantage of our lens model best-fit, mass-to-light scaling relation for cluster members, we infer that the total mass of the SG system is ∼ 1.3× {10}11 {M}ȯ , with a host-to-companion mass ratio of about 10:1. Despite being rare in high density environments, the SG constitutes an example to how stars of cluster galaxies are efficiently redistributed to the intra-cluster medium. Dedicated numerical simulations for the observed shell configuration, perhaps aided by the mass model, might cast interesting light on the interaction history and properties of the two galaxies. An archival HST search in galaxy cluster images can reveal more such systems.

  17. The Accelerated Build-up of the Red Sequence in High Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cerulo, P; Lidman, C; Demarco, R; Huertas-Company, M; Mei, S; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Barrientos, L F; Muñoz, R P

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts $0.8 11.5$) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than $z=0.8$. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range $0.8clusters is more developed at the faint end, suggesting that halo mass plays an important role in setting the time-scales for the build-up of the red sequence.

  18. Hierarchical Clustering and Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziminaoglou, E; Manrique, A

    2000-01-01

    The growth of Super Massive Black Holes and the parallel development of activity in galactic nuclei are implemented in an analytic code of hierarchical clustering. The evolution of the luminosity function of quasars and AGN will be computed with special attention paid to the connection between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. One of the major interests of the model is the parallel study of quasar formation and evolution and the History of Star Formation.

  19. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Far down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Centaurus, a diffuse spot of light can be perceived with the unaided eye. It may be unimpressive, but when seen through a telescope, it turns out to be a beautiful, dense cluster of innumerable stars [1]. Omega Centauri, as this object is called, is the brightest of its type in the sky. We refer to it as a "globular cluster", due to its symmetric form. It belongs to our Milky Way galaxy and astrophysical investigations have shown that it is located at a distance of about 16,500 light-years (1 light-year = 9,460,000,000,000 km). Nobody knows for sure how many individual stars it contains, but recent estimates run into the millions. Most of these stars are more than 10,000 million years old and it is generally agreed that Omega Centauri has a similar age. Measurements of its motion indicate that Omega Centauri plows through the Milky Way in an elongated orbit. It is not easy to understand how it has managed to keep its stars together during such an extended period. MEASURING STELLAR VELOCITIES IN OMEGA CENTAURI A group of astronomers [2] have recently carried through a major investigation of Omega Centauri. After many nights of observations at the ESO La Silla observatory, they now conclude that not only is this globular cluster the brightest, it is indeed by far the most massive known in the Milky Way. The very time-consuming observations were made during numerous observing sessions over a period of no less than 13 years (1981-1993), with the photoelectric spectrometer CORAVEL mounted on the 1.5-m Danish telescope at La Silla. The CORAVEL instrument (COrelation RAdial VELocities) was built in a joint effort between the Geneva (Switzerland) and Marseilles (France) observatories. It functions according to the cross-correlation technique, by means of which the spectrum of the observed star is compared with a "standard stellar spectrum" [3]. HOW HEAVY IS OMEGA CENTAURI? In the present study, a total of 1701

  20. Properties of the galaxy population in hydrodynamical simulations of clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saro, A.; Borgani, S.; Tornatore, L.; Dolag, K.; Murante, G.; Biviano, A.; Calura, F.; Charlot, S.

    2006-11-01

    We present a study of the galaxy population predicted by hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters. These simulations, which are based on the GADGET-2 TREE + SPH code, include gas cooling, star formation, a detailed treatment of stellar evolution and chemical enrichment, as well as supernova energy feedback in the form of galactic winds. As such, they can be used to extract the spectrophotometric properties of the simulated galaxies, which are identified as clumps in the distribution of star particles. Simulations have been carried out for a representative set of 19 cluster-sized haloes, having mass M200 in the range 5 × 1013-1.8 × 1015h-1Msolar. All simulations have been performed for two choices of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), namely using a standard Salpeter IMF with power-law index x = 1.35, and a top-heavy IMF with x = 0.95. In general, we find that several of the observational properties of the galaxy population in nearby clusters are reproduced fairly well by simulations. A Salpeter IMF is successful in accounting for the slope and the normalization of the colour-magnitude relation for the bulk of the galaxy population. In contrast, the top-heavy IMF produces too red galaxies, as a consequence of their exceedingly large metallicity. Simulated clusters have a relation between mass and optical luminosity, which generally agrees with observations, both in normalization and in slope. Also in keeping with observational results, galaxies are generally bluer, younger and more star forming in the cluster outskirts. However, we find that our simulated clusters have a total number of galaxies which is significantly smaller than the observed one, falling short by about a factor of 2-3. We have verified that this problem does not have an obvious numerical origin, such as lack of mass and force resolution. Finally, the brightest cluster galaxies are always predicted to be too massive and too blue, when compared to observations. This is due to gas

  1. Supersonic Motions of Galaxies in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Nagai, D; Gottlöber, S; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We study motions of galaxies in galaxy clusters formed in the concordance LCDM cosmology. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations that follow dynamics of dark matter and gas and include various physical processes critical for galaxy formation: gas cooling, heating and star formation. Analysing motions of galaxies and the properties of intracluster gas in the sample of eight simulated clusters at z=0, we study velocity dispersion profiles of the dark matter, gas, and galaxies. We measure the mean velocity of galaxy motions and gas sound speed as a function of radius and calculate the average Mach number of galaxy motions. The simulations show that galaxies, on average, move supersonically with the average Mach number of ~1.4, approximately independent of the cluster-centric radius. The supersonic motions of galaxies may potentially provide an important source of heating for the intracluster gas by driving weak shocks and via dynamical friction, although these heating processes appear to be inefficient ...

  2. JELLYFISH: EVIDENCE OF EXTREME RAM-PRESSURE STRIPPING IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebeling, H.; Stephenson, L. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    Ram-pressure stripping by the gaseous intracluster medium has been proposed as the dominant physical mechanism driving the rapid evolution of galaxies in dense environments. Detailed studies of this process have, however, largely been limited to relatively modest examples affecting only the outermost gas layers of galaxies in nearby and/or low-mass galaxy clusters. We here present results from our search for extreme cases of gas-galaxy interactions in much more massive, X-ray selected clusters at z > 0.3. Using Hubble Space Telescope snapshots in the F606W and F814W passbands, we have discovered dramatic evidence of ram-pressure stripping in which copious amounts of gas are first shock compressed and then removed from galaxies falling into the cluster. Vigorous starbursts triggered by this process across the galaxy-gas interface and in the debris trail cause these galaxies to temporarily become some of the brightest cluster members in the F606W passband, capable of outshining even the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. Based on the spatial distribution and orientation of systems viewed nearly edge-on in our survey, we speculate that infall at large impact parameter gives rise to particularly long-lasting stripping events. Our sample of six spectacular examples identified in clusters from the Massive Cluster Survey, all featuring M {sub F606W} < –21 mag, doubles the number of such systems presently known at z > 0.2 and facilitates detailed quantitative studies of the most violent galaxy evolution in clusters.

  3. Jellyfish: Evidence of Extreme Ram-pressure Stripping in Massive Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, H.; Stephenson, L. N.; Edge, A. C.

    2014-02-01

    Ram-pressure stripping by the gaseous intracluster medium has been proposed as the dominant physical mechanism driving the rapid evolution of galaxies in dense environments. Detailed studies of this process have, however, largely been limited to relatively modest examples affecting only the outermost gas layers of galaxies in nearby and/or low-mass galaxy clusters. We here present results from our search for extreme cases of gas-galaxy interactions in much more massive, X-ray selected clusters at z > 0.3. Using Hubble Space Telescope snapshots in the F606W and F814W passbands, we have discovered dramatic evidence of ram-pressure stripping in which copious amounts of gas are first shock compressed and then removed from galaxies falling into the cluster. Vigorous starbursts triggered by this process across the galaxy-gas interface and in the debris trail cause these galaxies to temporarily become some of the brightest cluster members in the F606W passband, capable of outshining even the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. Based on the spatial distribution and orientation of systems viewed nearly edge-on in our survey, we speculate that infall at large impact parameter gives rise to particularly long-lasting stripping events. Our sample of six spectacular examples identified in clusters from the Massive Cluster Survey, all featuring M F606W 0.2 and facilitates detailed quantitative studies of the most violent galaxy evolution in clusters. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs GO-10491, -10875, -12166, and -12884.

  4. Discovery of eight lensing clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, S M; Han, J L; Jiang, Y Y

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies have a huge mass which can act as gravitational lenses. Galaxies behind clusters can be distorted to form arcs in images by the lenses. Herein a search was done for giant lensed arcs by galaxy clusters using the SDSS data. By visually inspecting SDSS images of newly identified clusters in the SDSS DR8 and Stripe 82 data, we discover 8 strong lensing clusters together with additional 3 probable and 6 possible cases. The lensed arcs show bluer colors than the member galaxies of clusters. The masses and optical luminosities of galaxy clusters interior to the arcs are calculated, and the mass-to-light ratios are found to be in the range of a few tens of M_Solar/L_Solar, consistent with the distribution of previously known lensing clusters.

  5. Galaxy clustering around nearby luminous quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, K B; Kirhakos, S; Schneider, D P; Fisher, Karl B; Bahcall, John N; Schneider, Donald P

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z 100 kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  6. The Mass Function of Nearby Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Biviano, A; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1993-01-01

    We present the distribution of virial masses for nearby galaxy clusters, as obtained from a data-set of 75 clusters, each having at least 20 galaxy members with measured redshifts within 1 Abell radius. After having accounted for problems of incompleteness of the data-set, we fitted a power-law to the cluster mass distribution.

  7. Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bourdin, H; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Comis, B; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Da Silva, A; Dahle, H; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Démoclès, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Flores-Cacho, I; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frommert, M; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Luzzi, G; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Mei, S; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Piffaretti, R; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wang, W; Welikala, N; Weller, J; White, S D M; White, M; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo mass conversion using realistic mock catalogues based on the Millennium Simulation. Applying a multi-frequency matched filter to the Planck data for each LBG, and averaging the results in bins of stellar mass, we measure the mean SZ signal down to $M_\\ast\\sim 2\\times 10^{11} \\Msolar$, with a clear indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass range extending from rich clusters down to $M_{500}\\sim 2\\times 10^{13} \\Msolar$, and there is a clear indication of s...

  8. Galaxy Evolution in Clusters Since z ~ 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Salamanca, A.

    Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature" vs. "nurture" in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the Universe was half its present age. Many of the results presented here have been obtained within the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  9. The optical spectra of the brightest mid-IR-selected galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K. I.

    2007-01-01

    We present here sore of the first results we have obtained oil the study of the optical spectra, of Spitzer/MIPS 24 mu m selected galaxies in the COSMOS field. This is part of a, series of studies we are conducting to analyse the optical spectral properties of mid-infrared (mid-IR) galaxies with dif

  10. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. X. Quantifying the Star Cluster Formation Efficiency of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David O; Dale, Daniel A; Johnson, L Clifton; Weisz, Daniel R; Fouesneau, Morgan; Olsen, Knut A G; Engelbracht, Charles W; Dalcanton, Julianne J

    2012-01-01

    We study the relationship between the field star formation and cluster formation properties in a large sample of nearby dwarf galaxies. We use optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and from ground-based telescopes to derive the ages and masses of the young (t_age < 100Myr) cluster sample. Our data provides the first constraints on two proposed relationships between the star formation rate of galaxies and the properties of their cluster systems in the low star formation rate regime. The data show broad agreement with these relationships, but significant galaxy-to-galaxy scatter exists. In part, this scatter can be accounted for by simulating the small number of clusters detected from stochastically sampling the cluster mass function. However, this stochasticity does not fully account for the observed scatter in our data suggesting there may be true variations in the fraction of stars formed in clusters in dwarf galaxies. Comparison of the cluster formation and the brightest cluster in our sample gala...

  11. Investigations of Galaxy Clusters Using Gravitational Lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Matthew P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  12. Improved optical mass tracer for galaxy clusters calibrated using weak lensing measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Hirata, Christopher M; Bahcall, Neta; Seljak, Uros

    2008-01-01

    We develop an improved mass tracer for clusters of galaxies from optically observed parameters, and calibrate the mass relation using weak gravitational lensing measurements. We employ a sample of ~ 13,000 optically-selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) maxBCG catalog, with photometric redshifts in the range 0.1-0.3. The optical tracers we consider are cluster richness, cluster luminosity, luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and combinations of these parameters. We measure the weak lensing signal around stacked clusters as a function of the different tracers, and use it to determine the tracer with the least amount of scatter. We further use the weak lensing data to calibrate the mass normalization. We find that the best mass estimator for massive clusters is a combination of cluster richness, N_{200}, and the luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy, L_{BCG}: M_{200\\bar{\\rho}} = (1.27 +/- 0.08) (N_{200}/20)^{1.20 +/- 0.09} (L_{BCG}/\\bar{L}_{BCG}(N_{200}))^{0.71 +/- 0.14} ...

  13. Unifying X-ray Scaling Relations from Galaxies to Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Michael E; White, Simon D M; Wang, Wenting; Dai, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    We examine a sample of $\\sim 250 000$ "locally brightest galaxies" selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to be central galaxies within their dark matter halos. These were previously stacked by the Planck Collaboration to measure the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal as a function of central galaxy stellar mass. Here, we stack the X-ray emission from these halos using data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We detect emission across almost our entire sample, including emission which we attribute to hot gas around galaxies spanning a range of 1.2 dex in stellar mass (corresponding to nearly two orders of magnitude in halo mass) down to $M* = 10^{10.8} M_{\\odot}$ ($M_{500} \\approx 10^{12.6} M_{\\odot}$). Over this range, the X-ray luminosity can be fit by a power-law, either of stellar mass or of halo mass. A single unified scaling relation between mass and $L_X$ applies for galaxies, groups, and clusters. This relation has a steeper slope than expected for self-similarity, in contrast to the $Y_{SZ}$-$M_{500}$ relation...

  14. Velocity segregation effects in galaxy clusters at 0.4 ≲ z ≲ 1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, S.; Girardi, M.; Biviano, A.; Borgani, S.; Annunziatella, M.; Nonino, M.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Our study is meant to extend our knowledge of the galaxy color and luminosity segregation in velocity space (VCS and VLS, respectively), to clusters at intermediate and high redshift. Methods: Our sample is a collection of 41 clusters in the 0.4 ≲ z ≲ 1.5 redshift range for a total of 4172 galaxies, 1674 of which are member galaxies of the clusters within 2R200 with photometric or spectroscopic information, as taken from the literature. We perform homogeneous procedures to select cluster members, compute global cluster properties, in particular the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion σV, and separate blue from red galaxies. Results: We find evidence of VCS in clusters out to z ≃ 0.8 (at the 97-99.99% confidence level, depending on the test), in the sense that the blue galaxy population has a 10-20% larger σV than the red galaxy population. Poor or no VCS is found in the high-z sample at z ≥ 0.8. For the first time, we detect VLS in non-local clusters and confirm that VLS only affects the very luminous galaxies; brighter galaxies have lower velocities. The threshold magnitude of VLS is m3 + 0.5, where m3 is the magnitude of the third brightest cluster galaxy. Current data suggest that the threshold value moves to fainter magnitudes at higher redshift. We also detect (marginal) evidence of VLS for blue galaxies. Conclusions: We conclude that segregation effects can be important tracers of the galaxy evolution and cluster assembly when they are studied up to distant clusters. We also discuss the evidence of VCS at high redshift, which is poor or absent.

  15. Clusters and Groups of Galaxies : International Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Mezzetti, M

    1984-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe and systems Clusters, and Groups of galaxies are topics like Superclusters, They fully justify the meeting on "Clusters of great interest. and Groups of Galaxies". The topics covered included the spatial distribution and the clustering of galaxies; the properties of Superclusters, Clusters and Groups of galaxies; radio and X-ray observations; the problem of unseen matter; theories concerning hierarchical clustering, pancakes, cluster and galaxy formation and evolution. The meeting was held at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste (Italy) from September 13 to September 16, 1983. It was attended by about 150 participants from 22 nations who presented 67 invited lectures (il) and contributed papers (cp), and 45 poster papers (pp). The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of F. Bertola, P. Biermann, A. Cavaliere, N. Dallaporta, D. Gerba1, M. Hack, J . V . Peach, D. Sciama (Chairman), G. Setti, M. Tarenghi. We are particularly indebted to D. Scia...

  16. Reconstructing Galaxy Histories from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    West, M J; Marzke, R O; Jordan, A; West, Michael J.; Cote, Patrick; Marzke, Ronald O.; Jordan, Andres

    2004-01-01

    Nearly a century after the true nature of galaxies as distant "island universes" was established, their origin and evolution remain great unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. One of the most promising ways to investigate galaxy formation is to study the ubiquitous globular star clusters that surround most galaxies. Recent advances in our understanding of the globular cluster systems of the Milky Way and other galaxies point to a complex picture of galaxy genesis driven by cannibalism, collisions, bursts of star formation and other tumultuous events.

  17. EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, O; Sreekumar, P; Mattox, J R

    2003-01-01

    We report EGRET upper limits on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from clusters of galaxies. EGRET observations between 1991 and 2000 were analyzed at positions of 58 individual clusters from a flux-limited sample of nearby X-ray bright galaxy clusters. Subsequently, a coadded image from individual galaxy clusters has been analyzed using an adequately adapted diffuse gamma-ray foreground model. The resulting 2 sigma upper limit for the average cluster is \\~ 6 x 10^{-9} cm^{-2} s^{-1} for E > 100 MeV. Implications of the non--detection of prominent individual clusters and of the general inability to detect the X-ray brightest galaxy clusters as a class of gamma-ray emitters are discussed. We compare our results with model predictions on the high-energy gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters as well as with recent claims of an association between unidentified or unresolved gamma-ray sources and Abell clusters of galaxies and find these contradictory.

  18. Discovery of Misaligned Radio Emission in Galaxy Cluster Zw CL 2971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallack, Nicole; Migliore, C.; Resnick, A.; White, T.; Liu, C.

    2014-01-01

    In a search for green valley galaxies with radio loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), we found one such object that may be associated with the cluster of galaxies Zw CL 2971 (z = 0.098). Serendipitously, we found in this cluster a strong bent-jet radio source associated with the cluster's central dominant (cD) elliptical galaxy. The center of the cD galaxy is coincident (0.35 arcsecond) with the second brightest spot of radio continuum emission (34.3 mJy as measured by FIRST), but the brightest radio hotspot (66.8 mJy) is offset by 4.6 arcseconds 9 kpc at the redshift of the cluster) and has no visible counterpart. Furthermore, the optical spectrum of the cD galaxy has only weak emission lines, suggesting the absence of a currently active nucleus. It is possible that the counterpart is optically faint (possibly due to a recently completed duty cycle) or is not visible due to movement or position. If the radio source is a distant background object, then the brighter jet is most likely magnified by gravitational lensing. If the radio source is located at the redshift of the cluster, then the brighter radio jet trails backward toward and past the cD galaxy to a distance of ~120 kpc, while the fainter jet is bent at a nearly orthogonal angle, ~40 kpc away from the brightest radio hotspot, in the opposite direction. These geometric offsets could be used to constrain the duty cycle history of the AGN creating the radio emission, as well as the dynamical properties of the intracluster medium.

  19. Clustering of galaxies in brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameeda, Mir; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the clustering of galaxies using a modified Newtonian potential. This modification of the Newtonian potential occurs due to the existence of extra dimensions in brane world models. We will analyze a system of galaxies interacting with each other through this modified Newtonian potential. The partition function for this system of galaxies will be calculated, and this partition function will be used to calculate the free energy of this system of galaxies. The entropy and the chemical potential for this system will also be calculated. We will derive explicit expression for the clustering parameter for this system. This parameter will determine the behavior of this system, and we will be able to express various thermodynamic quantities using this clustering parameter. Thus, we will be able to explicitly analyze the effect that modifying the Newtonian potential can have on the clustering of galaxies. We also analyse the effect of extra dimensions on the two-point functions between galaxies.

  20. Jellyfish: The origin and distribution of extreme ram-pressure stripping events in massive galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Conor; Roediger, Elke; Blumenthal, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the observational signatures and physical origin of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at $z=0.3-0.7$, based on images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen "jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define morphological criteria to select 211 additional, less obvious cases of RPS. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of 124 candidates so far confirmed 53 as cluster members. For the brightest and most favourably aligned systems we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on the orientation of apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the onset of these events occurs primarily at large distances from the cluster core ($>400$ kpc), and that the trajectories of the affected galaxies feature high impact parameters. Simple models show that such trajectories are highly improbable for galaxy infall along filaments but common for infall at high velocities, eve...

  1. Collisionless evaporation from cluster elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Muccione, V

    2003-01-01

    We describe a particular aspect of the effects of the parent cluster tidal field (CTF) on stellar orbits inside cluster Elliptical galaxies. In particular we discuss, with the aid of a simple numerical model, the possibility that collisionless stellar evaporation from elliptical galaxies is an effective mechanism for the production of the recently discovered intracluster stellar populations. A preliminary investigation, based on very idealized galaxy density profiles (Ferrers density distributions), showed that over an Hubble time, the amount of stars lost by a representative galaxy may sum up to the 10% of the initial galaxy mass, a fraction in interesting agreement with observational data. The effectiveness of this mechanism is due to the fact that the galaxy oscillation periods near equilibrium configurations in the CTF are comparable to stellar orbital times in the external galaxy regions. Here we extend our previous study to more realistic galaxy density profiles, in particular by adopting a triaxial Her...

  2. A wide angle tail radio galaxy in the COSMOS field: evidence for cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Finoguenov, A; Sakelliou, I; Carilli, C L; Botzler, C S; Brusa, M; Scoville, N Z; Ajiki, M; Capak, P; Guzzo, L; Hasinger, G; Impey, C; Jahnke, K; Kartaltepe, J S; McCracken, H J; Mobasher, B; Murayama, T; Sasaki, S S; Shioya, Y; Taniguchi, Y; Trump, J R

    2006-01-01

    We have identified a complex galaxy cluster system in the COSMOS field via a wide angle tail (WAT) radio galaxy consistent with the idea that WAT galaxies can be used as tracers of clusters. The WAT galaxy, CWAT-01, is coincident with an elliptical galaxy resolved in the HST-ACS image. Using the COSMOS multiwavelength data set, we derive the radio properties of CWAT-01 and use the optical and X-ray data to investigate its host environment. The cluster hosting CWAT-01 is part of a larger assembly consisting of a minimum of four X-ray luminous clusters within ~2 Mpc distance. We apply hydrodynamical models that combine ram pressure and buoyancy forces on CWAT-01. These models explain the shape of the radio jets only if the galaxy's velocity relative to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) is in the range of about 300-550 km/s which is higher than expected for brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in relaxed systems. This indicates that the CWAT-01 host cluster is not relaxed, but is possibly dynamically young. We argue t...

  3. Hubble Space Telescope First Observations of the Brightest Stars in the Virgo Galaxy M100 = NGC 4321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, W. L.; Madore, B. F.; Stetson, P. B.; Hughes, S. M. G.; Holtzman, J. A.; Mould, J. R.; Trauger, J. T.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Ballester, G. E.; Burrows, C. J.; Casertano, S.; Clarke, J. T; Crisp, D.; Ferrarese, L.; Ford, H.; Graham, J. A.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hester, J. J.; Hill, R.; Hoessel, J. G.; Huchra, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Scowen, P. A.; Sparks, B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    As part of both the Early Release Observations fromthe Hubble Space Telescope and the Key PRoject on the Extragalctic Distance Scale, we have obtained multi-wavelength BVR WFPC2 images for the face-on Virgo cluster spiral galaxy M11 = NGC 4321.

  4. M$_1$ - M* correlation in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Trevese, D; Appodia, B

    1994-01-01

    Photographic F band photometry of a sample of 36 Abell clusters has been used to study the relation between the magnitude M_1 of the brightest cluster member and the Schechter function parameter M^*. Clusters appear segregated in the M_1-M^* plane according to their Rood \\& Sastry class. We prove on a statistical basis that on average, going from early to late RS classes, M_1 becomes brighter while M^* becomes fainter. The result agrees with the predictions of galactic cannibalism models, never confirmed by previous analyses.

  5. The merging cluster of galaxies Abell 3376: an optical view

    CERN Document Server

    Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastao B Lima; Adami, Christophe; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bagchi, Joydeep

    2013-01-01

    Abell 3376 is a merging cluster of galaxies at redshift z=0.046, famous mostly for its giant radio arcs, and shows an elongated and highly substructured X-ray emission, but has not been analysed in detail at optical wavelengths. We have obtained wide field images of Abell 3376 in the B band and derive the GLF applying a statistical subtraction of the background in three regions: a circle of 0.29 deg radius (1.5 Mpc) encompassing the whole cluster, and two circles centered on each of the two brightest galaxies (BCG2, northeast, coinciding with the peak of X-ray emission, and BCG1, southwest) of radii 0.15 deg (0.775 Mpc). We also compute the GLF in the zone around BCG1, which is covered by the WINGS survey in the B and V bands, by selecting cluster members in the red sequence in a (B-V) versus V diagram. Finally, we discuss the dynamical characteristics of the cluster implied by a Serna & Gerbal analysis. The GLFs are not well fit by a single Schechter function, but satisfactory fits are obtained by summin...

  6. PROBING CLUSTER GALAXIES WITH BACKGROUND QSOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lopez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the rst survey of intervening Mg II absorption systems associated with high-z cluster galaxies. We investigated the incidence (dN=dz of Mg II absorbers in hzi = 0:6 cluster galaxies from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. While strong (W0 > 1:0 A absorbers show a signi cant excess (up to 10, weak (W0 < 0:3 A absorbers conform to the eld statistics. We argue that this dichotomy could be explained if cluster galaxies that give rise to weak Mg II absorption have their cold halos truncated as a consequence of environmental e ects.

  7. Constraining the Redshift Evolution of FIRST Radio Sources in RCS1 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Megan B; Yee, H K C; Barrientos, L Felipe

    2010-01-01

    We conduct a statistical analysis of the radio source population in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift by matching radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) catalog with 618 optically-selected galaxy clusters from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1). The number of excess radio sources (above the background level) per cluster is 0.14 +/- 0.02 for clusters with 0.35 1.5 sigma) in the number of radio sources per unit of cluster mass for the galaxy clusters with 0.35 4.1 X 10^(24) W/Hz) radio sources per unit (10^14 solar masses) mass, which we measure to be 0.031 +/- 0.004. We further characterize the population of galaxy cluster-related radio sources through visual inspection of the RCS1 images, finding that although the radio activity of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) also does not strongly evolve between our high and low redshift samples, the lower-redshift, richest clusters are more likely to host radio-loud BCGs than the higher-redshift, rich est...

  8. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): Projected Galaxy Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, D J; Norberg, Peder; Metcalfe, N; Baldry, I; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J I; Hopkins, A M; Lacey, Cedric G; Liske, J; Loveday, Jon; Palamara, David P; Robotham, A S G; Sridhar, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    We measure the projected 2-point correlation function of galaxies in the 180 deg$^2$ equatorial regions of the GAMA II survey, for four different redshift slices between z = 0.0 and z=0.5. To do this we further develop the Cole (2011) method of producing suitable random catalogues for the calculation of correlation functions. We find that more r-band luminous, more massive and redder galaxies are more clustered. We also find that red galaxies have stronger clustering on scales less than ~3 $h^{-1}$ Mpc. We compare to two different versions of the GALFORM galaxy formation model, Lacey et al (in prep.) and Gonzalez-Perez et al. (2014), and find that the models reproduce the trend of stronger clustering for more massive galaxies. However, the models under predict the clustering of blue galaxies, can incorrectly predict the correlation function on small scales and under predict the clustering in our sample of galaxies with ~3$L_r$ . We suggest possible avenues to explore to improve these cluster- ing predictions....

  9. Galaxy clusters in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebrón, A.; Durret, F.; Martinet, N.; Adami, C.; Guennou, L.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of large scale structure formation in the universe predict that matter is essentially distributed along filaments at the intersection of which lie galaxy clusters. We have analysed 9 clusters in the redshift range 0.4deep large field multi-band imaging and spectroscopic data, in order to detect filaments and/or structures around these clusters. Based on colour-magnitude diagrams, we have selected the galaxies likely to be in the cluster redshift range and studied their spatial distribution. We detect a number of structures and filaments around several clusters, proving that colour-magnitude diagrams are a reliable method to detect filaments around galaxy clusters. Since this method excludes blue (spiral) galaxies at the cluster redshift, we also apply the LePhare software to compute photometric redshifts from BVRIZ images to select galaxy cluster members and study their spatial distribution. We then find that, if only galaxies classified as early-type by LePhare are considered, we obtain the same distribution than with a red sequence selection, while taking into account late-type galaxies just pollutes the background level and deteriorates our detections. The photometric redshift based method therefore does not provide any additional information.

  10. Galaxy evolution in clusters since z=1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Salamanca, A.

    2011-11-01

    It is now 30 years since Alan Dressler published his seminal paper onthe morphology-density relation. Although there is still much to learnon the effect of the environment on galaxy evolution, extensive progress has been made since then both observationally and theoretically.Galaxy clusters provide some of the most extreme environments in which galaxies evolve, making them excellent laboratories to study the age old question of "nature'' vs. "nurture'' in galaxy evolution. Here I review some of the key observational results obtained during the last decade on the evolution of the morphology, structure, dynamics, star-formation history and stellar populations of cluster galaxies since the time when the universe was half its present age.Many of the results presented here have been obtainedwithin the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and Space Telescope A901/02 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES) collaborations.

  11. Super Star Clusters in Luminous Infrared Galaxies: the SUNBIRD Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, P; Escala, A; Kankare, E; Kniazev, A; Kotilainen, J K; Mattila, S; Ramphul, R; Ryder, S; Tekola, A

    2014-01-01

    We present recent results from an adaptive optics imaging survey of 40 Luminous IR Galaxies (LIRGs) searching for obscured core collapse supernovae and studying the galaxies themselves. Here, in particular, we discuss the Super Star Clusters (SSC) populations in the LIRGs. We have constructed the first statistically significant samples of Luminosity Functions (LF) of SSCs in the near-IR, and find evidence that the LF slopes in LIRGs are shallower than in more quiescent spiral galaxies. Distance and blending effects were investigated in detail paving the way for SSC studies further out than done previously. We have also correlated the luminosities of the brightest clusters with the star formation rates (SFR) of the hosts. The relation is similar, though somewhat steeper than that found in the optical and at lower SFR levels, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. We find that the characteristics of the relation suggest an underlying physical driver rather than solely a size-of-sample effect. In p...

  12. Galaxy Cluster Baryon Fractions Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zabludoff, Ann I; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot gas components for twelve galaxy clusters and groups at z~0.1 with M=1-5e14 Msun. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component --- ICM, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies --- for each system. We recover a relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass consistent with our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot gas components is a strong function of M500; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within r500 scale as M500^-0.45 and M500^0.26, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the BCG and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. We find a weak, but statistically significant, dependence of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass, scaling as M500^0.16. For M500>2e14, the total baryon fr...

  13. The effects of assembly bias on cosmological inference from galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) and galaxy clustering is a promising route to measuring the amplitude of matter clustering and testing modified gravity theories of cosmic acceleration. Halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling can extend the approach down to nonlinear scales, but galaxy assembly bias could introduce systematic errors by causing the HOD to vary with large scale environment at fixed halo mass. We investigate this problem using the mock galaxy catalogs created by Hearin & Watson (2013, HW13), which exhibit significant assembly bias because galaxy luminosity is tied to halo peak circular velocity and galaxy colour is tied to halo formation time. The preferential placement of galaxies (especially red galaxies) in older halos affects the cutoff of the mean occupation function $\\langle N_\\text{cen}(M_\\text{min}) \\rangle$ for central galaxies, with halos in overdense regions more likely to host galaxies. The effect of assembly bias on the satellite galaxy HOD is minimal. We intro...

  14. Brighter galaxy bias: underestimating the velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Old, L; Pearce, F R

    2013-01-01

    We study the systematic bias introduced when selecting the spectroscopic redshifts of brighter cluster galaxies to estimate the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters from both simulated and observational galaxy catalogues. We select clusters with Ngal > 50 at five low redshift snapshots from a semi-analytic model galaxy catalogue, and from a catalogue of SDSS DR8 groups and clusters across the redshift range 0.021cluster, for example, dynamical friction. The velocity dispersions and stacked particle velocity distributions of the parent dark matter (DM) halos are compared to the corresponding cluster dispersions and galaxy velocity distribution. We find a clear bias between the halo and the semi-analytic galaxy cluster velocity dispersion on the order of sigma gal / sigma DM = 0.87-0.95 and a ...

  15. Clustering of Galaxies in Brane World Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hameeda, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the clustering of galaxies using a modified Newtonian potential. This modification of the Newtonian potential occurs due to the existence of extra dimensions in brane world models. We will analyze a system of galaxies interacting with each other through this modified Newtonian potential. The partition function for this system of galaxies will be calculated, and this partition function will be used to calculate the free energy of this system of galaxies. The entropy and the chemical potential for this system will also be calculated. We will derive an explicit expression for the clustering parameter for this system. This parameter will determine the behavior of this system, and we will be able to express various thermodynamic quantities using this clustering parameter. Thus, we will be able to explicitly analyze the effect that modifying the Newtonian potential can have on the clustering of galaxies.

  16. On the Merging Cluster Abell 578 and Its Central Radio Galaxy 4C +67.13

    CERN Document Server

    Hagino, K; Siemiginowska, A; Cheung, C C; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D; Szostek, A; Madejski, G; Harris, D E; Simionescu, A; Takahashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for a peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy, CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation $\\sim$10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C +67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C +67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio $\\sim10^{-4}$ (for the estimated black hole masses of $\\sim 3 \\times 10^8\\,M_\\odot$ and $\\sim 10^9 \\, M_\\odot$). The gathered X-ray ({\\it Chandra}) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset ($\\sim 60$\\,kpc projected) between the position of the brightest cluster galaxy and...

  17. X-Ray Evidence for Multiphase Hot Gas with Solar Abundances in the Brightest Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, D A

    1998-01-01

    We examine whether single-phase models of the hot gas can successfully describe the ASCA and ROSAT spectra of NGC 1399, NGC 4472, NGC 4636, and NGC 5044. Broad-band spectral fitting of the ASCA SIS and GIS data accumulated within a radius of ~5 arcmin for each galaxy shows that single-phase models are unable to fit the SIS data near 1 keV. In addition, these single-phase models typically fail to produce the large equivalent widths of the K-alpha line blends of the H-like and He-like ions of Si and S which are measured independently of the Fe L emission lines. Two-phase models provide excellent broad-band fits to both the SIS and GIS data of each galaxy with the relative abundances (except for NGC 4636) fixed at their solar values. A simple multiphase cooling flow model fits nearly as well as the two-phase model for NGC 1399, NGC 4472, and NGC 5044. The multiphase models also predict more accurately the Si and S equivalent widths and the ratios of Si XIV/XIII and S XVI/XV than the single-phase models. Using va...

  18. The evolution of the galaxy Red Sequence in simulated clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, Alessio D; Covone, G; Sommer-Larsen, J; Antonuccio-Delogu, V; Capaccioli, M

    2008-01-01

    N-body + hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters in a LambdaCDM cosmology are used in order to follow the building-up of the colour-magnitude relation in two clusters and in 12 groups. We have found that galaxies, starting from the more massive, move to the Red Sequence (RS) as they get aged over times and eventually set upon a ``dead sequence'' (DS) once they have stopped their bulk star formation activity. Fainter galaxies keep having significant star formation out to very recent epochs and lie broader around the RS. Environment plays a role as galaxies in groups and cluster outskirts hold star formation activity longer than the central cluster regions. However galaxies experiencing infall from the outskirts to the central parts keep star formation on until they settle on to the DS of the core galaxies. Merging contributes to mass assembly until z~1, after which major events only involve the brightest cluster galaxies. The emerging scenario is that the evoluti...

  19. Stellar population gradients in bright cluster galaxies at z=0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Davidge, T J; Davidge, T J; Grinder, M

    1995-01-01

    Slit spectra, covering the rest frame near-ultraviolet and blue wavelength regions, are combined with moderately deep g and R images to investigate radial population gradients in the brightest components of six z=0.2 galaxy clusters selected by x-ray brightness. We conclude that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of the EMSS0440+02, EMSS0906+11 and EMSS1231+15 clusters have global stellar contents resembling nearby elliptical galaxies. The BCGs in the clusters EMSS0839+29, EMSS1455+22 and Abell2390 are complicated by ionized gas, which is detected over large portions of all three systems. Radial color variations are detected in the majority of galaxies and, for those systems not showing extended [OII] emission, the weakening of D4000 (which measures the 4000 Angstrom break in magnitudes) with radius falls in the upper range of what is seen among nearby ellipticals. However, there is no correlation between local D4000 values and (g-r), suggesting that these quantities are sensitive to different parameters. ...

  20. High-energy emission from NGC 5506, the brightest hard X-ray Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Soldi, S; Gehrels, N; De Jong, S; Lubinski, P

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the hard X-ray emission of NGC 5506, the brightest narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy above 20 keV. All the recent observations by INTEGRAL, Swift and Suzaku have been analysed and spectral analysis during nine separated time periods has been performed. While flux variations by a factor of 2 were detected during the last 7 years, only moderate spectral variations have been observed, with the hint of a hardening of the X-ray spectrum and a decrease of the intrinsic absorption with time. Using Suzaku observations it is possible to constrain the amount of Compton reflection to R = 0.6-1.0, in agreement with previous results on the source. The signature of Comptonisation processes can also be found in the detection of a high-energy cut-off during part of the observations, at Ec = 40-100 keV. When a Comptonisation model is applied to the Suzaku data, the temperature and the optical depth of the Comptonising electron plasma are measured at kT = 60-80 keV and tau = 0.6-1.0, respectively. The properti...

  1. X-Ray Evidence for Multiphase Hot Gas with Nearly Solar Fe Abundances in the Brightest Groups of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, D A

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the ASCA spectra accumulated within ~100 kpc radii of 12 of the brightest groups of galaxies. Upon fitting isothermal models (1T) jointly to the ASCA SIS and GIS spectra we obtain fits for most groups that are of poor or at best marginal quality and give very sub-solar metallicities similar to previous studies, = 0.29 +/- 0.12 Z_sun. Two-temperature models (2T) provide significantly better fits for 11 out of the 12 groups and in every case have metallicities that are substantially larger than obtained for the 1T models, = 0.75 +/- 0.24 Z_sun. Although not very well constrained, for most of the groups absorption in excess of the Galactic value is indicated for the cooler temperature component of the 2T models. A simple multiphase cooling flow model gives results analogous to the 2T models including large metallicities, = 0.65 +/- 0.17 Z_sun. The nearly solar Fe abundances and also solar alpha/Fe ratios indicated by the 2T and cooling flow models are consistent with the standard models of chemical...

  2. Hard X-Rays from a Complete Sample of the Brightest Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David B.

    2003-01-01

    We were awarded 70kS of XMM-Newton spacecraft time using the Epic pn camera to observe three ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) in order to measure the spectral shape of their hard X-Ray emission, and to use this information to search for the presence of an highly obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN), and to separate out the contributions from a putative starburst. By observing three objects we hope to be able to better assess the role of AGN in the complete class of ULIGs and therefore to better constrain their contribution to the X-ray background. XMM-Newton was deemed to be better suited to our proposed measurements of ULIGs than the Chandra X-ray observatory due to its larger aperture and better sensitivity to hard (2-10 keV) X-rays.

  3. On the relation between globular cluster specific frequency and galaxy type

    CERN Document Server

    Kavelaars, J J

    1998-01-01

    The universality of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) contrasts the variation seen in the specific frequency ($S_N$). The variation in $S_N$ has been shown to follow a linear relation with $L_X$ for brightest cluster galaxies (Blakeslee, J. 1997, Harris, W.E. et al. 1998). Further, the variation of $S_N$ with galactic radius within individual giant ellipticals is seen to be a constant fraction of the gas density (McLaughlin 1998). There are now a number of galaxies for which direct mass estimates based on the radial velocities of the globular clusters are available. By comparing the mass of galaxies determined in this way with the number of clusters within these galaxies we show that the fraction of mass which is converted into globular clusters is constant independent of galaxy type or environment. This implies that the process of globular cluster formation is not influenced by the host galaxy and supports the notion of the universal GCLF.

  4. First LOFAR results on galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, C; Bonafede, A; Bîrzan, L; Brüggen, M; Brunetti, G; Cassano, R; Conway, J; De Gasperin, F; Heald, G; Jackson, N; Macario, G; McKean, J; Offringa, A R; Orrù, E; Pizzo, R; Rafferty, D A; Röttgering, H J A; Shulevski, A; Tasse, C; van der Tol, S; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M; van Zwieten, J E

    2012-01-01

    Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. The role played by this non-thermal intracluster component on the thermodynamical evolution of galaxy clusters is debated, with important implications for cosmological and astrophysical studies of the largest gravitationally bound structures of the Universe. The low surface brightness and steep spectra of diffuse cluster radio sources make them more easily detectable at low-frequencies. LOFAR is the first instrument able to detect diffuse radio emission in hundreds of massive galaxy clusters up to their formation epoch. We present the first observations of clusters imaged by LOFAR and the huge perspectives opened by this instrument for non-thermal cluster studies.

  5. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, M T; Pulido, F; Nulsen, P E J; Russell, H R; Vantyghem, A N; Edge, A C; Main, R A

    2016-01-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and AGN feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurately mapping the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly towards cluster centres where the total mass budget has substantial radially-dependent contributions from the stellar, gas, and dark matter components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular H-alpha emission in cool core clusters. Amongst this small sample we find no support for t...

  6. First LOFAR results on galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, C.; van Bemmel, I.; Bonafede, A.; Bîrzan, L.; Brüggen, M.; Brunetti, G.; Cassano, R.; Conway, J.; De Gasperin, F.; Heald, G.; Jackson, N.; Macario, G.; McKean, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Orrù, E.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D. A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Shulevski, A.; Tasse, C.; van der Tol, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M.; van Zwieten, J.E.; Boissier, S.; de Laverny, P.; Nardetto, N.; Samadi, R.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Wozniak, H.; Boissier, S.; de Laverny, P.; Nardetto, N.; Samadi, R.; Valls-Gabaud, D.; Wozniak, H.

    2012-01-01

    Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. The role played by this non-thermal intracluster component on the thermodynamical evolution of galaxy

  7. Star clusters in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of observational studies of the star cluster population in the interacting spiral galaxy M51, also known as the Whirlpool galaxy. Observations taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical and the near-UV are used to determine fundamental properties of the star

  8. A Chandra X-ray analysis of Abell 1664: cooling, feedback, and star formation in the central cluster galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkpatrick, C.C.; McNamara, B.R.; Rafferty, D.A.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Bîrzan, L.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Wise, M.W.; Gitti, M.; Cavagnolo, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of similar to 23 M-circle dot yr(-1). The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10(8) yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm(2) are consistent with other star

  9. Quenching of Satellite Galaxies at the Outskirts of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zinger, Elad; Kravtsov, Andrey V; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We find, using cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, that the hot X-ray emitting intra-cluster medium (ICM) enclosed within the outer accretion shock extends out to $R_{\\rm shock}\\sim(2 - 3) R_{\\rm vir}$, where $R_{\\rm vir}$ is the standard virial radius of the halo. Using a simple analytic model for satellite galaxies in the cluster, we evaluate the effect of ram-pressure stripping on the gas in the inner discs and in the haloes at different distances from the cluster centre. We find that significant removal of star-forming disc gas occurs only at $r \\lesssim 0.5 R_{\\rm vir}$, while gas removal from the satellite halo is also efficient between $R_{\\rm vir}$ and $R_{\\rm shock}$. This leads to quenching of star formation by starvation over $2-3\\,{\\rm Gyr}$, prior to the satellite entry to the inner cluster halo. This can explain the presence of quenched galaxies, preferentially discs, at the outskirts of galaxy clusters, and the delayed quenching of satellites compared to central galaxies.

  10. Constraints on Assembly Bias from Galaxy Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, Andrew R; Bosch, Frank C van den; Lange, Johannes U; Villarreal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the newly-introduced decorated Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model using SDSS DR7 measurements of projected galaxy clustering or r-band luminosity threshold samples. The decorated HOD is a model for the galaxy-halo connection that augments the HOD by allowing for the possibility of galaxy assembly bias: galaxy luminosity may be correlated with dark matter halo properties besides mass, Mvir. We demonstrate that it is not possible to rule out galaxy assembly bias using DR7 measurements of galaxy clustering alone. Moreover, galaxy samples with Mr < -20 and Mr < -20.5 favor strong central galaxy assembly bias. These samples prefer scenarios in which high-concentration are more likely to host a central galaxy relative to low-concentration halos of the same mass. We exclude zero assembly bias with high significance for these samples. Satellite galaxy assembly bias is significant for the faintest sample, Mr < -19. We find no evidence for assembly bias in the Mr < -21 sample. Assembly bi...

  11. Clusters of Galaxies in the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Nichol, R C

    2003-01-01

    I review here past and present research on clusters and groups of galaxies within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In particular, I discuss the C4 algorithm which is designed to search for clusters within a 7-dimensional data-space, i.e., simultaneous in both color & space. The C4 catalog has a well defined selection function based on mock SDSS galaxy catalogs constructed from the Hubble Volume simulation, and is >90% complete, with 10^14 Msolar at z<0.14. Furthermore, the observed summed r-band luminosity of C4 clusters is linearly related to M200 with <30% scatter at any given halo mass. I also briefly review the selection and observation of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) and demonstrate that these galaxies have a similar clustering strength as clusters and groups of galaxies. I outline a new collaboration planning to obtain redshifts for 10,000 LRGs at 0.4clusters and groups of galaxies in th...

  12. A LABOCA survey of submillimeter galaxies behind galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Daniel; Horellou, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Context: Submillimeter galaxies are a population of dusty star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Measuring their properties will help relate them to other types of galaxies, both at high and low redshift. This is needed in order to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies. Aims: We use gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to probe the faint and abundant submillimeter galaxy population down to a lower flux density level than what can be achieved in blank-field observations. Methods: We use the LABOCA bolometer camera on the APEX telescope to observe five cluster of galaxies at a wavelength of 870 micron. The final maps have an angular resolution of 27.5 arcsec and a point source noise level of 1.2-2.2 mJy. We model the mass distribution in the clusters as superpositions of spherical NFW halos and derive magnification maps that we use to calculate intrinsic flux densities as well as area-weighted number counts. We also use the positions of Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources in four of the fields for ...

  13. Galaxy Motions, Turbulence and Conduction in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ruszkowski, M

    2010-01-01

    Unopposed radiative cooling in clusters of galaxies results in excessive mass deposition rates. However, the cool cores of galaxy clusters are continuously heated by thermal conduction and turbulent heat diffusion due to minor mergers or the galaxies orbiting the cluster center. These processes can either reduce the energy requirements for AGN heating of cool cores, or they can prevent overcooling altogether. We perform 3D MHD simulations including field-aligned thermal conduction and self-gravitating particles to model this in detail. Turbulence is not confined to the wakes of galaxies but is instead volume-filling, due to the excitation of large-scale g-modes. We systematically probe the parameter space of galaxy masses and numbers. For a wide range of observationally motivated galaxy parameters, the magnetic field is randomized by stirring motions, restoring the conductive heat flow to the core. The cooling catastrophe either does not occur or it is sufficiently delayed to allow the cluster to experience a...

  14. Cluster-lensing: A Python Package for Galaxy Clusters & Miscentering

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Jes; VanderPlas, Jake

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new open source package for calculating properties of galaxy clusters, including NFW halo profiles with and without the effects of cluster miscentering. This pure-Python package, cluster-lensing, provides well-documented and easy-to-use classes and functions for calculating cluster scaling relations, including mass-richness and mass-concentration relations from the literature, as well as the surface mass density $\\Sigma(R)$ and differential surface mass density $\\Delta\\Sigma(R)$...

  15. Hidden Galaxies in the Fornax Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Drinkwater, M J; Webster, R L; Barnes, D G; Gregg, M D; Phillipps, S; Jones, J B

    2000-01-01

    We are using the Multibeam 21cm receiver on the Parkes Telescope combined with the optical Two degree Field spectrograph (2dF) of the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain the first complete spectroscopic sample of the Fornax cluster. In the optical the survey is unique in that all objects (both ``stars'' and ``galaxies'') within our magnitude limits (Bj=16.5 to 19.7) are measured, producing the most complete survey of cluster members irrespective of surface brightness. We have detected two new classes of high surface brightness dwarf galaxy in the cluster. With 2dF we have discovered a population of very low luminosity (Mb approx -12) objects which are unresolved from the ground and may be the stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies; they are unlike any known galaxies. In a survey of the brighter (Bj=16.5 to 18) galaxies with the FLAIR-II spectrograph we have found a number of new high surface brightness dwarf galaxies and show that the fraction of star-forming dwarf galaxies in the cluster is about 30 per cent, ab...

  16. Optical Substructures in 48 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Fadda, D; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the presence of substructures in a set of 48 galaxy clusters, by using galaxy positions and redshifts. We use a multi-scale analysis which couples kinematical estimators with the wavelet transform. 14% of our clusters are strongly substructured (i.e. they are bimodal or complex) and 24% of the remaining unimodal clusters contain substructures at small scales. Thus, in substantial agreement with previous studies, about one third of clusters show substructures. In unimodal clusters the presence of substructures does not affect the estimates of both virial masses and velocity dispersions, which are generally in good agreement with the X-ray temperatures. Thus, unimodal clusters are not too far from a status of dynamical equilibrium. On the contrary, velocity dispersions and masses for some bimodal or complex clusters strongly depend on whether they are treated as single systems or as sums of different clumps and X-ray temperatures and velocity dispersions may be very different.

  17. Star clusters as tracers of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters represent the most common 'mode' of star formation. They are found in all types of environments, cascading down from galaxy groups and merging pairs through starbursts to normal galaxies and dwarves and even isolated regions in extragalactic space. As they maintain a link to the overall star formation in a system, they can be used as tracers of the star formation history of environments located at distances prohibitive to the study of individual stars. This makes them ideally suited to the study of mergers and interactions in galaxy pairs and groups. In this work we present observations of the star cluster populations in the local starburst galaxy M82, post-interaction spiral NGC 6872, the "Antennae" merging pair and two compact groups, "Stephan's Quintet" and HCG 7. In each case, we extract information on the clusters and their hosts using mainly HST photometry and Gemini spectroscopy.

  18. Expected Number Counts of Radio Galaxy Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies may contain radio sources if they still experience successive mergers at present. This has been confirmed by radio observations that about 30% of nearby clusters possess radio halos. We present a theoretical prediction of radio cluster counts using a semi-analytic approach which incorporates the empirical correlation between radio power and dynamical mass of clusters, and the cluster mass function described by the Press-Schechter formalism. The total population of radio clusters over the whole sky and their redshift distribution are given.

  19. The Dynamical Equilibrium of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Yee, H. K. C.; Ellingson, E.; Morris, S. L.; Abraham, R.; Gravel, P.; Pritchet, C. J.; Smecker-Hane, T.; Hartwick, F. D. A.; Hesser, J. E.; Hutchings, J. B.; Oke, J. B.

    1997-02-01

    If a galaxy cluster is effectively in dynamical equilibrium, then all galaxy populations within the cluster must have distributions in velocity and position that individually reflect the same underlying mass distribution, although the derived virial masses can be quite different. Specifically, within the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology cluster sample, the virial radius of the red galaxy population is, on the average, a factor of 2.05 +/- 0.34 smaller than that of the blue population. The red galaxies also have a smaller rms velocity dispersion, a factor of 1.31 +/- 0.13 within our sample. Consequently, the virial mass calculated from the blue galaxies is 3.5 +/- 1.3 times larger than from the red galaxies. However, applying the Jeans equation of stellar hydrodynamic equilibrium to the red and blue subsamples separately gives statistically identical cluster mass profiles. This is strong evidence that these clusters are effectively equilibrium systems and therefore demonstrates empirically that the masses in the virialized region are reliably estimated using dynamical techniques.

  20. New Cosmology with Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schücker, P

    2005-01-01

    The review summarizes present and future applications of galaxy clusters to cosmology with emphasis on nearby X-ray clusters. The discussion includes the density of dark matter, the normalization of the matter power spectrum, neutrino masses, and especially the equation of state of the dark energy, the interaction between dark energy and ordinary matter, gravitational holography, and the effects of extra-dimensions.

  1. Anisotropic Metal-enriched Outflows Driven by AGN in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C; Cavagnolo, K W

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in ten galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies have experienced recent AGN activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the brightest cluster galaxy into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R_Fe ~ P_jet^0.42, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting this is a long lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses...

  2. When galaxy clusters collide : the impact of merger shocks on cluster gas and galaxy evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroe, Andra

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters mainly grow through mergers with other clusters and groups. Major mergers give rise to cluster-wide traveling shocks, which can be detected at radio wavelengths as relics: elongated, diffuse synchrotron emitting areas located at the periphery of merging clusters. The 'Sausage' cluste

  3. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Balogh, Michael L; Smith, Russell J; Power, Chris; Krane, Brad

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation within rich clusters, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from lambdaCDM cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. The orbits are combined with models of star formation followed by quenching in the cluster environment to predict colours and spectroscopic line indices of satellite galaxies. Simple models with only halo mass-dependent quenching and without environmental (i.e. cluster-dependent) quenching fail to reproduce the observed cluster-centric colour and absorption linestrength gradients. Models in which star formation is instantly quenched at the virial radius also fail to match the observations. Better matches to the data are achieved by more complicated bulge-disc models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc quenching depends on the cluster environment. In the most successful models quenching begins at pericentre, operating on an exponential timescale of 2 -- 3...

  4. Relics as Probes of Galaxy Cluster Mergers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. J. van Weeren; M. Brüggen; H. J. A. Röttgering; M. Hoeft

    2011-12-01

    Galaxy clusters grow by mergers with other clusters and galaxy groups. These mergers create shocks within the intracluster medium (ICM). It is proposed that particles can be accelerated to extreme energies within the shocks. In the presence of a magnetic field these particles should then form large regions emitting synchrotron radiation, creating the so-called radio relics. An example of a cluster with relics is CIZA J2242.8+5301. Here we present hydrodynamical simulations of idealized binary cluster collisions with the aim of constraining the merger scenario for this cluster. We conclude that by using the location, size and width of double radio relics we can set constraints on the mass ratios, impact parameters, time scales, and viewing geometries of binary cluster merger events.

  5. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind Lensing Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Lauchlan Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy J.; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. Observations of massive cluster fields are the best way to explore this faint submillimeter population, thanks to gravitational lensing effects. We have been undertaking a lensing cluster survey with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to map nine galaxy clusters, including the northern five clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array to determine the accurate positions of our detected sources. Our observations have discovered high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies. Some of these galaxies are still undetected in deep optical and near-infrared images. These results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  6. ABOUT THE LINEARITY OF THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith Castelli, Analia V.; Faifer, Favio R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de La Plata (CCT-La Plata, CONICET-UNLP), Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Gonzalez, Nelida M. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata, B1900FWA (Argentina); Forte, Juan Carlos, E-mail: asmith@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: ngonzalez@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: favio@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: forte@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET-Planetario de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires ' ' Galileo Galilei' ' , Av. Sarmiento y B. Roldan, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-20

    We revisit the color-magnitude relation of Virgo Cluster early-type galaxies in order to explore its alleged nonlinearity. To this aim, we reanalyze the relation already published from data obtained within the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey of the Hubble Space Telescope and perform our own photometry and analysis of the images of 100 early-type galaxies observed as part of this survey. In addition, we compare our results with those reported in the literature from data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have found that when the brightest galaxies and untypical systems are excluded from the sample, a linear relation arises in agreement with what is observed in other groups and clusters. The central regions of the brightest galaxies also follow this relation. In addition, we notice that Virgo contains at least four compact elliptical galaxies besides the well-known object VCC 1297 (NGC 4486B). Their locations in the ({mu}{sub eff})-luminosity diagram define a trend different from that followed by normal early-type dwarf galaxies, setting an upper limit in effective surface brightness and a lower limit in the effective radius for their luminosities. Based on the distribution of different galaxy sub-samples in the color-magnitude and ({mu}{sub eff})-luminosity diagrams, we draw some conclusions on their formation and the history of their evolution.

  7. Optical Mass Estimates of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Boschin, W

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate in a homogeneous way the optical masses of 170 nearby clusters (z< 0.15). The sample includes both data from the literature and the new ENACS data (Katgert et al. 1996, 1998). On the assumption that mass follows the galaxy distribution, we compute the masses of each cluster by applying the virial theorem to the member galaxies. We constrain the masses of very substructured clusters (about 10% of our clusters) between two limiting values. After appropriate rescaling to the X-ray radii, we compare our optical mass estimates to those derived from X-ray analyses, which we compiled from the literature (for 66 clusters). We find a good overall agreement. This agreement is expected in the framework of two common assumptions: that mass follows the galaxy distribution, and that clusters are not far from a situation of dynamical equilibrium with both gas and galaxies reflecting the same underlying mass distribution. We stress that our study strongly supports the reliability of present cluster mass estima...

  8. Jellyfish: Observational Properties of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping Events in Massive Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conor, McPartland; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical origin and observational signatures of extreme ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z=0.3-0.7, based on data in the F606W passband obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen ``jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define quantitative morphological criteria to select candidate galaxies which are similar to known cases of RPS. Considering a sample of 16 ``jellyfish" galaxies (10 of which we present for the first time), we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on dynamical features such as apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the observed events occur primarily at large distances from the cluster core and involve infall trajectories featuring high impact parameters. Simple models of cluster growth show that such trajectories are consistent with two scenarios: 1) galaxy infall along filaments; and 2) infall at high velocities (≥1000 km/s) characteristic of cluster mergers. The observed distribution of events is best described by timescales of ˜few Myr in agreement with recent numerical simulations of RPS. The broader areal coverage of the Hubble Frontier Fields should provide an even larger sample of RPS events to determine the relative contributions of infall and cluster mergers. Prompted by the discovery of several jellyfish galaxies whose brightness in the F606W passband rivals or exceeds that of the respective brightest cluster galaxy, we attempt to constrain the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing RPS. The observed significant excess at the bright end compared to the luminosity functions of blue cluster members strongly suggests enhanced star formation, thus challenging theoretical and numerical studies according to which RPS merely displaces existing star-forming regions. In-depth studies of individual objects will help test our

  9. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, Andrés; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case, we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger and longer, and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit are the properties of the bar controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenter. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All of the bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when the tidal forces are stronger. Using all simulation outputs of galaxies at different evolutionary stages, we construct a toy model of the galaxy population in the cluster and measure the average bar strength and bar fraction as a function of clustercentric radius. Both are found to be mildly decreasing functions of radius. We conclude that tidal forces can trigger bar formation in cluster cores, but not in the outskirts, and thus can cause larger concentrations of barred galaxies toward the cluster center.

  10. The Fundamental Plane of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schäffer, R; Cappi, A; Bernardeau, F

    1993-01-01

    Velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, radius $R$ and luminosity $L$ of elliptical galaxies are known to be related, leaving only two degrees of freedom and defining the so-called ``fundamental plane". In this {\\em Letter} we present observational evidence that rich galaxy clusters exhibit a similar behaviour. Assuming a relation $L \\propto R^{\\alpha}\\sigma^{2 \\beta}$, the best-fit values of $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ are very close to those defined by galaxies. The dispersion of this relation is lower than 10 percent, i.e. significantly smaller than the dispersion observed in the $L-\\sigma$ and $L-R$ relations. We briefly suggest some possible implications on the spread of formation times of objects and on peculiar velocities of galaxy clusters.

  11. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  12. Conduction and Turbulent Mixing in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, R; Kim, Woong-Tae; Narayan, Ramesh

    2004-01-01

    We discuss hydrostatic models of galaxy clusters in which heat diffusion balances radiative cooling. We consider two different sources of diffusion, thermal conduction and turbulent mixing, parameterized by dimensionless coefficients, f and alpha_mix, respectively. Models with thermal conduction give reasonably good fits to the density and temperature profiles of several cooling flow clusters, but some clusters require unphysically large values of f>1. Models with turbulent mixing give good fits to all clusters, with reasonable values of alpha_mix ~ 0.01-0.03. Both types of models are found to be essentially stable to thermal perturbations. The mixing model reproduces the observed scalings of various cluster properties with temperature, and also explains the entropy floor seen in galaxy groups.

  13. Spitzer Mid-Infrared Spectra of Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    de Messières, G E; McNamara, B R; Donahue, M; Nulsen, P E J; Voit, G M; Wise, M W

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained mid-infrared spectra of nine cool-core galaxy clusters with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. X-ray, ultraviolet and optical observations have demonstrated that each of these clusters hosts a cooling flow which seems to be fueling vigorous star formation in the brightest cluster galaxy. Our goal is to use the advantages of the mid-infrared band to improve estimates of star formation. Our spectra are characterized by diverse morphologies ranging from classic starbursts to flat spectra with surprisingly weak dust features. Although most of our sample are known from optical/UV data to be active star-formers, they lack the expected strong mid-infrared continuum. Star formation may be proceeding in unusually dust-deficient circumgalactic environments such as the interface between the cooling flow and the relativistic jets from the active galactic nucleus.

  14. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Russell, H. R.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Main, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar (M *), gas (M gas), and dark matter (M DM) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular Hα emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r 1.1 expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r 0.67 down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”

  15. Globular Cluster System erosion in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze data of 8 elliptical galaxies in order to study the difference between their globular cluster systems (GCSs) radial distributions and those of the galactic stellar component. In all the galaxies studied here the globular cluster system density profile is significantly flatter toward the galactic centre than that of stars. If this difference is interpreted as a depauperation of the initial GC population, the estimated number of missing globular clusters is significant, ranging from 21% to 71% of their initial population abundance in the eight galaxies examined. The corresponding mass lost to the central galactic region is 7x10^7-1.85x10^9 solar masses. All this mass carried toward central galactic regions have likely had an important feedback on the innermost galactic region, including its violent transient activity (AGN) and local massive black hole formation and growth.

  16. A Galaxy Cluster Near NGC 720

    CERN Document Server

    Arp, H

    2005-01-01

    The galaxy cluster RXJ 0152.7-1357 is emitting X-rays at the high rate of 148 counts $ks^{-1}$. It would be one of the most luminous X-ray clusters known if it is at its redshift distance of z = .8325. It is conspicuously elongated, however, toward the bright, X-ray active galaxy NGC 720 about 14 arcmin away. At the same distance on the other side of NGC 720, and almost perfectly aligned, is an X-ray BSO of 5.8 cts/ks. It is reported here that the redshift of this quasar is z = .8312.

  17. Projected and intrinsic shapes of galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plionis, Manolis (International School of Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy)); Barrow, J.D. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Astronomy Centre); Frenk, C.S. (Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-04-15

    We identify a large number of galaxy clusters in the Lick map using an algorithm based on an overdensity criterion. The resulting catalogues contain {similar to} 6000 clusters (with /b/ {ge} 40{sup o}) out of which 753 are Abell clusters. We determine ellipticities and major axis orientations for a suitable subset of this sample, including 397 Abell clusters. We find that the distribution of projected axial ratios is approximately Gaussian with a mean of {similar to} 0.6 and a standard deviation of {similar to} 0.2. We investigate methods to invert the distribution of apparent axial ratios in order to obtain the distribution of intrinsic axial ratios. (author).

  18. The Lifecycle of Clusters in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    We review many of the basic properties of star cluster systems, and focus in particular on how they relate to their host galaxy properties and ambient environment. The cluster mass and luminosity functions are well approximated by power-laws of the form $Ndm \\propto M^{\\alpha}dm$, with $\\alpha\\sim-2$ over most of the observable range. However, there is now clear evidence that both become steeper at high masses/luminosities, with the value of the downward turn dependent on environment. The host galaxy properties also appear to affect the cluster formation efficiency ($\\Gamma$ - i.e., the fraction of stars that form in bound clusters), with higher star-formation rate density galaxies having higher $\\Gamma$ values. Within individual galaxies, there is evidence for $\\Gamma$ to vary by a factor of 3-4, likely following the molecular gas surface density, in agreement with recent predictions. Finally, we discuss cluster disruption and its effect on the observed properties of a population, focussing on the age distri...

  19. Watching the Birth of a Galaxy Cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    First Visiting Astronomers to VLT ANTU Observe the Early Universe When the first 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescope (ANTU) was "handed over" to the scientists on April 1, 1999, the first "visiting astronomers" at Paranal were George Miley and Huub Rottgering from the Leiden Observatory (The Netherlands) [1]. They obtained unique pictures of a distant exploding galaxy known as 1138 - 262 . These images provide new information about how massive galaxies and clusters of galaxies may have formed in the early Universe. Formation of clusters of galaxies An intriguing question in modern astronomy is how the first galaxies and groupings or clusters of galaxies emerged from the primeval gas produced in the Big Bang. Some theories predict that giant galaxies, often found at the centres of rich galaxy clusters, are built up through a step-wise process. Clumps develop in this gas and stars condense out of those clumps to form small galaxies. Finally these small galaxies merge together to form larger units. An enigmatic class of objects important for investigating such scenarios are galaxies which emit intense radio emission from explosions that occur deep in their nuclei. The explosions are believed to be triggered when material from the merging swarm of smaller galaxies is fed into a rotating black hole located in the central regions. There is strong evidence that these distant radio galaxies are amongst the oldest and most massive galaxies in the early Universe and are often located at the heart of rich clusters of galaxies. They can therefore help pinpoint regions of the Universe in which large galaxies and clusters of galaxies are being formed. The radio galaxy 1138-262 The first visiting astronomers pointed ANTU towards a particularly important radio galaxy named 1138-262 . It is located in the southern constellation Hydra (The Water Snake). This galaxy was discovered some years ago using ESO's 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Because 1138-262 is at a distance of

  20. Discovery of a Strong Lensing Galaxy Embedded in a Cluster at z = 1.62

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Kenneth C; Suyu, Sherry H; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Brammer, Gabriel B; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Halkola, Aleksi; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Koekemoer, Anton M; Papovich, Casey J; Rudnick, Gregory H

    2014-01-01

    We identify a strong lensing galaxy in the cluster IRC 0218 (also known as XMM-LSS J02182-05102) that is spectroscopically confirmed to be at $z=1.62$, making it the highest-redshift strong lens galaxy known. The lens is one of the two brightest cluster galaxies and lenses a background source galaxy into an arc and a counterimage. With Hubble Space Telescope grism and Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we measure the source redshift to be $z_{\\rm S}=2.26$. Using HST imaging in ACS/F475W, ACS/F814W, WFC3/F125W, and WFC3/F160W, we model the lens mass distribution with an elliptical power-law profile and account for the effects of the cluster halo and nearby galaxies. The Einstein radius is $\\theta_{\\rm E}=0.38^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$'' ($3.2_{-0.1}^{+0.2}$ kpc) and the total enclosed mass is M$_{\\rm tot} (< \\theta_{\\rm E})=1.8^{+0.2}_{-0.1}\\times10^{11} {\\rm M}_{\\odot}$. We estimate that the cluster environment contributes $\\sim10$% of this total mass. Assuming a Chabrier IMF, the dark matter fraction within $\\theta_{{\\rm E}}...

  1. M32 Analogs? A Population of Massive Ultra Compact Dwarf Galaxies in intermediate redshift CLASH Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of relatively massive, M32-like Ultra Compact Dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in $0.2galaxy clusters imaged by the CLASH survey. Examining the nearly unresolved objects in the survey, we identify a sample of compact objects concentrated around the brightest cluster galaxies with colors similar to cluster red sequence galaxies. Their colors and magnitudes suggest stellar masses around $10^9 \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$. More than half of these galaxies have half-light radii smaller than 200pc, falling into the category of massive Ultra Compact Dwarfs (UCD), with properties similar to M32. The properties are consistent with a tidal stripping origin, but we can not rule out the possibility that they are early-formed compact objects trapped in massive dark matter halos. The 17 CLASH clusters studied in this work on average contain 2.7 of these objects in the their central 0.3 Mpc and 0.6 in their central 50 kpc. Our study demonstrates the possibility of statistically characteriz...

  2. Cosmological parameter constraints from galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering with the SDSS DR7

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Baldauf, Tobias; Seljak, Uros; Hirata, Christopher M; Nakajima, Reiko; Reyes, Reinabelle; Smith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the cross-correlation coefficient between galaxies and dark matter is very close to unity on scales outside a few virial radii of galaxy halos, independent of the details of how galaxies populate dark matter halos. This finding makes it possible to determine the dark matter clustering from measurements of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing and galaxy clustering. We present new cosmological parameter constraints based on large-scale measurements of spectroscopic galaxy samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7). We generalise the approach of Baldauf et al. (2010) to remove small scale information (below 2 and 4 Mpc/h for lensing and clustering measurements, respectively), where the cross-correlation coefficient differs from unity. We derive constraints for three galaxy samples covering 7131 sq. deg., containing 69150, 62150, and 35088 galaxies with mean redshifts of 0.11, 0.28, and 0.40. We clearly detect scale-dependent galaxy bias for the more luminous galaxy...

  3. X-ray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters of galaxies: Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z=1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Benson, B A; Forman, W R; Allen, S W; Bleem, L E; Ashby, M L N; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Dietrich, J P; Jones, C; Liu, J; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Schrabback, T; Song, J; Stalder, B; Vikhlinin, A; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) in brightest cluster galaxies. We report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift (0.40.5) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in brightest cluster galaxies has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the Universe (>7 Gyrs at z=0.8). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of 0.8-5*10^45 erg/s, enthalpies of 3-6*10^59 erg, and radii of 17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyrs, we find that the supermassive black holes in the brightest cluster galaxies may have accreted 10^8 to several 10^9M_sun of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high-redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1-1.0 keV per particle into the hot i...

  4. Photometric and clustering properties of hydrodynamical galaxies in a cosmological volume: results at z = 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuza, Sebastián E.; Dolag, Klaus; Saro, Alexandro

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we present results for the photometric and clustering properties of galaxies that arise in a Λ cold dark matter hydrodynamical simulation of the local Universe. The present-day distribution of matter was constructed to match the observed large-scale pattern of the IRAS 1.2-Jy galaxy survey. Our simulation follows the formation and evolution of galaxies in a cosmological sphere with a volume of ~1303h-3Mpc3 including supernova feedback, galactic winds, photoheating due to a uniform meta-galactic background and chemical enrichment of the gas and stellar populations. However, we do not consider active galactic nuclei. In the simulation, a total of ~20000 galaxies are formed above the resolution limit, and around 60 haloes are more massive than ~1014Msolar. Luminosities of the galaxies are calculated based on a stellar population synthesis model including the attenuation by dust, which is calculated from the cold gas left within the simulated galaxies. Environmental effects such as colour bimodality and differential clustering power of the hydrodynamical galaxies are qualitatively similar to observed trends. Nevertheless, the overcooling present in the simulations leads to too blue and overluminous brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). To overcome this, we mimic the late-time suppression of star formation in massive haloes by ignoring recently formed stars with the aid of a simple post-processing recipe. In this way we find luminosity functions, both for field and for group/cluster galaxies, in better agreement with observations. Specifically, the BCGs then follow the observed luminosity-halo mass relation. However, in such a case, the colour bimodality is basically lost, pointing towards a more complex interplay of late suppression of star formation than what is given by the simple scheme adopted.

  5. Cluster-lensing: A Python Package for Galaxy Clusters & Miscentering

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Jes

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new open source package for calculating properties of galaxy clusters, including NFW halo profiles with and without the effects of cluster miscentering. This pure-Python package, cluster-lensing, provides well-documented and easy-to-use classes and functions for calculating cluster scaling relations, including mass-richness and mass-concentration relations from the literature, as well as the surface mass density $\\Sigma(R)$ and differential surface mass density $\\Delta\\Sigma(R)$ profiles, probed by weak lensing magnification and shear. Galaxy cluster miscentering is especially a concern for stacked weak lensing shear studies of galaxy clusters, where offsets between the assumed and the true underlying matter distribution can lead to a significant bias in the mass estimates if not accounted for. This software has been developed and released in a public GitHub repository, and is licensed under the permissive MIT license. The cluster-lensing package is archived on Zenodo (Ford 2016). Full documenta...

  6. Tidal stripping of globular clusters in a simulated galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Felipe; Muriel, Hernán; Abadi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Using a cosmological N-body numerical simulation of the formation of a galaxy cluster- sized halo, we analyze the temporal evolution of its globular cluster population. We follow the dynamical evolution of 38 galactic dark matter halos orbiting in a galaxy cluster that at redshift z=0 has a virial mass of 1.71 * 10 ^14 Msol h^-1. In order to mimic both "blue" and "red" populations of globular clusters, for each galactic halo we select two different sets of particles at high redshift (z ~ 1), constrained by the condition that, at redshift z=0, their average radial density profiles are similar to the observed profiles. As expected, the general galaxy cluster tidal field removes a significant fraction of the globular cluster populations to feed the intracluster population. On average, halos lost approximately 16% and 29% of their initial red and blue globular cluster populations, respectively. Our results suggest that these fractions strongly depend on the orbital trajectory of the galactic halo, specifically on...

  7. Galaxy destruction and diffuse light in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Calcaneo-Roldan, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Malin, D; Sadler, E M; Calcaneo-Roldan, Carlos; Moore, Ben; Malin, David; Sadler, Elaine M.

    2000-01-01

    Deep images of the Centaurus and Coma clusters reveal two spectacular arcs of diffuse light that stretch for over 100 kpc, yet are just a few kpc wide. At a surface brightness of m_b \\sim 27-28th arcsec^-2, the Centaurus arc is the most striking example known of structure in the diffuse light component of a rich galaxy cluster. We use numerical simulations to show that this feature is most probably the tidal debris of a low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxy that has been disrupted by galaxy harassment, primarily by the gravitational potential of NGC 4709. High surface brightness disk galaxies are more stable to tidal shocks and lose less stellar mass, therefore their tidal debris is significantly fainter. Spheroidal galaxies can also produce features in the diffuse light component, yet these are even more diffuse and not as narrow. Only a luminous LSB galaxy on a fairly radial orbit, whose disk is co-rotating with its orbital path past pericentre can provide an acceptable reproduction of the extent, width ...

  8. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Soeren S

    2015-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies can have very high globular cluster specific frequencies, and the GCs are in general significantly more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars. In some dwarfs, such as Fornax, WLM, and IKN, the fraction of metal-poor stars that belong to GCs can be as high as 20%-25%, an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-2% typical of GCs in halos of larger galaxies. Given that chemical abundance anomalies appear to be present also in GCs in dwarf galaxies, this implies severe difficulties for self-enrichment scenarios that require GCs to have lost a large fraction of their initial masses. More generally, the number of metal-poor field stars in these galaxies is today less than what would originally have been present in the form of low-mass clusters if the initial cluster mass function was a power-law extending down to low masses. This may imply that the initial GC mass function in these dwarf galaxies was significantly more top-heavy than typically observed in present-day star forming environments.

  9. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Henry W; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the South Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01% - 10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster ...

  10. Clusters of galaxies: beyond the thermal view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaastra, J.S.; Bykov, A.M.; Schindler, S.; Bleeker, J.A.M.; Borgani, S.; Diaferio, A.; Dolag, K.; Durret, F.; Nevalainen, J.; Ohashi, T.; Paerels, F.; Petrosian, V.; Rephaeli, Y.; Richter, P.; Schaye, J.; Werner, N.

    2008-01-01

    We present the work of an international team at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern that worked together to review the current observational and theoretical status of the non-virialised X-ray emission components in clusters of galaxies. The subject is important for the study of

  11. EISily looking for distant galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, C; Iovino, A; Guzzo, L; Chincarini, G L; Lobo, Catarina; Lazzati, Davide; Iovino, Angela; Guzzo, Luigi; Chincarini, Guido

    1998-01-01

    We present a new algorithm to search for distant clusters of galaxies on catalogues deriving from imaging data, as those of the ESO Imaging Survey. We discuss the advantages of our technique relative to the ones developed before and present preliminary results of its application to the I--band data of the survey's patch A.

  12. Relativistic Particles in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ensslin, T A

    2002-01-01

    A brief overview on the theory and observations of relativistic particle populations in clusters of galaxies is given. The following topics are addressed: (i) the diffuse relativistic electron population within the intra-cluster medium (ICM) as seen in the cluster wide radio halos and possibly also seen in the high energy X-ray and extreme ultraviolet excess emissions of some clusters, (ii) the observed confined relativistic electrons within fresh and old radio plasma and their connection to cluster radio relics at cluster merger shock waves, (iii) the relativistic proton population within the ICM, and its observable consequences (if it exists), and (iv) the confined relativistic proton population (if it exists) within radio plasma. The importance of upcoming, sensitive gamma-ray telescopes for this research area is highlighted.

  13. Deep WIYN Imaging of the Globular Cluster System of the Lenticular Galaxy NGC 3607

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Derrick; Rhode, Katherine L.; Jorgenson, Regina

    2017-01-01

    Globular clusters serve as relics of a galaxy’s past history, because they are thought to be among the first objects to form in a galaxy. Measuring the properties of the globular cluster population of a galaxy — in particular the total number, spatial distribution, and color distribution of the clusters — can provide important clues about the formation and evolution of that galaxy. Here we present results from the analysis of the globular cluster population of NGC 3607, an S0 galaxy with M_V = -21.9 that is ~23 Mpc away and is the brightest member of the Leo II group. We used images from the Minimosaic camera on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope with total exposure times of 6300, 6000, and 5400 seconds in the B, V, and R filters, respectively, to image the globular cluster system of NGC 3607 well past its apparent radial extent of 6.3’ (41 kpc). Point-source globular clusters are selected with three-filter photometry to help eliminate foreground stars and background galaxies. The excellent seeing in our WIYN images (0.6” to 0.9”) also helped reduce contamination in the globular cluster candidate sample. Artificial star tests yielded 50% completeness levels of B = 25.4, V=25.2, and R=24.1 and we observed approximately 41% of the galaxy’s Globular Cluster Luminosity Function. We estimate the total number of globular clusters in NGC 3607 is 1000+/-50, which translates to specific frequency values of S_N = 1.7+/-0.3 and T = 2.6+/-0.3 for this galaxy’s luminosity and stellar mass. This research was supported in part by NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  14. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Klypin, A.A.

    1979-03-01

    The origin, space distribution, and emission of the hot intergalactic gas in galaxy clusters are discussed. This gas may have been left over from the period when the clusters were formed. According to the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation, primordial gas would have become heated and compressed into hot, thin pancake-shaped structures, representing protoclusters. As the primordial gas crosses the shock waves bounding the protocluster, its temperature and entropy will rise significantly. The gas not consumed in the formation of galaxies will remain in the hot phase, enriched with heavy elements from supernova explosions in the cluster members and from galactic winds. This gas will retain the entropy acquired during the contraction process, but its temperature will be governed by the depth of the cluster potential well. The primordial entropy of intracluster gas is estimated from this theory, and the results are compared with x-ray observations of clusters. The best fit is achieved for a nuclear region of 0.3-Mpc radius. Temperature fluctuations ..delta..T/Tapprox. = (1--2) x 10/sup -4/ in the microwave background radiation are inferred, depending only weakly on the model parameters.

  15. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  16. Adiabatic scaling relations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ascasibar, Y; Yepes, G; Müller, V; Gottlöber, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show that, contrary to popular belief, galaxy clusters are **not** expected to be self-similar, even when the only energy sources available are gravity and shock-wave heating. In particular, we investigate the scaling relations between mass, luminosity and temperature of galaxy groups and clusters in the absence of radiative processes. Theoretical expectations are derived from a polytropic model of the intracluster medium and compared with the results of high-resolution adiabatic gasdynamical simulations. It is shown that, in addition to the well-known relation between the mass and concentration of the dark matter halo, the effective polytropic index of the gas also varies systematically with cluster mass, and therefore neither the dark matter nor the gas profiles are exactly self-similar. It is remarkable, though, that the effects of concentration and polytropic index tend to cancel each other, leading to scaling relations whose logarithmic slopes roughly match the predictio...

  17. Joint Analysis of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering: Methodology and Forecasts for DES

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Y; Dodelson, S; Jain, B; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bridle, S L; Clampitt, J; Crocce, M; Fosalba, P; Gaztanaga, E; Honscheid, K; Rozo, E; Sobreira, F; Sánchez, C; Wechsler, R H; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; James, D J; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Miller, C J; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Weller, J; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large scale structure. This analysis will be carried out on data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. We develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting small scale lensing, which provides halo masses, and large scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects sub-dominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degen...

  18. Modeling the Color Magnitude Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Noelia; Castelli, Analia Smith; Bassino, Lilia P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The departure of galaxies in the bright end of the CMR with respect to the trend denoted by less luminous galaxies could be explained by the influence of minor mergers

  19. Supermodel Analysis of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco-Femiano, R; Lapi, A

    2009-01-01

    [abridged] We present the analysis of the X-ray brightness and temperature profiles for six clusters belonging to both the Cool Core and Non Cool Core classes, in terms of the Supermodel (SM) developed by Cavaliere, Lapi & Fusco-Femiano (2009). Based on the gravitational wells set by the dark matter halos, the SM straightforwardly expresses the equilibrium of the IntraCluster Plasma (ICP) modulated by the entropy deposited at the boundary by standing shocks from gravitational accretion, and injected at the center by outgoing blastwaves from mergers or from outbursts of Active Galactic Nuclei. The cluster set analyzed here highlights not only how simply the SM represents the main dichotomy Cool vs. Non Cool Core clusters in terms of a few ICP parameters governing the radial entropy run, but also how accurately it fits even complex brightness and temperature profiles. For Cool Core clusters like A2199 and A2597, the SM with a low level of central entropy straightforwardly yields the characteristic peaked pr...

  20. Baryon Content of Massive Galaxy Clusters (0.57 < z < 1.33)

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, I; Mcdonald, M; Bocquet, S; Ashby, M L; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Forman, W R; Gangkofner, C; Gonzalez, A H; Hennig, C; Liu, J; Reichardt, C L; Saro, A; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Song, J; Schrabback, T; Suhada, R; Strazzullo, V; Zenteno, A

    2014-01-01

    We study the stellar, Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) and intracluster medium (ICM) masses of 14 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected galaxy clusters with median redshift $z=0.9$ and median mass $M_{500}=6\\times10^{14}M_{\\odot}$. We estimate stellar masses for each cluster and BCG using six photometric bands spanning the range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared observed with the VLT, HST and Spitzer. The ICM masses are derived from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations, and the virial masses are derived from the SPT Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect signature. At $z=0.9$ the BCG mass $M_{\\star}^{\\textrm{BCG}}$ constitutes $0.12\\pm0.01$% of the halo mass for a $6\\times10^{14}M_{\\odot}$ cluster, and this fraction falls as $M_{500}^{-0.58\\pm0.07}$. The cluster stellar mass function has a characteristic mass $M_{0}=10^{11.0\\pm0.1}M_{\\odot}$, and the number of galaxies per unit mass in clusters is larger than in the field by a factor $1.65\\pm0.2$. Both results are consistent with measurements on group scales and ...

  1. Galaxy clusters and microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Quilis, V; Sáez, D

    1995-01-01

    Previous estimates of the microwave background anisotropies produced by freely falling spherical clusters are discussed. These estimates are based on the Swiss-Cheese and Tolman-Bondi models. It is proved that these models give only upper limits to the anisotropies produced by the observed galaxy clusters. By using spherically symmetric codes including pressureless matter and a hot baryonic gas, new upper limits are obtained. The contributions of the hot gas and the pressureless component to the total anisotropy are compared. The effects produced by the pressure are proved to be negligible; hence, estimations of the cluster anisotropies based on N-body simulations are hereafter justified. After the phenomenon of violent relaxation, any realistic rich cluster can only produce small anisotropies with amplitudes of order 10^{-7}. During the rapid process of violent relaxation, the anisotropies produced by nonlinear clusters are expected to range in the interval (10^{-6},10^{-5}). The angular scales of these anis...

  2. Properties of Simulated Magnetized Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dolag, K

    2000-01-01

    We study the evolution of magnetized clusters in a cosmological environment using magneto-hydro dynamical simulations. Large scale flows and merging of subclumps generate shear flows leading to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which, in addition to the compression of the gas where the magnetic field is frozen in, further amplify the magnetic field during the evolution of the cluster. Therefore, well-motivated initial magnetic fields of $^{1/2}=10^{-9} {\\rm G}$ reach the observed $\\sim\\mu{\\rm G}$ field strengths in the cluster cores at $z=0$. These magnetized clusters can be used to study the final magnetic field structure, the dynamical importance of magnetic fields for the interpretation of observed X-Ray properties, and help to constrain further processes in galaxy clusters like the population of relativistic particles giving rise to the observed radio halos or the behavior of magnetized cooling flows.

  3. Tracing cosmic evolution with clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Voit, G M

    2004-01-01

    The most successful cosmological models to date envision structure formation as a hierarchical process in which gravity is constantly drawing lumps of matter together to form increasingly larger structures. Clusters of galaxies currently sit atop this hierarchy as the largest objects that have had time to collapse under the influence of their own gravity. Thus, their appearance on the cosmic scene is also relatively recent. Two features of clusters make them uniquely useful tracers of cosmic evolution. First, clusters are the biggest things whose masses we can reliably measure because they are the largest objects to have undergone gravitational relaxation and entered into virial equilibrium. Mass measurements of nearby clusters can therefore be used to determine the amount of structure in the universe on scales of 10^14 to 10^15 solar masses, and comparisons of the present-day cluster mass distribution with the mass distribution at earlier times can be used to measure the rate of structure formation, placing ...

  4. Jellyfish: the origin and distribution of extreme ram-pressure stripping events in massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Conor; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke; Blumenthal, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the observational signatures and physical origin of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z = 0.3-0.7, based on images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen `jellyfish' galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define morphological criteria to select 211 additional, less obvious cases of RPS. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of 124 candidates so far confirmed 53 as cluster members. For the brightest and most favourably aligned systems, we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on the orientation of apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the onset of these events occurs primarily at large distances from the cluster core (>400 kpc), and that the trajectories of the affected galaxies feature high-impact parameters. Simple models show that such trajectories are highly improbable for galaxy infall along filaments but common for infall at high velocities, even after observational biases are accounted for, provided the duration of the resulting RPS events is ≲500 Myr. We thus tentatively conclude that extreme RPS events are preferentially triggered by cluster mergers, an interpretation that is supported by the disturbed dynamical state of many of the host clusters. This hypothesis implies that extreme RPS might occur also near the cores of merging poor clusters or even merging groups of galaxies. Finally, we present nine additional `jellyfish" galaxies at z > 0.3 discovered by us, thereby doubling the number of such systems known at intermediate redshift.

  5. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the ambient keV gas rushes to refill the wake of the buoyant bubble. The hot arc revealed in the temperature map may be one of the first instances in which ICM

  6. Small-scale galaxy clustering in the EAGLE simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Artale, M Celeste; Trayford, James W; Theuns, Tom; Farrow, Daniel J; Norberg, Peder; Zehavi, Idit; Bower, Richard G; Schaller, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We study present-day galaxy clustering in the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. EAGLE's galaxy formation parameters were calibrated to reproduce the redshift $z = 0.1$ galaxy stellar mass function, and the simulation also reproduces galaxy colours well. The simulation volume is too small to correctly sample large-scale fluctuations and we therefore concentrate on scales smaller than a few megaparsecs. We find very good agreement with observed clustering measurements from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, when galaxies are binned by stellar mass, colour, or luminosity. However, low-mass red-galaxies are clustered too strongly, which is at least partly due to limited numerical resolution. Apart from this limitation, we conclude that EAGLE galaxies inhabit similar dark matter haloes as observed GAMA galaxies, and that the radial distribution of satellite galaxies as function of stellar mass and colour is similar to that observed as well.

  7. Dynamical evolution of globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzio, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    The dynamical processes that affect globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies are analyzed. Two-body and impulsive approximations are utilized to study dynamical friction, drag force, tidal stripping, tidal radii, globular-cluster swapping, tidal accretion, and galactic cannibalism. The evolution of galaxies and the collision of galaxies are simulated numerically; the steps involved in the simulation are described. The simulated data are compared with observations. Consideration is given to the number of galaxies, halo extension, location of the galaxies, distribution of the missing mass, nonequilibrium initial conditions, mass dependence, massive central galaxies, globular-cluster distribution, and lost globular clusters. 116 references.

  8. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  9. Spectral imaging of galaxy clusters with Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, H; Rasia, E

    2016-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect is a promising tool for detecting the presence of hot gas out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. We developed a spectral imaging algorithm dedicated to the SZ observations of nearby galaxy clusters with Planck, with the aim of revealing gas density anisotropies related to the filamentary accretion of materials, or pressure discontinuities induced by the propagation of shock fronts. To optimize an unavoidable trade-off between angular resolution and precision of the SZ flux measurements, the algorithm performs a multiscale analysis of the SZ maps as well as of other extended components, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the Galactic thermal dust. The demixing of the SZ signal is tackled through kernel weighted likelihood maximizations. The CMB anisotropies are further analyzed through a wavelet analysis, while the Galactic foregrounds and SZ maps are analyzed via a curvelet analysis that best preserves their anisotropic details. The algorithm perfo...

  10. Are Galaxy Clusters Suggesting an Accelerating Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Cunha, J V; 10.1063/1.3462638

    2010-01-01

    The present cosmic accelerating stage is discussed through a new kinematic method based on the Sunyaev- Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness data from galaxy clusters. By using the SZE/X-ray data from 38 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.14 \\leq z \\leq 0.89 $ [Bonamente et al., Astrop. J. {\\bf 647}, 25 (2006)] it is found that the present Universe is accelerating and that the transition from an earlier decelerating to a late time accelerating regime is relatively recent. The ability of the ongoing Planck satellite mission to obtain tighter constraints on the expansion history through SZE/X-ray angular diameters is also discussed. Our results are fully independent on the validity of any metric gravity theory, the possible matter- energy contents filling the Universe, as well as on the SNe Ia Hubble diagram from which the presenting accelerating stage was inferred.

  11. The Evolution of Galaxy Clustering in Hierarchical Models

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The main ingredients of recent semi-analytic models of galaxy formation are summarised. We present predictions for the galaxy clustering properties of a well specified LCDM model whose parameters are constrained by observed local galaxy properties. We present preliminary predictions for evolution of clustering that can be probed with deep pencil beam surveys.

  12. Merging Galaxy Cluster A2255 in Mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyunjin; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Hwang, Narae; Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Lim, Sungsoon; Matsuhara, Hideo; Seo, Hyunjong; Wada, Takehiko; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2011-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) observation of a nearby galaxy cluster, A2255, by the AKARI space telescope. Using AKARI's continuous wavelength coverage between 3 and 24 μm and the wide field of view, we investigate the properties of cluster member galaxies to see how the infall of the galaxies, the cluster substructures, and the cluster-cluster merger influence their evolution. We show that the excess of MIR (~11 μm) flux is a good indicator for discriminating galaxies at different evolutionary stages and for dividing galaxies into three classes accordingly: strong MIR-excess (N3 - S11>0.2) galaxies that include both unobscured and obscured star-forming galaxies; weak MIR-excess (-2.0 S11 5 Gyr) galaxies where the MIR emission arises mainly from the circumstellar dust around AGB stars; and intermediate MIR-excess (-1.2 S11 < 0.2) galaxies in between the two classes that are less than a few Gyr old past the prime star formation activity. With the MIR-excess diagnostics, we investigate how local and cluster-scale environments affect the individual galaxies. We derive the total star formation rate (SFR) and the specific SFR of A2255 using the strong MIR-excess galaxies. The dust-free, total SFR of A2255 is ~130 M sun yr-1, which is consistent with the SFRs of other clusters of galaxies at similar redshifts and with similar masses. We find no strong evidence that supports enhanced star formation either inside the cluster or in the substructure region, suggesting that the infall or the cluster merging activities tend to suppress star formation. The intermediate MIR-excess galaxies, representing galaxies in transition from star-forming galaxies to quiescent galaxies, are located preferentially at the medium density region or cluster substructures with higher surface density of galaxies. Our findings suggest that galaxies are being transformed from star-forming galaxies into red, quiescent galaxies from the infall region through near the core which can be explained

  13. Shocks and cold fronts in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Markevitch, M L; Markevitch, Maxim; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    The currently operating X-ray imaging observatories provide us with an exquisitely detailed view of the Megaparsec-scale plasma atmospheres in nearby galaxy clusters. At z < 0.05, the Chandra's 1" angular resolution corresponds to linear resolution of less than a kiloparsec, which is smaller than some interesting linear scales in the intracluster plasma. This enables us to study the previously unseen hydrodynamic phenomena in clusters: classic bow shocks driven by the infalling subclusters, and the unanticipated "cold fronts," or sharp contact discontinuities between regions of gas with different entropies. The ubiquitous cold fronts are found in mergers as well as around the central density peaks in "relaxed" clusters. They are caused by motion of cool, dense gas clouds in the ambient higher-entropy gas. These clouds are either remnants of the infalling subclusters, or the displaced gas from the cluster's own cool cores. Both shock fronts and cold fronts provide novel tools to study the intracluster plasm...

  14. Masses of galaxy clusters from gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, Henk; Dahle, Haakon; Israel, Holger; Limousin, Marceau; Meneghetti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Despite consistent progress in numerical simulations, the observable properties of galaxy clusters are difficult to predict ab initio. It is therefore important to compare both theoretical and observational results to a direct measure of the cluster mass. This can be done by measuring the gravitational lensing effects caused by the bending of light by the cluster mass distribution. In this review we discuss how this phenomenon can be used to determine cluster masses and study the mass distribution itself. As sample sizes increase, the accuracy of the weak lensing mass estimates needs to improve accordingly. We discuss the main practical aspects of these measurements. We review a number of applications and highlight some recent results.

  15. Measuring the growth of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Diaferio, Antonaldo

    2015-01-01

    We suggest how we can use the mass profile of galaxy clusters beyond their virial radius to measure their mass accretion rate, a key prediction of structure formation models. The mass profile can be estimated by applying the caustic technique to dense redshift surveys of clusters and their outskirts, where dynamical equilibrium does not necessarily hold. An additional probe of the mass growth of clusters is their mass fraction in substructures. We show that the caustic technique, that identifies cluster substructures as a by-product, returns catalogs of substructures with mass larger than a few $10^{13}h^{-1}M_\\odot$ that are between 60% and 80% complete, depending on the density of the redshift survey.

  16. Globular cluster systems of six shell galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sikkema, G; Carter, D; Valentijn, E A; Balcells, M

    2006-01-01

    Shells in Elliptical Galaxies are faint, sharp-edged features, believed to provide evidence of a recent ($\\sim 0.5 - 2 \\times 10^9$ years ago) merger event. We analyse the Globular Cluster (GC) systems of six shell elliptical galaxies, to examine the effects of mergers upon the GC formation history. We examine the colour distributions, and investigate differences between red and blue globular cluster populations. We present luminosity functions, spatial distributions and specific frequencies ($S_N$) at 50 kpc radius for our sample. We present V and I magnitudes for cluster candidates measured with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Galaxy background light is modelled and removed, and magnitudes are measured in 8 pixel (0.4 arcsec) diameter apertures. Background contamination is removed using counts from HDFS. We find that the colour distributions for NGC 3923 and NGC 5982 have a bimodal form typical of bright ellipticals, with peaks near $V-I=0.92 \\pm 0.04$ and $V-I=1.18 \\pm 0.06$. In NGC 7626, we fin...

  17. The Hydra I cluster core. I. Stellar populations in the cD galaxy NGC 3311

    CERN Document Server

    Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Coccato, Lodovico; Hilker, Michael; de Oliveira, Cláudia Mendes; Richtler, Tom

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged for arXiv) The history of the mass assembly of brightest cluster galaxies may be studied by the mapping the stellar populations at large radial distances from the galaxy centre. We provide extended and robust measurements of the stellar population parameters in NGC 3311, the cD galaxy at the centre of the Hydra I cluster and out to three effective radii. Using seven absorption-features defined in the Lick/IDS system and single stellar populations models, we obtained luminosity-weighted ages, metallicities and alpha element abundances. The trends in the Lick indices and the distribution of the stellar population parameters indicate that the stars of NGC 3311 may be divided into two radial regimes, one within and the another beyond one effective radius, $R_e = 8.4$ kpc, similar to the distinction between inner galaxy and external halo derived from the NGC 3311 velocity dispersion profile. The inner galaxy ($R\\leq R_e$) is old (age $\\sim 14$ Gyr), have negative metallicity gradients and positive alpha ...

  18. Prospects of detecting gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters: cosmic rays and dark matter annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Pinzke, Anders; Bergstrom, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We study the possibility for detecting gamma-ray emission in galaxy clusters. We consider 1) cosmic ray (CR) induced pion decay which is thought to dominate the astrophysical signal from clusters, 2) different representative benchmark models of supersymmetric dark matter (DM), and 3) leptophilic models of DM annihilation that include a Sommerfeld enhancement (SFE). To model DM annihilation, we consider hadronization of annihilating neutralinos, internal bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton emission from the cosmic microwave background as well as from a realistic spatial and spectral distribution of dust and stellar light. We predict the Virgo and Fornax clusters to be the brightest DM sources and find a particularly low CR induced background for Fornax. For a minimum substructure mass given by the DM free-streaming scale, we find a substructure boost factor of more than 1000. Since the annihilation flux of substructures is mostly contributed by the regions around the virial radius, the resulting surface bright...

  19. A Color-Magnitude Diagram for a Globular Cluster In the Giant Elliptical Galaxy NGC 5128

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, G L H; Harris, W E

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain WFPC2 (V,I) photometry for a large sample of stars in the outer halo of the giant elliptical NGC 5128 (d = 4 Mpc). The globular cluster N5128-C44, at the center of the Planetary Camera field, is well enough resolved to permit the construction of a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) for it which covers the brightest two magnitudes of the giant branch. The CMD is consistent with that of a normal old, moderately low-metallicity ([Fe/H] = -1.30 globular cluster, distinctly more metal-poor than most of the field halo stars at the same projected location (which average [Fe/H] ~ -0.5). This is the most distant globular cluster in which direct color-magnitude photometry has been achieved to date, and the first one belonging to a giant E galaxy.

  20. CLUSTERING AND PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES AROUND HIGH REDSHIFT RADIO SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Bornancini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the clustering properties of galaxies in the eld 0:5 < z < 1:5 Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS radio sources selected from SUMSS and NVSS surveys. We nd a comoving correlation length of r0 = 14:0+.- 2:8 h-1 Mpc. We compare our ndings with those obtained in a cosmological N-body simulation populated with GALFORM semi-analytic galaxies. We nd that clusters of galaxies with masses in the range M = 1013:4-14:2 h-1 M have a cluster-galaxy cross-correlation amplitude comparable to those found between USS hosts and galaxies. These results suggest that distant radio galaxies are excellent tracers of galaxy overdensities and pinpoint the progenitors of present day rich clusters of galaxies.

  1. Recent galaxy mergers and residual star formation of red sequence galaxies in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Ree, Chang H; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the GALEX ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in 4 rich Abell clusters at z \\leq 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r' colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5), and that number was doubled (~ 72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r' \\leq 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5xR_{200}. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R_{200}. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the sub-structures in ...

  2. Cosmology with Galaxy Cluster Phase Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Alejo; Huterer, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach to constrain accelerating cosmologies with galaxy cluster phase spaces. With the Fisher matrix formalism we forecast constraints on the cosmological parameters that describe the cosmological expansion history. We find that our probe has the potential of providing constraints comparable to, or even stronger than, those from other cosmological probes. More specifically, with 1000 (100) clusters uniformly distributed in redshift between $ 0 \\leq z \\leq 0.8$, after applying a conservative $40\\%$ mass scatter prior on each cluster and marginalizing over all other parameters, we forecast $1\\sigma$ constraints on the dark energy equation of state $w$ and matter density parameter $\\Omega_M$ of $\\sigma_w = 0.161 (0.508)$ and $\\sigma_{\\Omega_M} = 0.001 (0.005)$ in a flat universe. Assuming the same galaxy cluster parameter priors and adding a prior on the Hubble constant we can achieve tight constraints on the CPL parametrization of the dark energy equation of state parameters $w_0$ and $w_a...

  3. MAGNETIC TURBULENCE IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. EnBlin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy clusters are large laboratories for magnetic plasma turbulence which permit us to confront our theoretical concepts of magnetogenesis with detailed observations. Magnetic turbulence in clusters can be studied via the radio-synchrotron emission from the intra-cluster medium in the form of cluster radio relics and halos. The power spectrum of turbulent magnetic elds can be examined via Faraday rotation analysis of extended radio sources. In case of the Hydra A cool core, the observed magnetic spectrum can be understood in terms of a turbulence-mediated feedback loop between gas cooling and the jet activity of the central galaxy. Finally, methods to measure higher-order statistics of the magnetic eld using Stokes-parameter correlations are discussed, which permit us to determine the power spectrum of the magnetic tension force. This fourth-order statistical quantity o ers a way to discriminate between di erent magnetic turbulence scenarios and di erent eld structures using radio polarimetric observations.

  4. Turbulent Mixing in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, W T; Kim, Woong-Tae; Narayan, Ramesh

    2003-01-01

    We present a model of galaxy clusters in which radiative cooling from the hot gas is balanced by heat transport through turbulent mixing. We describe the turbulent heat diffusion by means of a mixing length prescription with a dimensionless parameter alpha_mix. Models with alpha_mix ~ 0.01-0.03 yield reasonably good fits to the observed density and temperature profiles of several cooling flow clusters. The model clusters do not experience any serious thermal instability: they are either completely stable or have growth times considerably longer than the Hubble time. With the assumption that alpha_mix is roughly the same for all clusters, the model reproduces remarkably well the observed scalings of X-ray luminosity, gas mass fraction and entropy with temperature. The break in the scaling relations at kT ~ 1-2 keV is explained by the break in the cooling function at around this temperature, and the entropy floor observed in galaxy groups is reproduced naturally.

  5. Measuring the Mean and Scatter of the X-ray Luminosity -- Optical Richness Relation for maxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.A.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2007-10-02

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  6. Searching for galaxy clusters in the Kilo-Degree Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovich, M.; Puddu, E.; Bellagamba, F.; Roncarelli, M.; Moscardini, L.; Bardelli, S.; Grado, A.; Getman, F.; Maturi, M.; Huang, Z.; Napolitano, N.; McFarland, J.; Valentijn, E.; Bilicki, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the tools used to search for galaxy clusters in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), and our first results. The cluster detection is based on an implementation of the optimal filtering technique that enables us to identify clusters as over-densities in the distribution of galaxie

  7. Stellar Contents and Globular Cluster Candidates in the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 300

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S C; Lee, M G; Kim, Sang Chul; Sung, Hwankyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    We present UBVI CCD photometry of the stellar contents and globular cluster(GC) candidates in the spiral galaxy NGC 300 in the Sculptor group. Color-magnitude diagrams for 18 OB associations having more than 30 member stars are presented. The slope of the initial mass function for the bright stars in NGC 300 is estimated to be Gamma = -2.6 +/- 0.3. Assuming the distance to NGC 300 of (m-M)_0 = 26.53 +/- 0.07, the mean absolute magnitude of three brightest blue stars is obtained to be = -8.95 mag. We have performed search for GCs in NGC 300 and have found 17 GC candidates in this galaxy. Some characteristics of these GC candidates are discussed.

  8. Galaxy Clusters as Tele-ALP-scopes

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Axion-like particles have good theoretical motivation and are characterized by conversion to photons in astrophysical magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most efficient convertors of axion-like particles to photons in the universe. I discuss the physics and phenomenology of ALPs, and describe their astrophysical implications, with particular reference to the recently observed 3.5 keV X-ray line that is a candidate for a dark matter decay line. I discuss interpretations of this line in terms of dark matter decaying to an axion-like particle, that then converts to a photon in cluster magnetic fields, and describe the compatibility of this scenario with data and the different phenomenology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters.

  9. Theory of galaxy dynamics in clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A

    2000-01-01

    Analytical estimates of the mass and radial dependence of the rates of galaxy mergers and of tidal interactions are derived for clusters and groups of galaxies, taking into account the tides from the system potential that limit the sizes of galaxies. Only high mass galaxies undergo significant major merging before being themselves cannibalized by more massive galaxies. Strong tides from the group/cluster potential severely limit the merger/tide cross-sections in the central regions, and while tides are most efficient at the periphery, one should see merging encounters further inside rich clusters.

  10. Dynamical Analyses of Galaxy Clusters With Large Redshift Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, J. J.; Richstone, D. O.; Wegner, G.

    1998-12-01

    We construct equilibrium models of galaxy orbits in five nearby galaxy clusters to study the distribution of binding mass, the nature of galaxy orbits and the kinematic differences between cluster populations of emission-line and non emission-line galaxies. We avail ourselves of 1718 galaxy redshifts (and 1203 cluster member redshifts) in this Jeans analysis; most of these redshifts are new, coming from multifiber spectroscopic runs on the MDM 2.4m with the Decaspec and queue observing on WIYN with Hydra. In addition to the spectroscopic data we have V and R band CCD mosaics (obtained with the MDM 1.3m) of the Abell region in each of these clusters. Our scientific goals include: (i) a quantitative estimate of the range of binding masses M500 consistent with the optical and X-ray data, (ii) an estimate of the typical galaxy oribital anisotropies required to make the galaxy data consistent with the NFW expectation for the cluster potential, (iii) a better understanding of the systematics inherent in the process of rescaling and ``stacking'' galaxy cluster observations, (iv) a reexamination of the recent CNOC results implying that emission-line (blue) galaxies are an equilibrium population with a more extended radial distribution than their non emission-line (red) galaxy counterparts and (v) a measure of the galaxy contribution to the cluster mass of baryons.

  11. The thousand Brightest HIPASS Galaxies : HIMass Function and Omega_HI HIMass Function and Omega_HI

    CERN Document Server

    Zwaan, M A; Koribalski, B S; Henning, P A; Kilborn, V A; Ryder, S D; Barnes, D G; Bhathal, R; Boyce, P J; De Blok, W J G; Disney, M J; Drinkwater, M J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; Gibson, B K; Green, A J; Haynes, R F; Jerjen, H; Juraszek, S; Kesteven, M J; Knezek, P M; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Meyer, M; Minchin, R F; Mould, J R; O'Brien, J; Oosterloo, T; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Ryan-Weber, E; Sadler, E M; Schröder, A; Stewart, I M; Stootman, F; Warren, B; Waugh, M; Webster, R L; Wright, A E

    2003-01-01

    We present a new accurate measurement of the HI mass function of galaxies from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog, a sample of 1000 galaxies with the highest HI peak flux densities in the southern hemisphere (Koribalski et al. 2003). This sample spans nearly four orders of magnitude in HI mass (from log M_HI/M_sun=6.8 to 10.6, H0=75) and is the largest sample of HI selected galaxies to date. We develop a bivariate maximum likelihood technique to measure the space density of galaxies, and show that this is a robust method, insensitive to the effects of large scale structure. The resulting HI mass function can be fitted satisfactorily with a Schechter function with faint-end slope alpha=-1.30. This slope is found to be dependent on morphological type, with later type galaxies giving steeper slopes. We extensively test various effects that potentially bias the determination of the HI mass function, including peculiar motions of galaxies, large scale structure, selection bias, and inclination effects, and quantify ...

  12. The transformation of Spirals into S0 galaxies in the cluster environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro eD'onofrio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the observational evidences of the morphological transformation of Spirals into S0 galaxies in the cluster environment exploiting two big databases of galaxy clusters: WINGS (0.04galaxies in clusters is almost a factor of ∼ 3 − 4 larger today than at redshift z ∼ 1; 2 the fraction of S0’s to Spirals increases on average by a factor ∼ 2 every Gyr; 3 the average rate of transformation for Spirals (not considering the infall of new galaxies from the cosmic web is: ∼ 5 Sp→S0’s per Gyr and ∼ 2 Sp→E’s per Gyr; 4 there are evidences that the interstellar gas of Spirals is stripped by an hot intergalactic medium; 5 there are also indirect hints that major/minor merging events have played a role in the transformation of Spiral galaxies. In particular, we show that: 1 the ratio between the number of S0’s and Spirals (NS0/NSp in the WINGS clusters is correlated with their X-ray luminosity LX ; 2 that the brightest and massive S0’s are always close to the cluster center; 3 that the mean Se ́rsic index of S0’s is always larger than that of Spirals (and lower than E’s for galaxy stellar masses above 10^9.5M⊙; 4 that the number of E’s in clusters cannot be constant; 5 that the largest difference between the mean mass of S0’s and E’s with respect to Spirals is observed in clusters with low velocity dispersion.Finally, by comparing the properties of the various morphological types for galaxies in clusters and in the field, we find that the most significant effect of the environment is the stripping of the outer galaxy regions, resulting in a systematic difference in effective radius and Se ́rsic index.

  13. Statistical Issues in Galaxy Cluster Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The number and growth of massive galaxy clusters are sensitive probes of cosmological structure formation. Surveys at various wavelengths can detect clusters to high redshift, but the fact that cluster mass is not directly observable complicates matters, requiring us to simultaneously constrain scaling relations of observable signals with mass. The problem can be cast as one of regression, in which the data set is truncated, the (cosmology-dependent) underlying population must be modeled, and strong, complex correlations between measurements often exist. Simulations of cosmological structure formation provide a robust prediction for the number of clusters in the Universe as a function of mass and redshift (the mass function), but they cannot reliably predict the observables used to detect clusters in sky surveys (e.g. X-ray luminosity). Consequently, observers must constrain observable-mass scaling relations using additional data, and use the scaling relation model in conjunction with the mass function to predict the number of clusters as a function of redshift and luminosity.

  14. Dwarf galaxies in the Antlia Cluster: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V S; Cellone, S A; Richtler, T; Dirsch, B; Infante, L; Aruta, C; Gómez, M

    2006-01-01

    We present the first results of a project aimed to study the galaxy population of the Antlia cluster, the third nearest galaxy cluster after Virgo and Fornax. The observations for the Antlia project consist of Washington wide-field images taken with the MOSAIC camera mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope. Our preliminary results correspond to the identification and classification of dwarf galaxies in the central cluster region, extending the list of Ferguson & Sandage (1990). The final aim of our project is to study the luminosity function, morphology and structural parameters of dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster with a more complete sample.

  15. IPC two-color analysis of x ray galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1990-01-01

    The mass distributions were determined of several clusters of galaxies by using X ray surface brightness data from the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Determining cluster mass distributions is important for constraining the nature of the dark matter which dominates the mass of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the Universe. Galaxy clusters are permeated with hot gas in hydrostatic equilibrium with the gravitational potentials of the clusters. Cluster mass distributions can be determined from x ray observations of cluster gas by using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and knowledge of the density and temperature structure of the gas. The x ray surface brightness at some distance from the cluster is the result of the volume x ray emissivity being integrated along the line of sight in the cluster.

  16. Emission Line Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in WINGS clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Bettoni, D; Poggianti, B M; Moretti, A; Fasano, G; Fritz, J; Cava, A; Varela, J; Omizzolo, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey, Fasano et al. 2006). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We have examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star forming galaxies, transition objects and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency with respect to control samples, and by a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity (up to one order of magnitude in equivalent width with respect to control samples for transition objects) that implies a lower amount of ionised gas per unit mass and a lower s...

  17. Weak lensing galaxy cluster field reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullo, E.; Pires, S.; Jauzac, M.; Kneib, J.-P.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we compare three methods to reconstruct galaxy cluster density fields with weak lensing data. The first method called FLens integrates an inpainting concept to invert the shear field with possible gaps, and a multi-scale entropy denoising procedure to remove the noise contained in the final reconstruction, that arises mostly from the random intrinsic shape of the galaxies. The second and third methods are based on a model of the density field made of a multi-scale grid of radial basis functions. In one case, the model parameters are computed with a linear inversion involving a singular value decomposition (SVD). In the other case, the model parameters are estimated using a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain optimization implemented in the lensing software LENSTOOL. Methods are compared on simulated data with varying galaxy density fields. We pay particular attention to the errors estimated with resampling. We find the multi-scale grid model optimized with Monte Carlo Markov Chain to provide the best results, but at high computational cost, especially when considering resampling. The SVD method is much faster but yields noisy maps, although this can be mitigated with resampling. The FLens method is a good compromise with fast computation, high signal-to-noise ratio reconstruction, but lower resolution maps. All three methods are applied to the MACS J0717+3745 galaxy cluster field, and reveal the filamentary structure discovered in Jauzac et al. We conclude that sensitive priors can help to get high signal-to-noise ratio, and unbiased reconstructions.

  18. Joint Analysis of Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering: Methodology and Forecasts for DES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-07-19

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large scale structure. Our analysis will be carried out on data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. We develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting small scale lensing, which provides halo masses, and large scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects sub-dominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degeneracies necessitate the detailed joint modeling of the galaxy sample that we employ. Finally, we conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/optimistically constraining the growth function to 7.9%/4.8% with its first-year data that covered over 1000 square degrees, and to 3.9%/2.3% with its full five-year data that will survey 5000 square degrees, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  19. Clusters of galaxies associated with quasars. I. 3C 206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H.K.C.; Green, R.F.; Kinman, T.D. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA); Montreal Universite (Canada); Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Multislit spectroscopy and three-color CCD photometry of the galaxies in the cluster associated with the quasar 3C 206 (PKS 0837-12) at z = 0.198 are presented. This cluster is the richest environment of any low-redshift quasar observed in an Abell richness class 1 cluster. The cluster has a very flattened structure and a very concentrated core about the quasar. Most of the galaxies in this field have colors and luminosities consistent with normal galaxies at this redshift. The background-corrected blue fraction of galaxies is consistent with values for other rich clusters. The existence of several blue galaxies in the concentrated cluster core is an anomaly for a region of such high galaxy density, however, suggesting the absence of a substantial intracluster medium. This claim is supported by the Fanaroff-Riley (1974) class II morphology of the radio source. The velocity dispersion calculated from 11 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members is 500 + or - 110 km/s, which is slightly lower than the average for Abell class 1 clusters. A high frequency of interaction between the quasar host galaxy and cluster core members at low relative velocities, and a low intracluster gas pressure, may comprise a favorable environment for quasar activity. The properties of the cluster of galaxies associated with 3C 206 are consistent with this model. 59 refs.

  20. Environmental Effects on Late-Type Galaxies in Nearby Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A

    2006-01-01

    The transformations taking place in late-type galaxies in the environment of rich clusters of galaxies at z=0 are reviewed. From the handful of late-type galaxies that inhabit local clusters, whether they were formed in-situ and survived as such, avoiding transformation or even destruction or if they are newcomers that recently infall from outside, we can learn an important lesson on the latest stages of galaxy evolution. We start by reviewing the observational scenario, covering the broadest possible stretch of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the gas tracers, the star formation tracers, the old star tracers and the dust. Strong emphasis is given to the three nearby, well studied clusters Virgo, A1367 and Coma, representative of different evolutionary stages, from unrelaxed, spiral rich (Virgo) to relaxed, spiral poor clusters (Coma). We continue by providing a review of models of galaxy interactions relevant to clusters of galaxies. Prototypes of various mechanisms and processes are discussed and their ty...

  1. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. IV. Intergalactic Globular Clusters and the Massive Globular Cluster System at the Core of the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzmán, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Phillipps, Steven; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Russell J.; Tully, Brent; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is

  2. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : IV. Intergalactic Globular Clusters and the Massive Globular Cluster System at the Core of the Coma Galaxy Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzman, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Phillipps, Steven; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Russell J.; Tully, Brent; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is

  3. Lensing clusters of galaxies in the SDSS-Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Lue Wen; Jin-Lin Han; Yun-Ying Jiang

    2011-01-01

    We identify new strong lensing clusters of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Ⅲ (SDSS DR8) by visually inspecting color images of a large sample of clusters of galaxies.We find 68 new clusters showing giant arcs in addition to 30 known lensing systems.Among 68 cases,13 clusters are "almost certain" lensing systems with tangential giant arcs,22 clusters are "probable" and 31 clusters are "possible" lensing systems.We also find two exotic systems with blue rings.The giant arcs have angular separations of 2.0" - 25.7" from the bright central galaxies.We note that the rich clusters are more likely to be lensing systems and the separations between the arcs and the central galaxies increase with cluster richness.

  4. Far Ultraviolet Morphology of Star Forming Filaments in Cool Core Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, Grant R; Baum, Stefi A; Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, Michael; Combes, Françoise; Li, Yuan; McNamara, Brian; Bremer, Malcolm N; Clarke, Tracy E; Donahue, Megan; Edge, Alastair C; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen L; Hogan, Michael T; Oonk, Raymond; Quillen, Alice C; Sanders, Jeremy S; Salomé, Philippe; Voit, G Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star forming clouds and filaments in the central ($ 5$ \\Msol) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Ly$\\alpha$, narrowband H$\\alpha$, broadband optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot ($\\sim10^{7-8}$ K) and warm ionised ($\\sim 10^4$ K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright AGN outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend toward and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed {\\it in situ} by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations...

  5. Star Cluster Demographics. I. A General Framework and Application to the Antennae Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B C; Fall, S M; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali

    2006-01-01

    We present a framework for understanding the demographics of star cluster systems, and develop a toy model which incorporates a universal initial power law mass function, selected formation histories, selected disruption laws, and a convolution with common artifacts and selection effects found in observational data. The model confirms that the observed correlation between the brightest young cluster in a galaxy and the total number of young clusters can be understood as a statistical size-of-sample effect, rather than a difference in the physical process responsible for the formation of the clusters. A comparison is made between different cluster disruption laws and it is shown that the break in the dN/d\\tau diagram used to determine the parameters in the Boutloukos & Lamers model may be produced by incompleteness near the breakpoint. A model of the Antennae galaxies is developed and compared with the observational data. An important component of our model is the use of a "two-stage" disruption process, w...

  6. Hiding in Plain Sight - Recovering Clusters of Galaxies with the Strongest AGN in Their Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Green, T S; Ebeling, H; Burgett, W S; Draper, P W; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge in understanding the feedback mechanism of AGN in Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) is the inherent rarity of catching an AGN during its strong outburst phase. This is exacerbated by the ambiguity of differentiating between AGN and clusters in X-ray observations. If there is evidence for an AGN then the X-ray emission is commonly assumed to be dominated by the AGN emission, introducing a selection effect against the detection of AGN in BCGs. In order to recover these 'missing' clusters, we systematically investigate the colour-magnitude relation around some ~3500 ROSAT All Sky Survey selected AGN, looking for signs of a cluster red sequence. Amongst our 22 candidate systems, we independently rediscover several confirmed systems, where a strong AGN resides in a central galaxy. We compare the X-ray luminosity to red sequence richness distribution of our AGN candidate systems with that of a similarly selected comparison sample of ~1000 confirmed clusters and identify seven 'best' candidates (all ...

  7. Detecting the orientation of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pfrommer, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies, filled with hot, magnetised plasma, are the largest bound objects in existence and an important touchstone in understanding the formation of structures in our Universe. Because in clusters, thermal conduction follows field lines, magnetic fields strongly shape the cluster's thermal history, which remains mysterious; some should have long since cooled and collapsed. In a seemingly unrelated puzzle, recent observations of Virgo cluster spiral galaxies imply ridges of strong, coherent magnetic fields offset from their centre. Here we demonstrate, using 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations, that such ridges are easily explained by galaxies sweeping up field lines as they orbit inside the cluster. This magnetic drape is then literally lit up with cosmic rays from the galaxies' stars, generating coherent polarised emission at the galaxies' leading edges. This immediately presents a first technique for probing local orientations and characteristic length scales of cluster magnetic fields. The ...

  8. X-ray sources in globular clusters of other galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, W H G; Lewin, Walter H.G.; Verbunt, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A large number of X-ray sources in globular clusters of galaxies other than the Milky Way has been found with Chandra. We discuss three issues relating to these sources. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the sources in globular clusters of M31 is marginally compatible with the XLF of globular clusters of the Milky Way. The individual XLFs of a dozen elliptical galaxies, after correction for incompleteness, are compatible with one another and show no break; however, the XLF found by adding the individual XLFs of elliptical galaxies has a break at L_x about 5x10(38) ergs/s. For the moment there is no evidence for a difference between the XLFs of sources inside and outside globular clusters of elliptical galaxies. It is not (yet?) possible to decide which fraction of low-mass X-ray binaries in elliptical galaxies outside globular clusters have formed inside globular clusters.

  9. Cosmological constraints on galaxy cluster structure

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2014-01-01

    Observations of galaxy clusters (GC's) are a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the Universe at $z<2$. However, the determination of their real shape and structure is not completely understood and the assumption of asphericity is often used in several cosmological tests. In this work, we propose methods to infer the elongation of the gas distribution of GC's based on measurements of the cosmic expansion rate, luminosity distance to type Ia supernovae, X-Ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich properties of GC's and on the validity of the so-called distance duality relation. For the sample considered, we find that the clusters look elongated preferentially aligned along the line of sight with the results of the different methods showing a good agreement with each other and with those predicted by the current cosmic concordance model.

  10. Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy E.

    2012-05-01

    Steep spectrum radio emission associated with galaxy clusters comes from compact central active galactic nuclei (AGN) driven radio sources in dense cool core clusters as well as from large regions of diffuse (halo and relic) emission associated with dynamically complex merging systems. These radio halos and relics are best traced at low radio frequencies where details of their morphology, location and spectral index distribution can be used to probe the underlying acceleration mechanism(s) as well as important details of large scale structure formation. Low frequency radio observations also play an important role in the study of AGN feedback into the intracluster medium and the regulation of cooling cores. While spectacular results are coming from the current generation of low frequency instruments, there will soon be a new revolution in studies of steep spectrum sources with the upcoming generation of low frequency interferometers on Earth and ultimately the moon.

  11. Weak Lensing Galaxy Cluster Field Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Jullo, Eric; Jauzac, Mathilde; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we compare three methods to reconstruct galaxy cluster density fields with weak lensing data. The first method called FLens integrates an inpainting concept to invert the shear field with possible gaps, and a multi-scale entropy denoising procedure to remove the noise contained in the final reconstruction, that arises mostly from the random intrinsic shape of the galaxies. The second and third methods are based on a model of the density field made of a multi-scale grid of radial basis functions. In one case, the model parameters are computed with a linear inversion involving a singular value decomposition. In the other case, the model parameters are estimated using a Bayesian MCMC optimization implemented in the lensing software Lenstool. Methods are compared on simulated data with varying galaxy density fields. We pay particular attention to the errors estimated with resampling. We find the multi-scale grid model optimized with MCMC to provide the best results, but at high computational cost, ...

  12. The Galaxy Population of Low-Redshift Abell Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barkhouse, Wayne A; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the luminosity and color properties of galaxies selected from a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters. We utilize the non-parametric dwarf-to-giant ratio (DGR) and the blue galaxy fraction (fb) to investigate the clustercentric radial-dependent changes in the cluster galaxy population. Composite cluster samples are combined by scaling the counting radius by r200 to minimize radius selection bias. The separation of galaxies into a red and blue population was achieved by selecting galaxies relative to the cluster color-magnitude relation. The DGR of the red and blue galaxies is found to be independent of cluster richness (Bgc), although the DGR is larger for the blue population at all measured radii. A decrease in the DGR for the red and red+blue galaxies is detected in the cluster core region, while the blue galaxy DGR is nearly independent of radius. The fb is found not to correlate with Bgc; however, a steady decline toward the inner-cluster region is observed for the giant galaxies....

  13. XMM Observations of Metal Abundances in Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lovisari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot gas that fills the space between galaxies in clusters is rich in metals. Due to their large potential well, galaxy clusters accumulate metals over the whole history of the cluster, and retain important information on cluster formation and evolution.We derive detailed metallicity maps for a sample of 5 clusters, observed with XMM-Newton, to study the distribution of metals in the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM. We show that even in relaxed clusters the distribution of metals shows many inhomogeneities with several maxima separated by low metallicity regions. We also found a deviation from the expected temperature-metallicity relation.

  14. Star formation properties of galaxy cluster A1767

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abell 1767 is a dynamically relaxed, cD cluster of galaxies with a redshift of 0.0703. Among 250 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within a projected radius of 2.5r_{200}, 243 galaxies (~ 97%) are spectroscopically covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on this homogeneous spectral sample, the stellar evolutionary synthesis code, STARLIGHT, is applied to investigate the stellar populations and star formation histories (SFHs) of cluster galaxies. The star formation properties of galaxies, such as mean stellar ages, metallicities, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs), are presented as the functions of local galaxy density. Strong environmental effect is found in the manner that massive galaxies in the high-density core region of cluster tend to have higher metallicities, longer mean stellar ages, and lower specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and their recent star formation activities have been remarkably suppressed. In addition, the correlations of the metallicity and SSFR...

  15. Halpha Morphologies and Environmental Effects in Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A

    2004-01-01

    We describe the various Halpha morphologies of Virgo Cluster and isolated spiral galaxies, and associate the Halpha morphologies with the types of environmental interactions which have altered the cluster galaxies. The spatial distributions of Halpha and R-band emission are used to divide the star formation morphologies of the 52 Virgo Cluster spirals into several categories: normal (37%), anemic (6%), enhanced (6%), and (spatially) truncated (52%). Truncated galaxies are further subdivided based on their inner star formation rates into truncated/normal (37%), truncated/compact (6%), truncated/anemic (8%), and truncated/enhanced (2%). The fraction of anemic galaxies is relatively small (6-13%) in both environments, suggesting that starvation is not a major factor in the reduced star formation rates of Virgo spirals. The majority of Virgo spiral galaxies have their Halpha disks truncated (52%), whereas truncated Halpha disks are rarer in isolated galaxies (12%). Most of the Halpha-truncated galaxies have relat...

  16. Are Globular Clusters the Remnant Nuclei of Progenitor Disk Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Boeker, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The globular cluster system of a typical spheroidal galaxy makes up about 0.25% of the total galaxy mass (McLaughlin 1999). This is roughly the same mass fraction as contained in the nuclear star clus- ter (or stellar nucleus) present in most nearby low-mass galaxies. Motivated by this "coincidence", this Letter discusses a scenario in which globular clusters of present-day galaxies are the surviving nuclei of the dwarf galaxies that - according to the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy forma- tion - constitute the "building blocks" of present-day massive galaxies. This scenario, which was first suggested by Freeman (1993), has become more attractive recently in the light of studies that demonstrate a complex star formation history in a number of massive globular clusters.

  17. Nucleated Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matkovic, Ana; Ferguson, H. C.; Peng, E.; den Brok, M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies show that most dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE) in nearby clusters possess nuclear star clusters. Earlier studies used photographic plates and frequently missed the faint nuclei in dEs. For the first time, we are able to identify nuclei in a large number of dE galaxies in the Coma clust

  18. The connection between mass and light in galaxy clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sifón, Andalaft C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest reservoirs of matter in the Universe, and as such are unique laboratories to understand the connection between dark and luminous, 'normal' matter. We use several techniques and galaxy cluster samples to study this connection from various angles. In particular, we try

  19. A Flash In The Dark: Searching For Decaying Dark Matter Signal In Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Esra

    Galaxy clusters contain the largest concentrated reservoirs of dark matter, making them unique laboratories for the search for dark matter signatures. Despite intensive search, there is as yet no definitive detection of WIMP dark matter, viable alternative candidates ought to be considered. Some of these - including the well-motivated keV sterile neutrino dark matter candidate - radiatively decay, emitting X-rays that may be detected in observations of large dark matter aggregations such as clusters of galaxies. The decay of sterile neutrinos produces photons with energy half of the sterile neutrino rest mass, resulting in a monochromatic emission line broadened only by the cluster dark matter velocity dispersion. The stacking analysis of XMM-Newton observations of seventy of the brightest nearby galaxy clusters has recently strongly suggested an unknown and unidentified emission feature with a best fit energy of 3.54+/-0.02 keV, which would match ~7 keV sterile neutrino. The flux of the detected line implies a mixing angle, which is consistent with the previous upper limits on sterile neutrino radiative decay. This profound result must be verified using a variety of data sets, employing a variety of methods of data reduction, background subtraction, and statistical techniques to confirm/reject the validity of the detection. We propose to stack Suzaku archival observations of 47 galaxy clusters to verify/rule out the detection of this unidentified signal. The funding we request will support the data analysis and publication of results from this analysis. This work will directly address NASA's objective 2.4.1 in Astrophysics, as it will improve the understanding of the origin and destiny of the universe, and the nature of black holes, dark energy, dark matter, and gravity.

  20. Challenges And Results of the Applications of Fuzzy Logic in the Classification of Rich Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago Girola Schneider, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    The fuzzy logic is a branch of the artificial intelligence founded on the concept that 'everything is a matter of degree.' It intends to create mathematical approximations on the resolution of certain types of problems. In addition, it aims to produce exact results obtained from imprecise data, for which it is particularly useful for electronic and computer applications. This enables it to handle vague or unspecific information when certain parts of a system are unknown or ambiguous and, therefore, they cannot be measured in a reliable manner. Also, when the variation of a variable can produce an alteration on the others.The main focus of this paper is to prove the importance of these techniques formulated from a theoretical analysis on its application on ambiguous situations in the field of the rich clusters of galaxies. The purpose is to show its applicability in the several classification systems proposed for the rich clusters, which are based on criteria such as the level of richness of the cluster, the distribution of the brightest galaxies, whether there are signs of type-cD galaxies or not or the existence of sub-clusters.Fuzzy logic enables the researcher to work with “imprecise” information implementing fuzzy sets and combining rules to define actions. The control systems based on fuzzy logic join input variables that are defined in terms of fuzzy sets through rule groups that produce one or several output values of the system under study. From this context, the application of the fuzzy logic’s techniques approximates the solution of the mathematical models in abstractions about the rich galaxy cluster classification of physical properties in order to solve the obscurities that must be confronted by an investigation group in order to make a decision.

  1. THE CONTRIBUTION OF RADIO GALAXY CONTAMINATION TO MEASUREMENTS OF THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH DECREMENT IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 140 GHz WITH BOLOCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayers, J.; Mroczkowski, T.; Czakon, N. G.; Golwala, S. R.; Downes, T. P.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Siegel, S. [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mantz, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ameglio, S.; Pierpaoli, E.; Shitanishi, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Koch, P. M.; Lin, K.-Y.; Umetsu, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Molnar, S. M. [LeCosPA Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Moustakas, L., E-mail: jack@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We describe in detail our characterization of the compact radio source population in 140 GHz Bolocam observations of a set of 45 massive galaxy clusters. We use a combination of 1.4 and 30 GHz data to select a total of 28 probable cluster-member radio galaxies and also to predict their 140 GHz flux densities. All of these galaxies are steep-spectrum radio sources and they are found preferentially in the cool-core clusters within our sample. In particular, 11 of the 12 brightest cluster-member radio sources are associated with cool-core systems. Although none of the individual galaxies are robustly detected in the Bolocam data, the ensemble-average flux density at 140 GHz is consistent with, but slightly lower than, the extrapolation from lower frequencies assuming a constant spectral index. In addition, our data indicate an intrinsic scatter of {approx_equal} 30% around the power-law extrapolated flux densities at 140 GHz, although our data do not tightly constrain this scatter. For our cluster sample, which is composed of high-mass and moderate-redshift systems, we find that the maximum fractional change in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal integrated over any single cluster due to the presence of these radio sources is {approx_equal} 20%, and only {approx_equal} 1/4 of the clusters show a fractional change of more than 1%. The amount of contamination is strongly dependent on cluster morphology, and nearly all of the clusters with {>=}1% contamination are cool-core systems. This result indicates that radio contamination is not significant compared with current noise levels in 140 GHz images of massive clusters and is in good agreement with the level of radio contamination found in previous results based on lower frequency data or simulations.

  2. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dilday, Benjamin; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Mollá, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Östman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    ABRIDGED We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z <0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3$. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of $({0.37}^{+0.17+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.55}^{+0.13+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ ($\\mathrm{SNu}x = 10^{-12} L_{x\\sun}^{-1} \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be $({0.31}^{+0.18+0.01}_{-0.12-0.01}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.49}^{+0.15+0.02}_{-0.11-0.01})$ $\\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be $({2.04}^{+1.99+0.07}_{-1.11-0.04}) \\mathrm{SNu}r h^{2}$ and $({0.36}^{+0.84+0.01}_...

  3. Dissecting the Red Sequence: The Bulge and Disc Colours of Early-Type Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Head, Jacob T C G; Hudson, Micheal J; Smith, Russel J

    2014-01-01

    We explore the internal structure of red sequence galaxies in the Coma cluster across a wide range of luminosities ($-17>M_g>-22$) and cluster-centric radii ($0cluster}}<1.3 r_{200}$). We present the 2D bulge-disc decomposition of galaxies in deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope $u,g,i$ imaging using GALFIT. Rigorous filtering is applied to identify an analysis sample of 200 galaxies which are well described by an `archetypal' S0 structure (central bulge + outer disc). We consider internal bulge and/or disc colour gradients by allowing component sizes to vary between bands. Gradients are required for $30\\%$ of analysis sample galaxies. Bulge half-light radii are found to be uncorrelated with galaxy luminosity ($R_e \\sim 1$ kpc, $n\\sim2$) for all but the brightest galaxies ($M_g<-20.5$). The S0 discs are brighter (at fixed size, or smaller at fixed luminosity) than those of star-forming spirals. A similar colour-magnitude relation is found for both bulges and discs. The global red sequence for ...

  4. H.E.S.S. observations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W; Hinton, J A; Martineau-Huynh, O; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Pedaletti, G; Rowell, G

    2007-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies, the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe, are expected to contain a significant population of hadronic and leptonic cosmic rays. Potential sources for these particles are merger and accretion shocks, starburst driven galactic winds and radio galaxies. Furthermore, since galaxy clusters confine cosmic ray protons up to energies of at least 1 PeV for a time longer than the Hubble time they act as storehouses and accumulate all the hadronic particles which are accelerated within them. Consequently clusters of galaxies are potential sources of VHE (> 100 GeV) gamma rays. Motivated by these considerations, promising galaxy clusters are observed with the H.E.S.S. experiment as part of an ongoing campaign. Here, upper limits for the VHE gamma ray emission for the Abell 496 and Coma cluster systems are reported.

  5. Central Mass Profiles of the Nearby Cool-core Galaxy Clusters Hydra A and A478

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, N; Tamura, T; Fujita, Y; Takizawa, M; Matsushita, K; Fukazawa, Y; Futamase, T; Kawaharada, M; Miyazaki, S; Mochizuki, Y; Nakazawa, K; Ohashi, T; Ota, N; Sasaki, T; Sato, K; Tam, S I

    2015-01-01

    We perform a weak-lensing study of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, Hydra A ($z=0.0538$) and A478 ($z=0.0881$), of which brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) host powerful activities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For each cluster, the observed tangential shear profile is well described either by a single Navarro--Frenk--White model or a two-component model including the BCG as an unresolved point mass. For A478, we determine the BCG and its host-halo masses from a joint fit to weak-lensing and stellar photometry measurements. We find that the choice of initial mass functions (IMFs) can introduce a factor of two uncertainty in the BCG mass, whereas the BCG host halo mass is well constrained by data. We perform a joint analysis of weak-lensing and stellar kinematics data available for the Hydra A cluster, which allows us to constrain the central mass profile without assuming specific IMFs.We find that the central mass profile ($r<300$ kpc) determined from the joint analysis is in excellent agreement wi...

  6. Cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters with feedback from active galactic nuclei: profiles and scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Pike, Simon R; Newton, Richard D A; Thomas, Peter A; Jenkins, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a new set of 30 cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters, including the effects of radiative cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, black hole growth and AGN feedback. We first demonstrate that our AGN model is capable of reproducing the observed cluster pressure profile at redshift, z~0, once the AGN heating temperature of the targeted particles is made to scale with the final virial temperature of the halo. This allows the ejected gas to reach larger radii in higher-mass clusters than would be possible had a fixed heating temperature been used. Such a model also successfully reduces the star formation rate in brightest cluster galaxies and broadly reproduces a number of other observational properties at low redshift, including baryon, gas and star fractions; entropy profiles outside the core; and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation. Our results are consistent with the notion that the excess entropy is generated via selective removal of the densest material through radiative c...

  7. Bumpy Power Spectra and Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Knebe, A; Silk, J; Knebe, Alexander; Islam, Ranty; Silk, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of the abundance of galaxy clusters is not a reliable measure of Omega if there are features on scales of a few Mpc in the primordial power spectrum. Conversely, if we know the cosmological model parameters from other measurements, the cluster abundance evolution permits us to probe features in the power spectrum that are in the nonlinear regime at the present epoch, and hence difficult to discern directly from current epoch measurements. We have investigated the influence of an artificially introduced Gaussian feature on an otherwise unperturbed SCDM power spectrum. Using these modified spectra as an input to cosmological N-body simulations, we are able to show that in terms of the cluster abundance evolution, a SCDM model displays characteristics similar to an OCDM model. However, strong modifications would also be visible at a redshift z=0 in the dark matter power spectrum whereas minor alterations to the usual SCDM spectrum are washed away by non-linear evolution effects. We therefore conclu...

  8. Velocity Structure Diagnostics of Simulated Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Biffi, Veronica; Boehringer, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Gas motions in the hot intracluster medium of galaxy clusters have an important effect on the mass determination of the clusters through X-ray observations. The corresponding dynamical pressure has to be accounted for in addition to the hydrostatic pressure support to achieve a precise mass measurement. An analysis of the velocity structure of the ICM for simulated cluster-size haloes, especially focusing on rotational patterns, has been performed, demonstrating them to be an intermittent phenomenon, strongly related to the internal dynamics of substructures. We find that the expected build-up of rotation due to mass assembly gets easily destroyed by passages of gas-rich substructures close to the central region. Though, if a typical rotation pattern is established, the corresponding mass contribution is estimated to be up to ~17% of the total mass in the innermost region, and one has to account for it. Extending the analysis to a larger sample of simulated haloes we statistically observe that (i) the distrib...

  9. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 Cluster Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify Hα emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  10. Looking Wider and Further: The Evolution of Galaxies Inside Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are rare objects in the universe, but on-going wide field optical surveys are identifying many thousands of them to redshift 1.0 and beyond. Using early data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and publicly released data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this dissertation explores the evolution of cluster galaxies in the redshift range from 0 to 1.0. As it is common for deep wide field sky surveys like DES to struggle with galaxy detection efficiency at cluster core, the first component of this dissertation describes an efficient package that helps resolving the issue. The second part focuses on the formation of cluster galaxies. The study quantifies the growth of cluster bright central galaxies (BCGs), and argues for the importance of merging and intra-cluster light production during BCG evolution. An analysis of cluster red sequence galaxy luminosity function is also performed, demonstrating that the abundance of these galaxies is mildly dependent on cluster mass and redshift. The last component of the dissertation characterizes the properties of galaxy filaments to help understanding cluster environments

  11. Cosmological Simulations of Isotropic Conduction in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Britton D; Voit, G Mark; Ventimiglia, David; Skillman, Samuel W

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy clusters have a difficult time reproducing the radial gas-property gradients and red central galaxies observed to exist in the cores of galaxy clusters. Thermal conduction has been suggested as a mechanism that can help bring simulations of cluster cores into better alignment with observations by stabilizing the feedback processes that regulate gas cooling, but this idea has not yet been well tested with cosmological numerical simulations. Here we present cosmological simulations of ten galaxy clusters performed with five different levels of isotropic Spitzer conduction, which alters both the cores and outskirts of clusters, but not dramatically. In the cores, conduction flattens central temperature gradients, making them nearly isothermal and slightly lowering the central density but failing to prevent a cooling catastrophe there. Conduction has little effect on temperature gradients outside of cluster cores because outward conductive heat flow tends to inflate the outer parts of the in...

  12. Distant galaxy clusters in the XMM Large Scale Structure survey

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, J P; Bremer, M N; Pierre, M; Adami, C; Ilbert, O; Maughan, B; Maurogordato, S; Pacaud, F; Valtchanov, I; Chiappetti, L; Thanjavur, K; Gwyn, S; Stanway, E R; Winkworth, C

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) Distant galaxy clusters provide important tests of the growth of large scale structure in addition to highlighting the process of galaxy evolution in a consistently defined environment at large look back time. We present a sample of 22 distant (z>0.8) galaxy clusters and cluster candidates selected from the 9 deg2 footprint of the overlapping X-ray Multi Mirror (XMM) Large Scale Structure (LSS), CFHTLS Wide and Spitzer SWIRE surveys. Clusters are selected as extended X-ray sources with an accompanying overdensity of galaxies displaying optical to mid-infrared photometry consistent with z>0.8. Nine clusters have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts in the interval 0.80.8 clusters.

  13. Z>~7 galaxies with red Spitzer/IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors in the full CANDELS data set: the brightest-known galaxies at Z~7-9 and a probable spectroscopic confirmation at Z=7.48

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts-Borsani, G W; Oesch, P A; Labbe, I; Smit, R; Illingworth, G D; van Dokkum, P; Holden, B; Gonzalez, V; Stefanon, M; Holwerda, B; Wilkins, S

    2015-01-01

    We identify 4 unusually bright (H~7.5. As Y-band observations are not available over the full CANDELS program to perform a standard Lyman-break selection of z>7 galaxies, here we employ an alternate strategy using the deep Spitzer/IRAC data. We identify z~7.1-9.1 galaxies by selecting z>~6 galaxies from the HST CANDELS data that show quite red IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors, indicating a strong [OIII] line in the 4.5mu band. This selection strategy was validated using a modest sample for which we have deep Y-band coverage. Here we focus on using this criterion to select the brightest z>~7 sources. Applying the IRAC criteria to all HST-selected optical-dropout galaxies over the full ~900 arcmin**2 of the 5 CANDELS fields revealed four unusually bright z~7.1, 7.6, 7.9 and 8.6 candidates. The median [3.6]-[4.5] color of our selected z~7.1-9.1 sample is consistent with rest-frame [OIII]+Hbeta EWs of ~1600A in the [4.5] band. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy has already been reported for one of our selected sources EGS-zs8-1, s...

  14. The Distribution of Dark and Luminous Matter in the Unique Galaxy Cluster Merger Abell 2146

    CERN Document Server

    King, Lindsay J; Coleman, Joseph E; Russell, Helen R; Santana, Rebecca; White, Jacob A; Canning, Rebecca E A; Deering, Nicole J; Fabian, Andrew C; Lee, Brandyn E; Li, Baojiu; McNamara, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Abell 2146 ($z$ = 0.232) consists of two galaxy clusters undergoing a major merger. The system was discovered in previous work, where two large shock fronts were detected using the $\\textit{Chandra X-ray Observatory}$, consistent with a merger close to the plane of the sky, caught soon after first core passage. A weak gravitational lensing analysis of the total gravitating mass in the system, using the distorted shapes of distant galaxies seen with ACS-WFC on $\\textit{Hubble Space Telescope}$, is presented. The highest peak in the reconstruction of the projected mass is centred on the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) in Abell 2146-A. The mass associated with Abell 2146-B is more extended. Bootstrapped noise mass reconstructions show the mass peak in Abell 2146-A to be consistently centred on the BCG. Previous work showed that BCG-A appears to lag behind an X-ray cool core; although the peak of the mass reconstruction is centred on the BCG, it is also consistent with the X-ray peak given the resolution of the we...

  15. An IceCube Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in nearby Galaxies and Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; D'\\iaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanosk, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a first search for self-annihilating dark matter in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters using a sample of high energy neutrinos acquired in 339.8 days of livetime during 2009/10 with the IceCube neutrino observatory in its 59-string configuration. The targets of interest include the Virgo and Coma galaxy clusters, the Andromeda galaxy and several dwarf galaxies. We obtain upper limits on the cross section as function of the WIMP mass between 300 GeV and 100 TeV for the annihilation into b bbar, W+W-, \\tau+\\tau-, \\mu+\\mu- and \

  16. The accretion of galaxies into groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Bower, Richard G; Font, Andreea S; McCarthy, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    We use the galaxy stellar mass and halo merger tree information from the semi-analytic model galaxy catalogue of Font et al. (2009) to examine the accretion of galaxies into a large sample of groups and clusters, covering a wide range in halo mass (10E12.9 to 10E15.3 Msun/h), and selected from each of four redshift epochs (z=0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5). We find that clusters at all examined redshifts have accreted a significant fraction of their final galaxy populations through galaxy groups. A 10E14.5 Msun/h mass cluster at z=0 has, on average, accreted ~ 40% of its galaxies (Mstellar > 10E9 Msun/h) from halos with masses greater than 10E13 Msun/h. Further, the galaxies which are accreted through groups are more massive, on average, than galaxies accreted through smaller halos or from the field population. We find that at a given epoch, the fraction of galaxies accreted from isolated environments is independent of the final cluster or group mass. In contrast, we find that observing a cluster of the same halo mass a...

  17. Merging Galaxy Cluster Abell 2255 in Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Hyunjin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Hwang, Narae; Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Lim, Sungsoon; Matsuhara, Hideo; Seo, Hyunjong; Wada, Takehiko; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2010-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) observation of a nearby galaxy cluster, Abell 2255 by the AKARI space telescope. Using the AKARI's continuous wavelength coverage between 3-24 micron and the wide field of view, we investigate the properties of cluster member galaxies to see how the infall of the galaxies, the cluster substructures, and the cluster-cluster merger influence their evolution. We show that the excess of MIR (11 micron) flux is a good indicator to discriminate galaxies at different evolutionary stages, and divide galaxies into three classes accordingly : strong MIR-excess (N3-S11>0.2) galaxies that include both unobscured and obscured star-forming galaxies, weak MIR-excess (-2.05 Gyr) galaxies where the MIR emission arises mainly from the circumstellar dust around AGB stars, and intermediate MIR-excess (-1.2galaxies in between the two classes that are less than a few Gyrs old past the prime star formation activity. With the MIR-excess diagnostics, we investigate how local and cl...

  18. Spectacular tails of ionised gas in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4569

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Fossati, M; Boissier, S; Bomans, D; Consolandi, G; Anselmi, G; Cortese, L; Cote, P; Durrell, P; Ferrarese, L; Fumagalli, M; Gavazzi, G; Gwyn, S; Hensler, G; Sun, M; Toloba, E

    2016-01-01

    We obtained using MegaCam at the CFHT a deep narrow band Halpha+[NII] wide field image of NGC 4569, the brightest late-type galaxy in the Virgo cluster. The image reveals the presence of long tails of diffuse ionised gas without any associated stellar component extending from the disc of the galaxy up to ~ 80 kpc (projected distance) with a typical surface brightness of a few 10^-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. These features provide direct evidence that NGC 4569 is undergoing a ram presure stripping event. The image also shows a prominent 8 kpc spur of ionised gas associated to the nucleus that spectroscopic data identify as an outflow. With some assumptions on the 3D distribution of the gas, we use the Halpha surface brightness of these extended low surface brightness features to derive the density and the mass of the gas stripped during the interaction of the galaxy with the ICM. The comparison with ad-hoc chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution indicates that the mass of the Halpha emitting gas in t...

  19. Radio halos in merging clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Giacintucci, S; Bardelli, S; Brunetti, G; Dallacasa, D; Rao, P; Zucca, E

    2004-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of 235 MHz, 327 MHz and 610 MHz observations of the galaxy cluster A3562 in the core of the Shapley Concentration. The purpose of these observations, carried out with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT, Pune, India) was to study the radio halo located at the centre of A3562 and determine the shape of its radio spectrum at low frequencies, in order to understand the origin of this source. In the framework of the re--acceleration model, the preliminary analysis of the halo spectrum suggests that we are observing a young source (few $10^8$ yrs) at the beginning of the re--acceleration phase.

  20. Normal Globular Cluster Systems in Massive Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas, Daniela; Jordán, Andrés; Goudfrooij, Paul; Zwaan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the globular cluster systems of 6 massive spiral galaxies, originally cataloged as low surface brightness galaxies but here shown to span a wide range of central surface brightness values, including two intermediate to low surface brightness galaxies. We used the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board HST to obtain photometry in the F475W and F775W bands and select sources with photometric and morphological properties consistent with those of globular clusters. A total of 206 candidates were identified in our target galaxies. From a direct comparison with the Galactic globular cluster system we derive specific frequency values for each galaxy that are in the expected range for late-type galaxies. We show that the globular cluster candidates in all galaxies have properties consistent with globular cluster systems of previously studied galaxies in terms of luminosity, sizes and color. We establish the presence of globular clusters in the two intermediate to low surface brightn...

  1. Constraining Galaxy Formation Models with Dwarf Ellipticals in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Conselice, C J

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations demonstrate that dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in clusters, despite their faintness, are likely a critical galaxy type for understanding the processes behind galaxy formation. Dwarf ellipticals are the most common galaxy type, and are particularly abundant in rich galaxy clusters. The dwarf to giant ratio is in fact highest in rich clusters of galaxies, suggesting that cluster dEs do not form in groups that later merge to form clusters. Dwarf ellipticals are potentially the only galaxy type whose formation is sensitive to global, rather than local, environment. The dominant idea for explaining the formation of these systems, through Cold Dark Matter models, is that dEs form early and within their present environments. Recent results suggest that some dwarfs appear in clusters after the bulk of massive galaxies form, a scenario not predicted in standard hierarchical structure formation models. Many dEs have younger and more metal rich stellar populations than dwarfs in lower density enviro...

  2. The Brightest Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn: Securing the Largest Samples of z=9-11 galaxies for JWST by leveraging the HST archive with Spitzer/IRAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Rychard; Trenti, Michele; Calvi, Valentina; Bernard, Stephanie; Labbe, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Coe, Dan; Holwerda, Benne; Bradley, Larry; Mason, Charlotte; Schmidt, Kasper; Illingworth, Garth

    2015-10-01

    Hubble's WFC3 has been a game changer for studying early galaxy formation in the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. Reliable samples of sources up to z~10, which can be discovered only from space, are now constraining the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function into the epoch of reionization. Despite these efforts, the size of the highest redshift galaxy samples (z >9 and especially z > 10) is still very small, particularly at high luminosities (L > L*). To deliver transformational results, much larger numbers of bright z > 9 galaxies are needed both to map out the bright end of the luminosity/mass function and for spectroscopic follow-up (with JWST and otherwise). One especially efficient way of expanding current samples is (1) to leverage the huge amounts of pure-parallel data available with HST to identify large numbers of candidate z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies and (2) to follow up each candidate with shallow Spitzer/IRAC observations to distinguish the bona- fide z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies from z ~ 2 old, dusty galaxies. For this program we are requesting shallow Spitzer/IRAC follow-up of 20 candidate z ~ 9 - 11 galaxies we have identified from 130 WFC3/IR pointings obtained from more than 4 separate HST programs with no existing IRAC coverage. Based on our previous CANDELS/GOODS searches, we expect to confirm 5 to 10 sources as L > L* galaxies at z >= 9. Our results will be used to constrain the bright end of the LF at z >= 9, to provide targets for Keck spectroscopy to constrain the ionization state of the z > 8 universe, and to furnish JWST with bright targets for spectroscopic follow-up studies.

  3. Equilibrium configurations of 11 eV sterile neutrinos in MONDian galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, G. W.; Famaey, B.; Diaferio, A.

    2010-02-01

    Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can fit a broad range of galaxy kinematic data, but struggles with clusters of galaxies. MONDian clusters need dark matter (DM), and here we test the 11 eVc-2 sterile neutrino (SN) - used to fit the first three acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) - by investigating their equilibrium distributions in 30 groups and clusters over a wide range of temperatures. We do this by first taking the known SN density, necessary for hydrostatic equilibrium of the intracluster medium (or to produce the observed lensing map). Then, we solve for the SN velocity dispersion (VD), needed for their own hydrostatic equilibrium, through the equation of state for a partially degenerate neutrino gas. The VD is a unique, continuous function of radius determined by the density and mass of the SN particles. Knowing both the SN density and VD tells us the Tremaine-Gunn phase-space limit at all radii. We find that all 30 systems serendipitously reach the Tremaine-Gunn limit by the centre, which means a portion of the dynamical mass must always be covered by the brightest cluster galaxy. Interestingly, the typical fitted K-band mass-to-light ratio is unity and at most 1.2, which is very consistent - although leaving no margin for error - with stellar population synthesis models. Amidst the sample there are several special cases including the Coma cluster (for which DM was first proposed), NGC 720 (where geometrical evidence for DM was found) and the bullet cluster (where DM - of some kind - in clusters was directly proven to exist). We demonstrate that 11 eVc-2 SNs are unlikely to influence spiral galaxy rotation curves, as they do not influence even some very massive early-types (NGC 4125 and NGC 6482). Finally, we conclude that it is intriguing that the minimum mass of SN particle that can match the CMB is the same as the minimum mass found here to be consistent with equilibrium configurations of MONDian clusters of galaxies.

  4. Suppression of Star Formation in the central 200 kpc of a z = 1.4 Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Grutzbauch, Ruth; Jørgensen, Inger; Varela, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an extended narrow-band H{\\alpha} study of the massive galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.3-2557 at z = 1.39. This paper represents a follow up study to our previous investigation of star-formation in the cluster centre, extending our analysis out to a projected cluster radius of 1.5 Mpc. Using the Near InfraRed Imager and Spectrograph (NIRI) on Gemini North we obtained deep H narrow-band imaging corresponding to the rest-frame wavelength of H{\\alpha} at the cluster's redshift. We identify a total of 163 potential cluster members in both pointings, excluding stars based on their near-IR colours derived from VLT/HAWK-I imaging. Of these 163 objects 14 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, and 20% are excess line-emitters. We find no evidence of star formation activity within a radius of 200 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy in the cluster core. Dust-corrected star formation rates (SFR) of excess emitters outside this cluster quenching radius, RQ \\sim 200 kpc, are on average = 2.7...

  5. The Hierarchical Distribution of Young Stellar Clusters in Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the spatial distributions of young stellar clusters in six nearby galaxies to trace the large scale hierarchical star-forming structures. The six galaxies are drawn from the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). We quantify the strength of the clustering among stellar clusters as a function of spatial scale and age to establish the survival timescale of the substructures. We separate the clusters into different classes, compact (bound) clusters and associations (unbound), and compare the clustering among them. We find that younger star clusters are more strongly clustered over small spatial scales and that the clustering disappears rapidly for ages as young as a few tens of Myr, consistent with clusters slowly losing the fractal dimension inherited at birth from their natal molecular clouds.

  6. Molecular gas and dust in the highly magnified z = 2.8 galaxy behind the Bullet Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Daniel; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Muller, Sebastien; Birkinshaw, Mark; Black, John H; Bremer, Malcolm N; Wall, William F; Bertoldi, Frank; Castillo, Edgar; Ibarra-Medel, Hector Javier; 10.1051/0004-6361/201117918

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational magnification provided by massive galaxy clusters makes it possible to probe the physical conditions in distant galaxies that are of lower luminosity than those in blank fields and likely more representative of the bulk of the high-redshift galaxy population. We aim to constrain the basic properties of molecular gas in a strongly magnified submm galaxy located behind the massive Bullet Cluster. This galaxy (SMM J0658) is split into three images, with a total magnification factor of almost 100. We used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to search for {12}CO(1--0) and {12}CO(3--2) line emission from SMM J0658. We also used the SABOCA bolometer camera on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope to measure the continuum emission at 350 micron. CO(1--0) and CO(3--2) are detected at 6.8 sigma and 7.5 sigma significance when the spectra toward the two brightest images of the galaxy are combined. From the CO(1-0) luminosity we derive a mass of cold molecular gas of (1.8 \\pm 0.3) ...

  7. X-ray spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naomi Ota

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most massive objects in the Universe and precise knowledge of their mass structure is important to understand the history of structure formation and constrain still unknown types of dark contents of the Universe.X-ray spectroscopy of galaxy clusters provides rich information about the physical state of hot intracluster gas and the underlying potential structure.In this paper,starting from the basic description of clusters under equilibrium conditions,we review properties of clusters revealed primarily through X-ray observations considering their thermal and dynamical evolutions.The future prospects of cluster studies using upcoming X-ray missions are also mentioned.

  8. Probing dark energy via galaxy cluster outskirts

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to combine $Planck$ data and the X-ray physical properties of the intracluster medium in the virialization region of a sample of 320 galaxy clusters ($0.056 3$ keV) observed with $Chandra$. We exploited the high-level of similarity of the emission measure in the cluster outskirts as cosmology proxy. The cosmological parameters are thus constrained assuming that the emission measure profiles at different redshift are weakly self-similar, that is their shape is universal, explicitly allowing for temperature and redshift dependency of the gas fraction. This cosmological test, in combination with $Planck$+SNIa data, allows us to put a tight constraint on the dark energy models. For a constant-$w$ model, we have $w=-1.010\\pm0.030$ and $\\Omega_m=0.311\\pm0.014$, while for a time-evolving equation of state of dark energy $w(z)$ we have $\\Omega_m=0.308\\pm 0.017$, $w_0=-0.993\\pm0.046$ and $w_a=-0.123\\pm0.400$. Constraints on the cosmology are further improved by adding priors on the gas f...

  9. Probing dark energy via galaxy cluster outskirts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Andrea; Sun, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to combine Planck data and the X-ray physical properties of the intracluster medium in the virialization region of a sample of 320 galaxy clusters (0.056 z z) we have Ωm = 0.308 ± 0.017, w0 = -0.993 ± 0.046 and wa = -0.123 ± 0.400. Constraints on the cosmology are further improved by adding priors on the gas fraction evolution from hydrodynamic simulations. Current data favour the cosmological constant with w ≡ -1, with no evidence for dynamic dark energy. We checked that our method is robust towards different sources of systematics, including background modelling, outlier measurements, selection effects, inhomogeneities of the gas distribution and cosmic filaments. We also provided for the first time constraints on which definition of cluster boundary radius is more tenable, namely based on a fixed overdensity with respect to the critical density of the Universe. This novel cosmological test has the capacity to provide a generational leap forward in our understanding of the equation of state of dark energy.

  10. Simulating the effect of AGN feedback on the metal enrichment of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, D; Tornatore, L; Saro, A; Murante, G; Dolag, K

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the effect of AGN feedback on metal enrichment and thermal properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in hydrodynamical simulations. The cosmological simulations are performed for a set of clusters using a version of the TreePM-SPH Gadget code that follows chemo-dynamical evolution by accounting for metal enrichment by different stellar populations. Besides runs not including any efficient form of energy feedback, we carry out simulations including: (i) kinetic feedback in the form of galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions; (ii) AGN feedback from gas accretion onto super-massive black holes (BHs); (iii) AGN feedback in which a 'radio mode' is included. We find that AGN feedback is able to quench star formation in the brightest cluster galaxies at z<4 and provides correct temperature profiles in the central regions of galaxy groups. However, its effect is not sufficient to create cool cores in massive clusters. AGN feedback creates a widespread enrichment in the outskirts of...

  11. Radio emission at the centre of the galaxy cluster Abell 3560: evidence for core sloshing?

    CERN Document Server

    Venturi, T; Bardelli, S; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cornacchia, M; Kantharia, N

    2013-01-01

    Previous radio observations of the galaxy cluster A3560 in the Shapley Concentration showed complex radio emission associated with the brightest cluster member.To understand its origin we observed it with the GMRT, the VLA and ATCA at 240 and 610 MHz, 1.28,1.4, 2.3,4.8 and 8.4 GHz, and performed a detailed morphological and spectral study of the radio emission associated with the BCG. We also observed the cluster with XMM-Newton and Chandra to derive the properties of the ICM. The radio emission of the N-E nucleus of the dumb-bell BCG shows an active radio galaxy, plus aged diffuse emission, which is not refurbished at present. Our Chandra data show that the radio active nucleus of the BCG has extended X-ray emission, which we classify as a low-luminosity corona. A residual image of the XMM-Newton brightness shows the presence of a spiral-like feature, which we interpret as the signature of gas sloshing. The presence of a subgroup is clear in the surface brightness residual map, and in the XMM-Newton temperat...

  12. The Nature of Red-Sequence Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashur, Lane; Barkhouse, Wayne; Sultanova, Madina; Kalawila Vithanage, Sandanuwa; Archer, Haylee; Foote, Gregory; Mathew, Elijah; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of the red-sequence galaxy population from a sample of 57 low-redshift galaxy clusters observed using the KPNO 0.9m telescope and 74 clusters from the WINGS dataset, indicates that a small fraction of red-sequence galaxies have a morphology consistent with spiral systems. For spiral galaxies to acquire the color of elliptical/S0s at a similar luminosity, they must either have been stripped of their star-forming gas at an earlier epoch, or contain a larger than normal fraction of dust. To test these ideas we have compiled a sample of red-sequence spiral galaxies and examined their infrared properties as measured by 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel. These IR data allows us to estimate the amount of dust in each of our red-sequence spiral galaxies. We compare the estimated dust mass in each of these red-sequence late-type galaxies with spiral galaxies located in the same cluster field but having colors inconsistent with the red-sequence. We thus provide a statistical measure to discriminate between purely passive spiral galaxy evolution and dusty spirals to explain the presence of these late-type systems in cluster red-sequences.

  13. Luminosity Function of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 566

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the Luminosity Function (LF) of the cluster of galaxies Abell 566. The photometric data of 15 intermediate-bands are obtained from the Beijing- Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) photometric sky survey. For each of the 15 wavebands, the LF of cluster galaxies is well modelled by the Schechter function, with characteristic luminosities from -18.0 to -21.9 magnitude, from the a- to the p-band. Morphological dependence of the LF is investigated by separating the cluster members into 'red' and 'blue' subsamples. It is clear that late type galaxies have a steeper shape of LF than the early type galaxies. We also divided the sample galaxies by their local environment. It was found that galaxies in the sparser region have steeper shape of LF than galaxies in the denser region. Combining the results of morphological and environmental dependence of LFs, we show that Abell 566 is a well relaxed cluster with positive evidence of galaxy interaction and merger, and excess number of bright early type galaxies located in its denser region.

  14. Small-Scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate) and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color-color slope significance S ~ 2.73 sigma and cor...

  15. The Weak Clustering of Gas-Rich Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, M J; Webster, R L; Brown, M J I; Staveley-Smith, L; Meyer, Martin J.; Zwaan, Martin A.; Webster, Rachel L.; Brown, Michael J.I.; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2006-01-01

    We examine the clustering properties of HI-selected galaxies through an analysis of the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey Catalogue (HICAT) two-point correlation function. Various sub-samples are extracted from this catalogue to study the overall clustering of HI-rich galaxies and its dependence on luminosity, HI gas mass and rotational velocity. These samples cover the entire southern sky Dec < 0 deg, containing up to 4,174 galaxies over the radial velocity range 300-12,700 km/s. A scale length of r_0 = 3.45 +/- 0.25 Mpc/h and slope of gamma = 1.47 +/- 0.08 is obtained for the HI-rich galaxy real-space correlation function, making gas-rich galaxies among the most weakly clustered objects known. HI-selected galaxies also exhibit weaker clustering than optically selected galaxies of comparable luminosities. Good agreement is found between our results and those of synthetic HI-rich galaxy catalogues generated from the Millennium Run CDM simulation. Bisecting HICAT using different parameter cuts, clustering is found t...

  16. Clustering of Galaxies and Groups in the NOG Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Girardi, M; Mezzetti, M; Marinoni, C

    2000-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function in redshift space, $\\xi(s)$, to study the clustering of the galaxies and groups of the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) Sample, which is a nearly all-sky, complete, magnitude-limited sample of \\~7000 bright and nearby optical galaxies. The correlation function of galaxies is well-described by a power-law, $\\xi(s)= (s/s_0)^{-\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma\\sim1.5$ and $s_0\\sim 6.4 h^{-1}$ Mpc. We find evidence of morphological segregation between early- and late-type galaxies, with a gradual decreasing of the strength of clustering from the S0 to the late-type spirals, on intermediate scales. Furthermore, luminous galaxies (with $M_B\\leq -19.5 + 5 \\log h$) are more clustered than dim galaxies. The groups show an excess of clustering with respect to galaxies. Groups with greater velocity dispersions, sizes, and masses are more clustered than those with lower values of these quantities.

  17. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  18. Globular cluster system erosion and nucleus formation in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The radial distribution of globular clusters in galaxies is always less peaked to the centre than the halo stars'. Extending previous work to a sample of HST globular cluster systems in ellipticals, we evaluate the number of clusters lost to the galactic centre as the integrals of the difference between the observed globular cluster system distribution and the underlying halo light profile. It results that the initial populations of globular clusters were from 25% to 50% richer than now. This significant number of missing globular clusters supports the hypothesis that a large quantity of globular cluster mass in form of globular clusters decayed and destroyed has been lost to the galactic centres, where plausibly contributed to formation and feeding of a mas sive object therein. It is relevant noting that the observed correlation between the core radius of the globular cluster system and the parent galaxy luminosity can be interpreted as a result of evolution.

  19. The Colours of Satellite Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Font, Andreea S; McCarthy, Ian G; Benson, Andrew J; Frenk, Carlos S; Helly, John C; Lacey, Cedric G; Baugh, Carlton M; Cole, Shaun

    2008-01-01

    Current models of galaxy formation predict satellite galaxies in groups and clusters that are redder than observed. We investigate the effect on the colours of satellite galaxies produced by the ram pressure stripping of their hot gaseous atmospheres as the satellites orbit within their parent halo. We incorporate a model of the stripping process based on detailed hydrodynamic simulations within the Durham semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The simulations show that the environment in groups and clusters is less aggressive than previously assumed. The main uncertainty in the model is the treatment of gas expelled by supernovae. With reasonable assumptions for the stripping of this material, we find that satellite galaxies are able to retain a significant fraction of their hot gas for several Gigayears, thereby replenishing their reservoirs of cold, star forming gas and remaining blue for a relatively long period of time. A bimodal distribution of galaxy colours, similar to that observed in SDSS data, is...

  20. Structures and components in galaxy clusters: observations and models

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Ferrari, C; Forman, W R; Kaastra, J S; Klein, U; Markevitch, M; de Plaa, J

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bounded structures in the Universe dominated by dark matter. We review the observational appearance and physical models of plasma structures in clusters of galaxies. Bubbles of relativistic plasma which are inflated by supermassive black holes of AGNs, cooling and heating of the gas, large scale plasma shocks, cold fronts, non-thermal halos and relics are observed in clusters. These constituents are reflecting both the formation history and the dynamical properties of clusters of galaxies. We discuss X-ray spectroscopy as a tool to study the metal enrichment in clusters and fine spectroscopy of Fe X-ray lines as a powerful diagnostics of both the turbulent plasma motions and the energetics of the non-thermal electron populations. The knowledge of the complex dynamical and feedback processes is necessary to understand the energy and matter balance as well as to constrain the role of the non-thermal components of clusters.

  1. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, D.M.; Rieke, G.H. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range. 38 refs.

  2. Primordial alignment of elliptical galaxies in intermediate redshift clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Yu; Liao, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We measure primordial alignments for the red galaxies in the sample of eight massive galaxy clusters in the southern sky from the CLASH-VLT Large Programme, at a median redshift of 0.375. We find primordial alignment with about $3\\sigma$ significance in the four dynamically young clusters, but null detection of primordial alignment in the four highly relaxed clusters. The observed primordial alignment is not dominated by any single one of the four dynamically young clusters, and is primarily due to a population of bright galaxies ($M_r<-20.5\\ \\rm{m}$) residing in the region 300 to 810 kpc from the cluster centers. For the first time, we point out that the combination of radial alignment and halo alignment can cause fake primordial alignment. Finally, we find that the detected alignment for the dynamically young clusters is real rather than fake primordial alignment.

  3. How are galaxies assigned to halos? Searching for assembly bias in the SDSS galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as halo assembly bias. Standard halo occupation modeling (HOD) in large scale structure studies assumes that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. Modeling of galaxy clustering can face systematic effects if the number or properties of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution $N$-body simulation and the measurements of the projected two-point correlation function and the number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of halo occupation on halo concentration can be constrained, and to what extent allowing for this dependence can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering. Given the SDSS clustering data, our constraints on HOD with assembly bias, suggests that satellite population is not...

  4. Mapping stellar content to dark matter halos using galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing in the SDSS DR7

    CERN Document Server

    Zu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The mapping between the distributions of the observed galaxy stellar mass and the underlying dark matter halos provides the crucial link from theories of large-scale structure formation to interpreting the complex phenomena of galaxy formation and evolution. We develop a novel statistical method, based on the Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD), to solve for this mapping by jointly fitting the galaxy clustering and the galaxy-galaxy lensing measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method, called the iHOD model, extracts maximum information from the survey by including ~80% more galaxies than the traditional HOD methods, and takes into account the incompleteness of the stellar mass samples in a statistically consistent manner. The derived stellar-to-halo mass relation not only explains the clustering and lensing of SDSS galaxies over almost four decades in stellar mass, but also successfully predicts the stellar mass functions observed in SDSS. Due to its capability of modelling significantl...

  5. Gas, dust, and star formation in distant radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuland, Michiel

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis I discuss recent observations of distant (z > 2) radio galaxies. There is strong evidence that radio galaxies are the progenitors of the brightest cluster ellipticals and are among the most luminous and massive galaxies at any epoch, allowing relatively detailed studies of their forma

  6. The Role of Environment in Shaping Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Insights from the SpARCS Cluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gillian

    2015-08-01

    Between z = 2 and z = 1, the main progenitors of present-day massive clusters undergo rapid collapse, and cluster members transform from active star-forming to quiescent galaxies. The SpARCS survey is one of the largest surveys designed to detect clusters of galaxies at z> 1, and has discovered hundreds of Spitzer IR-selected clusters.I will present results from GCLASS, a 25-night Gemini/GMOS spectroscopic follow-up survey of ten of the most massive SpARCS clusters at z~1, and explain what we are learning about quenching and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in these, the densest of environments, relative to the field population. I will explain how predictions and observations of the stellar mass growth of Brightest Cluster Galaxies, previously controversially divergent, are now coming into agreement, and discuss the evidence for the relative importance of mergers versus in-situ star formation in driving this stellar mass growth as a function of redshift.I will also present a sample of newly-confirmed clusters at z~2 for which we have HST spectroscopy and imaging, and have been targeting with Keck/MOSFIRE. I will conclude by discussing GOGREEN and DEEPDRILL, two new large surveys approved by Gemini & Spitzer, designed to study the effects of environment at lower stellar mass and at higher redshift, respectively. Collectively, these powerful new surveys are beginning to allow us to place constraints on the location and timescale of quenching and, in concert with both hydro-simulations and semi-analytic models, identify the complex role of environment in shaping galaxy evolution over cosmic time.

  7. Clues on galaxy and cluster formation from their scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Cappi, A; Tormen, G; Zamorani, G

    2003-01-01

    By means of high-resolution N-body simulations in a LambdaCDM cosmology, we verify that scaling relations similar to those observed for nearby galaxy clusters are also defined by their dark matter hosts; the slopes, however, are not the same. We then show that the scaling relations of galaxy clusters can be explained as the result of the cosmological collapse of density fluctuations at the appropriate scales, plus a systematic trend of the M/L ratio with cluster mass. The empirical fact that the exponent of the Faber-Jackson relation of elliptical galaxies is significantly different (higher) than that of clusters, force us to conclude that the galaxy scaling laws might derive from the cosmological collapse of density fluctuations at the epoch when galactic scales became non-linear, plus modifications afterward due to early-time dissipative merging.

  8. Galaxy clusters as probes for cosmology and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, Elia S; de Bernardis, Paolo; Kirillov, Alexander A; Neto, Gastao B Lima; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans U; Ostermann, Peter; Roman, Matthieu; Rosati, Piero; Rossetti, Mariachiara

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in building new galaxy clusters samples, at low and high redshifts, from wide-area surveys, particularly exploiting the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. A large effort is underway to identify and characterize these new systems with optical/NIR and X-ray facilities, thus opening new avenues to constraint cosmological models using structure growth and geometrical tests. A census of galaxy clusters sets constraints on reionization mechanisms and epochs, which need to be reconciled with recent limits on the reionization optical depth from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Future advances in SZ effect measurements will include the possibility to (unambiguously) measure directly the kinematic SZ effect, to build an even larger catalogue of galaxy clusters able to study the high redshift universe, and to make (spatially-)resolved galaxy cluster maps with even spectral capability to (spectrally-)resolve the relativistic corrections of the SZ effect.

  9. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey - V. The Virgo cluster (I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    We present 21-cm observations of a 10 × 2 deg2 region in the Virgo cluster, obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. 289 sources are detected over the full redshift range (-2000 Fast ALFA (ALFALFA).

  10. Globular Clusters and Satellite Galaxies: Companions to the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Kroupa, Pavel; Metz, Manuel; Spitler, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Our Milky Way galaxy is host to a number of companions. These companions are gravitationally bound to the Milky Way and are stellar systems in their own right. They include a population of some 30 dwarf satellite galaxies (DSGs) and about 150 globular clusters (GCs). Here we discuss the relationship between GCs and DSGs using an interactive 3D model of the Milky Way.

  11. The Ursa Major Cluster of galaxies .1. Cluster definition and photometric data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tully, RB; Verheijen, MAW; Pierce, MJ; Wainscoat, RJ

    1996-01-01

    The Ursa Major Cluster has received remarkably little attention, although it is as near as the Virgo Cluster and contains a comparable number of H I-rich galaxies. In this paper, criteria for group membership are discussed and data are presented for 79 galaxies identified with the group. Of these, a

  12. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Gangkofner, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; McDonald, M.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; = 0.14) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg2 SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. We use the 150 GHz LF to estimate the impact of cluster radio galaxies on an SPT-SZ like survey. The radio galaxy flux typically produces a small bias on the SZE signal and has negligible impact on the observed scatter in the SZE mass-observable relation. If we assume there is no redshift evolution in the radio galaxy LF then 1.8 ± 0.7 percent of the clusters with detection significance ξ ≥ 4.5 would be lost from the sample. Allowing for redshift evolution of the form (1 + z)2.5 increases the incompleteness to 5.6 ± 1.0 percent. Improved constraints on the evolution of the cluster radio galaxy LF require a larger cluster sample extending to higher redshift.

  13. Signatures of Galaxy-Cluster Interactions Spiral Galaxy Rotation Curve Asymmetry, Shape, and Extent

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Haynes, M P; Hardy, E; Campusano, L E; Dale, Daniel A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Hardy, Eduardo; Campusano, Luis E.

    2001-01-01

    The environmental dependencies of the characteristics of spiral galaxy rotation curves are studied in this work. We use our large, homogeneously collected sample of 510 cluster spiral galaxy rotation curves to test the claim that the shape of a galaxy's rotation curve strongly depends on its location within the cluster, and thus presumably on the strength of the local intracluster medium and on the frequency and strength of tidal interactions with the cluster and cluster galaxies. Our data do not corroborate such a scenario, consistent with the fact that Tully-Fisher residuals are independent of galaxy location within the cluster; while the average late-type spiral galaxy shows more rise in the outer parts of its rotation curve than does the typical early-type spiral galaxy, there is no apparent trend for either subset with cluster environment. We also investigate as a function of cluster environment rotation curve asymmetry and the radial distribution of H II region tracers within galactic disks. Mild trends...

  14. Star formation in grand-design, spiral galaxies. Young, massive clusters in the near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: Spiral structure is a prominent feature in many disk galaxies and is often outlined by bright, young objects. We study the distribution of young stellar clusters in grand-design spiral galaxies and thereby determine whether strong spiral perturbations can influence star formation. Methods: Deep, near-infrared JHK-maps were observed for ten nearby, grand-design, spiral galaxies using HAWK-I at the Very Large Telescope. Complete, magnitude-limited candidate lists of star-forming complexes were obtained by searching within the K-band maps. The properties of the complexes were derived from (H - K) - (J - H) diagrams including the identification of the youngest complexes (i.e. ≲7 Myr) and the estimation of their extinction. Results: Young stellar clusters with ages ≲7 Myr have significant internal extinction in the range of AV = 3-7m, while older ones typically have AV pattern, the star formation rate in the arms is higher by a factor of 2-5 than in the inter-arm regions. The CLF in the arms is also shifted towards brighter MK by at least 0.4m. We also detect clusters with colors compatible with Large Magellanic Cloud intermediate age clusters and Milky Way globular clusters. The (J - K) - MK diagram of several galaxies shows, for the brightest clusters, a clear separation between young clusters that are highly attenuated by dust and older ones with low extinction. Conclusions: The gap in the (J - K) - MK diagrams implies that there has been a rapid expulsion of dust at an age around 7 Myr, possibly triggered by supernovae. Strong spiral perturbations concentrate the formation of clusters in the arm regions and shifts their CLF towards brighter magnitudes. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile; program: ESO 82.B-0331.Appendices A-C are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http

  15. Clustering of HI galaxies in HIPASS and ALFALFA

    CERN Document Server

    Passmoor, S S; Faltenbacher, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the clustering of HI-selected galaxies in the ALFALFA survey and compare results with those obtained for HIPASS. Measurements of the angular correlation function and the inferred 3D-clustering are compared with results from direct spatial-correlation measurements. We are able to measure clustering on smaller angular scales and for galaxies with lower HI masses than was previously possible. We calculate the expected clustering of dark matter using the redshift distributions of HIPASS and ALFALFA and show that the ALFALFA sample is somewhat more anti-biased with respect to dark matter than the HIPASS sample.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: the stellar content of galaxy clusters selected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hilton, Matt; Sifón, Cristóbal; Baker, Andrew J; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marriage, Tobias A; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Mike R; Page, Lyman A; Reese, Erik D; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Wollack, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We present a first measurement of the stellar mass component of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, using 3.6 um and 4.5 um photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our sample consists of 14 clusters detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which span the redshift range 0.27 < z < 1.07 (median z = 0.50), and have dynamical mass measurements, accurate to about 30 per cent, with median M500 = 6.9 x 10^{14} MSun. We measure the 3.6 um and 4.5 um galaxy luminosity functions, finding the characteristic magnitude (m*) and faint-end slope (alpha) to be similar to those for IR-selected cluster samples. We perform the first measurements of the scaling of SZ-observables (Y500 and y0) with both brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) stellar mass and total cluster stellar mass (M500star). We find a significant correlation between BCG stellar mass and Y500 (E(z)^{-2/3} DA^2 Y500 ~ M*^{1.2 +/- 0.6}), although we are not able to obtain a strong constraint on the slope of the relation...

  17. Sliding not sloshing in Abell 3744: the influence of radio galaxies NGC 7018 and 7016 on cluster gas

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M

    2013-01-01

    We present new X-ray (Chandra) and radio (JVLA) observations of the nearby cluster Abell 3744. It hosts two prominent radio galaxies with powers in the range critical for radio-mode feedback. The radio emission from these galaxies terminates in buoyant tendrils reaching the cluster's outer edge, and the radio-emitting plasma clearly influences the cluster's X-ray-emitting atmosphere. The cluster's average gas temperature, of kT=3.5 keV, is high for its bolometric luminosity of 3.2 \\times 10^{43} ergs s^{-1}, but the 100 kpc-scale cavity carved out by radio-emitting plasma shows evidence of less than 2 per cent of the excess enthalpy. We suggest instead that a high-velocity encounter with a galaxy group is responsible for dispersing and increasing the entropy of the gas in this non-cool-core cluster. We see no evidence for shocks, or established isobaric gas motions (sloshing), but there is much sub-structure associated with a dynamically active central region that encompasses the brightest radio emission. Gas...

  18. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  19. Average Heating Rate of Hot Atmospheres in Distant Galaxy Clusters by Radio AGN: Evidence for Continuous AGN Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng-Jiun; McNamara, B.; Nulsen, P.; Schaffer, R.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray observations of nearby clusters and galaxies have shown that energetic feedback from AGN is heating hot atmospheres and is probably the principal agent that is offsetting cooling flows. Here we examine AGN heating in distant X-ray clusters by cross correlating clusters selected from the 400 Square Degree X-ray Cluster survey with radio sources in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. The jet power for each radio source was determined using scaling relations between radio power and cavity power determined for nearby clusters, groups, and galaxies with atmospheres containing X-ray cavities. Roughly 30% of the clusters show radio emission above a flux threshold of 3 mJy within the central 250 kpc that is presumably associated with the brightest cluster galaxy. We find no significant correlation between radio power, hence jet power, and the X-ray luminosities of clusters in redshift range 0.1 -- 0.6. The detection frequency of radio AGN is inconsistent with the presence of strong cooling flows in 400SD, but cannot rule out the presence of weak cooling flows. The average jet power of central radio AGN is approximately 2 10^{44} erg/s. The jet power corresponds to an average heating of approximately 0.2 keV/particle for gas within R_500. Assuming the current AGN heating rate remained constant out to redshifts of about 2, these figures would rise by a factor of two. Our results show that the integrated energy injected from radio AGN outbursts in clusters is statistically significant compared to the excess entropy in hot atmospheres that is required for the breaking of self-similarity in cluster scaling relations. It is not clear that central AGN in 400SD clusters are maintained by a self-regulated feedback loop at the base of a cooling flow. However, they may play a significant role in preventing the development of strong cooling flows at early epochs.

  20. The Alignment of Red-Sequence Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Haylee; Barkhouse, Wayne; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of cluster galaxies has been used to determine the impact of the high-density environment on the evolution of galaxies. We have undertaken a study to measure the alignment of cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope. To supplement our KPNO sample, we have included an additional 64 low-redshift clusters from the WINGS dataset. From the combined cluster sample (121 clusters), we have selected cluster dwarf galaxies based on their position relative to the cluster red-sequence. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by position of the cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to the dwarf galaxy.

  1. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color-color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  2. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron

    2009-01-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M>10^{14.5}M_sun, galaxy clusters (GCs) may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the GC thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, beta_{core} and eta_e. beta_{core} is the ratio of CR energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the GC core, and eta_{e(p)} is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of ICM CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks (primary CRs), we find that beta_{core}~eta_{p}/200, nearly independent of GC mass and with a scatter Delta ln(beta_{core})~1 between GCs of given mass. We show that the HXR and gamma-ray luminosities produced by IC scattering of CMB photons by primary electrons exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions wit...

  3. Oscillatory relaxation of a merging galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Mathews, W G

    2006-01-01

    Within the cosmic framework clusters of galaxies are relatively young objects. Many of them have recently experienced major mergers. Here we investigate an equal mass merging event at z = ~0.6 resulting in a dark matter haloe of ~2.2 times 10^{14} Msol/h at z=0. The merging process is covered by 270 outputs of a high resolution cosmological N-body simulation performed with the ART (adaptive refinement tree) code. Some 2 Gyrs elapse between the first peri-centre passage of the progenitor cores and their final coalescence. During that phase the cores experience six peri-centre passages with minimal distances declining from ~30 to ~2 kpc/h. The time intervals between the peri-centre passages continuously decrease from 9 to 1 times 10^8 yrs. We follow the mean density, the velocity dispersion and the entropy of the two progenitors within a set of fixed proper radii (25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000 kpc/h). During the peri-centre passages we find sharp peaks of the mean densities within these radii, which exceed the su...

  4. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Color and Luminosity Dependence of Galaxy Clustering at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Croton, Darren; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Faber, S M; Gerke, Brian F; Koo, David C; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Wechsler, Risa H; Weiner, Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the color and luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering at z~1 in the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Using volume-limited subsamples in bins of both color and luminosity, we find that: 1) The clustering dependence is much stronger with color than with luminosity and is as strong with color at z~1 as is found locally. We find no dependence of the clustering amplitude on color for galaxies on the red sequence, but a significant dependence on color for galaxies within the blue cloud. 2) For galaxies in the range L/L*~0.7-2, a stronger large-scale luminosity dependence is seen for all galaxies than for red and blue galaxies separately. The small-scale clustering amplitude depends significantly on luminosity for blue galaxies, with brighter samples having a stronger rise on scales r_p<0.5 Mpc/h. 3) Redder galaxies exhibit stronger small-scale redshift-space distortions ("fingers of god"), and both red and blue populations show large-scale distortions in xi(r_p,pi) due to coherent infa...

  5. A bright, spatially extended lensed galaxy at z = 1.7 behind the cluster RCS2 032727-132623

    CERN Document Server

    Wuyts, Eva; Gladders, Michael D; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B; Carrasco, Mauricio; Gilbank, David; Yee, H K C; Koester, Benjamin P; Muñoz, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of an extremely bright and extended lensed source from the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). RCSGA 032727-132609 is spectroscopically confirmed as a giant arc and counter-image of a background galaxy at $z=1.701$, strongly-lensed by the foreground galaxy cluster RCS2 032727-132623 at $z=0.564$. The giant arc extends over $\\sim 38$\\,\\arcsec and has an integrated $g$-band magnitude of 19.15, making it $\\sim 20$ times larger and $\\sim 4$ times brighter than the prototypical lensed galaxy MS1512-cB58. This is the brightest distant lensed galaxy in the Universe known to date. Its location in the `redshift desert' provides unique opportunities to connect between the large samples of galaxies known at $z\\sim3$ and $z\\sim1$. We have collected photometry in 9 bands, ranging from $u$ to $K_s$, which densely sample the rest-frame UV and optical light, including the age-sensitive 4000\\AA\\ break. A lens model is constructed for the system, and results in a robust total magnification of $2...

  6. A Hubble Space Telescope Lensing Survey of X-ray Luminous Galaxy Clusters A Multiply-imaged Extremely Red Galaxy at z=1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, G P; Kneib, J P; Davis, C J; Takamiya, M; Ebeling, H; Czoske, O; Smith, Graham P.; Smail, Ian

    2002-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of EROJ003707+0909.5, the brightest of three gravitationally-lensed images of an Extremely Red Object (ERO) at z=1.6, in the field of the massive cluster A68 (z=0.255). We exploit the superlative resolution of our HST data and the enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity afforded by the lens amplification to reconstruct the source-plane properties of this ERO. Our morphological and photometric analysis reveals that EROJ003707 is an L* early-type disk-galaxy and we estimate that ~10 per cent of EROs with (R-K)>=5.3 and K<=21 may have similar properties. The unique association of passive EROs with elliptical galaxies therefore appears to be too simplistic. We speculate on the evolution of EROJ003707: if gas continues to cool onto this galaxy in the manner predicted by hierarchical galaxy formation models, then by the present day, EROJ003707 could evolve into a very luminous spiral galaxy.

  7. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Vecchia, Claudio dalla

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. In the era of precision cosmology, accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. For cases where only a limited set of simulations is available, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Also, relying on simulated realisations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these two points in mind, this work aims at presenting a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements f...

  8. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Ntampaka, M; Sutherland, D J; Fromenteau, S; Poczos, B; Schneider, J

    2015-01-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with width = 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further (width = 2.13). We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to...

  9. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Giocoli, Carlo; Baldi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters by using dense galaxy redshift surveys of their outer regions. By approximating the accretion with the infall of a spherical shell, the mass accretion rate only depends on the mass profile of the cluster in a thin shell at radii larger than $R_{200}$. This approximation is rather crude in hierarchical clustering scenarios, where both smooth accretion and aggregation of smaller dark matter haloes contribute to the mass accretion of clusters. Nevertheless, in the redshift range $z=[0,1]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20 \\%$ of the average rate derived with the more realistic merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters has been the topic of numerous detailed numerical and theoretical investigations, but so far it has remained inaccessible to measurements in the real Universe. Our result suggests that measuring the mass accreti...

  10. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    CERN Document Server

    Ichinohe, Y; Simionescu, A; Allen, S W; Canning, R E A; Ehlert, S; Mernier, F; Takahashi, T

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r~600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster center, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the southeast. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while toward the southwest the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall northwestward motion, with a sloshing-induced tangential ambient gas bulk flow bending the tail eastward. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that ...

  11. J0454-0309: Evidence for a strong lensing fossil group falling into a poor galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Schirmer, Mischa; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Halkola, Aleksi; Erben, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have discovered a strong lensing fossil group (J0454) at z=0.26, projected near the well-studied cluster MS0451-0305. Using multicolour Subaru/Suprime-Cam and CFHT/Megaprime imaging together with Keck spectroscopy we identify member galaxies. A VLT/FORS2 spectrum was taken to determine the redshifts of the brightest elliptical and the lensed arc. Using HST/ACS images we determine the group's weak lensing signal and model the strong lens system. This is the first time that a fossil group is analysed with lensing methods. The X-ray luminosity and temperature are derived from XMM-Newton data. We find two filaments extending over 4 Mpc, and within the virial radius we identify 31 members spectroscopically and 33 via the red sequence with i<22 mag. They segregate into spirals and a dynamically cooler central concentration of ellipticals with a velocity dispersion of 480 km/s. Weak lensing and cluster richness relations yield r200 = 830 kpc and M200 = 0.85 x 10^14 Msun. The brightest group galaxy (BGG) is inc...

  12. Effects of Cosmological Constant on Clustering of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hameeda, Mir; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the effect of the expansion of the universe on the clustering of galaxies. We evaluate the configurational integral for interacting system of galaxies in an expanding universe by including effects produced by the cosmological constant. The gravitational partition function is obtained using this configuration integral. Thermodynamic quantities, specifically, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, internal energy, pressure and chemical potential are also derived for this system. It is observed that they depend on the modified clustering parameter for this system of galaxies. It is also demonstrated that these thermodynamical quantities get corrected because of the cosmological constant.

  13. The Hydra I cluster core. I. Stellar populations in the cD galaxy NGC 3311

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, C. E.; Arnaboldi, M.; Coccato, L.; Hilker, M.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Richtler, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The history of the mass assembly of brightest cluster galaxies may be studied by mapping the stellar populations at large radial distances from the galaxy centre, where the dynamical times are long and preserve the chemodynamical signatures of the accretion events. Aims: We provide extended and robust measurements of the stellar population parameters in NGC 3311, the cD galaxy at the centre of the Hydra I cluster, and out to three effective radii. We wish to characterize the processes that drove the build-up of the stellar light at all these radii. Methods: We obtained the spectra from several regions in NGC 3311 covering an area of ~3 arcmin2 in the wavelength range 4800 ≲ λ(Å) ≲ 5800, using the FORS2 spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in the MXU mode. We measured the equivalent widths of seven absorption-features defined in the Lick/IDS system, which were modelled by single stellar populations, to provide luminosity-weighted ages, metallicities, and alpha element abundances. Results: The trends in the Lick indices and the distribution of the stellar population parameters indicate that the stars of NGC 3311 may be divided in two radial regimes, one within and the another beyond one effective radius, Re = 8.4 kpc, similar to the distinction between the inner galaxy and the external halo derived from the NGC 3311 velocity dispersion profile. The inner galaxy (R ≤ Re) is old (age ~14 Gyr), has negative metallicity gradients and positive alpha element gradients. The external halo is also very old, but has a negative age gradient. The metal and element abundances of the external halo both have a large scatter, indicating that stars from a variety of satellites with different masses have been accreted. The region in the extended halo associated with the off-centred envelope at 0°parent galaxies, either disks with truncated star formation, or the outer regions of early-type galaxies. Late mass accretion at large radii is now coming from the tidal

  14. Tailed radio galaxies as tracers of galaxy clusters. Serendipitous discoveries with the GMRT

    CERN Document Server

    Giacintucci, S

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of four new radio galaxies with tailed morphology. Tailed radio galaxies are generally found in rich environments, therefore their presence can be used as tracer of a cluster. The radio galaxies were found in the fields of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations carried out at 610 MHz and 327 MHz devoted to other studies. We inspected the literature and archives in the optical and X-ray bands to search for galaxy clusters or groups hosting them. All the tailed radio galaxies serendipitously found in the GMRT fields are located in rich environments. Two of them belong to the candidate cluster NCS J090232+204358, located at z(phot)=0.0746; one belongs to the cluster MaxBCGJ223.97317+22.15620 at z(phot)=0.2619; finally we suggest that the fourth one is probing a galaxy cluster at z=0.1177, located behind A262, and so far undetected in any band. Our results strenghten the relevance of high sensitivity and high resolution radio data in the detection of galaxy clusters at inte...

  15. N-Body Simulations of Galaxies in the Cluster Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Nicholas; Berrington, R. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present numerous N-body simulations of galaxy clusters consisting of up to 600,000 total particles and 50 galaxies each to characterize the evolution of galaxies in the cluster environment. These simulations were run on the Ball State University (BSU) College of Science and Humanities (CSH) 64-node Beowulf Cluster. Because the velocity dispersion (σ) is a tracer of a galaxies’ potential well and therefore its mass, we will use it to examine the mass evolution of the galaxies in the simulations by fitting a function to the σ of the galaxies. The strength of this function is its direct comparison to observational data. We further investigate the evolution of the galaxy structure parameters through the use of projected mass radii and line-of-sight (LOS) σ. Additionally, we discuss the use of alternate orbital parameters such as Vesc to investigate the potential wells of the galaxies. Our goal is to isolate the mass and luminosity evolution from the environmental effects on the evolution of elliptical galaxies. This project is a subset of a continuing study whose intent is to combine observational data with numerical techniques to study the effects of a galaxies’ environment on its mass evolution and internal dynamics.

  16. Searching for star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Vaduvescu, O; Bassino, L P; Castelli, A V Smith; Calderon, J P

    2014-01-01

    The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters need to be understood, and this requires large aperture telescopes. In this sense, we selected the Antlia cluster to continue our previous work in the Virgo, Fornax, and Hydra clusters and in the Local Volume (LV). Because of the scarce available literature data, we selected a small sample of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) candidates in Antlia for observation. Using the Gemini South and GMOS camera, we acquired the Halpha imaging needed to detect star-forming regions in this sample. With the long-slit spectroscopic data of the brightest seven knots detected in three BCD candidates, we derived their basic chemical properties. Using archival VISTA VHS survey images, we derived K_S magnitudes and surface brightness profile fits for the whole sample to assess basic physical properties. FS90-98, FS90-106, and FS90-147 are confirmed as BCDs and cluster members, based on their morphology, K_S surface photometry, oxygen abundance, and velocity redshift. FS90-15...

  17. XMM-Newton and Chandra Cross Calibration Using HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Schellenberger, G; Lovisari, L; Nevalainen, J; David, L

    2014-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from clusters rely on accurate gravitational mass estimates, which strongly depend on cluster gas temperature measurements. Therefore, systematic calibration differences may result in biased, instrument-dependent cosmological constraints. This is of special interest in the light of the tension between the Planck results of the primary temperature anisotropies of the CMB and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich plus X-ray cluster counts analyses. We quantify in detail the systematics and uncertainties of the cross-calibration of the effective area between five X-ray instruments, EPIC-MOS1/MOS2/PN onboard XMM-Newton and ACIS-I/S onboard Chandra, and the influence on temperature measurements. Furthermore, we assess the impact of the cross calibration uncertainties on cosmology. Using the HIFLUGCS sample, consisting of the 64 X-ray brightest galaxy clusters, we constrain the ICM temperatures through spectral fitting in the same, mostly isothermal, regions and compare them. Our work is an extension to a pre...

  18. A photometric catalogue of galaxies in the cluster Abell 496

    CERN Document Server

    Slezak, E; Guibert, J; Lobo, C; Slezak, Eric; Durret, Florence; Guibert, Jean; Lobo, Catarina

    1999-01-01

    We present two catalogues of galaxies in the direction of the rich cluster Abell 496. The first one includes 3,879 galaxies located in a region of roughly 1.3 degrees from the cluster centre. It has been obtained from a list of more than 35,000 galaxy candidates detected by scanning part of a Schmidt photographic plate taken in the b_J band. Positions are very accurate in this catalogue but magnitudes are not. This led us to perform CCD imaging observations in the V and R bands to calibrate these photographic magnitudes. A second catalogue gives a list of galaxies with CCD magnitudes in the V (239 galaxies) and R (610 galaxies) bands for a much smaller region in the centre of the cluster. These two catalogues will be combined with a redshift catalogue of 466 galaxies (Durret et al. 1999) to investigate the cluster properties at optical wavelengths (Durret et al. in preparation), as a complement to previous X-ray studies by a member of our group (Pislar 1998).

  19. High-energy neutrinos from sources in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays can be accelerated in clusters of galaxies, by mega-parsec scale shocks induced by accretion of gas during the formation of large-scale structure, or by powerful sources harbored in clusters. Once accelerated, the highest energy particles leave the cluster via almost rectilinear trajectories, while lower energy ones can be confined by the cluster magnetic field up to cosmological time and interact with the intracluster gas. Using a realistic model of the baryon distribution and the turbulent magnetic field in clusters, we studied the propagation and hadronic interaction of high-energy protons in the intracluster medium. We report the cumulative cosmic ray and neutrino spectra generated by galaxy clusters including embedded sources, and demonstrate that clusters can contribute a significant fraction of the observed IceCube neutrinos above 30 TeV while remaining undetected in high-energy cosmic rays and $\\gamma$ rays for reasonable choices of parameters and source scenarios.

  20. Clustering Property of Wolf-Rayet Galaxies in the SDSS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xu Kong; Fu-Zhen Cheng

    2008-01-01

    We have analysed, for the first time, the clustering properties of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) galaxies, using a large sample of 846 W-R galaxies selected from the Data Release 4 (DR4) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We compute the cross-correlation function between W- R galaxies and a reference sample of galaxies drawn from the DR4. We compare the function to the results for control samples of non-W-R star-forming galaxies that are matched closely in redshift, luminosity, concentration, 4000-A break strength and specific star formation rate (SSFR). On scales larger than a few Mpc, W-R galaxies have almost the same clustering amplitude as the control samples, indicating that W-R galaxies and non-W-R control galax- ies populate dark matter haloes of similar masses. On scales between 0.1-1 h-1 Mpc, W-R galaxies are less clustered than the control samples, and the size of the difference depends on the SSFR. Based on both observational and theoretical considerations, we speculate that this negative bias can be interpreted by W-R galaxies residing preferentially at the centers of their dark matter haloes. We examine the distribution of W-R galaxies more closely using the SDSS galaxy group catalogue of Yang et al., and find that ~82% of our W-R galaxies are the central galaxies of groups, compared to ~74% for the corresponding control galaxies. We find that W-R galaxies are hosted, on average, by dark matter haloes of masses of 1012,3 M☉, compared to 1012,1 M? For centrally-located W-R galaxies and 1012,7 M☉ For satellite ones. We would like to point out that this finding, which provides a direct observational support to our conjecture, is really very crude due to the small number of W-R galaxies and the incom- pleteness of the group catalogue, and needs more work in future with larger samples.

  1. Disentangling the ICL with the CHEFs in the Pandora galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Dupke, Renato A.

    2016-01-01

    The intracluster light (ICL) is important for understanding the metal enrichment of the intracluster gas and constraining cosmological parameters independently of the other methods. However, its measurement it is not trivial due to the necessity of disentangling the light of stars locked up in galaxies from the proper ICL. Currently, there is no standard method to efficiently measure the ICL (Rudick et al. 2011, ApJ, 732, 48), and different approaches relying on the binding energy of the cluster galaxies, the density of the material, or the surface brightness distribution, have been tried. Moreover, a suitable way to disentangle the limits of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and the ICL still has not been developed.The CHEFs (from Chebyshev-Fourier bases, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) are a mathematical tool especially designed to model the two-dimensional light distribution of galaxies. We use the CHEFs and tools from differential geometry to infer the light contribution of the ICL to the total brightness, without imposing any artificial thresholds and avoiding the ambiguity introduced by free parameters that are usually set in these studies (Rudick et al. 2011).We use the extremely deep optical images from Abell 2744, the Pandora cluster, a multi-cluster merger, observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields project to show the efficiency of this new method. The CHEFs can accurately fit and remove all the galaxies close to the cluster center, including the BCG. The limits of the BCG are marked out by determining the points where the surface curvature changes, thus disentangling the ICL from the BCG light in a completely natural way. Once we have the residual image just containing ICL and background, we extrapolate the value of this latter from images of individual pointings close to the main Pandora field. We finally estimate the ICL to be ~24% of the total light, which is very consistent with the predictions from numerical simulations (Montes

  2. Multicolor Photometry of the Nearby Galaxy Cluster A119

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Ma, Jun; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Zhou; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zou, Hu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents multicolor optical photometry of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 119 (z = 0:0442) with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system of 15 intermediate bands. Within the BATC viewing field of 58'* 58', there are 368 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts, including 238 member galaxies (called sample I). Based on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 1376 galaxies brighter than iBATC = 19:5, photometric redshift technique and the color-magnitude relation of earlytype galaxies are applied to select faint member galaxies. As a result, 117 faint galaxies were selected as new member galaxies. Combined with sample I, an enlarged sample (called sample II) of 355 member galaxies is obtained. Spatial distribution and localized velocity structure for two samples demonstrate that A119 is a dynamically complex cluster with at least three prominent substructures in the central region within 1 Mpc. A large velocity dispersion for the central clump indicates a merging along the line of ...

  3. Galaxy and cluster formation in a neutrino universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.

    1984-07-01

    Analysis of 27 clusters of galaxies indicates that about 90% of the mass is hidden in neutrinos; the member galaxies account for (5--7)%, and (3--5)% comprises hot gas of very high entropy. Comparison of the cluster parameters against those of the primordial neutrino--gaseous ''pancakes'' yields an estimate for the redshift when the pancakes originally formed. A model is proposed for the ensuing pancake evolution: early supernovae would explode and further heat the pancake gas that has not yet cooled, raising its entropy to the values observed. The strong flows induced in the gas by the explosions would dictate the subsequent, galaxy-formation process and the observed supercluster structure: the mass distribution of the member galaxies and their correlation function. Only large-scale objects (superclusters, clusters) preserve information on the spectrum of the initial fluctuations.

  4. Intermediate-age globular clusters in four galaxy merger remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trancho, Gelys [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, 251 South Lake Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Miller, Bryan W. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Schweizer, François [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Burdett, Daniel P. [The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Palamara, David, E-mail: gtrancho@gmto.org [Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based K{sub s} -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIK{sub s} GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ∼1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  5. Super Star Cluster Nebula in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.; Turner, J. L.; Tsai, C.-W.; Beck, S. C.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2004-12-01

    We have mapped the starburst galaxy NGC 660 at 100mas resolution at K band (1.3 cm) with the NRAO Very Large Array. A peculiar galaxy at a distance of 13 Mpc, NGC 660 contains concentrated central star formation of power ˜ 2 x 1010 Lsun. Our 1.3 cm continuum image reveals a bright, compact source of less than 10 pc extent with a rising spectral index. We infer that this is optically thick free-free emission from a super star cluster nebula. The nebula is less than 10 pc in size, comparable in luminosity to the ``supernebula" in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. We estimate that there are a few thousand O stars contained in this single young cluster. There are a number of other weaker continuum sources, either slightly smaller or more evolved clusters of similar size within the central 300 parsecs of the galaxy. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Observation of the Perseus galaxy cluster with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, S; Colin, P; Doro, M; Hildebrand, D; Prada, F; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

    2011-01-01

    The MAGIC ground-based Imaging Cherenkov experiment observed the Perseus galaxy cluster for a total of about 25 hr between November and December 2008 in single telescope mode and for nearly 90 hr between October 2009 and February 2011 in stereoscopic mode. This survey represents the deepest observation of a cluster of galaxies at very high energies ever. It resulted in the detection of the central radio galaxy NGC 1275 and the head-tail radio galaxy IC 310. It also permits for the first time to put constraints on emission models predicting gamma-rays from cosmic ray acceleration in the cluster and to investigate dark matter scenarios. Here, we will report the latest MAGIC results on these studies.

  7. The Galaxy Cluster Merger Catalog: An Online Repository of Mock Observations from Simulated Galaxy Cluster Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    ZuHone, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present the first release of the "Galaxy Cluster Merger Catalog". This catalog provides an extensive suite of mock observations and related data for N-body and hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster mergers. These mock observations consist of projections of a number of important observable quantities in several different wavebands, for the entire evolution of each simulation as well as along different lines of sight through the three-dimensional simulation domain. The web interface to the catalog consists of easily browseable images over epoch and projection direction, as well as download links for the raw data and a JS9 interface for interactive data exploration. All of the data products are provided in the standard FITS file format, in image and table form. Data is being stored on the yt Hub (http://hub.yt), which allows for remote access and analysis using a Jupyter notebook server. Future versions of the catalog will include simulations from a number of research groups and a variety of research t...

  8. New Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    How do ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) galaxies that are especially small and dense form and evolve? Scientists have recently examined distant galaxy clusters, searching for more UCDs to help us answer this question.Origins of DwarfsIn recent years we have discovered a growing sample of small, very dense galaxies. Galaxies that are tens to hundreds of light-years across, with masses between a million and a billion solar masses, fall into category of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs).An example of an unresolved compact object from the authors survey that is likely an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy. [Adapted from Zhang Bell 2017]How do these dense and compact galaxies form? Two possibilities are commonly suggested:An initially larger galaxy was tidally stripped during interactions with other galaxies in a cluster, leaving behind only its small, dense core as a UCD.UCDs formed as compact galaxies at very early cosmic times. The ones living in a massive dark matter halo may have been able to remain compact over time, evolving into the objectswe see today.To better understand which of these formation scenarios applies to which galaxies, we need a larger sample size! Our census of UCDs is fairly limited and because theyare small and dim, most of the ones weve discovered are in the nearby universe. To build a good sample, we need to find UCDs at higher redshifts as well.A New SampleIn a recent study, two scientists from University of Michigan have demonstrated how we might find more UCDs. Yuanyuan Zhang (also affiliated with Fermilab) and Eric Bell used the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) to search 17 galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts of 0.2 z 0.6, looking for unresolved objects that might be UCDs.The mass and size distributions of the UCD candidates reported in this study, in the context of previously known nuclear star clusters, globular clusters (GCs), UCDs, compact elliptical galaxies (cEs), and dwarf galaxies. [Zhang Bell 2017]Zhang and

  9. Cluster X-Ray Substructure and Radio Galaxy Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledlow, M. J.; Burns, J. O.

    1994-12-01

    Current wisdom suggests that X-ray substructure in the intracluster medium (ICM) is fairly common in galaxy clusters. This substructure takes the form of elongations, isophotal twisting, asymmetries, and sub-clumping. Substructure is also frequently present in kinematical analysis of the galaxy velocity and spatial distributions. These features include bimodality, kurtosis or skewness, and non-Gaussian velocity distributions. Consistent with the observations, Hydro/N-Body simulations suggest that cluster-subcluster mergers may be the culprit to explain these features in the ICM gas distribution, and would indicate that many clusters, even at the present epoch, are still undergoing significant dynamical evolution. From a sample of X-ray images from the Einstein satellite and, more recently, the ROSAT mission, Burns et al. (1994) found a significant correlation between the positions of radio galaxies and subclumps within the cluster-scale X-ray emission. Burns et al. have suggested that radio galaxies reside in the residue of cluster/sub-cluster merging sites, and may therefore act as pointers to clusters with ongoing and intersting dynamical activity. We are following up these ideas with a detailed substructure analysis, and a comparison to a sample of clusters without radio galaxies. In order to determine the signficance of substructure, we have reanalyzed the X-ray images using a Bootstrap-Resampling Monte-Carlo technique. In this method, asymmetries, elongations, and other forms of substructure are evaluated using a moment-analysis similar to M{o}hr et al. (1994), with the advantage that we need not assume apriori any specific substructure-free model for the source (\\ie\\ a Beta-model). The significance of individual features is determined solely from a comparison to statistical fluctuations (including noise) of the actual data. Using this technique, we place limits on the fraction of clusters with significant substructure and test the radio galaxy

  10. The Influence of Cluster Mergers on Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Bouy, H.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.

    2016-06-01

    The rich environment of galaxy clusters is understood to have a profound effect on the evolution of constituent galaxies. However, even clusters of a similar mass and at fixed redshift are not homogeneous, displaying a range in structural complexity. Here we concentrate on the effect of cluster merging, the most massive dynamic process in the Universe. Two spectacular cluster mergers at z~0.3 are explored: the archetypal Bullet cluster (1E0657-558; Rawle et al. 2012), and the HST Frontier Field, Pandora's cluster (Abell 2744; Rawle et al. 2014, 2016). We present detailed analysis of their total star formation, derived from multi-wavelength observations of both dusty and unobscured activity from Herschel, Spitzer, WISE and GALEX. Examination of the morphologies of individual cluster galaxies reveals striking evidence for transformation and enhanced star formation, triggered by the merger-induced shock front. This includes several galaxies identified as having "jellyfish" morphologies caused by the passing shock. We discuss the implications, and preview future work exploring a large sample of clusters covering a range of dynamic states and redshifts.

  11. J0454-0309: evidence of a strong lensing fossil group falling into a poor galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, M.; Suyu, S.; Schrabback, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Erben, T.; Halkola, A.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We have discovered a strong lensing fossil group (J0454) projected near the well-studied cluster MS0451-0305. Using the large amount of available archival data, we compare J0454 to normal groups and clusters. A highly asymmetric image configuration of the strong lens enables us to study the substructure of the system. Methods: We used multicolour Subaru/Suprime-Cam and CFHT/Megaprime imaging, together with Keck spectroscopy to identify member galaxies. A VLT/FORS2 spectrum was taken to determine the redshifts of the brightest elliptical and the lensed arc. Using HST/ACS images, we determined the group's weak lensing signal and modelled the strong lens system. This is the first time that a fossil group is analysed with lensing methods. The X-ray luminosity and temperature were derived from XMM-Newton data. Results: J0454 is located at z = 0.26, with a gap of 2.5 mag between the brightest and second brightest galaxies within half the virial radius. Outside a radius of 1.5 Mpc, we find two filaments extending over 4 Mpc, and within we identify 31 members spectroscopically and 33 via the red sequence with i instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  12. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. Accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. Usually, only a limited set of accurate N-body simulations is available. Thus, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Further, relying on simulated realizations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these points in mind, this work presents a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements for galaxy samples with a trivial geometry in the case of a Gaussian approximation of the clustering likelihood. As main result of this paper, we give the explicit formulae for Fourier and configuration space covariance matrices. To validate our model, we create synthetic halo occupation distribution galaxy catalogues by populating the haloes of an ensemble of large-volume N-body simulations. Using linear and non-linear input power spectra, we find very good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements on the synthetic catalogues in the quasi-linear regime.

  13. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A; Zandanel, F; Gomez, Mario E; Prada, F

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, most of the attention in gamma-ray dark matter (DM) searches has been devoted to neutralino annihilations in nearby dwarf galaxies. However, massive galaxy clusters in the local Universe may constitute very good targets as well. The main aim of this work is to compare both dwarf galaxies and local galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters, and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman~1 appears as the best candidate in the sample and, given the morphology of its annihilation signal, it is also one of the objects more readily observable by IACTs. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the hi...

  14. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R; ),

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  15. Thermal diffusion in the IGM of clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shtykovskiy, P

    2009-01-01

    We revisit the phenomenon of elements diffusion in the intergalactic medium (IGM) in clusters of galaxies. The diffusion is driven by gravity, concentration and temperature gradients. The latter cause thermal diffusion, which has been so far ignored in IGM studies. We consider the full problem based on the Burgers' equations and demonstrate that the temperature gradients present in clusters of galaxies may successfully compete with gravity, evacuating metals from cooler regions. Under the combined action of gravity and temperature gradients, complicated metallicity profiles with several peaks and depressions may be formed. For a typical cool core cluster, the thermal diffusion may significantly reduce and even reverse the gravitational sedimentation of metals, resulting in the depression in their abundance in the core. This may have implications for diagnostics of the low temperature plasma in the centers of clusters of galaxies.

  16. A new constraint on millicharged dark matter from galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kadota, Kenji; Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new constraint on millicharged dark matter from considerations on galaxy clusters. The charged dark matter moves under the influence of the randomly oriented magnetic fields in galaxy clusters, and the corresponding dark matter density profile can significantly differ from the concordance CDM predictions which are well supported from the galaxy cluster observations. With a typical amplitude of magnetic fields $B=\\mathcal O(1)\\,\\mu$G and dark matter velocity $v=\\mathcal O(100)\\,$km/sec at a cluster radius $R\\simeq 1\\,$Mpc, we claim that the charge $\\epsilon e$ ($e$ is the elementary charge) of dark matter with mass $m$ should be bounded as $\\epsilon \\lesssim 10^{-14}(m/{\\rm GeV})$ which is substantially tighter than the other previous constraints.

  17. Evolutionary Synthesis Modelling of Young Star Clusters in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, P; De Grijs, R; Anders, Peter; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.; Grijs, Richard de

    2003-01-01

    The observational properties of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are vital tools to investigate the violent star formation histories of their host galaxies. This violence is thought to have been triggered by galaxy interactions or mergers. The most basic properties of a GCS are its luminosity function (number of clusters per luminosity bin) and color distributions. A large number of observed GCS show bimodal color distributions, which can be translated into a bimodality in either metallicity and/or age. An additional uncertainty comes into play when one considers extinction. These effects can be disentangled either by obtaining spectroscopic data for the clusters or by imaging observations in at least four passbands. This allows us then to discriminate between various formation scenarios of GCSs, e.g. the merger scenario by Ashman & Zepf, and the multi-phase collapse model by Forbes et. al.. Young and metal-rich star cluster populations are seen to form in interacting and merging galaxies. We analyse multi...

  18. A Hidden Radio Halo in the Galaxy Cluster A1682?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Venturi; S. Giacintucci; D. Dallacasa

    2011-12-01

    High sensitivity observations of radio halos in galaxy clusters at frequencies ≤ 330 MHz are still relatively rare, and very little is known compared to the classical 1.4 GHz images. The few radio halos imaged down to 150–240 MHz show a considerable spread in size, morphology and spectral properties. All clusters belonging to the GMRT Radio Halo Survey with detected or candidate cluster-scale diffuse emission have been imaged at 325 MHz with the GMRT. Few of them were also observed with the GMRT at 240 MHz and 150 MHz. For A1682, imaging is particularly challenging due to the presence of strong and extended radio galaxies at the center. Our data analysis suggests that thew radio galaxies are superposed to very low surface brightness radio emission extended on the cluster scale, which we present here.

  19. Constraints on the optical depth of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel; McDonald, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth ($\\tau$) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on $\\tau$ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intra-cluster medium, which takes into account star-formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. By calibrating the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters and $M_{\\mathrm{gas}}-M$ relations of groups ...

  20. Star Cluster Luminosity Functions and Cluster Formation Efficiencies in LEGUS Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Lee, Janice C.; Adamo, Angela; Kim, Hwiyun; Ryon, Jenna E.; LEGUS Team

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results of star cluster luminosity functions (LFs) and cluster formation efficiencies (Γ) in the LEGUS dwarf galaxy sub-sample. We have used a combination of automated and visual identification techniques to allow us to construct a more complete sample of clusters in these low-mass, low-SFR environments compared to previous studies of dwarf galaxies. Cluster properties are derived from fitting UV and optical (NUV-I) HST photometry to both deterministic and stochastic single-aged stellar populations models. We compare the cluster formation efficiencies and LF slopes to those of previous studies in both dwarf and massive spiral galaxy environments. Recent studies have found that both the LF slope and Γ form trends with galaxy environment. Our LF slope and Γ measurements in the LEGUS dwarfs will allow us to test these trends in the extreme, low-SFR regime and provide a better understanding of the star formation process.

  1. Featured Image: A Galaxy Plunges Into a Cluster Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The galaxy that takes up most of the frame in this stunning image (click for the full view!) is NGC 1427A. This is a dwarf irregular galaxy (unlike the fortuitously-located background spiral galaxy in the lower right corner of the image), and its currently in the process of plunging into the center of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Marcelo Mora (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) and collaborators have analyzed observations of this galaxy made by both the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, which produced the image shown here as a color composite in three channels. The team worked to characterize the clusters of star formation within NGC 1427A identifiable in the image as bright knots within the galaxy and determine how the interactions of this galaxy with its cluster environment affect the star formation within it. For more information and the original image, see the paper below.Citation:Marcelo D. Mora et al 2015 AJ 150 93. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/93

  2. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  3. Age and Metallicities of Cluster Galaxies: A1185 and Coma

    CERN Document Server

    Rakos, K; Odell, A

    2006-01-01

    We present age and metallicities determinations based on narrow band continuum colors for the galaxies in the rich clusters A1185 and Coma. Using a new technique to extract luminosity-weighted age and [Fe/H] values for non-star-forming galaxies, we find that both clusters have two separate populations based on these parameters. One population is old ($\\tau >$ 11 Gyrs) with a distinct mass-metallicity relation. The second population is slightly younger ($\\tau \\approx$ 9 Gyrs) with lower metallicities and lower stellar masses. We find detectable correlations between age and galaxy mass in both populations such that older galaxies are more massive and have higher mean metallicities, confirming previous work with line indices for the same type of galaxies in other clusters (Kelson et al 2006, Thomas et al 2005). Our results imply shorter durations for higher mass galaxies, in contradiction to the predictions of classic galactic wind models. Since we also find a clear mass-metallicity relation for these galaxies, ...

  4. Starbursts versus Truncated Star Formation in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, J A; Caldwell, N; Chaboyer, B; Rose, James A.; Gaba, Alejandro E.; Caldwell, Nelson; Chaboyer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy, B and R bandpass imaging, and 21 cm observations of a sample of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters which are known to be either in a star-forming phase or to have had star formation which recently terminated. From the long-slit spectra, obtained with the Blanco 4-m telescope, we find that emission lines in the star-forming cluster galaxies are significantly more centrally concentrated than in a sample of field galaxies. The broadband imaging reveals that two currently star-forming early-type galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster have blue nuclei, again indicating that recent star formation has been concentrated. In contrast, the two galaxies for which star formation has already ended show no central color gradient. The Pegasus I galaxy with the most evident signs of ongoing star formation (NGC7648), exhibits signatures of a tidal encounter. Neutral hydrogen observations of that galaxy with the Arecibo radiotelescope reveal the presence of ~4 x 10^8 solar masses of HI. Arecib...

  5. DISCOVERY OF A STRONG LENSING GALAXY EMBEDDED IN A CLUSTER AT z = 1.62

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Suyu, Sherry H. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey J. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina G. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Rudnick, Gregory H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Kansas, Malott Room 1082, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Halkola, Aleksi

    2014-07-10

    We identify a strong lensing galaxy in the cluster IRC 0218 (also known as XMM-LSS J02182–05102) that is spectroscopically confirmed to be at z = 1.62, making it the highest-redshift strong lens galaxy known. The lens is one of the two brightest cluster galaxies and lenses a background source galaxy into an arc and a counterimage. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grism and Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we measure the source redshift to be z {sub S} = 2.26. Using HST imaging in ACS/F475W, ACS/F814W, WFC3/F125W, and WFC3/F160W, we model the lens mass distribution with an elliptical power-law profile and account for the effects of the cluster halo and nearby galaxies. The Einstein radius is θ{sub E}=0.38{sub −0.01}{sup +0.02} arcsec (3.2{sub −0.1}{sup +0.2} kpc) and the total enclosed mass is M {sub tot}(<θ{sub E})=1.8{sub −0.1}{sup +0.2}×10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙}. We estimate that the cluster environment contributes ∼10% of this total mass. Assuming a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), the dark matter fraction within θ{sub E} is f{sub DM}{sup Chab}=0.3{sub −0.3}{sup +0.1}, while a Salpeter IMF is marginally inconsistent with the enclosed mass (f{sub DM}{sup Salp}=−0.3{sub −0.5}{sup +0.2}). The total magnification of the source is μ{sub tot}=2.1{sub −0.3}{sup +0.4}. The source has at least one bright compact region offset from the source center. Emission from Lyα and [O III] are likely to probe different regions in the source.

  6. On the interaction of the PKS B1358–113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Szostek, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ulica Orla 171, 30-244 Kraków (Poland); Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Werner, N. [KIPAC, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Madejski, G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Begelman, M. C., E-mail: stawarz@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}∼2×10{sup −4} M-dot {sub Edd}∼0.02 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ∼ (1-6) × 10{sup –3} L {sub Edd} ∼ (0.5-3) × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τ{sub j} ∼ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}∼2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on

  7. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  8. The K-band luminosity functions of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Propris, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    We derive the galaxy luminosity function in the Ks band for galaxies in 24 clusters to provide a local reference for higher redshift studies and to analyse how and if the luminosity function varies according to environment and cluster properties. We use new, deep K-band imaging and match the photometry to available redshift information and to optical photometry from the SDSS or the UKST/POSS: More than 80 per cent of the galaxies to K ∼ 14.5 have measured redshifts. We derive composite luminosity functions, for the entire sample and for cluster subsamples. We consider the luminosity functions for red-sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The full composite luminosity function has K* = 12.79 ± 0.14 (MK = -24.81) and α = -1.41 ± 0.10. We find that K* is largely unaffected by the environment, but that the slope α increases towards lower mass clusters and clusters with Bautz-Morgan type function seems to be approximately universal (within errors) in all environments: It has parameters K* = 13.16 ± 0.15 (MK = -24.44) and α = -1.00 ± 0.12 (for all galaxies). Blue galaxies do not show a good fit to a Schechter function, but the best values for its parameters are K* = 13.51 ± 0.41 (MK = -24.09) and α = -1.60 ± 0.29: We do not have enough statistics to consider environmental variations for these galaxies. We find some evidence that K* in clusters is brighter than in the field and α is steeper, but note that this comparison is based (for the field) on 2MASS photometry, while our data are considerably deeper.

  9. Galaxy Cluster Bulk Flows and Collision Velocities in QUMOND

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Harley; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G W

    2013-01-01

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {\\Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain about 1000 km/s by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {\\Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {\\Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for 'pink elephants' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  10. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  11. Tidally Induced Elongation and Alignments of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Salvador-Solé, E; Salvador-Sole, Eduard; Solanes, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    We show that tidal interaction among galaxy clusters can account for their observed alignments and very marked elongation and, consequently, that these characteristics of clusters are actually consistent with them being formed in hierarchical clustering. The well-established distribution of projected axial ratios of clusters with richness class $R\\ge 0$ is recovered very satisfactorily by means of a simple model with no free parameters. The main perturbers are relatively rich ($R\\ge 1$) single clusters and/or groups of clusters (superclusters) of a wider richness class ($R\\ge 0$) located within a distance of about 65 $h^{-1}$ Mpc from the perturbed cluster. This makes the proposed scheme be also consistent with all reported alignment effects involving clusters. We find that this tidal interaction is typically in the saturate regime (\\ie the maximum elongation allowed for systems in equilibrium is reached), which explains the very similar intrinsic axial ratio shown by all clusters. Tides would therefore play ...

  12. Sommerfeld enhancement of invisible dark matter annihilation in galaxies and galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Man Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that core-like dark matter structures exist in many galaxies, while numerical simulations reveal a singular dark matter density profile at the center. In this article, I show that if the annihilation of dark matter particles gives invisible sterile neutrinos, the Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation cross-section can give a sufficiently large annihilation rate to solve the core-cusp problem. The resultant core density, core radius, and their scaling relation generally agree with recent empirical fits from observations. Also, this model predicts that the resultant core-like structures in dwarf galaxies can be easily observed, but not for large normal galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  13. Central mass profiles of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters Hydra A and A478

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, N.; Umetsu, K.; Tamura, T.; Fujita, Y.; Takizawa, M.; Matsushita, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Futamase, T.; Kawaharada, M.; Miyazaki, S.; Mochizuki, Y.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ota, N.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, K.; Tam, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a weak-lensing study of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, Hydra A (z = 0.0538) and A478 (z = 0.0881), of which the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) host the powerful activities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For each cluster, the observed tangential shear profile is described well by either a single Navarro-Frenk-White model or a two-component model including the BCG as an unresolved point mass. For A478, we determine the BCG and its host-halo masses from a joint fit to weak-lensing and stellar photometry measurements. We find that the choice of initial mass functions (IMFs) can introduce a factor of 2 uncertainty in the BCG mass, whereas the BCG host-halo mass is constrained well by data. We perform a joint analysis of the weak-lensing and stellar kinematics data available for the Hydra A cluster, which allows us to constrain the central mass profile without assuming specific IMFs. We find that the central mass profile (r < 300 kpc) determined from the joint analysis is in excellent agreement with those from independent measurements, including dynamical masses estimated from the cold gas disc component, X-ray hydrostatic total mass estimates, and the central stellar mass estimated with the Salpeter IMF. The observed dark matter fraction around the BCG for Hydra A is found to be smaller than those predicted by adiabatic contraction models, suggesting the importance of other physical processes, such as AGN feedback and/or dissipationless mergers.

  14. Generalizing MOND to explain the missing mass in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Alistair O.; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2017-02-01

    Context. MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is a gravitational framework designed to explain the astronomical observations in the Universe without the inclusion of particle dark matter. MOND, in its current form, cannot explain the missing mass in galaxy clusters without the inclusion of some extra mass, be it in the form of neutrinos or non-luminous baryonic matter. We investigate whether the MOND framework can be generalized to account for the missing mass in galaxy clusters by boosting gravity in high gravitational potential regions. We examine and review Extended MOND (EMOND), which was designed to increase the MOND scale acceleration in high potential regions, thereby boosting the gravity in clusters. Aims: We seek to investigate galaxy cluster mass profiles in the context of MOND with the primary aim at explaining the missing mass problem fully without the need for dark matter. Methods: Using the assumption that the clusters are in hydrostatic equilibrium, we can compute the dynamical mass of each cluster and compare the result to the predicted mass of the EMOND formalism. Results: We find that EMOND has some success in fitting some clusters, but overall has issues when trying to explain the mass deficit fully. We also investigate an empirical relation to solve the cluster problem, which is found by analysing the cluster data and is based on the MOND paradigm. We discuss the limitations in the text.

  15. STAR FORMATION AND RELAXATION IN 379 NEARBY GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and level of relaxation in a sample of 379 galaxy clusters at z < 0.2. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure cluster membership and level of relaxation, and to select star-forming galaxies based on mid-infrared emission detected with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. For galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub r} < −19.5, we find an inverse correlation between SF fraction and cluster relaxation: as a cluster becomes less relaxed, its SF fraction increases. Furthermore, in general, the subtracted SF fraction in all unrelaxed clusters (0.117 ± 0.003) is higher than that in all relaxed clusters (0.097 ± 0.005). We verify the validity of our SF calculation methods and membership criteria through analysis of previous work. Our results agree with previous findings that a weak correlation exists between cluster SF and dynamical state, possibly because unrelaxed clusters are less evolved relative to relaxed clusters.

  16. MC$^2$: Dynamical Analysis of the Merging Galaxy Cluster MACS J1149.5+2223

    CERN Document Server

    Golovich, Nathan; Wittman, David; Ogrean, Georgiana A; van Weeren, Reinout J; Bonafede, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the merging cluster MACS J1149.5+2223 using archival imaging from Subaru/Suprime-Cam and multi-object spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS and Gemini/GMOS. We employ two and three dimensional substructure tests and determine that MACS J1149.5+2223 is composed of two separate mergers between three subclusters occurring $\\sim$1 Gyr apart. The primary merger gives rise to elongated X-ray morphology and a radio relic in the southeast. The brightest cluster galaxy is a member of the northern subcluster of the primary merger. This subcluster is very massive (16.7$^{+\\text{1.25}}_{-\\text{1.60}}\\times\\text{10}^{\\text{14}}$ M$_{\\odot}$). The southern subcluster is also very massive (10.8$^{+\\text{3.37}}_{-\\text{3.54}}\\times\\text{10}^{\\text{14}}$ M$_{\\odot}$), yet it lacks an associated X-ray surface brightness peak, and it has been unidentified previously despite the detailed study of this \\emph{Frontier Field} cluster. A secondary merger is occurring in the north along the line of sight with a thir...

  17. The descendents of Lyman Break Galaxies in galaxy clusters spatial distribution and orbital properties

    CERN Document Server

    Governato, F; Moore, B; Quinn, T; Stadel, J; Lake, G; Brera-Merate, O A

    2000-01-01

    We combine semi-analytical methods with a ultra-high resolution simulation of a galaxy cluster (of mass 2.3 10^14h-1Msolar, and 4 10^6 particles within its virial radius) formed in a standard CDM universe to study the spatial distribution and orbital properties of the present-day descendents of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). At the present time only five (out of 12) of halos containing LBGs survive as separate entities inside the cluster virial radius. Their circular velocities are in the range 200 - 550 km/sec. Seven halos merged together to form the central object at the very center of the cluster. Using semi-analytical modeling of galaxy evolution we show that descendents of halos containing LBGs now host giant elliptical galaxies. Galaxy orbits are radial, with a pericenter to apocenter ratio of about 1:5. The orbital eccentricities of LBGs descendents are statistically indistinguishable from those of the average galaxy population inside the cluster, suggesting that the orbits of these galaxies are not sign...

  18. Cosmological simulations of isotropic conduction in galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Britton; O' Shea, Brian W.; Voit, G. Mark; Ventimiglia, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Skillman, Samuel W., E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of galaxy clusters have a difficult time reproducing the radial gas-property gradients and red central galaxies observed to exist in the cores of galaxy clusters. Thermal conduction has been suggested as a mechanism that can help bring simulations of cluster cores into better alignment with observations by stabilizing the feedback processes that regulate gas cooling, but this idea has not yet been well tested with cosmological numerical simulations. Here we present cosmological simulations of 10 galaxy clusters performed with five different levels of isotropic Spitzer conduction, which alters both the cores and outskirts of clusters, though not dramatically. In the cores, conduction flattens central temperature gradients, making them nearly isothermal and slightly lowering the central density, but failing to prevent a cooling catastrophe there. Conduction has little effect on temperature gradients outside of cluster cores because outward conductive heat flow tends to inflate the outer parts of the intracluster medium (ICM), instead of raising its temperature. In general, conduction tends reduce temperature inhomogeneity in the ICM, but our simulations indicate that those homogenizing effects would be extremely difficult to observe in ∼5 keV clusters. Outside the virial radius, our conduction implementation lowers the gas densities and temperatures because it reduces the Mach numbers of accretion shocks. We conclude that, despite the numerous small ways in which conduction alters the structure of galaxy clusters, none of these effects are significant enough to make the efficiency of conduction easily measurable, unless its effects are more pronounced in clusters hotter than those we have simulated.

  19. Semi analytical description of formation of galaxies and clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Demiański, Marek

    2013-01-01

    We apply the well known semi analytical model of formation of DM halos to discuss the process of formation and evolution of the relaxed objects dominated by the DM component (such as the first and dSph galaxies and clusters of galaxies). On the one hand this approach allows us to obtain a simple description of evolution of the first galaxies. On the other hand it reveals links between the observed characteristics of the relaxed DM halos and the initial power spectrum of density perturbations. Results of our analysis of the observed properties of 41 DM dominated dSph galaxies and data of $\\sim 300$ clusters of galaxies are consistent with the $\\Lambda$CDM like power spectrum of initial perturbations down to the scale of $\\sim 10kpc$.

  20. Semi-analytical description of formation of galaxies and clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    We apply the well-known semi-analytical model of formation of the Dark Matter (DM) haloes to discuss properties of the relaxed objects dominated by the DM component (such as the first and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) and/or clusters of galaxies). This approach allows us to obtain a simple but more detailed description of evolution of the first galaxies. It also reveals links between the observed characteristics of the relaxed DM haloes and the initial power spectrum of density perturbations. Results of our analysis of the observed properties of ˜40 DM dominated galaxies and ˜100 clusters of galaxies are consistent with the Λ cold dark matter like power spectrum of initial perturbations down to the scale of ˜10 kpc. For the DM dominated objects the scaling relations are also discussed.

  1. Kinematic evidence of satellite galaxy populations in the potential wells of first-ranked cluster galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowie, L.L.; Hu, E.M.

    1986-06-01

    The velocities of 38 centrally positioned galaxies (r much less than 100 kpc) were measured relative to the velocity of the first-ranked galaxy in 14 rich clusters. Analysis of the velocity distribution function of this sample and of previous data shows that the population cannot be fit by a single Gaussian. An adequate fit is obtained if 60 percent of the objects lie in a Gaussian with sigma = 250 km/s and the remainder in a population with sigma = 1400 km/s. All previous data sets are individually consistent with this conclusion. This suggests that there is a bound population of galaxies in the potential well of the central galaxy in addition to the normal population of the cluster core. This is taken as supporting evidence for the galactic cannibalism model of cD galaxy formation. 14 references.

  2. New Fast Lane towards Discoveries of Clusters of Galaxies Inaugurated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Space and Ground-Based Telescopes Cooperate to Gain Deep Cosmological Insights Summary Using the ESA XMM-Newton satellite, a team of European and Chilean astronomers [2] has obtained the world's deepest "wide-field" X-ray image of the cosmos to date. This penetrating view, when complemented with observations by some of the largest and most efficient ground-based optical telescopes, including the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), has resulted in the discovery of several large clusters of galaxies. These early results from an ambitious research programme are extremely promising and pave the way for a very comprehensive and thorough census of clusters of galaxies at various epochs. Relying on the foremost astronomical technology and with an unequalled observational efficiency, this project is set to provide new insights into the structure and evolution of the distant Universe. PR Photo 19a/03: First image from the XMM-LSS survey. PR Photo 19b/03: Zoom-in on PR Photo 19b/03. PR Photo 19c/03: XMM-Newton contour map of the probable extent of a cluster of galaxies, superimposed upon a CHFT I-band image. PR Photo 19d/03: Velocity distribution in the cluster field shown in PR Photo 19c/03. The universal web Unlike grains of sand on a beach, matter is not uniformly spread throughout the Universe. Instead, it is concentrated into galaxies which themselves congregate into clusters (and even clusters of clusters). These clusters are "strung" throughout the Universe in a web-like structure, cf. ESO PR 11/01. Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, for example, belongs to the so-called Local Group which also comprises "Messier 31", the Andromeda Galaxy. The Local Group contains about 30 galaxies and measures a few million light-years across. Other clusters are much larger. The Coma cluster contains thousands of galaxies and measures more than 20 million light-years. Another well known example is the Virgo cluster, covering no less than 10 degrees on the sky ! Clusters of galaxies are the most

  3. Galaxy clustering and the dark-matter problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S.

    1986-12-17

    Recent observational and theoretical results on galaxy clustering are reviewed. A major difficulty in relating observations to theory is that the former refer to luminous material whereas the latter is most directly concerned with the gravitationally dominant but invisible dark matter. The simple assumption that the distribution of galaxies generally follows that of the mass appears to conflict with evidence suggesting that galaxies of different kinds are clustered in different ways. If galaxies are indeed biased tracers of the mass, then dynamical estimates of the mean cosmic density, which give ..cap omega.. approx. = 0.2 may underestimate the global value of ..cap omega... There are now several specific models for the behaviour of density fluctuations from very early times to the present epoch. The late phases of this evolution need to be followed by N-body techniques; simulations of scale-free universes and of universes dominated by various types of elementary particles are discussed.

  4. Unbiased methods for removing systematics from galaxy clustering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elsner, Franz; Peiris, Hiranya V

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the angular clustering of galaxies as a function of redshift is a powerful method for tracting information from the three-dimensional galaxy distribution. The precision of such measurements will dramatically increase with ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys. However, these are also increasingly sensitive to observational and astrophysical contaminants. Here, we study the statistical properties of three methods proposed for controlling such systematics - template subtraction, basic mode projection, and extended mode projection - all of which make use of externally supplied template maps, designed to characterise and capture the spatial variations of potential systematic effects. Based on a detailed mathematical analysis, and in agreement with simulations, we find that the template subtraction method in its original formulation returns biased estimates of the galaxy angular clustering. We derive closed-form expressions that should be used to correct results for this shortcoming. Turning to th...

  5. Hubble tracks down a galaxy cluster's dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Unique mass map hi-res Size hi-res: 495 kb Credits: European Space Agency, NASA and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, France/Caltech, USA) Unique mass map This is a mass map of galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 derived from an extensive Hubble Space Telescope campaign. The colour image is made from two images: a dark-matter map (the blue part of the image) and a 'luminous-matter' map determined from the galaxies in the cluster (the red part of the image). They were constructed by feeding Hubble and ground-based observations into advanced mathematical mass-mapping models. The map shows that dark matter is present where the galaxies clump together. The mass of the galaxies is shown in red, the mass of the dark matter in blue. The dark matter behaves like a 'glue', holding the cluster together. The dark-matter distribution in the cluster is not spherical. A secondary concentration of dark-matter mass is shown in blue to the upper right of the main concentration. Sky around galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 hi-res Size hi-res: 3742 kb Credits: European Space Agency, NASA and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, France/Caltech, USA) Sky around galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654 This is a 2.5-degree field around galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654. The cluster galaxies are visible in the centre of the image in yellow. The image is a colour composite constructed from three Digitized Sky Survey 2 images: Blue (shown in blue), Red (shown in green), and Infrared (shown in red). HST observes shapes of more than 7000 faint background galaxies hi-res Size hi-res: 5593 kb Credits: European Space Agency, NASA and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, France/Caltech, USA) Hubble observes shapes of more than 7000 faint background galaxies Five days of observations produced the altogether 39 Hubble Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images required to map the mass of the galaxy cluster Cl0024+1654. Each WFPC2 image has a size of about 1/150 the diameter of the full Moon. In

  6. Simulating galaxy Clusters -II: global star formation histories and galaxy populations

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A D; Sommer-Larsen, J

    2004-01-01

    Cosmological (LambdaCDM) TreeSPH simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters have been performed. The simulations invoke star formation, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling, metal dependent radiative cooling, strong star burst and (optionally) AGN driven galactic super winds, effects of a meta-galactic UV field and thermal conduction. The properties of the galaxy populations in two clusters, one Virgo-like (T~3 keV) and one (sub) Coma-like (T~6 keV), are discussed. The global star formation rates of the cluster galaxies are found to decrease very significantly with time from redshift z=2 to 0, in agreement with observations. The total K-band luminosity of the cluster galaxies correlates tightly with total cluster mass, and for models without additional AGN feedback, the zero point of the relation matches the observed one fairly well. The match to observed galaxy luminosity functions is reasonable, except for a deficiency of bright galaxies (M_B < -20), which bec...

  7. The clustering of galaxies and galaxy clusters: constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from future wide-field surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Fedeli, Cosimo; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity with varied bispectrum shapes that can be derived from the power spectrum of galaxies and clusters of galaxies detected in future wide field optical/near-infrared surveys. Having in mind the proposed ESA space mission \\emph{Euclid} as a specific example, we combine the spatial distribution of spectroscopically selected galaxies with that of weak lensing selected clusters. We use the physically motivated halo model in order to represent the correlation function of arbitrary tracers of the Large Scale Structure in the Universe. As naively expected, we find that galaxies are much more effective in jointly constrain the level of primordial non-Gaussianity $f_\\mathrm{NL}$ and the amplitude of the matter power spectrum $\\sigma_8$ than clusters of galaxies, due to the much lower abundance of the latter that is not adequately compensated by the larger effect on the power spectrum. Nevertheless, combination of the galaxy power spectrum with the cluster-galax...

  8. The impact of galaxy harassment on the globular cluster systems of early-type cluster dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rory; Fellhauer, Michael; Puzia, Thomas H; Aguerri, J A L; Farias, Juan-Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of globular cluster systems (GCSs) around galaxies are often used to assess the total enclosed mass, and even to constrain the dark matter distribution. The globular cluster system of a galaxy is typically assumed to be in dynamical equilibrium within the potential of the host galaxy. However cluster galaxies are subjected to a rapidly evolving and, at times, violently destructive tidal field. We investigate the impact of the harassment on the dynamics of GCs surrounding early type cluster dwarfs, using numerical simulations. We find that the dynamical behaviour of the GCS is strongly influenced by the fraction of bound dark matter f_{DM} remaining in the galaxy. Only when f_{DM} falls to ~15%, do stars and GCs begin to be stripped. Still the observed GC velocity dispersion can be used to measure the true enclosed mass to within a factor of 2, even when f_{DM} falls as low as ~3%. This is possible partly because unbound GCs quickly separate from the galaxy body. However even the distribution of {...

  9. High Frequency Cluster Radio Galaxies: Luminosity Functions and Implications for SZE Selected Cluster Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Mohr, J J; Benson, B A; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Chiu, I; Crawford, T M; de Haan, T; Dietrich, J P; Gangkofner, C; Holzapfel, W L; McDonald, M; Rapetti, D; Reichardt, C L

    2016-01-01

    We study the overdensity of point sources in the direction of X-ray-selected galaxy clusters from the Meta-Catalog of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC; $\\langle z \\rangle = 0.14$) at South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) frequencies. Flux densities at 95, 150 and 220 GHz are extracted from the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey maps at the locations of SUMSS sources, producing a multi-frequency catalog of radio galaxies. In the direction of massive galaxy clusters, the radio galaxy flux densities at 95 and 150 GHz are biased low by the cluster Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, which is negative at these frequencies. We employ a cluster SZE model to remove the expected flux bias and then study these corrected source catalogs. We find that the high frequency radio galaxies are centrally concentrated within the clusters and that their luminosity functions (LFs) exhibit amplitudes that are characteristically an order of magnitude lower than the cluster LF at 843 MHz. ...

  10. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  11. MACSJ1423.8+2404: Gravitational Lensing by a Massive, Relaxed Cluster of Galaxies at z=0.54

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, M; Ma, C -J; Swinbank, A M; Smith, G P; Richard, J; Edge, A C; Jauzac, M; Kneib, J -P; Marshall, P; Schrabback, T; Smail, I R

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a gravitational-lensing and optical study of MACS ,J1423.8+2404 (z=0.545, MACS, J1423). Our analysis uses high-resolution images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in the F555W and F814W passbands, ground based imaging in eight optical and near-infrared filters obtained with Subaru and CFHT, as well as extensive spectroscopic data gathered with the Keck telescopes. At optical wavelengths the cluster exhibits no sign of substructure and is dominated by a cD galaxy that is 2.1 magnitudes (K-band) brighter than the second brightest cluster member, suggesting that MACS, J1423 is close to be fully virialized. Analysis of the redshift distribution of 140 cluster members reveals a Gaussian distribution, mildly disturbed by the presence of a loose galaxy group that may be falling into the cluster along the line of sight. Combining strong-lensing constraints from two spectroscopically confirmed multiple-image systems near the cluster core with a weak-lensing measurement of the gravitational sh...

  12. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, J; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Brunner, R J; Thaler, J

    2016-01-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are $\\Delta z=0.1$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.

  13. Studying the Dynamical Properties of 20 Nearby Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullah, Mohamed H; Ismail, H A; Rassem, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Using SDSS-DR7, we construct a sample of 42382 galaxies with redshifts in the region of 20 galaxy clusters. Using two successive iterative methods, the adaptive kernel method and the spherical infall model, we obtained 3396 galaxies as members belonging to the studied sample. The 2D projected map for the distribution of the clusters members is introduced using the 2D adaptive kernel method to get the clusters centers. The cumulative surface number density profile for each cluster is fitted well with the generalized King model. The core radii of the clusters' sample are found to vary from 0.18 Mpc $\\mbox{h}^{-1}$ (A1459) to 0.47 Mpc $\\mbox{h}^{-1}$ (A2670) with mean value of 0.295 Mpc $\\mbox{h}^{-1}$. The infall velocity profile is determined using two different models, Yahil approximation and Praton model. Yahil approximation is matched with the distribution of galaxies only in the outskirts (infall regions) of many clusters of the sample, while it is not matched with the distribution within the inner core of...

  14. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM of galaxy clusters to outer regions observed with Suzaku. The observed temperature dropped by about ~30% from the central region to the virial radius of the clusters. The derived entropy profile agreed with the expectation from simulations within r500, while the entropy profile in r > r500 indicated a flatter slope than the simulations. This would suggest that the cluster outskirts were out of hydrostatic equilibrium. As for the metallicity, we studied the metal abundances from O to Fe up to ~0.5 times the virial radius of galaxy groups and clusters. Comparing the results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II to Ia supernovae is estimated to be ~3.5. We also calculated not only Fe, but also O and Mg mass-to-light ratios (MLRs with K-band luminosity. The MLRs in the clusters had a similar feature.

  15. Searching for galaxy clusters in the Kilo-Degree Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovich, M.; Puddu, E.; Bellagamba, F.; Roncarelli, M.; Moscardini, L.; Bardelli, S.; Grado, A.; Getman, F.; Maturi, M.; Huang, Z.; Napolitano, N.; McFarland, J.; Valentijn, E.; Bilicki, M.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: In this paper, we present the tools used to search for galaxy clusters in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), and our first results. Methods: The cluster detection is based on an implementation of the optimal filtering technique that enables us to identify clusters as over-densities in the distribution of galaxies using their positions on the sky, magnitudes, and photometric redshifts. The contamination and completeness of the cluster catalog are derived using mock catalogs based on the data themselves. The optimal signal to noise threshold for the cluster detection is obtained by randomizing the galaxy positions and selecting the value that produces a contamination of less than 20%. Starting from a subset of clusters detected with high significance at low redshifts, we shift them to higher redshifts to estimate the completeness as a function of redshift: the average completeness is 85%. An estimate of the mass of the clusters is derived using the richness as a proxy. Results: We obtained 1858 candidate clusters with redshift 0 http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl/DR2 and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/598/A107

  16. Velocity dispersions and X-ray temperatures of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Biviano, A

    1995-01-01

    Using a large and well-controlled sample of clusters of galaxies, we investigate the relation between cluster velocity dispersions and X-ray temperatures of intra-cluster gas. In order to obtain a reliable estimate of the total velocity dispersion of a cluster, independent of the level of anisotropies in galaxy orbits, we analyze the integrated velocity dispersion profiles over increasing distances from the cluster centers. Distortions in the velocity fields, the effect of close clusters, the presence of substructures, and the presence of a population of (spiral) galaxies not in virial equilibrium with the cluster potential are taken into account. Using our final sample of 37 clusters, for which a reliable estimate of the velocity dispersion could be obtained, we derive a relation between the velocity dispersions and the X-ray temperatures, with a scatter reduced by more than 30 % with respect to previous works. A chi square fit to the temperature-velocity dispersion relation does not exclude the hypothesis t...

  17. Richness-based masses of rich and famous galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreon, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a catalog of galaxy cluster masses derived by exploiting the tight correlation between mass and richness, i.e., a properly computed number of bright cluster galaxies. The richness definition adopted in this work is properly calibrated, shows a small scatter with mass, and has a known evolution, which means that we can estimate accurate (0.16 dex) masses more precisely than by adopting any other richness estimates or X-ray or SZ-based proxies based on survey data. We measured a few hundred galaxy clusters at 0.05 web front-end is available at the URL http://www.brera.mi.astro.it/~andreon/famous.html

  18. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in investigating the growth of structures at the nonlinear scales of galaxy clusters from an observational perspective: we explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters from their mass profile beyond the virial radius. We derive the accretion rate from the mass of a spherical shell whose infall velocity is extracted from $N$-body simulations. In the redshift range $z=[0,2]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20-40 \\%$ of the average rate derived from the merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. Our result suggests that measuring the mean mass accretion rate of a sample of galaxy clusters is actually feasible, thus providing a new potential observational test of the cosmological and structure formation models.

  19. Scaling relations for galaxy clusters: properties and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Giodini, S; Pointecouteau, E; Ettori, S; Reiprich, T H; Hoekstra, H

    2013-01-01

    Well-calibrated scaling relations between the observable properties and the total masses of clusters of galaxies are important for understanding the physical processes that give rise to these relations. They are also a critical ingredient for studies that aim to constrain cosmological parameters using galaxy clusters. For this reason much effort has been spent during the last decade to better understand and interpret relations of the properties of the intra-cluster medium. Improved X-ray data have expanded the mass range down to galaxy groups, whereas SZ surveys have openened a new observational window on the intracluster medium. In addition,continued progress in the performance of cosmological simulations has allowed a better understanding of the physical processes and selection effects affecting the observed scaling relations. Here we review the recent literature on various scaling relations, focussing on the latest observational measurements and the progress in our understanding of the deviations from self...

  20. Comparing Dense Galaxy Cluster Redshift Surveys with Weak Lensing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J; Zahid, H Jabran

    2014-01-01

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at $z\\sim0.2$ to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70--89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5$z_{\\rm cl}$20% for A383, A689 and A750). The fractional excess in the cross correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing th...

  1. Passive galaxies as tracers of cluster environments at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Strazzullo, V; Gobat, R; Garilli, B; Mignoli, M; Valentino, F; Onodera, M; Renzini, A; Cimatti, A; Finoguenov, A; Arimoto, N; Cappellari, M; Carollo, C M; Feruglio, C; Floc'h, E Le; Lilly, S J; Maccagni, D; McCracken, H J; Moresco, M; Pozzetti, L; Zamorani, G

    2015-01-01

    Even 10 billion years ago, the cores of the first galaxy clusters are often found to host a characteristic population of massive galaxies with already suppressed star formation. Here we search for distant cluster candidates at z~2 using massive passive galaxies as tracers. With a sample of ~40 spectroscopically confirmed passive galaxies at 1.3galaxy overdensities that we identify in the redshift range 1.5galaxy clusters (likely mid-10^13 M_sun range). Although this search approach is likely biased towards more evolved structures, it has...

  2. Galaxies at the Extremes: Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Durrell, Patrick R.; Ferrarese, Laura; Feldmeier, John J.; Côté, Patrick; Peng, Eric W.; Harding, Paul; Liu, Chengze; Gwyn, Stephen; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of three large ({R}29 ≳ 1‧) extremely low surface brightness (LSB; {μ }V,0≈ 27.0) galaxies identified using our deep, wide-field imaging of the Virgo Cluster from the Burrell Schmidt telescope. Complementary data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey do not resolve red giant branch stars in these objects down to i = 24, yielding a lower distance limit of 2.5 Mpc. At the Virgo distance, these objects have half-light radii 3-10 kpc and luminosities {L}{{V}} = 2-9 × 107 {L}⊙ . These galaxies are comparable in size but lower in surface brightness than the large ultradiffuse LSB galaxies recently identified in the Coma cluster, and are located well within Virgo’s virial radius; two are projected directly on the cluster core. One object appears to be a nucleated LSB in the process of being tidally stripped to form a new Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxy. The others show no sign of tidal disruption, despite the fact that such objects should be most vulnerable to tidal destruction in the cluster environment. The relative proximity of Virgo makes these objects amenable to detailed studies of their structural properties and resolved stellar populations. They thus provide an important new window onto the connection between cluster environment and galaxy evolution at the extremes.

  3. The formation of S0 galaxies: evidence from globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, J M; Bamford, S P; Bedregal, A G; Merrifield, M R

    2007-01-01

    We test the theory that lenticular (S0) galaxies form from spirals whose star formation has been shut down. We use the globular cluster specific frequency S_N, defined as the number of globular clusters normalised by the galaxy luminosity as a diagnostic. NTT/EMMI long-slit spectroscopic observations of 11 S0 galaxies at z < 0.006 are used to measure the absorption-line indices, Hdelta, Hgamma, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335 within the central r_e/8. By inverting single-stellar population models, luminosity-weighted mean ages, metallicities and alpha-element abundance ratios are derived. We estimate the amount of fading a galaxy has undergone by comparing each galaxy's S_N with its deviation from the mean spiral S_N. Galaxies with higher S_N have older stellar populations. Moreover, we find that the zero-point and amount of fading is consistent with a scenario where lenticulars are formed by the quenching of star formation in spiral galaxies. Our data also rule out any formation method for S0s which creates a larg...

  4. Implications of the remarkable homogeneity of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    We measure the diversity of galaxy groups and clusters with mass M>1E13/h Msun, in terms of the star formation history of their galaxy populations, for the purpose of constraining the mass scale at which environmentally-important processes play a role in galaxy evolution. We consider three different group catalogues, selected in different ways, with photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each system we measure the fraction of passively-evolving galaxies within R200 and brighter than either Mr=-18 (and with z<0.05) or Mr=-20 (and z<0.1). We use the (u-g) and (r-i) galaxy colours to distinguish between star-forming and passively-evolving galaxies. By considering the binomial distribution expected from the observed number of members in each cluster, we are able to either recover the intrinsic scatter in this fraction, or put robust 95% confidence upper-limits on its value. The intrinsic standard deviation in the fraction of passive galaxies is consistent with a small value of &l...

  5. The realm of the galaxy protoclusters

    CERN Document Server

    Overzier, R A

    2016-01-01

    The study of galaxy protoclusters is beginning to fill in unknown details of the important phase of the assembly of clusters and cluster galaxies. This review describes the current status of this field and highlights promising recent findings related to galaxy formation in the densest regions of the early universe. We discuss the main search techniques and the characteristic properties of protoclusters in observations and simulations, and show that protoclusters will have present-day masses similar to galaxy clusters when fully collapsed. We discuss the physical properties of galaxies in protoclusters, including (proto-)brightest cluster galaxies, and the forming red sequence. We highlight the fact that the most massive halos at high redshift are found in protoclusters, making these objects uniquely suited for testing important recent models of galaxy formation. We show that galaxies in protoclusters should be among the first galaxies at high redshift making the transition from a gas cooling regime dominated ...

  6. The Ubiquity of Coeval Starbursts in Massive Galaxy Cluster Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Caitlin M

    2016-01-01

    The Universe's largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive $>10^{11} M_\\odot$ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached from emerging datasets on $z>2$ proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, $\\sim10^{4}$ comoving Mpc$^3$ at $z>2$, subtending areas $\\sim$half a degree on the sky. Thus the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five $210^{15} M_\\odot$ galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe, a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension yet exists between measurements of their volume density of starburst-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that t...

  7. Can A Galaxy Redshift Survey Measure Dark Energy Clustering?

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, M

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) A wide-field galaxy redshift survey allows one to probe galaxy clustering at largest spatial scales, which carries an invaluable information on horizon-scale physics complementarily to the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Assuming the planned survey consisting of z~1 and z~3 surveys with areas of 2000 and 300 square degrees, respectively, we study the prospects for probing dark energy clustering from the measured galaxy power spectrum, assuming the dynamical properties of dark energy are specified in terms of the equation of state and the effective sound speed c_e in the context of an adiabatic cold dark matter (CDM) model. The dark energy clustering adds a power to the galaxy power spectrum amplitude at spatial scales greater than the sound horizon, and the enhancement is sensitive to redshift evolution of the net dark energy density, i.e. the equation of state. We find that the galaxy survey, when combined with Planck, can distinguish dark energy clustering from a smooth dark energy model such ...

  8. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Paul; Blanc, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to ISM-ICM interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of 3 H I deficient spirals and 2 H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13\\pm0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log(O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our resul...

  9. Optical galaxy cluster detection across a wide redshift range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The past decade is one of the most exciting period in the history of physics and astronomy. The discovery of cosmic acceleration dramatically changed our understanding about the evolution and constituents of the Universe. To accommodate the new acceleration phase into our well established Big Bang cosmological scenario under the frame work of General Relativity, there must exist a very special substance that has negative pressure and make up about 73% of the total energy density in our Universe. It is called Dark Energy. For the first time people realized that the vast majority of our Universe is made of things that are totally different from the things we are made of. Therefore, one of the major endeavors in physics and astronomy in the coming years is trying to understand, if we can, the nature of dark energy. Understanding dark energy cannot be achieved from pure logic. We need empirical evidence to finally determine about what is dark energy. The better we can constrain the energy density and evolution of the dark energy, the closer we will get to the answer. There are many ways to constrain the energy density and evolution of dark energy, each of which leads to degeneracy in certain directions in the parameter space. Therefore, a combination of complimentary methods will help to reduce the degeneracies and give tighter constraints. Dark energy became dominate over matter in the Universe only very recently (at about z ~ 1.5) and will affect both the cosmological geometry and large scale structure formation. Among the various experiments, some of them constrain the dark energy mainly via geometry (such as CMB, Supernovae) while some others provides constraints from both structures and geometry (such as BAO, Galaxy Clusters) Galaxy clusters can be used as a sensitive probe for cosmology. A large cluster catalog that extends to high redshift with well measured masses is indispensable for precisely constraining cosmological parameters. Detecting clusters in optical

  10. Galaxy Infall by Interacting with its Environment: a Comprehensive Study of 340 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Gandhi, Poshak; Inada, Naohisa; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kodama, Tadayuki; Konami, Saori; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Xu, Haiguang; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    To study systematically the evolution on the angular extents of the galaxy, ICM, and dark matter components in galaxy clusters, we compiled the optical and X-ray properties of a sample of 340 clusters with redshifts $<0.5$, based on all the available data with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and {\\it Chandra}/{\\it XMM-Newton}. For each cluster, the member galaxies were determined primarily with photometric redshift measurements. The radial ICM mass distribution, as well as the total gravitational mass distribution, were derived from a spatially-resolved spectral analysis of the X-ray data. When normalizing the radial profile of galaxy number to that of the ICM mass, the relative curve was found to depend significantly on the cluster redshift; it drops more steeply towards outside in lower redshift subsamples. The same evolution is found in the galaxy-to-total mass profile, while the ICM-to-total mass profile varies in an opposite way. We interpret that the galaxies, the ICM, and the dark matter compone...

  11. Radio properties of fossil galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study 1.4 GHz radio properties of a sample of fossil galaxy groups using GMRT radio observations and the FIRST survey catalog. Fossil galaxy groups, having no recent major mergers in their dominant galaxies and also group scale mergers, give us the opportunity to investigate the effect of galaxy merger on AGN activity. In this work, we compare the radio properties of a rich sample of fossil groups with a sample of normal galaxy groups and clusters and show that the brightest group galaxies in fossil groups are under luminous at 1.4 GHz, relative to the general population of the brightest group galaxies, indicating that the dynamically relaxed nature of fossil groups has influenced the AGN activity in their dominant galaxy.

  12. Recovering dark-matter clustering from galaxies with Gaussianization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Nuala; Neyrinck, Mark; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The Gaussianization transform has been proposed as a method to remove the issues of scale-dependent galaxy bias and non-linearity from galaxy clustering statistics, but these benefits have yet to be thoroughly tested for realistic galaxy samples. In this paper, we test the effectiveness of the Gaussianization transform for different galaxy types by applying it to realistic simulated blue and red galaxy samples. We show that in real space, the shapes of the Gaussianized power spectra of both red and blue galaxies agree with that of the underlying dark matter, with the initial power spectrum, and with each other to smaller scales than do the statistics of the usual (untransformed) density field. However, we find that the agreement in the Gaussianized statistics breaks down in redshift space. We attribute this to the fact that red and blue galaxies exhibit very different fingers of god in redshift space. After applying a finger-of-god compression, the agreement on small scales between the Gaussianized power spectra is restored. We also compare the Gaussianization transform to the clipped galaxy density field and find that while both methods are effective in real space, they have more complicated behaviour in redshift space. Overall, we find that Gaussianization can be useful in recovering the shape of the underlying dark-matter power spectrum to k ˜ 0.5 h Mpc-1 and of the initial power spectrum to k ˜ 0.4 h Mpc-1 in certain cases at z = 0.

  13. X-ray survey of clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of the x-ray properties of clusters of galaxies. The data were taken by the A-1 experiment aboard the HEAO 1 satellite in the 0.5 to 20 keV energy band. All clusters in both the Abell catalog and Duus and Newell southern cluster catalog were examined. An error box or an explicit upper limit was obtained for every cluster. The appendices present extensive lists of the survey results. A complete discussion of the reduction and analysis procedure is given. Supporting optical data (morphological classifications and redshifts) were obtained from the literature and included in the appendices. Each cluster in both catalogs has an estimated or measured redshift. Redshift measurements of cluster galaxies were obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory. A complete description of these observations with the 2.1 meter telescope is given. A statistical subset of the Southern catalog was defined, making it possible to combine the Abell and Southern catalogs, and thereby take advantage of the large data base afforded by the combined catalogs. Between 10/sup 42/ /sup 5/ and 10/sup 45/ /sup 5/ ergs s/sup -1/ the luminosity function for all clusters and groups of galaxies is well represented. The integrated volume emissivity is 18.66 x 10/sup 37/ ergs s/sup -1/ Mpc/sup -3/.

  14. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey V : The Virgo Cluster (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, R; Auld, R; Minchin, R F

    2012-01-01

    We present 21 cm observations of a 10 $\\times$ 2 degree region in the Virgo cluster, obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. 289 sources are detected over the full redshift range (-2,000 $<$ $v$$_{hel}$ $<$ + 20,000 km/s) with 95 belonging to the cluster ($v$$_{hel}$ $<$ 3,000 km/s). We combine our observations with data from the optically selected Virgo Cluster Catalogue (VCC) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Most of our detections can be clearly associated with a unique optical counterpart, and 30% of the cluster detections are new objects fainter than the VCC optical completeness limit. 7 detections may have no optical counterpart and we discuss the possible origins of these objects. 7 detections appear associated with early-type galaxies. We perform HI stacking on the HI-undetected galaxies listed in the VCC in this region and show that they must have significantly less gas than those actually detected in HI. Galaxies undetected in HI in the cluster appear to be really ...

  15. The K-band luminosity functions of cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, R

    2016-01-01

    We derive the galaxy luminosity function in the $K_s$ band for galaxies in 24 clusters to provide a local reference for higher redshift studies and to analyse how and if the luminosity function varies according to environment and cluster properties. We use new, deep $K$ band imaging and match the photometry to available redshift information and to optical photometry from the SDSS or the UKST/POSS: $>80\\%$ of the galaxies to $K \\sim 14.5$ have measured redshifts. We derive composite luminosity functions, for the entire sample and for cluster subsamples . We consider the luminosity functions for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The full composite luminosity function has $K^*=12.79 \\pm 0.14$ ($M_K=-24.81$) and $\\alpha=-1.41 \\pm 0.10$. We find that $K^*$ is largely unaffected by the environment but that the slope $\\alpha$ increases towards lower mass clusters and clusters with Bautz-Morgan type $<$ II. The red sequence luminosity function seems to be approximately universal (within errors) in all environm...

  16. Star cluster disruption in the starburst galaxy Messier 82

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo; Anders, Peter; Li, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete sample, $U$-band selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on careful analysis of their spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining a relatively young, log(t/yr) 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body natu...

  17. The unrelaxed dynamical structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 85

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Heng; Agulli, Irene; Aguerri, Jose Alfonso Lopez; Tozzi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we explore the dynamics of the central region of a galaxy cluster within $r_{500}\\sim 600h^{-1}$~kpc from its center by combining optical and X-ray spectroscopy. We use (1) the caustic technique that identifies the cluster substructures and their galaxy members with optical spectroscopic data, and (2) the X-ray redshift fitting procedure that estimates the redshift distribution of the intracluster medium (ICM). We use the spatial and redshift distributions of the galaxies and of the X-ray emitting gas to associate the optical substructures to the X-ray regions. When we apply this approach to Abell 85 (A85), a complex dynamical structure of A85 emerges from our analysis: a galaxy group, with redshift $z=0.0509 \\pm 0.0021$ is passing through the cluster center along the line of sight dragging part of the ICM present in the cluster core; two additional groups, at redshift $z=0.0547 \\pm 0.0022$ and $z=0.0570 \\pm 0.0020$, are going through the cluster in opposite directions, almost perpendicula...

  18. Self-Similar Shocks and Winds in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Jin, Chi-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model framework of spherical symmetry is presented for a composite astrophysical system of two polytropic fluids coupled together by gravity to explore large-scale shocks and flow dynamics in clusters of galaxies or in globular clusters. The existence of such large-scale shocks in clusters of galaxies as inferred by high-resolution X-ray and radio imaging observations implies large-scale systematic flows that are beyond usual static models for clusters of galaxies. Here, we explore self-similar two-fluid flow solutions with shocks for a hot polytropic gas flow in a cluster of galaxies in the presence of a massive dark matter (DM) flow after the initiation of a gravitational core collapse or a central AGN activity or a large-scale merging process. In particular, the possibility of DM shocks or sharp jumps of mass density and of velocity dispersion in dark matter halo is discussed and such DM shocks might be detectable through gravitational lensing effects. To examine various plausible scenarios f...

  19. Virial masses of galaxy clusters in the post-Newtonian limit

    CERN Document Server

    Roshan, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    We estimate virial masses of galaxy clusters using the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) virial theorem. Also, we show explicitly that post-Newtonian corrections can not address the mass discrepancy in the galaxy clusters.

  20. Southern Sky Redshift Survey: Clustering of Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmer, Christopher N. A.; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Pellegrini, Paulo S.

    1998-03-01

    We use the two-point correlation function to calculate the clustering properties of the recently completed SSRS2 survey, which probes two well-separated regions of the sky, allowing one to evaluate the sensitivity of sample-to-sample variations. Taking advantage of the large number of galaxies in the combined sample, we also investigate the dependence of clustering on the internal properties of galaxies. The redshift-space correlation function for the combined magnitude-limited sample of the SSRS2 is given by xi(s) = [s/(5.85 h^-1 Mpc)]^-1.60 for separations in the range 2 h^-1 Mpc b b is the linear biasing factor for optical galaxies. We have used the SSRS2 sample to study the dependence of xi on the internal properties of galaxies, such as luminosity, morphology, and color. We confirm earlier results that luminous galaxies (L > L^*) are more clustered than sub-L^* galaxies and that the luminosity segregation is scale-independent. We also find that early types are more clustered than late types. However, in the absence of rich clusters, the relative bias between early and late types in real space, b_E+S0/b_S ~ 1.2, is not as strong as previously estimated. Furthermore, both morphologies present a luminosity-dependent bias, with the early types showing a slightly stronger dependence on luminosity. We also find that red galaxies are significantly more clustered than blue ones, with a mean relative bias of b_R/b_B ~ 1.4, stronger than that observed for morphology. Finally, by comparing our results with the measurements obtained from the infrared-selected galaxies, we determine that the relative bias between optical and IRAS galaxies in real space is b_o/b_I ~ 1.4. Based on observations obtained at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, operated

  1. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Cannoni, Mirco; Gómez, Mario E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Zandanel, Fabio; Prada, Francisco, E-mail: masc@stanford.edu, E-mail: mirco.cannoni@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: fabio@iaa.es, E-mail: mario.gomez@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: fprada@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18008, Granada (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  2. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife; Cannoni, Mirco; /Huelva U.; Zandanel, Fabio; /IAA, Granada; Gomez, Mario E.; /Huelva U.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  3. Joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering: Methodology and forecasts for Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Krause, E.; Dodelson, S.; Jain, B.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bridle, S. L.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Honscheid, K.; Rozo, E.; Sobreira, F.; Sánchez, C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large-scale structure. Anticipating a near future application of this analysis to Dark Energy Survey (DES) measurements of galaxy positions and shapes, we develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting the joint analysis of small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing and large-scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects being subdominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degeneracies necessitate the detailed joint modeling of the galaxy sample that we employ. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the Universe, conservatively/optimistically constraining the growth function to 7.9%/4.8% with its first-year data that cover over 1000 square degrees, and to 3.9%/2.3% with its full five-year data that will survey 5000 square degrees, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  4. Xray cavities in a sample of 83 SPT-selected clusters galaxies. Tracing the evolution of AGN feedback in clusters of galaxies out to z=1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Forman, W. R.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Dietrich, J. P.; Jones, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-05-18

    X-ray cavities are key tracers of mechanical (or radio mode) heating arising from the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We report on a survey for X-ray cavities in 83 massive, high-redshift ($0.4\\lt z\\lt 1.2$) clusters of galaxies selected by their Sunyaev-Zel’dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. Based on Chandra X-ray images, we find a total of six clusters having symmetric pairs of surface brightness depressions consistent with the picture of radio jets inflating X-ray cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM). The majority of these detections are of relatively low significance and require deeper follow-up data in order to be confirmed. Further, this search will miss small (<10 kpc) X-ray cavities that are unresolved by Chandra at high ($z\\gtrsim 0.5$) redshift. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the power generated by AGN feedback in BCGs has remained unchanged for over half of the age of the universe ($\\gt 7$ Gyr at $z\\sim 0.8$). On average, the detected X-ray cavities have powers of $(0.8-5)\\times {{10}^{45}}\\ {\\rm erg}\\ {{{\\rm s}}^{-1}}$, enthalpies of $(3-6)\\times {{10}^{59}}\\ {\\rm erg}$, and radii of ~17 kpc. Integrating over 7 Gyr, we find that the supermassive black holes in BCGs may have accreted 10(8) to several ${{10}^{9}}\\,{{M}_{\\odot }}$ of material to power these outflows. This level of accretion indicates that significant supermassive black hole growth may occur not only at early times, in the quasar era, but at late times as well. We also find that X-ray cavities at high redshift may inject an excess heat of 0.1–1.0 keV per particle into the hot ICM above and beyond the energy needed to offset cooling. Although this result needs to be confirmed, we note that the magnitude of excess heating is similar to the energy needed to preheat clusters, break self-similarity, and explain the excess entropy in hot atmospheres.

  5. The State of the Warm and Cold Gas in the Extreme Starburst at the Core of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Edge, Alastair C; Wilner, David J; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Braford A; Hogan, Michael T; Marrone, Daniel P; McNamara, Brian R; Wei, Lisa H; Bayliss, Matthew B; Bautz, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (~800 Msun/yr) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly-cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy. The total Halpha luminosity, assuming Halpha/Hbeta = 2.85, is L_Ha = 7.6 +/- 0.4 x10^43 erg/s, making this the most luminous emission line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hbeta) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly-discovered highly-ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and AGN photoionization. We speculate...

  6. The ATLAS-SPT Radio Survey of Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Brien, A N; Norris, R P; Filipović, M D

    2016-01-01

    Using a high-performance computing cluster to mosaic 4,787 pointings, we have imaged the 100 sq. deg. South Pole Telescope (SPT) deep-field at 2.1 GHz using the Australian Telescope Compact Array to an rms of 80 $\\mu$Jy and a resolution of 8". Our goal is to generate an independent sample of radio-selected galaxy clusters to study how the radio properties compare with c