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Sample records for bright spatially-coherent compact

  1. A Bright Spatially-Coherent Compact X-ray Synchrotron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Martins, J L; Martins, S F; Bellei, C; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Fonseca, R; Huntington, C; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C; Schreiber, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Silva, L O; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Each successive generation of x-ray machines has opened up new frontiers in science, such as the first radiographs and the determination of the structure of DNA. State-of-the-art x-ray sources can now produce coherent high brightness keV x-rays and promise a new revolution in imaging complex systems on nanometre and femtosecond scales. Despite the demand, only a few dedicated synchrotron facilities exist worldwide, partially due the size and cost of conventional (accelerator) technology. Here we demonstrate the use of a recently developed compact laser-plasma accelerator to produce a well-collimated, spatially-coherent, intrinsically ultrafast source of hard x-rays. This method reduces the size of the synchrotron source from the tens of metres to centimetre scale, accelerating and wiggling a high electron charge simultaneously. This leads to a narrow-energy spread electron beam and x-ray source that is >1000 times brighter than previously reported plasma wiggler and thus has the potential to facilitate a myri...

  2. Compact and spatially coherent X-ray source based on cryogenic ERL. Basic design of the X-ray radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of spatially coherent X-ray generator based on the compact energy recovery linac (ERL) has been studied in collaboration with Nihon University, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and Toyama. In this novel source, parametric X-ray radiation (PXR), which is a radiation phenomenon caused by the interaction between a charged particle and a crystal medium, is used for X-ray production. Thus, a thin crystal plate such as silicon or diamond irradiated with the electron beam from the ERL acts as an X-ray radiator. Since the acceptance of the deceleration tube restricts the emittance growth of the electron beam at the radiator, we define the maximum thickness of the radiator crystal as 0.2 mm. Under this condition, the properties of the available PXR beam were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The results show possibility of X-ray photon rate higher than 109 /s when the electron beam current is 30 μA. (author)

  3. Electromagnetic spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently introduced concept of spatial coherence wavelets is generalized for describing the propagation of electromagnetic fields in the free space. For this aim, the spatial coherence wavelet tensor is introduced as an elementary amount, in terms of which the formerly known quantities for this domain can be expressed. It allows analyzing the relationship between the spatial coherence properties and the polarization state of the electromagnetic wave. This approach is completely consistent with the recently introduced unified theory of coherence and polarization for random electromagnetic beams, but it provides a further insight about the causal relationship between the polarization states at different planes along the propagation path. (author)

  4. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Westenskow, Glen; Grote, D P; Halaxa, Erni; Kwan, Joe W

    2005-01-01

    To provide compact high-brightness heavy-ion beams for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar+ in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm2 was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. More than 90% of the ions were in the Ar+ state, and the energy spread from charge exchange was found to be small. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of a 61-beamlet injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We will report on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, the test will be carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We will measure the beam’s emittance after the beamlets are merged and have bee...

  5. Spatial coherence of random laser emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Choma, Michael A; Cao, Hui

    2011-09-01

    We experimentally studied the spatial coherence of random laser emission from dye solutions containing nanoparticles. The spatial coherence, measured in a double slit experiment, varied significantly with the density of scatterers and the size and shape of the excitation volume. A qualitative explanation is provided, illustrating the dramatic difference from the spatial coherence of a conventional laser. This work demonstrates that random lasers can be controlled to provide intense, spatially incoherent emission for applications in which spatial cross talk or speckle limit performance. PMID:21886225

  6. Spatial coherence of random laser emission

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the spatial coherence of random laser emission from dye solutions containing nanoparticles. The spatial coherence, measured in a double-slit experiment, varied significantly with the density of scatterers and the size and shape of the excitation volume. A qualitative explanation is provided, illustrating the dramatic difference from the spatial coherence of a conventional laser. This work demonstrates that random lasers can be controlled to provide intense, spatially incoherent emission for applications in which spatial cross talk or speckle limit performance.

  7. Compact collimators for high brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, H.J.; Ma, H.; Ho, C.; Li, M.; Mu, C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes

  8. Partially coherent imaging and spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of spatially partially coherent imaging based on the propagation of second order spatial coherence wavelets and marginal power spectra (Wigner distribution functions) is presented. In this dynamics, the spatial coherence wavelets will be affected by the system through its elementary transfer function. The consistency of the model with the both extreme cases of full coherent and incoherent imaging was proved. In the last case we obtained the classical concept of optical transfer function as a simple integral of the elementary transfer function. Furthermore, the elementary incoherent response function was introduced as the Fourier transform of the elementary transfer function. It describes the propagation of spatial coherence wavelets form each object point to each image point through a specific point on the pupil planes. The point spread function of the system was obtained by a simple integral of the elementary incoherent response function. (author)

  9. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy

  10. Demonstration of a bright and compact source of tripartite nonclassical light

    OpenAIRE

    Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Andreoni, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the nonclassical photon number correlations expected in tripartite continuous variable states obtained by parametric processes. Our scheme involves a single nonlinear crystal, where two interlinked parametric interactions take place simultaneously, and represents a bright and compact source of a sub-shot-noise tripartite light field. We analyze the effects of the pump intensities on the numbers of detected photons and on the amount of noise reduction in some deta...

  11. Spatial coherence of a polariton condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui; Solomon, Glenn S; Hey, Rudolf; Ploog, Klaus H; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-09-21

    We perform Young's double-slit experiment to study the spatial coherence properties of a two-dimensional dynamic condensate of semiconductor microcavity polaritons. The coherence length of the system is measured as a function of the pump rate, which confirms a spontaneous buildup of macroscopic coherence in the condensed phase. An independent measurement reveals that the position and momentum uncertainty product of the condensate is close to the Heisenberg limit. An experimental realization of such a minimum uncertainty wave packet of the polariton condensate opens a door to coherent matter-wave phenomena such as Josephson oscillation, superfluidity, and solitons in solid state condensate systems. PMID:17930529

  12. An intuitive introduction to the concept of spatial coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Rabal, Héctor; Grumel, Eduardo; Trivi, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The concept of spatial coherence is usually hard to be understood the first time that it is studied. We propose here a fully intuitive geometric description that does not contain mathematical difficulties and permits to understand how a Young Fringes system is obtained with a source not spatially coherent. It is based in a very simple experiment that permits the detection of spatial coherence in a scene. Experimental results are shown.

  13. Low spatial coherence electrically pumped semiconductor laser for speckle-free full-field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Cerjan, Alexander; Huang, Xue; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Stone, A Douglas; Choma, Michael A; Cao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    The spatial coherence of laser sources has limited their application to parallel imaging and projection due to coherent artifacts, such as speckle. In contrast, traditional incoherent light sources, such as thermal sources or light emitting diodes (LEDs), provide relatively low power per independent spatial mode. Here, we present a chip-scale, electrically pumped semiconductor laser based on a novel design, demonstrating high power per mode with much lower spatial coherence than conventional laser sources. The laser resonator was fabricated with a chaotic, D-shaped cavity optimized to achieve highly multimode lasing. Lasing occurs simultaneously and independently in ∼1,000 modes, and hence the total emission exhibits very low spatial coherence. Speckle-free full-field imaging is demonstrated using the chaotic cavity laser as the illumination source. The power per mode of the sample illumination is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a LED or thermal light source. Such a compact, low-cost source, which combines the low spatial coherence of a LED with the high spectral radiance of a laser, could enable a wide range of high-speed, full-field imaging and projection applications. PMID:25605946

  14. Stellar Systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44 - I. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, C G

    2016-01-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims. In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (mueff_g'~27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods. We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also search for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results. We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associati...

  15. Ultra high brightness laser diode arrays for pumping of compact solid state lasers and direct applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Andreas; Fillardet, Thierry; Laugustin, Arnaud; Rabot, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    High Power Laser Diodes (HPLD) are increasingly used in different fields of applications such as Industry, Medicine and Defense. Our significant improvements of performances (especially in power and efficiency) and a reproducible manufacturing process have led to reliable, highly robust components. For defense and security applications these devices are used predominantly for pumping of solid state lasers (ranging, designation, countermeasures, and sensors). Due to the drastically falling price per watt they are more and more replacing flash lamps as pump sources. By collimating the laser beam even with a bar to bar pitch of only 400μm. cutting edge brightness of our stacks.is achieved Due the extremely high brightness and high power density these stacks are an enabling technology for the development of compact highly efficient portable solid state lasers for applications as telemeters and designators on small platforms such as small UAVs and handheld devices. In combination with beam homogenizing optics their compact size and high efficiency makes these devices perfectly suited as illuminators for portable active imaging systems. For gated active imaging systems a very short pulse at high PRF operation is required. For this application we have developed a diode driver board with an efficiency several times higher than that of a standard driver. As a consequence this laser source has very low power consumption and low waste heat dissipation. In combination with its compact size and the integrated beam homogenizing optics it is therefore ideally suited for use in portable gated active imaging systems. The kWatt peak power enables a range of several hundred meters. The devices described in this paper mostly operate at wavelength between 800 nm and 980nm. Results from diodes operating between 1300 nm and 1550 nm are presented as well.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF BLUE COMPACT AND HIGH SURFACE BRIGHTNESS STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Talavera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreground reddening values and ages are determined from integrated spectra for a sample of Key Words: g29 blue, compact and high surface brightness Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC clusters. Cluster reddening values were estimated by using both the template matching method and interstellar extinction maps, while cluster age s were derivedfrom template matching and equivalent width (EWs methods, respectively. In the this case, empirical age/metallicity calibrations were used together with diagnostic diagrams involving the sum of EWs of selected spectral lines. The derived cluster ages range from - 5 to 800 Myr. In general, a good agreement is found between the results obtained from the two methods. The present cluster sample omplements previous ones in an attempt to provide a spectral library for the LMC with several clusters per age interval.

  17. Simple, compact, high brightness source for x-ray lithography and x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, compact, high brightness x-ray source has recently been built. This source utilizes a commercially available, cylindrical geometry electron beam evaporator, which has been modified to enhance the thermal cooling to the anode. Cooling is accomplished by using standard, low-conductivity laboratory water, with an inlet pressure of less than 50 psi, and a flow rate of approx.0.3 gal/min. The anode is an inverted cone geometry for efficient cooling. The x-ray source has a measured sub-millimeter spot size (FWHM). The anode has been operated at 1 KW e-beam power (10 KV, 100 ma). Higher operating levels will be investigated. A variety of different x-ray lines can be obtained by the simple interchange of anodes of different materials. Typical anodes are made from easily machined metals, or materials which are vacuum deposited onto a copper anode. Typically, a few microns of material is sufficient to stop 10 KV electrons without significantly decreasing the thermal conductivity through the anode. The small size and high brightness of this source make it useful for step and repeat exposures over several square centimeter areas, especially in a research laboratory environment. For an aluminum anode, the estimated Al-K x-ray flux at 10 cms from the source is 70 μW/cm2

  18. Low-spatial coherence electrically-pumped semiconductor laser for speckle-free full-field imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, B; Huang, X; Lee, M L; Stone, A D; Choma, M A; Cao, H

    2014-01-01

    The spatial coherence of laser sources has limited their application to parallel imaging and projection due to coherent artifacts, such as speckle. In contrast, traditional incoherent light sources, such as thermal sources or light emitting diodes (LEDs), provide relatively low power per independent spatial mode. Here, we present a chip-scale, electrically-pumped semiconductor laser based on a novel design, demonstrating high power per mode with much lower spatial coherence than conventional laser sources. The laser resonator was fabricated with a chaotic, D-shaped cavity optimized to achieve highly multimode lasing. Lasing occurs simultaneously and independently in ~1000 modes, and hence the total emission exhibits very low spatial coherence. Speckle-free full-field imaging is demonstrated using the chaotic cavity laser as the illumination source. The power per mode of the sample illumination is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a LED or thermal light source. Such a compact, low-cost source, wh...

  19. Diffraction from the perspective of the spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffraction of spatially partially coherent optical fields is analysed by using two concepts recently introduced by the authors: the spatial coherence wavelets and the effective diffracting aperture. Within this framework, the intimate link between the spatial properties of the optical field and the aperture's edges in the diffraction phenomena is studied. New insight is proposed in regard to the diffraction in the Fresnel - Fraunhofer approximation. Our ideas are supported by numerical calculations and analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained when an optical field with adjustable spatial coherence impinges upon a circular aperture (author)

  20. Efficient method for controlling the spatial coherence of a laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Micha; Friesem, Asher; Cao, Hui; Davidson, Nir

    2013-01-01

    An efficient method to tune the spatial coherence of a degenerate laser over a broad range with minimum variation in the total output power is presented. It is based on varying the diameter of a spatial filter inside the laser cavity. The number of lasing modes supported by the degenerate laser can be controlled from 1 to 320,000, with less than a 50% change in the total output power. We show that a degenerate laser designed for low spatial coherence can be used as an illumination source for speckle-free microscopy that is 9 orders of magnitude brighter than conventional thermal light.

  1. Spatial coherence of thermal photons favors photosynthetic life

    OpenAIRE

    Manrique, Pedro, Arquebisbe de Saragossa, altres; De Mendoza, Adriana; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Rodríguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Harvesting of sunlight underpins Life on Earth as well as driving novel energy device design. Though several experiments suggest that excitation energy transport and charge separation within a photosynthetic membrane may benefit from the quantum nature of their dynamics, the effects of spatial coherences in the incident light have been largely ignored. Here we show that spatial correlations in the incident light likely play an important role in trapping light and adding robustness, as well as...

  2. Influence of finite spatial coherence on ptychographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachnik, K., E-mail: karolina.stachnik@desy.de; Stuebe, N.; Meyer, J.; Warmer, M.; Meents, A. [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Mohacsi, I.; Vartiainen, I.; David, C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-07-06

    X-ray ptychography is an ultrahigh-resolution scanning coherent diffractive imaging technique, allowing quantitative measurements of extended samples and a simultaneous reconstruction of the illuminating wavefront. Recent development of the mixed-state reconstruction algorithm has triggered a certain interest in utilizing partially coherent X-ray sources for ptychography. Here, we study how finite spatial coherence influences the reconstructed image of a test structure. Our work shows that use of a highly coherent illumination provides images with better spatial resolution and fewer artefacts than the approach with partial coherence.

  3. Influence of finite spatial coherence on ptychographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray ptychography is an ultrahigh-resolution scanning coherent diffractive imaging technique, allowing quantitative measurements of extended samples and a simultaneous reconstruction of the illuminating wavefront. Recent development of the mixed-state reconstruction algorithm has triggered a certain interest in utilizing partially coherent X-ray sources for ptychography. Here, we study how finite spatial coherence influences the reconstructed image of a test structure. Our work shows that use of a highly coherent illumination provides images with better spatial resolution and fewer artefacts than the approach with partial coherence

  4. Spatial coherence of polaritons in a 1D channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savenko, I. G., E-mail: savenko.j@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Academic University, Research and Education Center of Nanotechnologies (Russian Federation); Iorsh, I. V. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (Russian Federation); Kaliteevski, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Academic University, Research and Education Center of Nanotechnologies (Russian Federation); Shelykh, I. A. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland)

    2013-01-15

    We analyze time evolution of spatial coherence of a polariton ensemble in a quantum wire (1D channel) under constant uniform resonant pumping. Using the theoretical approach based on the Lindblad equation for a one-particle density matrix, which takes into account the polariton-phonon and excitonexciton interactions, we study the behavior of the first-order coherence function g{sup 1} for various pump intensities and temperatures in the range of 1-20 K. Bistability and hysteresis in the dependence of the first-order coherence function on the pump intensity is demonstrated.

  5. Transient Aspects of Wave Propagation Connected with Spatial Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents transient aspects of light wave propagation connected with spatial coherence. It is shown that reflection and refraction phenomena involve spatial patterns which are created within a certain transient time interval. After this transient time interval, these patterns act like a memory, determining the wave vector for subsequent sets of reflected/refracted waves. The validity of this model is based on intuitive aspects regarding phase conservation of energy for waves reflected/refracted by multiple centers in a certain material medium.

  6. The spatial coherence of Schumann activity in the polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtham, P. M.; McAskill, B. J.

    1988-02-01

    The spatial coherence of the first two Schumann resonant modes has been studied at two locations in the polar cap separated by 1100 km. Measurements were made at Assistance Bay and Mould Bay, which have geomagnetic latitudes of 83 and 79 deg, respectively, and satellite time-keeping was employed to accurately synchronize the field stations. The coherence was found to be high, typically 95 percent for the first Schumann mode, and was unaffected by changes in Kp, a storm sudden commencement, or a solar flare event. Polarization rotations were observed between the two stations, which could most likely be attributed to the coastline effect. The results are consistent with a stable propagation of Schumann activity from midlatitudes to high latitudes that is relatively unaffected by changes in the polar cap ionosphere.

  7. Spatial coherence of thermal photons favors photosynthetic life

    CERN Document Server

    Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Rodríguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Harvesting of sunlight underpins Life on Earth as well as driving novel energy device design. Though several experiments suggest that excitation energy transport and charge separation within a photosynthetic membrane may benefit from the quantum nature of their dynamics, the effects of spatial coherences in the incident light have been largely ignored. Here we show that spatial correlations in the incident light likely play an important role in trapping light and adding robustness, as well as providing a driving mechanism for an organism's adaptation toward more ordered structures. Our theory is grounded by empirical inputs, while its output is validated against testable predictions. Our results suggest that spatiotemporal correlations between photons, a fundamental property of the quantum world, should play a key role in our understanding of early Life and in improving the design of artificial photosynthetic systems.

  8. Transport theory: Spatial coherence of random laser emission

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Regine

    2012-01-01

    Recently random laser reached the stage of technologi- cal applicability. They have already been engineered as coherent microscope light sources in combination with light transport based disordered lenses. The big issue for all kinds of applications is the degree of coherence of the emitted radiation. The lasing spot sizes in dif- ferent regimes may provide different degrees of spatial and temporal coherence and as a consequence they can be perfectly tunable light sources for the case that the modal behavior can be controlled easily. In this letter we investigate the spatial coherence lengths of different random laser samples theoretically. The samples only vary in their filling with spherical ZnO Mie scatterers. Beyond we show, that the scattering mean free paths of random lasers are not only a material characteristics and dependent to the filling, instead the mean free paths change in depth of the sample and therefor depend on the nonlinear self-consistent gain of the random lasing principle.

  9. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z>4.5

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Rocco; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É; Gurvits, Leonid I; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on observations of an additional ten z>4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50%. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z>4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis ...

  10. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  11. Robust spatial coherence 5 μ m from a room-temperature atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Keil, Mark; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-06-01

    We study spatial coherence near a classical environment by loading a Bose-Einstein condensate into a magnetic lattice potential and observing diffraction. Even very close to a surface (5 μ m ), and even when the surface is at room temperature, spatial coherence persists for a relatively long time (≥500 ms ). In addition, the observed spatial coherence extends over several lattice sites, a significantly greater distance than the atom-surface separation. This opens the door for atomic circuits, and may help elucidate the interplay between spatial dephasing, interatomic interactions, and external noise.

  12. Measurement of the spatial coherence of a soft x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial coherence of a neon-like selenium x-ray laser operating at 206 and 210 Angstroems has been measured using a technique based on partially coherent x-ray diffraction. The time integrated spatial coherence of the selenium x-ray laser was determined to be equivalent to that of a quasi-monochromatic spatially incoherent disk source whose diameter is comparable to the line focus of the visible light laser pumping the x-ray laser. The spatial coherence was improved by narrowing the line focus width. 20 refs., 4 figs

  13. Experimental study of coherence vortices: Local properties of phase singularities in a spatial coherence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Duan, Z.H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner;

    2006-01-01

    By controlling the irradiance of an extended quasimonochromatic, spatially incoherent source, an optical field is generated that exhibits spatial coherence with phase singularities, called coherence vortices. A simple optical geometry for direct visualization of coherence vortices is proposed, and...

  14. Spatial coherences of the sound pressure and the particle velocity in underwater ambient noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jin; LUO Xianzhi; HOU Chaohuan

    2007-01-01

    The spatial coherences were investigated between the sound pressure and the three orthogonal components of the particle velocity in underwater ambient noise. Based on the ray theory, integral expression was derived for the spatial coherence matrix of the sound pressure and the particle velocity in a stratified ocean with dipole noise sources homogenously distributed on the surface. The integrand includes a multiplying factor of the vertical directivity of the noise intensity, and the layered ocean environment affects the spatial coherences via this directivity factor. For a shallow water environment and a semi-infinite homogenous medium, the coherence calculation results were given. It was showed that the sound speed profile and the sea bottom could not be neglected in determining the spatial coherences of the ambient noise vector field.

  15. Optimising predictor domains for spatially coherent precipitation downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radanovics, S.; Vidal, J.-P.; Sauquet, E.; Ben Daoud, A.; Bontron, G.

    2012-04-01

    resulting optimised domains are analysed for defining regions where neighbouring zones have equal or similar predictor domains and identifying which French river basins contain zones associated with different predictor domains, i.e. are exposed to different meteorological influences. The above analysis will be used (1) to extend the statistical downscaling method of Ben Daoud et al. (2011) to the whole of France and (2) to develop it further in order to achieve spatially coherent forecasts while preserving the predictive skill on the local scale. Ben Daoud, A., Sauquet, E., Lang, M., Bontron, G., and Obled, C. (2011). Precipitation forecasting through an analog sorting technique: a comparative study. Advances in Geosciences, 29:103-107. doi: 10.5194/adgeo-29-103-2011 Obled, C., Bontron, G., and Garçon, R. (2002). Quantitative precipitation forecasts: a statistical adaptation of model outputs through an analogues sorting approach. Atmospheric Research, 63(3-4):303-324. doi: 10.1016/S0169-8095(02)00038-8 Vidal, J.-P., Martin, E., Franchistéguy, L., Baillon, M., and Soubeyroux, J.-M. (2010) A 50-year high-resolution atmospheric reanalysis over France with the Safran system. International Journal of Climatology, 30:1627-1644. doi: 10.1002/joc.2003

  16. Effect of spatial coherence on damage occurrence in multimode optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Amir; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev; Ishaaya, Amiel A

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the influence of spatial coherence on damage occurrence in highly multimode optical fibers using ultraviolet (UV) nanosecond pulses, with the aim of delivering high fluence in the UV. In some cases, the optical damage is initiated below the fiber facet damage threshold and takes place along the propagation path; such damage is believed to be caused by local constructive interference, creating "hot spots." In order to reduce the degree of spatial coherence, we used a large-diameter core (1.5 mm) fiber as a mode scrambler. Different lengths of this large core fiber were used to deliver energy to a fiber core with a smaller diameter (0.6 mm), in which the damage occurrence was observed. The experimental results indicate that there is a correlation between the degree of spatial coherence and the occurrence of optical damages, typically observed a few millimeters from the fiber facet. Numerical simulations, based on the beam-propagation method, support the degradation of spatial coherence, due to the excitation of high-order modes. Finally, by degrading the spatial coherence of the beam, we establish a new record by delivering more than 100 mJ via a 1.5 mm core diameter fiber in the UV, corresponding to ∼26 times the critical power for self-focusing. Our work sheds light on the ability to deliver high energies of nanosecond-pulsed UV laser radiation through multimode optical fibers. PMID:25680061

  17. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. PMID:27155359

  18. Spatial coherence resonance induced by coloured noise and parameter diversity in a neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial coherence resonance in a two-dimensional neuronal network induced by additive Gaussian coloured noise and parameter diversity is studied. We focus on the ability of additive Gaussian coloured noise and parameter diversity to extract a particular spatial frequency (wave number) of excitatory waves in the excitable medium of this network. We show that there exists an intermediate noise level of the coloured noise and a particular value of diversity, where a characteristic spatial frequency of the system comes forth. Hereby, it is verified that spatial coherence resonance occurs in the studied model. Furthermore, we show that the optimal noise intensity for spatial coherence resonance decays exponentially with respect to the noise correlation time. Some explanations of the observed nonlinear phenomena are also presented. (general)

  19. Atomic spatial coherence with spontaneous emission in a strong coupling cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zhen; Zhou, Xiaoji; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-01-01

    The role of spontaneous emission in the interaction between a two-level atom and a pumped micro-cavity in the strong coupling regime is discussed in this paper. Especially, using a quantum Monte-Carlo simulation, we investigate atomic spatial coherence. It is found that atomic spontaneous emission destroys the coherence between neighboring lattice sites, while the cavity decay does not. Furthermore, our computation of the spatial coherence function shows that the in-site locality is little affected by the cavity decay, but greatly depends on the cavity pump amplitude.

  20. The Role of Spatial Coherence and Orbital Angular Momentum of Light in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hetharia, D; Löffler, W

    2014-01-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is potentially interesting for astronomical study of rotating objects such as black holes, but the effect of reduced spatial coherence of astronomical light sources such as stars is largely unknown. In a lab-scale experiment, we find that the detected OAM spectrum depends strongly on the position of the light-twisting object along the line of sight. We develop a simple intuitive model to predict the influence of reduced spatial coherence in astronomical observations, and discuss line-of-sight and intensity issues.

  1. Characterization of Spatial Coherence of Synchrotron Radiation with Non-Redundant Arrays of Apertures

    CERN Document Server

    Skopintsev, P; Bach, J; Muller, L; Beyersdorf, B; Schleitzer, S; Gorobtsov, O; Shabalin, A; Kurta, R; Dzhigaev, D; Yefanov, O M; Glaser, L; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Grubel, G; Fromter, R; Oepen, H P; Viefhaus, J; Vartanyants, I A

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to characterize the spatial coherence of soft X-ray radiation from a single diffraction pattern. The technique is based on scattering from non-redundant arrays (NRA) of slits and records the degree of spatial coherence at several relative separations from one to 15 microns, simultaneously. Using NRAs we measured the transverse coherence of the X-ray beam at the XUV X-ray beamline P04 of the PETRA III synchrotron storage ring as a function of different beam parameters. To verify the results obtained with the NRAs additional Young's double pinhole experiments were conducted and show good agreement.

  2. Measurement of Spatial Coherence of Light Propagating in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barcik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A lot of issues have to be taken into account when designing a reliable free space optical communication link. Among these are e.g.,beam wander, fluctuation of optical intensity and loss of spatial coherence that are caused by atmospheric turbulence. This paper presents experimental measurements of spatial coherence of a laser beam. The experimental setup is based on Young's double pinhole experiment. Fringe patterns under atmospheric turbulence for four different pinhole separations are presented. From these fringe patterns, visibility is determined and the coherence radius is estimated.

  3. New insights to the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from deep Near-Infrared studies I. Observations, surface photometry and decomposition of surface brightness profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    (shortened) We analyze deep Near Infrared (NIR) broad band images for a sample of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the quantitative study of their extended stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. NIR surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts agree at large galactocentric radii with those from optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal for more than half of our sample a significant flattening of the exponential SBP of the LSB host. Such SBPs ("type V" SBPs, Binggeli & Cameron 1991) have rarely been detected in LSB hosts of BCDs at optical wavelengths, where the relative flux contribution of the starburst is stronger than in the NIR and can hide such central intensity depressions of the LSB host. The structural properties, frequency and physical origin of type V LSB SBPs in BCDs and other dwarf galaxies have not yet been systematically studied. Nevertheless, their occurrence in a significant fraction of BCDs would impose important new ...

  4. Retrieving of the complex degree of spatial coherence of electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the applicability of a recently developed method for two-dimensionally retrieving the complex degree of spatial coherence of laser beams, in both amplitude and phase, to the case of the electron beam provided by the source of an electron microscope. Obtaining an electron beam with the highest possible coherence is critical for successful holography experiments. Therefore, the accurate measurement of the complex degree of spatial coherence is highly desirable. The method consists of the following three steps: recording of the beam spot, determining its centered-reduced moments and inserting them as coefficients of a series. This procedure is simple, fast and of higher performance than conventional procedures such Fourier analysis or Young interferometry. Experimental results are presented. (author)

  5. Spiral Waves and Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances Induced by Colored Noise in Neuronal Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussian colored noise induced spatial patterns and spatial coherence resonances in a square lattice neuronal network composed of Morris-Lecar neurons are studied. Each neuron is at resting state near a saddle-node bifurcation on invariant circle, coupled to its nearest neighbors by electronic coupling. Spiral waves with different structures and disordered spatial structures can be alternately induced within a large range of noise intensity. By calculating spatial structure function and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is found that SNR values are higher when the spiral structures are simple and are lower when the spatial patterns are complex or disordered, respectively. SNR manifest multiple local maximal peaks, indicating that the colored noise can induce multiple spatial coherence resonances. The maximal SNR values decrease as the correlation time of the noise increases. These results not only provide an example of multiple resonances, but also show that Gaussian colored noise play constructive roles in neuronal network. (general)

  6. Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances and Spatial Patterns in a Noise-Driven Heterogeneous Neuronal Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneity of the neurons and noise are inevitable in the real neuronal network. In this paper, Gaussian white noise induced spatial patterns including spiral waves and multiple spatial coherence resonances are studied in a network composed of Morris—Lecar neurons with heterogeneity characterized by parameter diversity. The relationship between the resonances and the transitions between ordered spiral waves and disordered spatial patterns are achieved. When parameter diversity is introduced, the maxima of multiple resonances increases first, and then decreases as diversity strength increases, which implies that the coherence degrees induced by noise are enhanced at an intermediate diversity strength. The synchronization degree of spatial patterns including ordered spiral waves and disordered patterns is identified to be a very low level. The results suggest that the nervous system can profit from both heterogeneity and noise, and the multiple spatial coherence resonances are achieved via the emergency of spiral waves instead of synchronization patterns. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. Spatial Coherence of Impact Pressures at a Vertical Breakwater in Multidirectional Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, W.; Löffler, A.; Kortenhaus, A.;

    " (LSF) includes the possibility for researchers to work at selected European large-scale facilities. Within this activity the project "Spatial coherence of impact pressures at a vertical breakwater in multidirectional seas" was founded and could therefore be performed by the University of Bologna...... (DISTART Idraulica, Italy [UoB]), Aalborg University (Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Denmark [AU]) and Technical University of Braunschweig (Leichtweiss-Institut, Germany [LWI])....

  8. On a spatial coherence of a field of wave disturbances in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reason for a rapid decrease of spatial coherence of ionosphere F2-layer electron content disturbance field is considered. The reason is that the disturbance field is formed both by wave disturbances conditioned by internal atmospheric acoustic-gravitational wave propagation and disturbances of stochastic origin. A method for calculating the wave disturbance coherence function is proposed, coherence radii of wave and stochastic fields are determined for a particular case

  9. Study of the spatial coherence of high order harmonic radiation generated from pre-formed plasma plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the spatial coherence of the high order harmonic radiation generated by the interaction of 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser beam with carbon (graphite) plasma plume has been carried out using Young's double slit interferometry. It is observed that the spatial coherence varies with harmonic order, laser focal spot size in plasma plume, and peaks at an optimal spot size. It is also observed that the spatial coherence is higher when the laser pulse is focused before the plasma plume than when focused after the plume, and it decreases with increase in the harmonic order. The optimum laser parameters and the focusing conditions to achieve good spatial coherence with high harmonic conversion have been identified, which is desirable for practical applications of the harmonic radiation

  10. Study of the spatial coherence of high order harmonic radiation generated from pre-formed plasma plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.; Singhal, H.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Khan, R. A.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, M.P. (India)

    2013-07-21

    A study of the spatial coherence of the high order harmonic radiation generated by the interaction of 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser beam with carbon (graphite) plasma plume has been carried out using Young's double slit interferometry. It is observed that the spatial coherence varies with harmonic order, laser focal spot size in plasma plume, and peaks at an optimal spot size. It is also observed that the spatial coherence is higher when the laser pulse is focused before the plasma plume than when focused after the plume, and it decreases with increase in the harmonic order. The optimum laser parameters and the focusing conditions to achieve good spatial coherence with high harmonic conversion have been identified, which is desirable for practical applications of the harmonic radiation.

  11. Equatorial spread {ital F} effects on an HF path: Doppler spread, spatial coherence, and frequency coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Argo, P.E.; Carlos, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In August 1990 we participated in the Equatorial Ionospheric Studies sounding rocket campaign near Kwajalein Atoll in the equatorial Pacific region. The campaign included measurements of plasma density using rocket probes and coherent and incoherent scatter radar. During the campaign we fielded high-frequency ionospheric sounders over a bistatic path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The distance between the transmitters and receivers was 700 km; the ionospheric-reflection region was at 10.18; {degree}N, 168.40;{degree}E, near the magnetic equator. We made three types of measurements: Doppler spread and spatial coherence for a single-frequency CW path; frequency coherence of multiple CW paths; and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for a 60-kHz bandwidth path. We obtained such data over a period of 2 weeks for approximately 2 hours each evening; during this period spread {ital F} was common. Fifty percent of the evenings showed Doppler spread of greater than 6 Hz at the {minus}10 dB level (relative to the peak signal power) and greater than 15 Hz at the {minus}30 dB level. Forty percent of the evenings showed spatial coherence distance of less than 180 m in the direction normal to the bistatic path; 40{percent} of the evenings showed spatial coherence of less than 75 m in the direction parallel to the path. Seventy-five percent of the evenings showed coherence bandwidths of less than 1.5 kHz. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  12. Equatorial spread F effects on an HF path: Doppler spread, spatial coherence, and frequency coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1990 we participated in the Equatorial Ionospheric Studies sounding rocket campaign near Kwajalein Atoll in the equatorial Pacific region. The campaign included measurements of plasma density using rocket probes and coherent and incoherent scatter radar. During the campaign we fielded high-frequency ionospheric sounders over a bistatic path between Maloelap Atoll and Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The distance between the transmitters and receivers was 700 km; the ionospheric-reflection region was at 10.18; degree N, 168.40;degree E, near the magnetic equator. We made three types of measurements: Doppler spread and spatial coherence for a single-frequency CW path; frequency coherence of multiple CW paths; and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for a 60-kHz bandwidth path. We obtained such data over a period of 2 weeks for approximately 2 hours each evening; during this period spread F was common. Fifty percent of the evenings showed Doppler spread of greater than 6 Hz at the -10 dB level (relative to the peak signal power) and greater than 15 Hz at the -30 dB level. Forty percent of the evenings showed spatial coherence distance of less than 180 m in the direction normal to the bistatic path; 40% of the evenings showed spatial coherence of less than 75 m in the direction parallel to the path. Seventy-five percent of the evenings showed coherence bandwidths of less than 1.5 kHz. copyright 1999 American Geophysical Union

  13. Similarities and differences between spatial coherence profilometry and white-light interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, Pavel; Takeda, M.

    Melville, New York : AIP, 2010 - ( Hack , E.; Rastogi, P.), s. 161-166 ISBN 978-0-7354-0783-1. - (AIP Conference Proceedings. 1236). [International Conference on Advanced Phase Measurement Methods in Optics and Imaging. Ascona (CH), 16.05.2010-21.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : white-light interferometry * spatial coherence profilometry * shape measurement Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3426104

  14. Water-soluble multidentate polymers compactly coating Ag2S quantum dots with minimized hydrodynamic size and bright emission tunable from red to second near-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Rijun; Wan, Ajun; Liu, Xifeng; Yuan, Wen; Jin, Hui

    2014-04-01

    Hydrodynamic size-minimized quantum dots (QDs) have outstanding physicochemical properties for applications in multicolor molecular and cellular imaging at the level of single molecules and nanoparticles. In this study, we have reported the aqueous synthesis of Ag2S QDs by using thiol-based multidentate polymers as capping reagents. By regulating the composition of the precursors (AgNO3 and sulfur-N2H4.H2O complex) and multidentate polymers (poly(acrylic acid)-graft-cysteamine-graft-ethylenediamine), as well as the reaction time, Ag2S QDs (2.6-3.7 nm) are prepared, displaying tunable photoluminescence (PL) emission from red to the second near-infrared region (687-1096 nm). The small hydrodynamic thickness (1.6-1.9 nm) of the multidentate polymers yields a highly compact coating for the QDs, which results in the bright fluorescent QDs with high PL quantum yields (QYs: 14.2-16.4%). Experimental results confirm that the QDs have high PL stability and ultralow cytotoxicity, as well as high PLQYs and small hydrodynamic sizes (4.5-5.6 nm) similar to fluorescent proteins (27-30 kDa), indicating the feasibility of highly effective PL imaging in cells and living animals.Hydrodynamic size-minimized quantum dots (QDs) have outstanding physicochemical properties for applications in multicolor molecular and cellular imaging at the level of single molecules and nanoparticles. In this study, we have reported the aqueous synthesis of Ag2S QDs by using thiol-based multidentate polymers as capping reagents. By regulating the composition of the precursors (AgNO3 and sulfur-N2H4.H2O complex) and multidentate polymers (poly(acrylic acid)-graft-cysteamine-graft-ethylenediamine), as well as the reaction time, Ag2S QDs (2.6-3.7 nm) are prepared, displaying tunable photoluminescence (PL) emission from red to the second near-infrared region (687-1096 nm). The small hydrodynamic thickness (1.6-1.9 nm) of the multidentate polymers yields a highly compact coating for the QDs, which results in

  15. Long spatial coherence times a few micro-meters from a room temperature surface

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shuyu; Keil, Mark; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The search for quantum coherence based on isolated atoms integrated with a room temperature solid state device (so-called atomchip [1-3]) has been intensifying in the last decade, with advances being made towards applications such as clocks, quantum information processing, surface probing and acceleration and gravitational field sensors. Such a device will also enable (and to some extent has already enabled) novel experiments in fundamental physics (e.g., [4-7]). Here we report on the trapping and maintenance of spatial coherence of atoms (in a Bose-Einstein Condensate -- BEC) about 5$\\mu$m from a room temperature surface, reducing significantly the distance previously achieved between the spatially coherent atoms and their classical environment [8-12], and most importantly entering the regime where atomic circuits are enabled. In addition, we enter the interesting regime in which the distance to the surface is much smaller than the probed coherence length, a regime in which the spatial dephasing reaches its ...

  16. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  17. Correlation between the degree of spatial coherence of the field and the variance of the wave vectors of laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosach, O.Y.; Orlov, E.P.

    1978-07-01

    It is shown that in lasers with an active medium optically inhomogeneous over the transverse cross section and an absorbing lateral boundary, amplitude fluctuations make a negligible contribution compared with phase fluctuations to the deterioration of the spatial coherence of the field. The correlation between the degree of spatial coherence of the field and the variance of the wave vectors of the radiation is obtained for such lasers. The conditions are found under which the main contribution to the variance of the wave vectors is made by the variance of their directions but the variance of the different mode frequencies can be neglected. Measurements of the degree of spatial coherence of the field may yield information on the width of the angular spectrum of the laser radiation in the near field.

  18. Spatial Coherence Properties of Organic Molecules Coupled to Plasmonic Surface Lattice Resonances in the Weak and Strong Coupling Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, L; Rekola, H T; Martikainen, J -P; Moerland, R J; Törmä, P

    2014-01-01

    We study spatial coherence properties of a system composed of periodic silver nanoparticle arrays covered with a fluorescent organic molecule (DiD) film. The evolution of spatial coherence of this composite structure from the weak to the strong coupling regime is investigated by systematically varying the coupling strength between the localized DiD excitons and the collective, delocalized modes of the nanoparticle array known as surface lattice resonances. A gradual evolution of coherence from the weak to the strong coupling regime is observed, with the strong coupling features clearly visible in interference fringes. A high degree of spatial coherence is demonstrated in the strong coupling regime, even when the mode is very excitonlike (80%), in contrast to the purely localized nature of molecular excitons. We show that coherence appears in proportion to the weight of the plasmonic component of the mode throughout the weak-to-strong coupling crossover, providing evidence for the hybrid nature of the normal m...

  19. Characterization of Spatial Coherence of Synchrotron Radiation with Non-Redundant Arrays of Apertures

    OpenAIRE

    Skopintsev, P.; Singer, A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Glaser, L; Sakdinawat, A.; Grübel, G.; Frömter, R.; Oepen, H.P.; Viefhaus, J.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Bach, J.; MÜller, L.; Beyersdorff, B; Schleitzer, S.; Gorobtsov, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to characterize the spatial coherence of soft X-ray radiation from a single diffraction pattern. The technique is based on scattering from non-redundant arrays (NRA) of slits and records the degree of spatial coherence at several relative separations from one to 15 microns, simultaneously. Using NRAs we measured the transverse coherence of the X-ray beam at the XUV X-ray beamline P04 of the PETRA III synchrotron storage ring as a function of different beam parameters. To v...

  20. An off-axis digital holographic microscope with quasimonochromatic partially spatially coherent illumination in transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, Anton A.; Tarakanchikova, Yana V.; Ryabukho, Vladimir P.

    2014-10-01

    We propose an off-axis imaging approach for digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with quasimonochromatic partially spatially coherent illumination in transmission, which is intended to provide the advantages of off-axis partially coherent DHM imaging with a comparatively simple optical scheme. This approach does not require a diffraction grating for creating the off-axis modality and also allows for convenient control of the spatial frequency of carrier interference fringes for hologram sampling optimization. Theoretical analysis of the off-axis imaging process in this microscope is performed. An off-axis DHM based on the proposed approach is built and quantitative phase imaging of test objects is performed with suppressed coherent noise.

  1. Low-spatial-coherence broadband fiber source for speckle free imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Mokan, Vadim; Seifert, Martin; Choma, Michael A; Cao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    We designed and demonstrate a fiber-based amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source with low spatial coherence, low temporal coherence, and high power per mode. ASE is produced by optically pumping a large gain core multimode fiber while minimizing optical feedback to avoid lasing. The fiber ASE source provides 270 mW of continuous wave emission, centered at {\\lambda}=1055 nm with a full-width half-maximum bandwidth of 74 nm. The emission is distributed among as many as ~70 spatial modes, enabling efficient speckle suppression when combined with spectral compounding. Finally, we demonstrate speckle-free full field imaging using the fiber ASE source. The fiber ASE source provides a unique combination of high power per mode with both low spatial and low temporal coherence, making it an ideal source for full-field imaging and ranging applications.

  2. Partial spatial coherence and partial polarization in random evanescent fields on lossless interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrman, Andreas; Setälä, Tero; Friberg, Ari T

    2011-03-01

    We consider partial spatial coherence and partial polarization of purely evanescent optical fields generated in total internal reflection at an interface of two dielectric (lossless) media. Making use of the electromagnetic degree of coherence, we show that, in such fields, the coherence length can be notably shorter than the light's vacuum wavelength, especially at a high-index-contrast interface. Physical explanation for this behavior, analogous to the generation of incoherent light in a multimode laser, is provided. We also analyze the degree of polarization by using a recent three-dimensional formulation and show that the field may be partially polarized at a subwavelength distance from the surface even though it is fully polarized farther away. The degree of polarization can assume values unattainable by beamlike fields, indicating that electromagnetic evanescent waves generally are genuine three-dimensional fields. The results can find applications in near-field optics and nanophotonics. PMID:21383821

  3. On the spatial coherence in mixed sound fields and its application to signal-to-diffuse ratio estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiergart, Oliver; Del Galdo, Giovanni; Habets, Emanuël A P

    2012-10-01

    Many applications in spatial sound recording and processing model the sound scene as a sum of directional and diffuse sound components. The power ratio between both components, i.e., the signal-to-diffuse ratio (SDR), represents an important measure for algorithms which aim at performing robustly in reverberant environments. This contribution discusses the SDR estimation from the spatial coherence between two arbitrary first-order directional microphones. First, the spatial coherence is expressed as function of the SDR. For most microphone setups, the spatial coherence is a complex function where both the absolute value and phase contain relevant information on the SDR. Secondly, the SDR estimator is derived from the spatial coherence function. The estimator is discussed for different practical microphone setups including coincident setups of arbitrary first-order directional microphones and spaced setups of identical first-order directional microphones. An unbiased SDR estimation requires noiseless coherence estimates as well as information on the direction-of-arrival of the directional sound, which usually has to be estimated. Nevertheless, measurement results verify that the proposed estimator is applicable in practice and provides accurate results. PMID:23039430

  4. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Houlihan, John; Mullane, Mark; O'Neill, Eamonn

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture....... Large apertures result in high order transverse modes, filamentation and spatio-temporal instabilities, all of which degrade spatial coherence and therefore brightness. We shall describe a combined assault on three fronts: (1) minimise aperture size required for a given power by maximising the facet...... damage threshold, (2) for a given aperture, minimise self-focusing and filamentation by minimising the effective nonlinear coefficient (the alpha parameter), and (3) for a given aperture and nonlinear coefficient, develop optical cavities and propagation structures to suppress filamentation and high...

  5. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture....... Large apertures result in high order transverse modes, filamentation and spatio-temporal instabilities, all of which degrade spatial coherence and therefore brightness. We shall describe a combined assault on three fronts: (1) minimise aperture size required for a given power by maximising the facet...... damage threshold, (2) for a given aperture, minimise self-focusing and filamentation by minimising the effective nonlinear coefficient (the alpha parameter), and (3) for a given aperture and nonlinear coefficient, develop optical cavities and propagation structures to suppress filamentation and high...

  6. Defining predictand areas with homogeneous predictors for spatially coherent precipitation downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radanovics, Sabine; Vidal, Jean-Philippe; Sauquet, Eric; Ben Daoud, Aurélien; Bontron, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    the 5 ones that lead to the highest CRPSS for the zone in question are retained. The 5 retained domains were found to be equally skillfull with a maximum difference of around 1% of CRPSS on average, and are thus all candidates for clustering predictand zones. An objective procedure has then been implemented for clustering zones together, based on their sharing a common predictor domain inside their 5 near-optimal domain ensemble. For zones sharing several near-optimal predictor domains, the aim was to minimise the number of disjoint predictand areas. Furthermore solutions that lead to more similar sized areas were preferred. This procedure defines areas with natural spatial coherence and reduces the number of different predictor domains using a procedure based on objective rules, unlike most of studies where this is done either subjectively or arbitrarily. It allowed to reduce significantly the number of independent zones and to identify large homogeneous areas encompassing relatively large river basins. Further developments will address the issue of spatial coherent downscaling for predictand areas that do not share any near-optimal predictor domains. Ben Daoud, A., Sauquet, E., Lang, M., Bontron, G., and Obled, C. (2011). Precipitation forecasting through an analog sorting technique: a comparative study. Advances in Geosciences, 29:103-107. doi: 10.5194/adgeo-29-103-2011 Timbal, B., Dufour, A., and McAvaney, B. (2003). An estimate of future climate change for western France using a statistical downscaling technique. Climate Dynamics, 20(7-8):807-823. doi: 10.1007/s00382-002-0298-9 Vidal, J.-P., Martin, E., Franchistéguy, L., Baillon, M., and Soubeyroux, J.-M. (2010) A 50-year high-resolution atmospheric reanalysis over France with the Safran system. International Journal of Climatology, 30:1627-1644. doi: 10.1002/joc.2003

  7. Parameter Diversity Induced Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances and Spiral Waves in Neuronal Network with and Without Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diversity in the neurons and noise are inevitable in the real neuronal network. In this paper, parameter diversity induced spiral waves and multiple spatial coherence resonances in a two-dimensional neuronal network without or with noise are simulated. The relationship between the multiple resonances and the multiple transitions between patterns of spiral waves are identified. The coherence degrees induced by the diversity are suppressed when noise is introduced and noise density is increased. The results suggest that natural nervous system might profit from both parameter diversity and noise, provided a possible approach to control formation and transition of spiral wave by the cooperation between the diversity and noise. (general)

  8. Mediatization, Spatial Coherence and Social Sustainability The Role of Digital Media Networks in a Swedish Countryside Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Jansson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available What does the implementation of new communication networks mean for the spa-tial coherence and social sustainability of rural communities? This paper takes its key from Wittel’s discussion of network sociality, understood as the opposite of Gemeinschaft. Wittel’s argument may inform our understanding of how commu-nicative patterns in rural communities are partly re-embedded through ongoing media transitions. But it must also be problematized. Relating Wittel’s discussion to Halfacree’s model of spatial coherence and Urry’s notion of network capital, as well as to findings from an ethnographic study in a Swedish countryside commu-nity, a more complex view is presented. It is argued that global communication networks under rural conditions contribute to the integration and sustainability of the community, as much as to processes of expansion and differentiation. The results show that network sociality and community constitute interdependent con-cepts. Through their capacity of linking people to external realms of interest, while simultaneously reinforcing their sense of belonging in the local community, online media promote ontological security at the individual level, thus operating as a social stabilizer.

  9. Improved semi-conductor laser device, operating, at room temperature, with an array of three lasers in the spatially coherent, free running mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The peak pulse power was increased by operating an array of three homostructure Ga As lasers in the laser device. A spatial filter in the laser device selects the spatially coherent, free running, mode. The optical peak power is 5 watts, which is three times the peak power of a single laser in the array. The far-field distribution of the three laser array is a single Gaussian beam of spatial coherence without sidelobes or grating lobes. The length of the optical pulses of spatial coherence was increased to 200 ns by improved heat transfer from the p-n junctions of the lasers to the metal housing of the pulse transformer, and by doubling the core area and increasing the turns of the primary windings of the pulse transformer. The mechanical stability of the laser device was improved and the transition from mechanical alignment to electro-mechanical alignment control, was facilitated.

  10. Variability, Brightness Temperature, Superluminal Motion, Doppler Boosting, and Related Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2003-01-01

    We review the observations of rapid flux density variations in compact radio sources, and discuss the inverse Compton limit to the maximum brightness temperature of incoherent synchrotron sources in comparison with recent VLBA observations. The apparent agreement of the theoretical brightness temperature limit due to inverse Compton cooling and the brightness temperatures observed by early VLBI observations appears to have been fortuitous. VLBA observations have greatly improved the quality of the data, but many of the early issues remain unresolved.

  11. Enhancement of conversion efficiency and spatial coherence of high order harmonics generated from pre-formed plasma plumes using an apertured laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Chakravarty, U.; Rathore, R.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of laser beam aperturing (Ti: sapphire laser; 800 nm, 45 fs) on the conversion efficiency (CE), harmonic yield and spatial coherence of high order harmonics generated from a low excited plasma plume of carbon (neutral and singly charged ions) is studied. The optimization of CE by varying the aperture size in combination with different laser and plasma plume parameters was carried out. The CE of the 15th harmonic is enhanced from ˜10-7 for an unapertured laser beam to ˜10-6 for ˜¼ times the unapertured beam diameter, at same laser energy in both cases. Further, it was found that, at a given aperture size, there is an optimum prepulse intensity for maximum CE. The results are explained by taking into account the theoretical consideration of phase matching issues in plasma plumes. The study shows that tuning the prepulse intensity and aperture size gives an easy handle to increase the harmonic conversion along with its coherence properties. The study will be useful for producing an intense source of harmonics with high spatial coherence from plasmas plumes for applications.

  12. Spatial coherence measurement of 13.9 nm Ni-like Ag soft x-ray laser pumped by a 1.5 ps, 20 J laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of the time-integrated spatial coherence of the Ni-like Ag X-ray laser at 13.9 nm pumped by a 1.5 ps, 20 J Nd glass laser, in which the transient collisional excitation (TCE) pumping scheme is realized. The time-integrated complex coherence factor (CCF) of the X-ray laser has been determined from partially coherent diffraction patterns of a multislit array placed 1 m away from the X-ray laser source. The transverse coherence lengths in the directions horizontal and vertical to the Ag target surface are estimated respectively to be within 110 μm to 140 μm at a position 1 m from the X-ray laser source. We tried to explain the profile of the CCF with a quasi-monochromatic incoherent source model with various profiles. (author)

  13. Compact, passively Q-switched, all-solid-state master oscillator-power amplifier-optical parametric oscillator (MOPA-OPO) system pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser generating high-brightness, tunable, ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Peuser, Peter; Platz, Willy; Fix, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard; Meister, Alexander; Haag, Matthias; Zolichowski, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We report on a compact, tunable ultraviolet laser system that consists of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a longitudinally diode-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA). The pump energy for the whole laser system is supplied via a single delivery fiber. Nanosecond pulses are produced by an oscillator that is passively Q-switched by a Cr4+:YAG crystal. The OPO is pumped by the second harmonic of the Nd:YAG MOPA. Continuously tunable radiation is generated by an intrac...

  14. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  15. COMPACT OPERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Swartz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We give a characterization in terms of the transpose operator for a continuous linear operator between locally convex spaces to map bounded sets into relatively weakly compact [relatively compact, precompact] sets. Our results give a known characterization for compact operators between Banach spaces.

  16. Compact, passively Q-switched, all-solid-state master oscillator-power amplifier-optical parametric oscillator (MOPA-OPO) system pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser generating high-brightness, tunable, ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuser, Peter; Platz, Willi; Fix, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard; Meister, Alexander; Haag, Matthias; Zolichowski, Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report on a compact, tunable ultraviolet laser system that consists of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a longitudinally diode-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA). The pump energy for the whole laser system is supplied via a single delivery fiber. Nanosecond pulses are produced by an oscillator that is passively Q-switched by a Cr(4+):YAG crystal. The OPO is pumped by the second harmonic of the Nd:YAG MOPA. Continuously tunable radiation is generated by an intracavity sum-frequency mixing process within the OPO in the range of 245-260 nm with high beam quality. Maximum pulse energies of 1.2 mJ were achieved, which correspond to an optical efficiency of 3.75%, relating to the pulse energy of the MOPA at 1064 nm. PMID:19571944

  17. BrightFocus Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size: A A Contrast En Español Donate BrightFocus Foundation Alzheimer’s Disease Research Macular Degeneration Research National Glaucoma ... Bovenkamp, Ph.D., Scientific Program Officer for BrightFocus Foundation, about the basic science and therapeutic research the ...

  18. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  19. High Brightness Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements

  20. The contribution of z ≲ 6 sources to the spatial coherence in the unresolved cosmic near-infrared and X-ray backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helgason, K.; Ricotti, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cappelluti, N. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kashlinsky, A., E-mail: kari@astro.umd.edu [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    A spatial clustering signal has been established in Spitzer/IRAC measurements of the unresolved cosmic near-infrared background (CIB) out to large angular scales, ∼1°. This CIB signal, while significantly exceeding the contribution from the remaining known galaxies, was further found to be coherent at a highly statistically significant level with the unresolved soft cosmic X-ray background (CXB). This measurement probes the unresolved CXB to very faint source levels using deep near-IR source subtraction. We study contributions from extragalactic populations at low to intermediate redshifts to the measured positive cross-power signal of the CIB fluctuations with the CXB. We model the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), normal galaxies, and hot gas residing in virialized structures, calculating their CXB contribution including their spatial coherence with all infrared emitting counterparts. We use a halo model framework to calculate the auto and cross-power spectra of the unresolved fluctuations based on the latest constraints of the halo occupation distribution and the biasing of AGNs, galaxies, and diffuse emission. At small angular scales (≲ 1'), the 4.5 μm versus 0.5-2 keV coherence can be explained by shot noise from galaxies and AGNs. However, at large angular scales (∼10'), we find that the net contribution from the modeled populations is only able to account for ∼3% of the measured CIB×CXB cross-power. The discrepancy suggests that the CIB×CXB signal originates from the same unknown source population producing the CIB clustering signal out to ∼1°.

  1. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  2. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  3. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  4. Compact cosmic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data are discussed obtained using the method of superfar radiointerferometry. High angular resolution of radiointerferometers with superlong bases has made compact radiosources placed inside and beyond the Galaxy accessable for investigations. Outer galactic objects with extraordinarily active nuclei have been found. Seyfert galaxies 3C84(NGC 1275) in the Perseus constellation and 3C 345 quasar in the Hercules constellation are objects with active nuclei. In the nuclei of separate quasars extraordinarily active processes take place which are accompanied by outflow of clouds of relativistic particles. The velocity of these particles exceeds the light velocity. Measurements with high angular resolution performed in the shortest wave of the centimeter range (1.35 cm) have permitted to find the double nucleus in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275. The superfar radiointerferometry has made interesting discoveries when studying gas-dust galactic nebular. Laser sources that emit bright and narrow lines of hydroxyl and water vapour are found in them

  5. Compact Lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Menezes, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the presence of lumplike solutions in models described by a single real scalar field with standard kinematics in two-dimensional spacetime. The results show several distinct models that support the presence of bell-shaped, lumplike structures which may live in a compact space.

  6. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  7. Compact NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  8. Acceleration of Compact Radio Jets on Sub-parsec Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Zensus, J Anton

    2016-01-01

    Jets of compact radio sources are highly relativistic and Doppler boosted, making studies of their intrinsic properties difficult. Observed brightness temperatures can be used to study the intrinsic physical properties of the relativistic jets, and constrain models of jet formation in the inner jet region. We aim to observationally test such inner jet models. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) cores of compact radio sources are optically thick at a given frequency. The distance of the core from the central engine is inversely proportional to the frequency. Under the equipartition condition between the magnetic field energy and particle energy densities, the absolute distance of the VLBI core can be predicted. We compiled the brightness temperatures of VLBI cores at various radio frequencies of 2, 8, 15, and 86~GHz. We derive the brightness temperature on sub-parsec scales in the rest frame of the compact radio sources. We find that the brightness temperature increases with increasing distance from t...

  9. Fornax compact object survey FCOS: On the nature of Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mieske, S; Infante, L

    2004-01-01

    The results of the Fornax Compact Object Survey (FCOS) are presented. The FCOS aims at investigating the nature of the Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies (UCDs) recently discovered in the center of the Fornax cluster (Drinkwater et al. 2000). 280 unresolved objects in the magnitude space covering UCDs and bright globular clusters (1820 mag) at 96% confidence. The mean velocity of the bright compact objects is consistent with that of the dwarf galaxy population in Fornax, but inconsistent with that of NGC 1399's globular cluster system at 93.5% confidence. The compact objects follow a colour magnitude relation with a slope very similar to that of normal dEs, but shifted about 0.2 mag redwards. The magnitude distribution of compact objects shows a fluent transition between UCDs and GCs with an overpopulation of 8 +/- 4 objects for V<20 mag with respect to the extrapolation of NGC 1399's GC luminosity function. The spatial distribution of bright compact objects is in comparison to the faint ones more extended at 88...

  10. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  11. High brightness electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10-8 torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given

  12. High-brightness diode-pumped waveguide lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Reported in this thesis are advances toward high-brightness diode-pumped planar waveguide (PW) lasers. Efficient and compact planar waveguide lasers are made possible by their geometry, which is compatible with that of high-power diode lasers, has very good thermal management characteristics, and delivers high optical gains per unit pump power. Thus using the waveguide structure in conjunction with trivalent rare-earth ions, multi-Watt diffraction-limited operation of weak and quasi-three-lev...

  13. 基于时空一致性的非结构化网格时变流场高效体绘制方法%High-Efficiency Volume Rendering of Unstructured-Grid Time-Varying Flows Using Temporal and Spatial Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马千里; 刘涛; 王攀; 刘瑜; 李思昆

    2011-01-01

    The temporal and spatial coherence which is an important characteristic of unsteady flows plays an essential role in visualizing time-varying fields. This paper presents an approach for high- efficiency volume rendering of unstructured time-varying flows using the temporal and spatial coherence on the framework of the hardware-based ray casting algorithm (HRC). Firstly, a method is provided to analyze the temporal coherence of both the cell and the vertex data on unstructured grids. Then the cell and the vertex data temporal tables are built to achieve a lower time cost during rendering. Secondly, a novel texture structure is designed to separate the vertex data from the cell data, and a smart gradient matrix is used to reduce the pressure of GPU memory. The scheme of data management can effectively avoid rendering stalls and lead to a compact and efficient storage. The experiments demonstrate that our approach not only gains a much higher efficiency than the existing method, but also achieves a lower space cost, allowing rendering time-varying data on a larger mesh scale.%时空一致性是时变流场的重要性质,也是加速时变数据可视化算法的关键.以硬件加速的光线投射算法(HRC)为框架,设计并实现了一种基于时空一致性的非结构化网格时变流场高效体绘制方法.首先提出一种分析非结构化网格单元和顶点数据时间一致性的方法,分别建立单元和顶点数据时间表,以降低绘制过程中的计算开销;然后设计一种单元和顶点数据相分离的GPU纹理结构,并采用一种小巧的单元梯度矩阵来降低显存开销;同时,设计了一种合理的数据调度策略,既能有效地避免绘制停顿,又使显存纹理结构更为紧致、高效.实验结果表明,该方法不仅明显地提高了绘制效率,而且具有更优显存空间利用率,能实现更大网格规模的非结构化网格时变流场数据体绘制.

  14. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  15. Acceleration of Compact Radio Jets on Sub-parsec Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    2016-01-01

    Jets of compact radio sources are highly relativistic and Doppler boosted, making studies of their intrinsic properties difficult. Observed brightness temperatures can be used to study the intrinsic physical properties of the relativistic jets, and constrain models of jet formation in the inner jet region. We aim to observationally test such inner jet models. The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) cores of compact radio sources are optically thick at a given frequency. The distance of t...

  16. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  17. The EUVE bright source list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroozas, B.; Mcdonald, K.; Antia, B.; Mcdonald, J.; Wiercigroch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial results for bright extreme ultraviolet sources discovered during the EUVE all-sky and deep ecliptic surveys have been published as a Bright Source List (BSL) and released to the astronomical community with a recent NASA research announcement (NRA 93-OSS-02, Appendix F). This paper describes the data processing software, the EUVE survey data set, and the production of the BSL at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The contents, format, and selection criteria for sources, the data processing strategy, some problems encountered, and a summary of the BSL results are presented.

  18. All things bright and beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    'All Things Bright and Beautiful' was exhibited in 20/21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe, which is sited in a 'redundant' church. The fundamental question that the exhibition explored concerned the role of 'the animal' within contemporary art and within secular society, which in turn hoped to prompt reflections on our understanding of the place of 'the human' in the world and in nature. If there is no divine order, as posited by the hymn 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', where does this leave...

  19. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  20. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  1. Development of pierce type high-brightness electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Pierce type electron gun has been developed. High voltage of 200kV DC is effective for the purpose of high brightness. A compact insulation gas tank of 600mmx600mmφ, and a very simple structure of high voltage feeding is realized by insulation designing using an electric field analysis. At the test bench experiments, high voltage of 200kV was achieved, which justifies our design. After a measurement of electron beam characteristics, the gun has been installed into linac system and operated stably. (author)

  2. Compact radio cores : from the first black holes to the last

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H; Kording, E; Nagar, NM

    2004-01-01

    One of the clearest signs of black hole activity is the presence of a compact radio core in the nuclei of galaxies. While in the past the focus had been on the few bright and relativistically beamed sources, new surveys now show that essentially all black holes produce compact radio emission that ca

  3. Compact balanced tries

    OpenAIRE

    Nicodeme, Pierre

    1991-01-01

    We show how it is possible to split Compact Tries described as bit-lists in a segmented and flexible structure of B-tree type, keeping the compactness advantages of the Compact Tries and recovering all the important properties of B-trees.

  4. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts

  5. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J M [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); McDonald, G S [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Chamorro-Posada, P [Departmento de TeorIa de la Senal y Comunicaciones e IngenierIa Telematica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-02-16

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts.

  6. Bright solitons from defocusing nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Borovkova, Olga V.; Kartashov, Yaroslav; Torner Sabata, Lluís; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-01-01

    We report that defocusing cubic media with spatially inhomogeneous nonlinearity, whose strength increases rapidly enough toward the periphery, can support stable bright localized modes. Such nonlinearity landscapes give rise to a variety of stable solitons in all three dimensions, including one-dimensional fundamental and multihump states, two-dimensional vortex solitons with arbitrarily high topological charges, and fundamental solitons in three dimensions. Solitons maintain their coherence ...

  7. Scintillation camera brightness calibration apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circuitry is described for calibrating the brightness of a cathode ray tube display and recording apparatus comprising: 1) intensity control means for adjusting the intensity of the cathode ray tube beam; 2) light sensitive means disposed to receive light emitted from the cathode ray tube and generating a first electrical signal having a magnitude dependent upon the intensity of the emitted light; 3) reference signal generating means for generating a second electrical signal of predetermined magnitude; and 4) electrical signal comparison means coupled to the light sensitive means and the reference signal generating means for comparing the magnitude of the first and second electrical signals. (author)

  8. High-brightness electron injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators and synchrotron light sources require pulse trains of high peak brightness and, in some applications, high-average power. Recent developments in the technology of photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for electron-linac injector applications offer promising advances over conventional electron injectors. Reduced emittance growth in high peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by using high field strengths and by linearizing the radial component of the cavity electric field at the expense of lower shunt impedance

  9. High brightness beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented

  10. Intensity limitations in compact Hminus cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At TRIUMF, we have demonstrated 2.5 mA in a compact H- cyclotron. It is worthwhile to explore possibility of going to even higher intensity. In small cyclotrons, vertical focusing vanishes at the center. The space charge tune shift further reduces vertical focusing, thus determining an upper limit on instantaneous current. Limit on average current is of course also dependent upon phase acceptance, but this can be made quite large in an H- cyclotron. Longitudinal space charge on the first turn can reduce the phase acceptance as well. For finite ion source brightness, another limit comes from bunching efficiency in presence of space charge forces. We present methods of calculating and optimizing these limits. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve 10mA in a 50 MeV compact H- cyclotron

  11. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; OUCHI, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  12. Compact radio cores in radio-quiet AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Alessandro; Norris, Ray P; Giovannini, Gabriele; Spitler, Lee R

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of radio emission in radio-quiet (RQ) active galactic nuclei (AGN) is still debated and might arise from the central AGN, from star formation activity in the host, or from either of these sources. A direct detection of compact and bright radio cores embedded in sources that are classified as RQ can unambiguously determine whether a central AGN significantly contributes to the radio emission. We search for compact, high-surface-brightness radio cores in RQ AGNs that are caused unambiguously by AGN activity. We used the Australian Long Baseline Array to search for compact radio cores in four RQ AGNs located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). We also targeted four radio-loud (RL) AGNs as a control sample. We detected compact and bright radio cores in two AGNs that are classified as RQ and in one that is classified as RL. Two RL AGNs were not imaged because the quality of the observations was too poor. We report on a first direct evidence of radio cores in RQ AGNs at cosmological reds...

  13. Uniaxial backfill block compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main parts of the project were: to make a literature survey of the previous uniaxial compaction experiments; do uniaxial compaction tests in laboratory scale; and do industrial scale production tests. Object of the project was to sort out the different factors affecting the quality assurance chain of the backfill block uniaxial production and solve a material sticking to mould problem which appeared during manufacturing the blocks of bentonite and cruched rock mixture. The effect of mineralogical and chemical composition on the long term functionality of the backfill was excluded from the project. However, the used smectite-rich clays have been tested for mineralogical consistency. These tests were done in B and Tech OY according their SOPs. The objective of the Laboratory scale tests was to find right material- and compaction parameters for the industrial scale tests. Direct comparison between the laboratory scale tests and industrial scale tests is not possible because the mould geometry and compaction speed has a big influence for the compaction process. For this reason the selected material parameters were also affected by the previous compaction experiments. The industrial scale tests were done in summer of 2010 in southern Sweden. Blocks were done with uniaxial compaction. A 40 tons of the mixture of bentonite and crushed rock blocks and almost 50 tons of Friedland-clay blocks were compacted. (orig.)

  14. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  15. VERITAS Observations under Bright Moonlight

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The presence of moonlight is usually a limiting factor for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes due to the high sensitivity of the camera photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In their standard configuration, the extra noise limits the sensitivity of the experiment to gamma-ray signals and the higher PMT currents also accelerates PMT aging. Since fall 2012, observations have been carried out with VERITAS under bright moonlight (Moon illumination $> 35\\%$), in two observing modes, by reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs and with UV bandpass filters, which allow observations up to $\\sim80\\%$ Moon illumination resulting in $29\\%$ more observing time over the course of the year. In this presentation, we provide details of these new observing modes and their performance relative to the standard VERITAS observations.

  16. [Bright light therapy for elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Masako

    2015-06-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) holds considerable promise for sleep problems in the elderly. BLT for community-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significant improvement in sleep parameters. In the institutional setting, BLT was effective in reducing daytime nap duration. Morning BLT was found to advance the peak circadian rhythm and increase activity level in daytime and melatonin level at night. Light therapy could be used in combination with other nonpharmacological methods such as social activities, outside walking, physical exercises, which showed greater effects than independent BLT on sleep and cognitive function. BLT treatment strategy was proposed in the present paper. We should pay more attentions to BLT in community setting for mental and physical well-being. PMID:26065132

  17. The lowest surface brightness disc galaxy known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a galaxy with a prominent bulge and a dominant extremely low surface brightness disc component is reported. The profile of this galaxy is very similar to the recently discovered giant low surface brightness galaxy Malin 1. The disc central surface brightness is found to be ∼ 26.4 Rμ, some 1.5 mag fainter than Malin 1 and thus by far the lowest yet observed. (author)

  18. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  19. Ultra-Compact Dwarfs around NGC 3268

    CERN Document Server

    Caso, Juan Pablo; Richtler, Tom; Calderón, Juan Pablo; Castelli, Analía V Smith

    2014-01-01

    We present radial velocities (from Gemini/GMOS) of the second sample of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) and bright globular clusters (GCs) in the Antlia cluster. Twenty-three objects are located around the giant elliptical NGC 3268, and one is close to the fainter lenticular NGC 3273. Together with previously found UCDs around NGC 3258 a total of 35 UCDs and bright GCs has been now identified in the Antlia cluster. Their colours and magnitudes are compared with those of the nuclei of dE,N galaxies already confirmed as Antlia members. For a subsample that lie on ACS images and are brighter than M_V = -9 mag, the effective radii (R_eff) have been measured, the maximum radius being approximately 10 pc. In addition to the radial velocity sample, we find 10 objects in the magnitude range corresponding to GCs but with 10 < R_eff < 17 pc, resembling the so-called `extended clusters'. By number and magnitude, the new UCDs fit to the GC luminosity function, supporting their interpretation as bright GCs. Additionally...

  20. Compact boson stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Betti [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, Postfach 750 561, D-28725 Bremen (Germany); Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Schaffer, Isabell, E-mail: i.schaffer@jacobs-university.de [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, Postfach 750 561, D-28725 Bremen (Germany)

    2012-07-24

    We consider compact boson stars that arise for a V-shaped scalar field potential. They represent a one parameter family of solutions of the scaled Einstein-Gordon equations. We analyze the physical properties of these solutions and determine their domain of existence. Along their physically relevant branch emerging from the compact Q-ball solution, their mass increases with increasing radius. Employing arguments from catastrophe theory we argue that this branch is stable, until the maximal value of the mass is reached. There the mass and size are on the order of magnitude of the Schwarzschild limit, and thus the spiraling respectively oscillating behaviour, well known for compact stars, sets in.

  1. Soliton fay identities: II. Bright soliton case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a set of bilinear matrix identities that generalize the ones that have been used to construct the bright soliton solutions for various models. As an example of an application of these identities, we present a simple derivation of the N-bright soliton solutions for the Ablowitz–Ladik hierarchy. (paper)

  2. Incoherently coupled dark-bright photorefractive solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Coskun, Tamer H.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Afanasjev, Vsevolod V.

    1996-11-01

    We report the observation of incoherently coupled dark-bright spatial soliton pairs in a biased bulk photorefractive crystal. When such a pair is decoupled, the dark component evolves into a triplet structure, whereas the bright one decays into a self-defocusing beam.

  3. Spatial Brightness Perception of Trichromatic Stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Houser, Kevin W.

    2012-11-16

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. The results indicate that light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, V(λ)-based photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. The results suggest further development of metrics to predict brightness perception is warranted, and that including age as a variable in predictive models may be valuable.

  4. Soliton Fay identities. II. Bright soliton case

    OpenAIRE

    Vekslerchik, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of bilinear matrix identities that generalize the ones that have been used to construct the bright soliton solutions for various models. As an example of an application of these identities, we present a simple derivation of the N-bright soliton solutions for the Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy.

  5. VLA observations of objects in the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on the VLA observations (with 18 arcsec resolution) of all 114 objects from the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) are presented, and the relation between the radio luminosity and optical luminosity is discussed. It was found that most of the BQS quasars are radio quiet and have a radio flux density close to that of the optical flux density; however, 15-20 percent of the quasars are radio loud and are much brighter at radio than at optical wavelengths. The radio luminosity function was derived. It is shown that the radio emission from high-red-shift (z greater than 0.5) quasars is dominated by compact components; most quasars with R above 100 have small red shifts. 39 refs

  6. Silicon-chip source of bright photon pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei C; Lu, Xiyuan; Zhang, Jidong; Painter, Oskar; Lin, Qiang

    2015-08-10

    Integrated quantum photonics relies critically on the purity, scalability, integrability, and flexibility of a photon source to support diverse quantum functionalities on a single chip. Here we report a chip-scale photon-pair source on the silicon-on-insulator platform that utilizes dramatic cavity-enhanced four-wave mixing in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator. The device is able to produce high-quality photon pairs at different wavelengths with a high spectral brightness of 6.24×10(7) pairs/s/mW(2)/GHz and photon-pair correlation with a coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 1386 ± 278 while pumped with a continuous-wave laser. The superior performance, together with the structural compactness and CMOS compatibility, opens up a great avenue towards quantum silicon photonics with capability of multi-channel parallel information processing for both integrated quantum computing and long-haul quantum communication. PMID:26367942

  7. Roller compaction of theophylline

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzovic, Ervina

    2008-01-01

    1. Summary Direct compaction requires a very good flowability and compressibility of the materials. Those parameters become even more critical if the formulation contains large amount of active substance. To overcome these problems, several alternatives have been used. Roller compaction is a very attractive technology in the pharmaceutical industry. It is a fast and efficient way of producing granules, especially suitable for moisture sensitive materials. The intention of this work was to ...

  8. Galaxy selection and the surface brightness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, S S; Schombert, J M

    1995-01-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney (1976) suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman (1970) was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (\\ie approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity ...

  9. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  10. Surface Brightness Profiles of Dwarf Galaxies: I. Profiles and Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Kimberly A; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBV JHK and H{\\alpha}, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and break at larger radii; dwarf trends with M_B extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, M_B, and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have diff...

  11. Compact groups in theory and practice - I. The spatial properties of compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    McConnachie, Alan W; Patton, David R

    2008-01-01

    We use a mock galaxy catalogue based upon the Millennium Run simulation to investigate the intrinsic spatial properties of compact groups of galaxies. We find that approximately 30% of galaxy associations identified in our mock catalogue are physically dense systems of four or more galaxies with no interlopers, approximately half are close associations of 2, 3 or 4 galaxies with one or more interlopers, and the remainder are not physically dense. Genuine compact groups are preferentially brighter and more isolated than those with interlopers; by increasing the required minimum surface brightness of a group from the canonical value of 26mags/arcsec^2 to 22mags/arcsec^2, we can increase the proportion of genuinely compact systems identified with no interlopers from 29% to 75%. Of the genuine compact groups identified, more than half consist of a single dark matter halo with all the member galaxies deeply embedded within it. In some cases, there are other galaxies which share the same halo (typically with mass ~...

  12. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  13. Designers predict a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As power plant designers and builders, there is a bright future for the industry. The demand for electricity will continue to grow, and the need for new plants will increase accordingly. But companies that develop and supply these plants must adapt to new ways of doing business if they expect to see the dawn of this new age. Several factors will have a profound effect on the generation and use of electricity in future years. Instant communications now reach all corners of the globe, making people everywhere aspire to a higher standard of living. The economic surge needed to satisfy these appetites will, in turn, be fed by a network of suppliers who are themselves restructuring to serve global markets, unimpeded by past nationalistic barriers to trade. The strong correlation between economic progress and the growing demand for electricity is well recognized. A ready supply of affordable electricity is a necessary underpinning for any economic expansion. As economies advance and jobs increase, electric demand grows geometrically, fueled by an ever-improving quality of life. Coupled with increasing demand is the worldwide trend toward privatization of the generation industry. The reasons may vary in different parts of the world, but the effect is the same--companies are battling intensely for the right to build or purchase generating facilities. Those companies, like the industry they serve, are themselves in a period of transition. Once a closed, monopolistic group of owners in a predominantly services-based market, they are, thanks to competitive forces, being driven steadily toward a product-based structure

  14. Compact radio sources in luminous infrared galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Rodrigo

    2007-08-01

    Radio interferometry is an observational technique of high sensitivity and incomparably high spatial resolution. Moreover, because radio waves can freely propagate through interstellar dust and gas, it allows the study of regions of the universe completely obscured at other wavelengths. This thesis reports the observational and theoretical results of my research during the past four years which are mostly based on interferometric radio data. The COLA sample is an infrared selected sample of active star forming galaxies. We conducted 6 cm VLA and VLBI snapshot observations of the northern half of this sample. The radio emission seen at VLA scales is consistent with being powered by star formation activity because it follows the far infrared to radio correlation. We detect 22% of the sample sources in our VLBI snapshots. Based on luminosity arguments, we argue that these sub-parsec VLBI sources are powered by AGN activity. Furthermore, we find that VLBI detections are preferentially found in sources whose VLA scale structures have the highest peak brightnesses suggesting a strong correlation between compact starburst and AGN activity. This observational result is consistent with the theoretical picture of an Eddington-limited nuclear starburst acting as the last valve in the pipeline transporting the gas from kiloparsec scales onto the accretion disc of a buried AGN. Arp 220 is the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy. For many years this source has been known to harbour a compact (~100 pc) cluster of unresolved 18 cm bright sources believed to be bright core collapse supernovae. Using multiwavelength VLBI observations, we obtained for the first time radio spectra for 18 of these sources. We find that over a half of them have spectra consistent with young supernovae. The rest can be better explained as older supernova remnants interacting with the high density starburst ISM. This finding allowed us to constrain the number of possible scenarios for the Arp 220

  15. Quiet-Sun Network Bright Point Phenomena with Sigmoidal Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.; Champey, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous solar atmospheric coronal and transition region bright points (BPs) are compact features overlying strong concentrations of magnetic flux. Here, we utilize high-cadence observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to provide the first observations of extreme ultraviolet quiet-Sun (QS) network BP activity associated with sigmoidal structuring. To our knowledge, this previously unresolved fine structure has never been associated with such small-scale QS events. This QS event precedes a bi-directional jet in a compact, low-energy, and low-temperature environment, where evidence is found in support of the typical fan-spine magnetic field topology. As in active regions and micro-sigmoids, the sigmoidal arcade is likely formed via tether-cutting reconnection and precedes peak intensity enhancements and eruptive activity. Our QS BP sigmoid provides a new class of small-scale structuring exhibiting self-organized criticality that highlights a multi-scaled self-similarity between large-scale, high-temperature coronal fields and the small-scale, lower-temperature QS network. Finally, our QS BP sigmoid elevates arguments for coronal heating contributions from cooler atmospheric layers, as this class of structure may provide evidence favoring mass, energy, and helicity injections into the heliosphere.

  16. An Ultraviolet imager to study bright UV sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A G; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and developed a compact ultraviolet imaging payload to fly on a range of possible platforms such as high altitude balloon experiments, cubesats, space missions, etc. The primary science goals are to study the bright UV sources (mag < 10) and also to look for transients in the Near UV (200 - 300 nm) domain. Our first choice is to place this instrument on a spacecraft going to the Moon as part of the Indian entry into Google lunar X-Prize competition. The major constraints for the instrument are, it should be lightweight (< 2Kg), compact (length < 50cm) and cost effective. The instrument is an 80 mm diameter Cassegrain telescope with a field of view of around half a degree designated for UV imaging. In this paper we will discuss about the various science cases that can be performed by having observations with the instrument on different platforms. We will also describe the design, development and the current state of implementation of the instrument. This includes opto-mechanical and e...

  17. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  18. Compact Dynamical Foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    According to the work of Dennis Sullivan, there exists a smooth flow on the 5-sphere all of whose orbits are periodic although there is no uniform bound on their periods. The question addressed in this article is whether such an example can occur in the partially hyperbolic context. That is, does there exist a partially hyperbolic diffeomorphism of a compact manifold such that all the leaves of its center foliation are compact although there is no uniform bound for their volumes. We will show that the previous question has negative answer under very natural hypothesis as one-dimensional center foliation, transitivity or in the volume preserving case. Moreover we study the dynamical properties of partially hyperbolic maps preserving a compact center foliation. We prove in particular that if the number of center leaves with non-trivial holonomy is finite then the map is plaque expansive.

  19. An Active Black Hole in a Compact Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new type of galaxy has just been added to the galaxy zoo: a small, compact, and old elliptical galaxy that shows signs of a monster black hole actively accreting material in its center. What can this unusual discovery tell us about how compact elliptical galaxies form?A New Galactic BeastCompact elliptical galaxies are an extremely rare early-type dwarf galaxy. Consistent with their name, compact ellipticals are small, very compact collections of ancient stars; these galaxies exhibit a high surface brightness and arent actively forming stars.Optical view of the ancient compact elliptical galaxy SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 (center of image) in an SDSS color composite image. [Adapted from Paudel et al. 2016]Most compact ellipticals are found in dense environments, particularly around massive galaxies. This has led astronomers to believe that compact ellipticals might form via the tidal stripping of a once-large galaxy in interactions with another, massive galaxy. In this model, once the original galaxys outer layers are stripped away, the compact inner bulge component would be left behind as a compact elliptical galaxy. Recent discoveries of a few isolated compact ellipticals, however, have strained this model.Now a new galaxy has been found to confuse our classification schemes: the first-ever compact elliptical to also display signs of an active galactic nucleus. Led by Sanjaya Paudel (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute), a team of scientists discovered SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 serendipitously in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The team used SDSS images and spectroscopy in combination with data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to learn more about this unique galaxy.Puzzling CharacteristicsSDSS J085431.18+173730.5 presents an interesting conundrum. Ancient compact ellipticals are supposed to be devoid of gas, with no fuel left to trigger nuclear activity. Yet SDSS J085431.18+173730.5 clearly shows the emission lines that indicate active accretion onto

  20. The solar brightness temperature at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuseski, R. A.; Swanson, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the brightness temperature of the sun near 36 GHz and 93 GHz were made using the new moon as a calibration source. Provided the brightness temperature of the moon is known and all measurements are reduced to the same zenith angle, a simple expression can be used for the sun-to-new moon ratio which is independent of antenna gain, atmospheric absorption and reemission, and radiometer calibration constants. This ratio was measured near 36 GHz and at two frequencies near 93 GHz with a Dicke switched superheterodyne radiometer system and a 2.4 m Cassegrain antenna. The slopes of the solar brightness temperature spectrum based on these ratios were measured. The absolute solar brightness spectrum derived from all current available measurements supplemented by the present ones is also plotted and discussed.

  1. A spectroscopic atlas of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for amateur astronomers interested in practical spectroscopy or spectrography, this reference book identifies more than 70 (northern hemisphere) bright stars that are suitable observational targets. It provides finder charts for locating these sometimes-familiar stars.

  2. Surface Brightness Profiles of Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tugay, A V

    2014-01-01

    We built r-band surface brightness profiles by SDSS data for 16 Seyfert galaxies observed in Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Obtained profiles can be used for finding more accurate lightcurves for these galaxies.

  3. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  4. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic surface brightness Ssub(e) of 500 disc galaxies (0<=T<=9) drawn from the Second Reference Catalogue is computed and it is shown that Ssub(e) does not correlate significantly with Msub(B), (B-V) or type. This is consistent with the notion that there is a heavy selection bias in favour of disc galaxies with that particular surface brightness which allows inclusion in the catalogue over the largest volume of space. (author)

  5. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed that Freeman's discovery that the extrapolated central surface brightness of spiral galaxies is approximately constant can be simply explained if the galaxies contain a spheroidal component which dominates the light in their outer isophotes. Calculations of an effective central surface brightness indicate a wide spread of values. This requires either a wide spread in disc properties or significant spheroidal components or, most probably, both. (author)

  6. Development of a high brightness ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightness and emittance of an ion beam can depend on the ion temperature, aberrations and scattering, as well as other factors. However, it is the ion temperature which determines the irreducible minimum value of the emittance and hence brightness, as the other components can be eliminated by careful design. An ion source design is presented which has attained this minimum value for the emittance; the dependence of the ion temperature on the plasma source parameters is discussed

  7. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H-2-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H2 bright galaxies, with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks......, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression......-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect LCO-M(H2) conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal gas-to-dust ratios. It is likely that the cause of the apparent suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence into the molecular gas...

  8. A compact H- cyclotron for isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of a compact, high intensity H- cyclotron for isotope production exploiting the recently developed TRIUMF high brightness multicusp volume H- ion source. A 5 mA version of this H- source currently under development, makes possible accelerated beam intensities of up to 500 μA. The cyclotron has a four sector, radial ridge design, with two 45 degrees dees in opposite valleys. Beam extraction is by stripping to H+ in thin graphite foils. Two foil strippers permit the simultaneous extraction of two beams. By varying the radial position of the stripper the energy of the extracted beams can be varied between 15 MeV and 30 MeV

  9. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices. PMID:26764780

  10. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  11. Compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power are proposed to improve economic viability through the use of less-advanced technology in systems of considerably reduced scale. The rationale for and the means by which these systems can be achieved are discussed, as are unique technological problems

  12. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  13. Tachyons in Compact Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Suyama, T

    2005-01-01

    We discuss condensations of closed string tachyons localized in compact spaces. Time evolution of an on-shell condensation is naturally related to the worldsheet RG flow. Some explicit tachyonic compactifications of Type II string theory is considered, and some of them are shown to decay into supersymmetric theories known as the little string theories.

  14. Optimal design of compact and connected nature reserves for multiple species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yicheng; Önal, Hayri

    2016-04-01

    When designing a conservation reserve system for multiple species, spatial attributes of the reserves must be taken into account at species level. The existing optimal reserve design literature considers either one spatial attribute or when multiple attributes are considered the analysis is restricted only to one species. We built a linear integer programing model that incorporates compactness and connectivity of the landscape reserved for multiple species. The model identifies multiple reserves that each serve a subset of target species with a specified coverage probability threshold to ensure the species' long-term survival in the reserve, and each target species is covered (protected) with another probability threshold at the reserve system level. We modeled compactness by minimizing the total distance between selected sites and central sites, and we modeled connectivity of a selected site to its designated central site by selecting at least one of its adjacent sites that has a nearer distance to the central site. We considered structural distance and functional distances that incorporated site quality between sites. We tested the model using randomly generated data on 2 species, one ground species that required structural connectivity and the other an avian species that required functional connectivity. We applied the model to 10 bird species listed as endangered by the state of Illinois (U.S.A.). Spatial coherence and selection cost of the reserves differed substantially depending on the weights assigned to these 2 criteria. The model can be used to design a reserve system for multiple species, especially species whose habitats are far apart in which case multiple disjunct but compact and connected reserves are advantageous. The model can be modified to increase or decrease the distance between reserves to reduce or promote population connectivity. PMID:26365329

  15. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations, an ope...

  16. Spectroscopic Surface Brightness Fluctuations: Amplifying Bright Stars in Unresolved Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzkus, M.; Dreizler, S.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on our early-stage efforts to resolve the Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) in the spectral dimension. Combining the diagnostic power of SBFs with the physical information content of spectra seems a tempting possibility to gain new insights into the bright stars in unresolved stellar populations. The new VLT integral field spectrograph MUSE is the first instrument that enables spectroscopic SBFs observationally.

  17. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  18. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  19. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Compact Quantum Groupoids

    OpenAIRE

    Landsman, N.P.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum groupoids are a joint generalization of groupoids and quantum groups. We propose a definition of a compact quantum groupoid that is based on the theory of C*-algebras and Hilbert bimodules. The essential point is that whenever one has a tensor product over the complex numbers in the theory of quantum groups, one now uses a certain tensor product over the base algebra of the quantum groupoid.

  1. Compactly Generated Domain Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo; Schröder, Matthias; Simpson, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We propose compactly generated monotone convergence spaces as a well-behaved topological generalisation of directed-complete partial orders (dcpos). The category of such spaces enjoys the usual properties of categories of 'predomains' in denotational semantics. Moreover, such properties are retained if one restricts to spaces with a countable pseudobase in the sense of E. Michael, a fact that permits connections to be made with computability theory, realizability semantics and recent work on ...

  2. Compact Torsatron configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high Β should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite Β. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  3. Energy report compact 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Report compact 2015 from the Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection and the Energy Sector and the State Office for Statistics Baden-Wuerttemberg provides an overview on the energy sector developments in Baden-Wuerttemberg in 2013. It contains numerous information on the energy consumption in Baden-Wuerttemberg, the energy productivity, the share of renewable energy sources, power generation and the energy-related CO2 emissions.

  4. Utra-bright compact sources of correlated photons based on SPDC in periodically-poled KTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, Ray; Fiorentino, Marco; Spillane, Sean; Roberts, Tony; Battle, Phil; Munroe, Mark

    2007-05-01

    Photon pairs generated using spontaneous parametric down- conversion (SPDC) have been a central ingredient for a number of quantum optics experiments ranging from the generation of entanglement to demonstrations of quantum information processing protocols. The flux of pairs generated by SPDC sources has been steadily growing over the years opening the door to practical applications of correlated and entangled photon pairs. SPDC sources based on periodically poled waveguides have shown a great potential to generate large numbers of correlated pairs with a few μW of pump. These works, however, lack a clear explanation of the increased pair rate in waveguides and do not directly compare the waveguide result with bulk. Na"ively, field confinement in waveguides is not expected to enhance pair generation rate, since SPDC is a scattering phenomenon that only involves one pump photon and therefore does not benefit from higher photon densities created by focussing. In this talk we present a theoretical and experimental comparison of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in periodically poled waveguides and bulk KTP crystals. We measured a waveguide pair generation rate of 2.9 .10^6 pairs/s per mW of pump in a 1-nm band: more than 50 times higher than the bulk crystal generation rate. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.E3.4

  5. Observing Faint Companions Close to Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Progress in a number of technical areas is enabling imaging and interferometric observations at both smaller angular separations from bright stars and at deeper relative contrast levels. Here we discuss recent progress in several ongoing projects at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First, extreme adaptive optics wavefront correction has recently enabled the use of very short (i.e., blue) wavelengths to resolve close binaries. Second, phase-based coronagraphy has recently allowed observations of faint companions to within nearly one diffraction beam width of bright stars. Finally, rotating interferometers that can observe inside the diffraction beam of single aperture telescopes are being developed to detect close-in companions and bright exozodiacal dust. This paper presents a very brief summary of the techniques involved, along with some illustrative results.

  6. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF DWARF GALAXIES. I. PROFILES AND STATISTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBVJHK and Hα, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and breaks at larger radii; dwarf trends with MB extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, MB , and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have different interiors and IIs break ∼twice as far as IIIs. Outer Type II and III scale lengths may have weak trends with wavelength, but pure Type II inner scale lengths clearly decrease from the FUV to visible bands whereas Type III inner scale lengths increase with redder bands. This suggests the influence of different star formation histories on profile type, but nonetheless the break location is approximately the same in all passbands. Dwarfs continue trends between profile and Hubble types such that later-type galaxies have more Type II but fewer Type I and III profiles than early-type spirals. BCDs and Sms are over-represented as Types III and II, respectively, compared to dIms

  7. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  8. The historical investigation of cometary brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W.

    1998-12-01

    The interpretation of the way in which the brightness of a comet varied as a function of both its heliocentric and geocentric distance was essentially started by Isaac Newton in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Astronomers have argued about the form of this variability ever since, and for many years it was regarded as an important clue as to the physical nature of the cometary nucleus and its decay process. This paper reviews our understanding of the causes of cometary brightness variability between about 1680 and the 1950s.

  9. The environment of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, S. D.; Bomans, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) we investigated the clustering properties of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in comparison to normal, High Surface Brightness (HSB) galaxies. We selected LSB galaxies and HSB galaxies with well measured redshifts from the SDSS data base and performed three-dimensional neighbour counting analysis within spheres of radii between 0.8 Mpc and 8.0 Mpc. As a second analysis method we used an N-th neighbour analysis with N var...

  10. Discovery program for bright quasars: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program has been undertaken to obtain a complete sample of bright quasars on the basis of ultraviolet color excess. Spectroscopic examination of candidates selected from two-color Schmidt telescope films has yielded four new quasars brighter than B = 16/sup m/5, with the candidate list containing two more previously identified. Magnitudes, color indices, and redshifts are presented for the new discoveries, along with positions and finding charts. Although the sample is not yet complete, these first results suggest that bright quasars have a low surface density

  11. High-brightness electron beams for production of high intensity, coherent radiation for scientific and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relativistic electron beams with high six-dimensional phase space densities, i.e., high-brightness beams, are the basis for efficient generation of intense and coherent radiation beams for advanced scientific and industrial applications. The remarkable progress in synchrotrons radiation facilities from the first generation to the current, third-generation capability illustrates this point. With the recent development of the high-brightness electron gun based on laser-driven rf photocathodes, linacs have become another important option for high-brightness electron beams. With linacs of about 100 MeV, megawatt-class infrared free-electron lasers can be designed for industrial applications such as power beaming. With linacs of about 10 GeV, 1- angstrom x-ray beams with brightness and time resolution exceeding by several orders of magnitude the current synchrotrons radiation sources can be generated based on self-amplified spontaneous emission. Scattering of a high-brightness electron beam by high power laser beams is emerging as a compact method of generating short-pulse, bright x-rays. In the high-energy frontier, photons of TeV quantum energy could be generated by scattering laser beams with TeV electron beams in future linear colliders

  12. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O' Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  13. A Magnetic Bright Point Case Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Utz, D.; Jurčák, Jan; Bellot Rubio, L.; del Toro Iniesta, J.C.; Thonhofer, S.; Hanslmeier, A.; Veronig, A.; Muller, R.; Lemmerer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 459-470. ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB061109 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar magnetic field * magnetic bright points * sunrise/IMaX Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  14. A photometric investigation of a bright Geminid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degewij, J.; Diggelen, Johannes van

    1968-01-01

    Photographic observations of meteors in the Netherlands started with a bright Geminid of photographic magnitude −8 observed on December 11, 1955, 21h39m55s by M. Alberts. From the assumed radiant and velocity we have constructed the trajectory of the bolide. The luminosity of the trail has been dete

  15. Brightness versus roughness: a multiscale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A link between roughness and brightness is sought for brass specimens that were superfinished, sandblasted and brushed. Only the blasting conditions are varied in order to get different roughness and brightness. First, a relation between roughness and brightness is sought for specimens that were superfinished and sandblasted. The best relation is obtained using the mean height of the motifs, calculated using a low-pass filter and cut-off length equal to 30 μm, with a logarithmic–logarithmic model. Then, the same type of relation is determined after superfinishing sandblasting and brushing. The core material volume Vmc, computed using a high-pass filter with a cut-off length of 60 μm and a linear–logarithmic relationship, gives the best results. A relation between roughness and brightness that is common to both the pre-brushing state and post-brushing state is identified: the best roughness parameter is the arithmetic mean deviation Sa using a high-pass filter with a cut-off of 15 μm, with a logarithmic–logarithmic relationship. Finally, it is shown that the use of these filtering conditions enables us to verify the model of Beckmann and Spizzichino for the examined specimens. This scale corresponds to the end of the fractal regime and is close to the end of the signal correlation. (paper)

  16. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  17. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Kline, Christopher E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark; Devlin, Tina M.; Moore, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness...

  18. Conservation of an ion beam brightness. Study of a non brightness disturbing lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of ion sources prove that large initial brightnesses can be obtained by using the plasma expansion principle. However these brightnesses are usually spoiled by the beam focusing and accelerating systems. A high intensity focusing set up is first theoretically studied, then numerically determined by use of a 7094 IBM computer. Aberrations have been minimized. It has then been possible to construct a set up conserving the source initial brightness. For a 100 mA beam the focusing voltage is 150 kV, the beam study has been done for 350 keV beam final energy. Given is a discussion of results. (author)

  19. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  20. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Masao; Inatani, Junji; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high...

  1. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  2. 7 mm continuum observations of ultra compact HII regions

    OpenAIRE

    Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Dolei, S.; Manzitto, P.; L. Cerrigone; Siringo, C.

    2009-01-01

    Ultra compact HII (UCHII) regions are indicators of high-mass star formation sites and are distributed mainly in the Galactic plane. We intend to investigate the possible contribution of the forthcoming ESA Planck mission to the science of UCHII regions by evaluating the possibility of detecting UCHIIs that are bright in the radio regime. We performed new 7 mm observations of a sample of UCHII regions. For each source in our sample, the free-free radio spectrum has been modeled. Along with fa...

  3. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark R; Devlin, Tina M; Moore, Teresa A

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210-2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210-2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210-2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410-0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect. PMID:27103935

  4. Compaction properties of agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    TANG, Anh Minh; CUI, Yu Jun; Eslami, Javad; DEFOSSEZ BERTHOUD, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    The compaction of field soils due to repeated rolling of agricultural vehicles is one of the main reasons for the agricultural soil degradation. A good understanding of the compaction properties of these soils is essential for an optimum organisation of agricultural activities, and therefore for environmental protection in terms of nitrate migrations. In the present work, the compaction properties of agricultural soils from four sites in France are studied after experimental data ...

  5. Soil compaction in forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    TURGUT, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Soil compaction is a widespread degradation process in forest sites. Soil degradation occurring on the structural formation of a natural soil system by rainfall or mechanical outer forces generally results in soil particles to be rearranged tighter than its previous status. In this case, soil compaction -defined as the increase in bulk density of soil- develops with negative effects on soil-plant-water relations. With the compaction, the density of soil increases while the porosity rate decre...

  6. Advances in compact torus research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact torus is a low aspect ratio, axisymmetric, closed magnetic field line configuration with no vessel wall or magnetic field coils linking the hole in the plasma toroid. This concept offers reactor advantages such as simplicity, high β, and the possibility of translation. Several methods have been used to generate compact toroids, including plasma guns, high energy particle rings, and field-reversed theta pinches. This document summarizes the results of recent work on compact toroids, presented at the first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Compact Torus Research held in Sydney, Australia from 4 to 7 March 1985

  7. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M; Grygar, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Hrabovsk'y, M; Mandat, D; Nosek, D; Palatka, M; Pandey, S B; Pech, M; Schovanek, P; De Postigo, A U; Vítek, S; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin; R}\\'idk\\'y, Jan {; Grygar, Ji{r}\\'i; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hrabovsk\\'y, Miroslav; Mand\\'at, Du{s}an; Nosek, Dalibor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pandey, Shashi B.; Pech, Miroslav; Schov\\'anek, Petr; S}m\\'ida, Radom\\'ir {; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; V\\'itek, Stanislav

    2006-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ~ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  8. An ultra-bright atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel, ultra-bright atom laser and an ultra-cold thermal atom beam. Using rf-radiation we strongly couple the magnetic hyperfine levels of 87Rb atoms in a trapped Bose–Einstein condensate. The resulting time-dependent adiabatic potential forms a trap, which at low rf-frequencies opens just below the condensate and thus allows an extremely bright well-collimated atom laser beam to emerge. As opposed to traditional atom lasers based on weak coupling of the magnetic hyperfine levels, this technique allows us to outcouple atoms at an arbitrarily large rate. We achieve a flux of 4×107 atom s-1, a seven fold increase compared to the brightest atom lasers to date. Furthermore, we demonstrate by two orders of magnitude the coldest thermal atom beam (200 nK). (paper)

  9. Quantum Bright Soliton in a Disorder Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, K.; Delande, D.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2009-11-01

    At very low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with attractive interactions tend to form a bright soliton. When exposed to a sufficiently weak external potential, the shape of the soliton is not modified, but its external motion is affected. We develop in detail the Bogoliubov approach for the problem, treating, in a non-perturbative way, the motion of the center of mass of the soliton. Quantization of this motion allows us to discuss its long time properties. In particular, in the presence of a disordered potential, the quantum motion of the center of mass of a bright soliton may exhibit Anderson localization, on a localization length which may be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  10. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  11. Compact SPS - Power delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.

    1982-09-01

    The power deliverable by a compact solar Space Power Station (SPS) is a function of its outer surface shape. Methods of fitting the power delivery curve of such a system to different patterns of daily power demand are considered that involve the appropriate choice of the number of satellites, their maximal power, height to width ratio and the shift of longitude with respect to the receiving station. Changes in the daily delivery curve can be made by altering the longitudes and orientations of the satellites. Certain limitations to the choice of parameters exist, such as: the height to width ratio should be near 1.2, and the sum of longitude and orientation changes will probably not be greater than 50 deg. The optimization of the peak to average power ratio is also discussed.

  12. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  13. Compact pentaquark structures

    CERN Document Server

    Santopinto, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We study the possibility that at least one of the two pentaquark structures recently reported by LHCb can be described as a compact pentaquark state, and we give predictions for new channels that can be studied by the experimentalists if this hypothesis is correct. We use very general arguments dictated by symmetry considerations, in order to describe the pentaquark states within a group theory approach. A complete classification of all possible states and quantum numbers, that can be useful both to the experimentalists, for new finding, or to theoretical model builders, are given, without the introduction of any particular dynamical model. Some prediction are finally given using a Guersey-Radicati inspired mass formula. We reproduce the mass and the quantum numbers of the lightest pentaquark state reported by LHCb ( 3/2^-), with a parameter free mass formula, fixed on the well established baryons. We predict others pentaquark resonances (giving their masses, and suggesting possible decay channels) which belo...

  14. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  15. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  16. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  17. Spectral Characterization of Bright Materials on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaccioni, Fabrizio; DeSanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Li, Jian-Yang; Longobardo, A.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Schroeder, S. E.; Tosi, F.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    The surface of Vesta, as observed by the camera and imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn spacecraft, displays large surface diversity in terms of its geology and mineralogy with noticeably dark and bright areas on the surface often associated with various geological features and showing remarkably different forms. Here we report our initial attempt to spectrally characterize the areas that are distinctively brighter than their surroundings.

  18. Surface Brightness Fluctuations as Stellar Population Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Blakeslee, John P

    2009-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBF) can provide useful information about the unresolved stellar content of early-type galaxies and spiral bulges. The absolute SBF magnitude Mbar in a given passband depends on the properties of the stellar population and can be predicted by population synthesis models. SBF measurements in different bandpasses are sensitive to different evolutionary stages within the galaxy stellar population. Near-IR SBF magnitudes are sensitive to the evolution of stars wit...

  19. Bright vortex solitons in Bose Condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Sadhan K.

    2003-01-01

    We suggest the possibility of observing and studying bright vortex solitons in attractive Bose-Einstein condensates in three dimensions with a radial trap. Such systems lie on the verge of critical stability and we discuss the conditions of their stability. We study the interaction between two such solitons. Unlike the text-book solitons in one dimension, the interaction between two radially trapped and axially free three-dimensional solitons is inelastic in nature and involves exchange of pa...

  20. Bright Solitary Waves in Malignant Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-García, Víctor M.; Calvo, Gabriel F.; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Diego, D.; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We put forward a nonlinear wave model describing the fundamental physio-pathologic features of an aggressive type of brain tumors: glioblastomas. Our model accounts for the invasion of normal tissue by a proliferating and propagating rim of active glioma cancer cells in the tumor boundary and the subsequent formation of a necrotic core. By resorting to numerical simulations, phase space analysis and exact solutions, we prove that bright solitary tumor waves develop in such systems.

  1. Origin of bright flares in SFXTs

    CERN Document Server

    Postnov, K; Sidoli, L; Paizis, A

    2014-01-01

    In the settling accretion theory, which is applicable to quasi-spherical accreting slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars with X-ray luminosity $L_x\\lesssim 4\\times 10^{36}$~erg/s, bright X-ray flares ($\\sim 10^{38}-10^{40}$~ergs) observed in supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXT) may be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar-wind plasma from the early-type supergiant. At sufficiently low steady accretion rates ($\\lesssim 10^{15}$~g/s) through the shell around the neutron star magnetosphere at the settling accretion stage, magnetic reconnection can temporarily enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling, and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time scale in the shell, $R_B^{3/2}/\\sqrt{GM}\\sim 10^3-10^4$~s ($R_B$ is the classical Bondi capture radius), and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass of the shell.

  2. On the origin of facular brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Kostik, R

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the CaIIH line core brightness on the strength and inclination of photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the solar disc center. We use three simultaneous datasets obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of BaII 4554 A line registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in FeI 1.56 $\\mu$m lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in CaIIH that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the CaIIH brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, that propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature min...

  3. Search for bright stars with infrared excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright stars, stars with visual magnitude smaller than 6.5, can be studied using small telescope. In general, if stars are assumed as black body radiator, then the color in infrared (IR) region is usually equal to zero. Infrared data from IRAS observations at 12 and 25μm (micron) with good flux quality are used to search for bright stars (from Bright Stars Catalogues) with infrared excess. In magnitude scale, stars with IR excess is defined as stars with IR color m12−m25>0; where m12−m25 = −2.5log(F12/F25)+1.56, where F12 and F25 are flux density in Jansky at 12 and 25μm, respectively. Stars with similar spectral type are expected to have similar color. The existence of infrared excess in the same spectral type indicates the existence of circum-stellar dust, the origin of which is probably due to the remnant of pre main-sequence evolution during star formation or post AGB evolution or due to physical process such as the rotation of those stars

  4. The surface brightness of spiral galaxies: Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using measurements from IRAS correlations are found between optical surface brightness and both infrared-to-optical flux ratio and infrared colour temperature, in the sense that galaxies with high surface brightness have higher FIR emission and higher temperatures. (author)

  5. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  6. A pedagogical history of compactness

    OpenAIRE

    Raman-Sundström, Manya

    2010-01-01

    Compactness is a central notion in advanced mathematics, but we often teach the concept without much historical motivation.  This paper fills in many of the gaps left by the standard textbook treatment, including what motivated the definition, how did the definition evolve, and how can compactness be expressed in terms of nets and filters.

  7. The Meaning of a Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  8. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  9. Star formation and the surface brightness of spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (blue) surface brightness of spiral galaxies is significantly correlated with their Hα linewidth. This can be most plausibly interpreted as a correlation of surface brightness with star formation rate. There is also a significant difference in surface brightness between galaxies forming stars in a grand design spiral pattern and those with floc star formation regions. (author)

  10. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch

  11. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Muñoz, Roberto P; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W; Peng, Eric W; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\\!\\lesssim\\! r_{\\rm eff}/{\\rm kpc}\\! \\lesssim\\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\\!\\lesssim\\! M_U\\! \\lesssim\\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\\!\\lesssim\\! M_I\\! \\lesssim\\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\\!-\\!I)_0\\!\\simeq\\!1.1\\!-\\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\\mu_U\\!\\simeq\\!28.1\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\\mu_I\\!\\simeq\\!27.4\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\\odot} \\simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\\,Z_\\odot}\\!\\simeq\\!10^{6.3-8}\\,M_{\\odot}$. Three dwarfs are ol...

  12. Ultra-Compact Dwarfs around NGC 3258 in Antlia

    CERN Document Server

    Caso, Juan Pablo; Richtler, T; Castelli, A V Smith; Faifer, Favio; 10.1093/mnras/sts687

    2013-01-01

    We present the first compact stellar systems with luminosities in the range of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), discovered in the Antlia galaxy cluster (-10.5 < M_V < -11.6). The magnitude limit between UCDs and globular clusters (CGs) is discussed. By means of imaging from VLT (FORS1), CTIO (MOSAIC), and the HST (ACS) archive, eleven UCDs/bright GCs are selected on the basis of photometry and confirmed as Antlia members through radial velocities measured on new GEMINI (GMOS-S) spectra. In addition, nine UCD candidates are identified taking into account properties derived from their surface brightness profiles. All of them, members and candidates, are located in the proximity of NGC\\,3258, one of the two brightest elliptical galaxies in the cluster core. Antlia UCDs in this sample present absolute magnitudes fainter than M_V ~ -11.6 mag and most of them have colours within the blue GC range, falling only two within the red GC range. Effective radii measured for the ones lying on the ACS field are in the ran...

  13. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  14. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  15. Compact toroid formation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and experimental performance of a compact toroid (CT) formation experiment. The device has co-axial electrode diameters of 0.9 m (inner) and 1.25 m (outer), and an electrode length of ∼ 1.2 m, including an expansion/drift section. The CT is formed by a 0.1--0.2 Tesla initial radial magnetic field embedded co-axial puff gas discharge. The gas puff is injected with an array of 60 pulsed solenoid driven fast valves. The formation discharge is driven by a 108 microfarad, 40 to 100 KV, 86 to 540 kilojoule 2 to 5 megamp capacitor discharge with ∼ 20 nanohenry initial total discharge inductance. The hardware includes transmission line connections for a Shiva Star (1300 microfarad, up to 120 KV, 0.4 megajoule) capacitor bank driven acceleration discharge. Experimental measurements include current, voltage; azimuthal, radial and axial magnetic field at numerous location; fast photography, optical spectroscopy; microwave, CO2 laser, and He-Ne laser interferometry. Auxiliary experiments include Penning ionization gauge, pressure probe, and breakdown gas trigger diagnostics of gas injection, and Hall probe measurements of magnetic field injection

  16. Compactable reactor waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compactable reactor wastes were characterized in respect of physical composition. β/γ activity levels, radionuclide inventory, and tritium and carbon-14 content. 1072 bags of waste representing 18 bales with a volume of 9 m3 were examined. This waste is extremely heterogeneous and can contain any item or material used at nuclear generating stations. The β/γ activity level of the waste is low; at the time of manufacture the 18 bales ranged between 1.0 and 6.94 mCi most of which was attributable to radionuclides with a half-life of one year or less. After ten years' decay the activity of any bale will have decreased to a maximum of 1.5 mCi and the only β/γ radionuclides of significance will be 60Co and 137Cs. Tritium and carbon-14 were found in most of the waste bags and it is estimated that a cubic metre of waste could contain 8.4 to 11.3 Ci of tritium and 0.8 to 5.4 μCi carbon-14. It is considered there is no need for further conditioning of this waste for disposal

  17. Monitoring of bright blazars with MAGIC telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, C. C.; Satalecka, K.; Thom, M; Backes, M.; Bernardini, E.; Bonnoli, G.; Galante, N.; Goebel, F; Lindfors, E.; Majumdar, P.; Stamerra, A.; Wagner, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Blazars, a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) characterized by a close orientation of their relativistic outflows (jets) towards the line of sight, are a well established extragalactic TeV $\\gamma$-ray emitters. Since 2006, three nearby and TeV bright blazars, Markarian (Mrk) 421, Mrk 501 and 1ES 1959+650, are regularly observed by the MAGIC telescope with single exposures of 30 to 60 minutes. The sensitivity of MAGIC allows to establish a flux level of 30% of the Crab flux for each such o...

  18. The Bright Quasar 3C 273

    OpenAIRE

    Courvoisier, Thierry J. -L.

    1998-01-01

    We review the observed properties of the bright quasar 3C~273 and discuss the implications of these observations for the emission processes and in view of gaining a more global understanding of the object. Continuum and line emission are discussed. The emission from the radio domain to gamma rays are reviewed. Emphasis is given to variability studies across the spectrum as a means to gain some understanding on the relationships between the emission components. 3C~273 has a small scale jet and...

  19. Quantum bright soliton in a disorder potential

    OpenAIRE

    Sacha, K.; Delande, D; Zakrzewski, J.

    2009-01-01

    At very low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with attractive interactions tend to form a bright soliton. When exposed to a sufficiently weak external potential, the shape of the soliton is not modified, but its external motion is affected. We develop in detail the Bogoliubov approach for the problem, treating, in a non-perturbative way, the motion of the center of mass of the soliton. Quantization of this motion allows us to discuss its long time properties. In particula...

  20. A Compact Supermassive Binary Black Hole System

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, C; Zavala, R T; Peck, A B; Pollack, L K; Romani, R W

    2006-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a supermassive binary black hole system in the radio galaxy 0402+379, with a projected separation between the two black holes of just 7.3 pc. This is the closest black hole pair yet found by more than two orders of magnitude. These results are based upon recent multi-frequency observations using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) which reveal two compact, variable, flat-spectrum, active nuclei within the elliptical host galaxy of 0402+379. Multi-epoch observations from the VLBA also provide constraints on the total mass and dynamics of the system. Low spectral resolution spectroscopy using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope indicates two velocity systems with a combined mass of the two black holes of ~1.5 x 10^8 solar masses. The two nuclei appear stationary while the jets emanating from the weaker of the two nuclei appear to move out and terminate in bright hot spots. The discovery of this system has implications for the number of close binary black holes that might be sources of gravi...

  1. Selection effects in the bivariate brightness distribution for spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joint distribution of total luminosity and characteristic surface brightness (the bivariate brightness distribution) is investigated for a complete sample of spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster. The influence of selection and physical limits of various kinds on the apparent distribution are detailed. While the distribution of surface brightness for bright galaxies may be genuinely fairly narrow, faint galaxies exist right across the (quite small) range of accessible surface brightnesses so no statement can be made about the true extent of the distribution. The lack of high surface brightness bright galaxies in the Virgo sample relative to an overall RC2 sample (mostly field galaxies) supports the contention that the star-formation rate is reduced in the inner region of the cluster for environmental reasons. (author)

  2. Development of a compact FEL system and its technological applications for x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a 6MeV S-band rf linac, a compact FEL system for a wide wavelength range is being developed at ILT/ILE Osaka University. It covers radiation wavelengths from ∼10 μm to a few millimeters. A photocathode driven by a Nd:YAG laser was installed in the rf gun to improve the beam quality. The photocathode operation was investigated in detail by our simulation code. As an application of the FEL technology, study of a compact high-brightness x-ray source is in progress. Compton scattering between relativistic e-beam and laser beam generates spectrally bright x-rays. Higher harmonics generation of the scattered x-rays by nonlinear Thomson scattering is also investigated numerically. (author)

  3. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-08-01

    The Planck Collaboration has produced catalogues of radio and sub-mm compact sources at the nine Planck frequencies, Galactic cold clumps catalogues and SZ cluster catalogues. But new catalogues are foreseen. A multifrequency compact source catalogue will be produced selecting sources at radio frequencies and following them across all Planck bands. Multifrequency catalogues can be difficult to produce in experiments like Planck with a large frequency coverage and very different resolutions across bands, but the science that can be extracted from such a catalogue compensates the effort. In addition, for those sources where a clear identification can be made, we will attempt to include flux density information from Herschel and other experiments, in particular for those blazars that are bright in radio, sub-mm and even in gamma-ray frequencies, as seen by Fermi. Moreover, Planck is making available to the community the single survey frequency maps that will allow astronomers to study the long-term variability of their favourite sources. New functionalities will be added to the Planck Legacy Archive, for example a timeline-cutting tool that will allow one to extract maps from the Planck timelines for specific periods of time allowing short-term variability studies of compact sources (e.g., flares). The unique frequency coverage of Planck make these catalogues very valuable for other experiments using the Planck compact source catalogues. For example, experiments like QUIJOTE use Planck selected sources to study the impact of polarized radio source emission on their cosmological fields and other CMB experiments will use Planck polarized compact source information for calibration.

  4. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  5. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  6. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm–3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  8. At Bright Band Inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright band as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater. Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright band. Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  9. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  10. Compact, Airborne Multispecies Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer to benefit Earth science research activities. To...

  11. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  12. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  13. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  14. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  15. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  16. Compact Massive Object in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Melo, I Tosta e

    2016-01-01

    The central regions of galaxies show the presence of super massive black holes and/or very dense stellar clusters. Both objects seem to follow similar host-galaxy correlations, suggesting that they are members of the same family of Compact Massive Objects. We investigate here a huge data collection of Compact Massive Objects properties to correlate them with absolute magnitude, velocity dispersion and mass of their host galaxies.

  17. Bright and peaklike pulse solitary waves and analogy with modulational instability in an extended nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmogne, Fabien; Yemélé, David

    2013-10-01

    The modulational instability (MI) phenomenon in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) extended by two different nonlinear dispersion terms and the gradient term is investigated. We find that the possibility of instability of plane waves depends on the sign of the nonlinear dispersion parameters with regard to the linear dispersion coefficient. In contrast to the basic NLSE, the system may exhibit instability in the defocusing media for amplitude exceeding a critical value depending on the magnitude of the nonlinear dispersion. An additional feature, namely the higher order or the infinite gain band, absent in the NLSE case, may appear and in which MI induces the birth of the nonlinear localized wave (NLW) of different carrier wave numbers. The result of the qualitative investigations of the system's dynamics indicates the existence of the NLW, such as peak, bright, dark, and compact dark solitary waves which can be well predicted by the MI criteria. In addition the nonlinear dispersion induces the existence of a pair of bright-dark solitary waves which is usually exhibited by the coupled NLSEs only, and the pairs of peak-dark and compact dark-bright solitary waves. PMID:24229297

  18. New Distant Comet Headed for Bright Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    How Impressive Will Comet Hale-Bopp Become in 1997 ? A very unusual comet was discovered last month, on its way from the outer reaches of the solar system towards the Sun. Although it is still situated beyond the orbit of Jupiter, it is so bright that it can be observed in even small telescopes. It has been named `Hale-Bopp' after the discoverers and is already of great interest to cometary astronomers. No less than seven telescopes have been used at the ESO La Silla observatory for the first observations of the new object. Together with data gathered at other sites, their aim is to elucidate the nature of this comet and also to determine whether there is reason to hope that it will become a bright and beautiful object in the sky from late 1996 and well into 1997. Further observations are now being planned at ESO and elsewhere to monitor closely the behaviour of this celestial visitor during the coming months. Discovery circumstances The comet was discovered on 23 July 1995, nearly simultaneously by two American amateur astronomers, Alan Hale of Cloudcroft (New Mexico) and Thomas Bopp of Glendale (Arizona). Although the chronology is slightly uncertain, it appears that Hale first saw it some 10 - 20 minutes before Bopp, at 06:10 - 06:15 UT on that day. In any case, he informed the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT) in Cambridge (Massachussetts) about his discovery by email already at 06:50 UT, while Bopp's message was filed more than 2 hours later, after he had driven back to his home, 140 km from where he had been observing. Upon receipt of these messages, Brian Marsden at the CBAT assigned the designation `1995 O1' (indicating that it is the first comet found in the second half of July 1995). After further sightings had been made by other observers, and according to the venerable astronomical tradition, the new object was named after the discoverers. The magnitude, reported as 10.5 by Hale, is not unusual for a comet that is discovered within

  19. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  20. Modelling Solar and Stellar Brightness Variabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, K. L.; Shapiro, A. I.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance, TSI and SSI, have been measured from space since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating the observed variability by relating it to solar surface magnetism. Despite significant progress, there remains persisting controversy over the secular change and the wavelength-dependence of the variation with impact on our understanding of the Sun's influence on the Earth's climate. We highlight the recent progress in TSI and SSI modelling with SATIRE. Brightness variations have also been observed for Sun-like stars. Their analysis can profit from knowledge of the solar case and provide additional constraints for solar modelling. We discuss the recent effort to extend SATIRE to Sun-like stars.

  1. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm−2 sr−1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date

  2. Considerations for high-brightness electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators are now used in many areas of physics research and in industrial and medical applications. New uses are being studied to address major societal needs in energy production, materials research, generation of intense beams of radiation at optical and suboptical wavelengths, treatment of various kinds of waste, and so on. Many of these modern applications require a high intensity beam at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. Considerations for ion and electron accelerators are often different, but there are also many commonalties, and in fact, techniques derived for one should perhaps more often be considered for the other as well. We discuss some aspects of high-brightness electron sources here from that point of view. 6 refs

  3. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  4. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Borish, H. Jacob; Burkhardt, Andrew; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Matthews, Allison; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    We present updates from our seventh year of operation including new club content, continued assessments, and our fifth annual Star Party. Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.

  5. Moon night sky brightness simulation for the Xinglong station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a sky brightness monitor at the Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, we collected data from 22 dark clear nights and 90 moon nights. We first measured the sky brightness variation with time for dark nights and found a clear correlation between sky brightness and human activity. Then with a modified sky brightness model of moon nights and data from these nights, we derived the typical value for several important parameters in the model. With these results, we calculated the sky brightness distribution under a given moon condition for the Xinglong station. Furthermore, we simulated the sky brightness distribution of a moon night for a telescope with a 5° field of view (such as LAMOST). These simulations will be helpful for determining the limiting magnitude and exposure time, as well as planning the survey for LAMOST during moon nights

  6. High brightness laser source based on polarization coupling of two diode lasers with asymmetric feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Chi, M.; Sass, B.; Petersen, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we show that polarization coupling and asymmetric diode-laser feedback can be used to combine two diode-laser beams with low spatial coherence into a single beam with high spatial coherence. The coupled laser source is based on two similar laser systems each consisting of a 1 mumx......200 mum broad area laser diode applied with a specially designed feedback circuit. When operating at two times threshold, 50% of the freely running system output power is obtained in a single beam with an M-2 beam quality factor of 1.6+/-0.1, whereas the M-2 values of the two freely running diode...... lasers are 29+/-1 and 34+/-1, respectively. (C) 2003 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Annular bright and dark field imaging of soft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here polyethylene, as an example of an important soft material, was studied by STEM annular bright and dark field. The contrast as function of the probe size/shape and the detector collection angle are discussed. The results are compared to conventional bright field transmission electron microscopy, electron energy filtered imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping. Annular bright and dark field gave a higher contrast than conventional transmission and analytical mapping techniques

  8. Research on Brightness Measurement of Intense Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Huang; Yang, GuoJun; Li, YiDing; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The mostly research fasten on high emission density of injector to study electron beam's brightness in LIA. Using the injector(2MeV) was built to research brightness of multi-pulsed high current(KA) electron beam, and researchs three measurement method (the pepper-pot method, beam collimator without magnetic field, beam collimator with magnetic field method) to detect beam's brightness with time-resolved measurement system.

  9. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, C.; Grandi, N.; Klimas, P.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Wereszczyński, A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  10. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Klimas, P; Sánchez-Guillén, J; Wereszczynski, A

    2009-01-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  11. INVESTIGATION ON THE CAUSES OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP BRIGHTNESS REVERSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kátia M. M. Eiras; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Ana Márcia M. L. Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Some high brightness eucalyptus Kraft pulps have shown poor brightness stability. In most cases, the causes have notbeen identified and permanent solutions have not been found. This work focused on evaluating the brightness stability profile of pulpsbleached by in sequences such as O(DC)(PO)DD, O(DC)(PO)DP, OD(PO)DD, OD(PO)DP, ODHT(PO)DD, ODHT(PO)DP, OA/D(PO)DD, OA/D(PO)DP, OAD(PO)DD and O(Ze)D(PO). Brightness stability tests induced by according to Tappi UM200 procedureon samples bleached to...

  12. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When viewing three-dimensional (3D images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the photographic principle is used in this study to measure metering values by capturing 2D and 3D images on television screens. By analyzing these images with statistical product and service solutions (SPSS software, the image brightness values can be estimated using the statistical regression model, which can also indicate the impact of various environmental factors or hardware on the image brightness. In analysis of the experimental results, comparison of the image brightness between 2D and 3D images indicates 60.8% degradation in the 3D image brightness amplitude. The experimental values, from 52.4% to 69.2%, are within the 95% confidence interval

  13. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  14. Co-compact Gabor Systems on Locally Compact Abelian Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    characterization results via the Zak transform. From these results we derive non-existence results for critically sampled continuous Gabor frames. We obtain general characterizations in time and in frequency domain of when two Gabor generators yield dual frames. Moreover, we prove the Walnut and Janssen......-compact subgroups. Our results only rely on the assumption that either one of the translation and modulation group (in some cases both) are co-compact subgroups of the time and frequency domain. This presentation offers a unified approach to the study of continuous and the discrete Gabor frames....

  15. Probing the Environment of Accreting Compact Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    X-ray binaries are the topic of this thesis. They consist of a compact object -- a black hole or a neutron star -- and an ordinary star, which loses matter to the compact object. The gravitational energy released through this process of mass accretion is largely converted into X-rays. The latter are used in the present work to screen the environment of the compact object. The main focus in the case of a massive star is on its wind, which is not homogeneous, but may display structures in form of temperature and density variations. Since great importance is, in multiple respects, attached to stellar winds in astrophysics, there is large interest in general to understand these structures more thoroughly. In particular for X-ray binaries, whose compact object obtains matter from the wind of its companion star, the state of the wind can decisively influence mass accretion and its related radiation processes. A detailed introduction to the fundamentals of stellar winds, compact objects, accretion and radiation processes in X-ray binaries, as well as to the employed instruments and analysis methods, is given in chapter 1. The focus of this investigation is on Cygnus X-1, a binary system with a black hole and a blue supergiant, which form a persistently very bright X-ray source because of accretion from the stellar wind. It had been known for a long time that this source -- when the black hole is seen through the dense stellar wind -- often displays abrupt absorption events whose origin is suspected to be in clumps in the wind. More detailed physical properties of these clumps and of the wind in general are explored in this work. Observations that were specifically acquired for this study, as well as archival data from different satellite observatories, are analyzed in view of signatures of the wind and its fine structures. These results are presented in chapter 2. In a first part of the analysis, the statistical distribution of the brightness of Cyg X-1, as measured since

  16. The relation between isolated tree brightness temperature and grass background brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusinger, A. E.

    1983-08-01

    This study involves thermal infrared measurement for the determination of the diurnal and seasonal aspects of the relations between isolated evergreen tress and a cut grass background and between a large truck brightness temperature and cut grass, uncut grass, and bare soil backgrounds. Seasonal changes in the tree brightness temperature-background brightness temperature contrast ranged from 4 to 5 C in February and March to 1 to 2 C in July. At night, the thermal contrast between trees and background was found to vary inversely with long wave incoming radiation, which is a measure of cloudiness. A study of the change in the thermal contrast during the night showed that, during clear weather, the contrast was at a peak a few hours after sundown and decreased the rest of the night. In overcast conditions, a reduced contrast peak occurred at sundown and very gradually diminished through the night. Isothermal conditions were found to occur in the early mornings, and the time of these occurrences changed seasonally, in a systematic manner.

  17. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, logg. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure logg to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex (Bastien et al. 2013). Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag<13) candidate planet-hosting stars with Teff=4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, an astrophysical bias exists that contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50%...

  18. Gravitational waves from compact bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S

    1995-01-01

    A review is given of recent research on gravitational waves from compact bodies and its relevance to the LIGO/VIRGO international network of high-frequency (10 to 10,000 Hz) gravitational-wave detectors, and to the proposed LISA system of low-frequency (0.1 to 0.0001 Hz) detectors. The sources that are reviewed are ordinary binary star systems, binaries made from compact bodies (black holes and neutron stars), the final inspiral and coalescence of compact-body binaries, the inspiral of stars and small black holes into massive black holes, the stellar core collapse that triggers supernovae, and the spin of neutron stars. This paper is adapted from a longer review article entitled ``Gravitational Waves'' (GRP-411) that the author has written for the Proceedings of the Snowmass '94 Summer Study on Particle and Nuclear Astrophysics and Cosmology.

  19. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  20. New engineering ceramic has a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fabrication of silicon carbide is described which has very high resistance to thermal stress and thermal shock, exceptional resistance to corrosion, high resistance to wear, improved mechanical strength and absolute impermeability. It is made by a proprietary reaction bonding technique in which a cold-compacted body of alpha-SiC and graphite powders is heated in contact with liquid silicon which impregnates the body, converting the graphite to beta-SiC which bonds the original alpha grains. Physical and mechanical properties of the new product (registered trade mark REFEL) are compared with those of other materials. Diamond machining is used to obtain a high accuracy and surface finish on precision components. (U.K.)

  1. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy.Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The

  2. Multi-spectral study of a new sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Doublier, V; Comte, G

    1999-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.124, no.3, p.405-24 (1997). We present the results of surface photometry on a new sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs), in continuation to a previous paper (Doublier et al. 1997). The 22 galaxies $9 (plus two companions) discussed in the present paper have been selected in the Southern Hemisphere, from several lists. An atlas containing isophotal maps, surface brightnesses and B-R color profiles of the sample is given, together $9 with the tables containing the photometric parameters. The results are consistent with those for objects selected from the Byurakan surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. Similarly, we find about one fourth of the BCDGs showing a $9 dominant r/sup 1/4/ brightness distribution component, one fourth of the BCDGs showing a dominant exponential surface brightness profile, and about half of them show composite brightness distributions. Integrated properties, colors, $9 mean surface brightnesses and luminosity-radius relations are investigated and discussed f...

  3. Compactly supported multi-wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Banaś

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show some construction of compactly supported multi-wavelets in \\(L^2(\\mathbb{R}^d\\, \\(d \\geq 2\\ which is based on the one-dimensional case, when \\(d=1\\. We also demonstrate that some methods, which are useful in the construction of wavelets with a compact support at \\(d=1\\, can be adapted to higher-dimensional cases if \\(A \\in M_{d \\times d}(\\mathbb{Z}\\ is an expansive matrix of a special form.

  4. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  5. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  6. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  7. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  8. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a catalogue of sources observed over the entire sky at nine different frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz. It consists of Galactic and extragalactic objects detected in the Planck single-frequency full mission total intensity maps. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two sub·catalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location ...

  9. Dark and bright vortex solitons in electromagnetically induced transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that dark and bright vortex solitons can exist in three-state electromagnetically induced transparent media under some appropriate conditions. We also analyse the stability of the dark and bright vortex solitons. This work may provide other research opportunities in nonlinear optical experiments and may result in a substantial impact on technology

  10. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nangle, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  11. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  12. Intercomparisons of Nine Sky Brightness Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Spoelstra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across the Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from −16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and −7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m2 on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m2 on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  13. Bright visible light emission from graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Duck; Kim, Hakseong; Cho, Yujin; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Pilkwang; Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Sunwoo; Li, Yilei; Park, Seung-Nam; Shim Yoo, Yong; Yoon, Duhee; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Pop, Eric; Heinz, Tony F.; Hone, James; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Sang Wook; Bae, Myung-Ho; Park, Yun Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here, we report the observation of bright visible light emission from electrically biased suspended graphene devices. In these devices, heat transport is greatly reduced. Hot electrons (˜2,800 K) therefore become spatially localized at the centre of the graphene layer, resulting in a 1,000-fold enhancement in thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be used to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realization of commercially viable large-scale, atomically thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low operation voltage and graphene-based on-chip ultrafast optical communications.

  14. Antilensing: the bright side of voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Clarkson, Chris; Maartens, Roy; Bacon, David; Meures, Nikolai; Beynon, Emma

    2013-01-11

    More than half of the volume of our Universe is occupied by cosmic voids. The lensing magnification effect from those underdense regions is generally thought to give a small dimming contribution: objects on the far side of a void are supposed to be observed as slightly smaller than if the void were not there, which together with conservation of surface brightness implies net reduction in photons received. This is predicted by the usual weak lensing integral of the density contrast along the line of sight. We show that this standard effect is swamped at low redshifts by a relativistic Doppler term that is typically neglected. Contrary to the usual expectation, objects on the far side of a void are brighter than they would be otherwise. Thus the local dynamics of matter in and near the void is crucial and is only captured by the full relativistic lensing convergence. There are also significant nonlinear corrections to the relativistic linear theory, which we show actually underpredicts the effect. We use exact solutions to estimate that these can be more than 20% for deep voids. This remains an important source of systematic errors for weak lensing density reconstruction in galaxy surveys and for supernovae observations, and may be the cause of the reported extra scatter of field supernovae located on the edge of voids compared to those in clusters. PMID:23383886

  15. Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Brightness Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G.; Stern, S.; Egan, A. F.; Miles, P. F.; Parker, J. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Versteeg, M. H.; Feldman, P. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an ultraviolet (UV) spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that is designed to map the lunar albedo at far-UV wavelengths. LAMP primarily measures interplanetary Hydrogen Lyman-alpha sky-glow and far-UV starlight reflected from the night-side lunar surface, including permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the poles. Dayside observations are also obtained. Brightness maps sorted by wavelength (including the Lyman-alpha wavelength of 121.6 nm) are reported for the polar regions, with a few regions of interest reported in more detail. LAMP's spectral range of 58 nm to 196 nm includes a water ice spectral feature near 160 nm, which provides a diagnostic tool for detecting water on the lunar surface that is complementary to recent discoveries using infrared and radio frequency techniques. Progress towards producing far-UV albedo maps and searching for water ice signatures will be reported. We'll discuss how LAMP data may address questions regarding how water is formed on the moon, transported through the lunar atmosphere, and deposited in the PSRs.

  16. Chromatic variations suppress suprathreshold brightness variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Bell, Jason; Gheorghiu, Elena; Malkoc, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Most objects in natural scenes are suprathreshold in both color (chromatic) and luminance contrast. How salient is each dimension? We have developed a novel method employing a stimulus similar to that used by B. C. Regan and J. D. Mollon (1997) who studied the relative saliencies of the two chromatic cardinal directions. Our stimuli consist of left- and right-oblique modulations of color and/or luminance defined within a lattice of circles. In the "separated" condition, the two modulations were presented separately as forced-choice pairs, and the task was to indicate which was more salient. In the "combined" condition, the two orthogonal-in-orientation modulations were added, and the task was to indicate the more salient orientation. The ratio of color to luminance contrast at the PSE was calculated for both conditions. Across color directions, 48% more luminance contrast relative to color contrast was required to achieve a PSE in the "combined" compared to the "separated" condition. A second experiment showed that the PSE difference was due to the luminance being masked by the color, rather than due to superior color grouping. We conclude that suprathreshold brightness variations are masked by suprathreshold color variations. PMID:20884478

  17. Energy balance in a bright active prominence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transitions between ten levels and hydrogen atom continuum and 4S, 3D, 4P, Ca+ terms in a bright active prominence are considered. The role of electron impacts and solar radiation scattering taking account of optical thicknesses in all frequencies is considered. It has been found that hydrogen atoms and calcium ions radiate approximately equal amount of energy: 2.4x107 and 1.3x107 erg/cm2xs., respectively. The hydrogen atom radiation is by 2/3 due to solar radiation scattering, the contribution of the scattered radiation for various series and separate lines being unequal. The radiation in the n, k lines and in Ca+ infrared lines is almost completely ensured by electron impacts. Only the tenth part of the necessary energy is added on account of the solar radiation absorption. The total prominence radiation is half ensured due to solar radiation scattering. Approximately the same amount of energ is taken from the electron gas. The higher is q, the more significant becomes the role of electron impacts in hydrogen atom excitation and ionization. The q prominence duty factor value is near to unity

  18. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Sandra; Troup, Nicholas William; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Barcos-Munoz, Loreto D.; Beaton, Rachael; Bittle, Lauren; Borish, Henry J.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dean, Janice; Hancock, Danielle; King, Jennie; Prager, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Wenger, Trey; Zucker, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Now entering our sixth year of operation, Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts beyond Virginia's Standards of Learning. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.DSBK has amassed over 15,000 contact hours since 2009 and we continue to broaden our impact. One important step we have taken in the past year is to establish a graduate student led assessment program to identify and implement directed learning goals for DSBK outreach. The collection of student workbooks, observations, and volunteer surveys indicates broad scale success for the program both in terms of student learning and their perception of science. The data also reveal opportunities to improve our organizational and educational practices to maximize student achievement and overall volunteer satisfaction for DSBK's future clubs and outreach endeavors.

  19. Magnetic flux supplement to coronal bright points

    CERN Document Server

    Mou, Chaozhou; Xia, Lidong; Madjarska, Maria S; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong

    2015-01-01

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here, we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyse longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 A passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs' lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hours. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely emergence, convergence and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of a MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of a MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 \\AA\\ passband varie...

  20. Longitudinal Spatial Coherence Analysis Based on the Interpretation of the Fringes of Equal Thickness and its Practical Application for the Surface Profilometry%基于等厚干涉的轴向空间相干度分析及其在表面形状测量中的可行性探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段志辉; GolkherMark; 等

    2002-01-01

    Based on the interpretation for the fringes of equal thickness, we proposed the two dimensional longitudinal spatial coherence function. By manipulating the irradiance of an extended quasi-monochromatic spatially incoherent source with a spatial light modulator, we generated a special optical field that exhibits high coherence selectively for a specified location along the optical propagation axis and a specified inclination between the two mirrors. We proved the feasibility of the proposed principle for the application through measuring a real object with the standard step. In particular, we proposed a new phase shift technique without mechanical movement. The quantitative experimental proof of the principle is presented.%从等厚干涉的解释出发,推导出了二维空间的相干方程.基于空间相干方程,利用SLM产生了一个新的空间非相干光源.同时提出了新的相移方案,并结合这个新的相移方案,实现了轴向空间距离的探测和干涉条纹的相移.分析了空间方向角对相干方程的影响,并给出了实验验证.通过对非相干光源的参数和特定的空间距离以及空间方向角的匹配,重建了一个具有标准段差的实际物体的表面形状.为光学表面形状测量提供了新的思路.

  1. RADIO AND MID-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF COMPACT STARBURSTS: DISTANCING THEMSELVES FROM THE MAIN SEQUENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relationship between 8.44 GHz brightness temperatures and 1.4 to 8.44 GHz radio spectral indices with 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission and 9.7 μm silicate absorption features for a sample of 36 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We find that galaxies having small 6.2 μm PAH equivalent widths (EQWs), which signal the presence of weak PAH emission and/or an excess of very hot dust, also have flat spectral indices. The three active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified through their excessively large 8.44 GHz brightness temperatures are also identified as AGN via their small 6.2 μm PAH EQWs. We also find that the flattening of the radio spectrum increases with increasing silicate optical depth, 8.44 GHz brightness temperature, and decreasing size of the radio source even after removing potential AGN, supporting the idea that compact starbursts show spectral flattening as the result of increased free-free absorption. These correlations additionally suggest that the dust obscuration in these galaxies must largely be coming from the vicinity of the compact starburst itself, and is not distributed throughout the (foreground) disk of the galaxy. Finally, we investigate the location of these infrared-bright systems relative to the main sequence (star formation rate versus stellar mass) of star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We find that the radio spectral indices of galaxies flatten with increasing distance above the main sequence, or in other words, with increasing specific star formation rate. This indicates that galaxies located above the main sequence, having high specific star formation rates, are typically compact starbursts hosting deeply embedded star formation that becomes more optically thick in the radio and infrared with increased distance above the main sequence.

  2. Intrinsic brightness temperatures of blazar jets at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovatta Talvikki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to deconvolve light curves of blazars into individual flares, including proper estimation of the fit errors. We use the method to fit 15GHzlight curves obtained within the OVRO 40-m blazar monitoring program where a large number of AGN have been monitored since 2008 in support of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope mission. The time scales obtained from the fitted models are used to calculate the variability brightness temperature of the sources. Additionally, we have calculated brightness temperatures of a sample of these objects using Very Long Baseline Array data from the MOJAVE survey. Combining these two data sets enables us to study the intrinsic brightness temperature distribution in these blazars at 15 GHz. Our preliminary results indicate that the mean intrinsic brightness temperature in a sample of 14 sources is near the equipartition brightness temperature of ~ 1011K.

  3. A compact Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Yang, Wen-Hai; Zheng, Yao-Hui; Peng, Kun-Chi

    2015-07-01

    We present a stable entangled light source that integrates the pump laser, entanglement generator, detectors, and electronic control systems. By optimizing the design of the mechanical elements and the optical path, the size of the source is minimized, and the quantum correlations over 6 dB can be directly provided by the entangled source. The compact and stable entangled light source is suitable for practical applications in quantum information science and technology. The presented protocol provides a useful reference for manufacturing products of bright entangled light sources. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61227015) and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China.

  4. Tidal Tails in Interacting Galaxies: Formation of Compact Stellar Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mullan, B; Konstantopoulos, I S; Bastian, N; Chandar, R; Durrell, P R; Elmegreen, D; English, J; Gallagher, S C; Gronwall, C; Hibbard, J E; Hunsberger, S; Johnson, K E; Kepley, A; Knierman, K; Koribalski, B; Lee, K H; Maybhate, A; Palma, C; Vacca, W D

    2009-01-01

    We have used V- and I- band images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to identify compact stellar clusters within the tidal tails of twelve different interacting galaxies. The seventeen tails within our sample span a physical parameter space of HI/stellar masses, tail pressure and density through their diversity of tail lengths, optical brightnesses, mass ratios, HI column densities, stage on the Toomre sequence, and tail kinematics. Our preliminary findings in this study indicate that star cluster demographics of the tidal tail environment are compatible with the current understanding of star cluster formation in quiescent systems, possibly only needing changes in certain parameters or normalization of the Schechter cluster initial mass function (CIMF) to replicate what we observe in color-magnitude diagrams and a brightest absolute magnitude -- log N plot.

  5. Recent progress of the compact AFEL at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Free Electron Laser (AFEL) is a compact, infrared, rf-linac FEL that uses a high-brightness photoinjector and a short-period permanent-magnet wiggler. Lasing at saturation with and without sidebands has been achieved over the 4--6 μm region with a nominally 15-MeV electron beam energy and a 1-cmperiod, 24-period wiggler. Sideband-free FEL operation was optimized with respect to outcoupling by tuning off the reflectivity curve of the multilayer dielectric mirrors. Sideband operation was achieved using copper mirrors with a 1.1% outcoupling hole. The measured macropulse energy with ∼1300 micropulses was approximately 50 mJ per 1 nC of beam, corresponding to an output efficiency of 0.25% and a maximum extraction efficiency of 1.4%

  6. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  7. JACKSON'S THEOREM FOR COMPACT GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Vaezi; S. F. Rzaev

    2002-01-01

    In this article we consider the generalized shift operator defined by(Sh.f)(g) = ∫Gf (tut-1g)dton compact group G and by help of this operator we define "Spherical" modulus of continuity. So we proveStechkin and Jackson type theorems.

  8. Properties of dynamically compacted WIPP salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic compaction of mine-run salt is being investigated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), where compacted salt is being considered for repository sealing applications. One large-scale and two intermediate-scale dynamic compaction demonstrations were conducted. Initial fractional densities of the compacted salt range form 0.85 to 0.90, and permeabilities vary. Dynamically-compacted specimens were further consolidated in the laboratory by application of hydrostatic pressure. Permeability as a function of density was determined, and consolidation microprocesses were studied. Experimental results, in conjunction with modeling results, indicate that the compacted salt will function as a viable seal material

  9. Interpolation of compact non-linear operators

    OpenAIRE

    Bento AJG

    2000-01-01

    Let and be two Banach couples and let be a continuous map such that is a Lipschitz compact operator and is a Lipschitz operator. We prove that if is also compact or is continuously embedded in or is continuously embedded in , then is also a compact operator when and . We also investigate the behaviour of the measure of non-compactness under real interpolation and obtain best possible compactness results of Lions–Peetre type for non-linear operators. A two-sided compactness r...

  10. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  11. Brightness-equalized quantum dots: Engineering strategies derived from spectral trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Lim, Sung Jun

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that absorb and emit light at wavelengths tunable by the size of the crystal. Size-tuning provides access to a broad range of optical spectra, however it is fundamentally problematic for many applications because it leads to a large mismatch in absorption cross-section and fluorescence brightness across a series of colors. We have recently demonstrated engineering strategies to generate multicolor, extinction-matched, and brightness-matched quantum dots based on colloidal multi-domain core/shell structures. We use alloyed cores with composition-tunable bandgaps and finely adjust the domain size and electronic properties of the shell to precisely match both absorption cross-section and quantum yield. Using this strategy, it is possible to tune fluorescence wavelength, extinction, and quantum yield independently, vastly expanding the photophysical landscape of these materials. Moreover compared with conventional size-tuning strategies, this enables access to a wider spectral range with compact dimensions. The equalized optical properties translate from the ensemble level down to the single-molecule level, setting the stage for new possibilities in highly quantitative, multiplexed imaging in cells and tissue. However selection of appropriate structural parameters to generate specific optical properties is challenging without insight into the photophysics of these materials. Here we describe the evolution of the optical properties of alloyed cores during the shell growth process that provide new insights into general engineering strategies.

  12. Dark Skies, Bright Kids: Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Johnson, K.; Lynch, R.; Walker, L.; Beaton, R.; Corby, J.; de Messieres, G.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Jackson, L.; Kingery, A.; Layman, S.; Murphy, E.; Richardson, W.; Ries, P.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G.; Sokal, K.; Trammell, G.; Whelan, D.; Yang, A.; Zasowski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) outreach program brings astronomy education into local elementary schools in central Virginia's Southern Albemarle County through an after-school club. Taking advantage of the unusually dark night skies in the rural countryside, DSBK targets economically disadvantaged schools that tend to be underserved due to their rural locale. The goals of DSBK are to foster children's natural curiosity, demonstrate that science is a fun and creative process, challenge students' conceptions of what a scientist is and does, and teach some basic astronomy. Furthermore, DSBK works to assimilate families into students' education by holding family observing nights at the school. Now in its third semester, DSBK has successfully run programs at two schools with very diverse student populations. Working with these students has helped us to revise our activities and to create new ones. A by-product of our work has been the development of lesson plans, complete with learning goals and detailed instructions, that we make publically available on our website. This year we are expanding our repertoire with our new planetarium, which allows us to visualize topics in novel ways and supplements family observing on cloudy nights. The DSBK volunteers have also created a bilingual astronomy artbook --- designed, written, and illustrated by UVa students --- that we will publish and distribute to elementary schools in Virginia. Our book debuted at the last AAS winter meeting, and since then it has been extensively revised and updated with input from many individuals, including parents, professional educators, and a children's book author. Because the club is currently limited to serving a few elementary schools, this book will be part of our efforts to broaden our impact by bringing astronomy to schools we cannot go to ourselves and reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities at the same time.

  13. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R. L.; Borish, J.; Corby, J. F.; Dorsey, G.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Prager, B. J.; Ries, P. A.; Romero, C. E.; Sokal, K. R.; Tang, X.; Walker, L. M.; Yang, A. J.; Zasowski, G.

    2012-01-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a program that brings astronomy education to elementary schools throughout central Virginia. In a relaxed, out-of-classroom atmosphere, we are able to foster the innate curiosity that young students have about science and the world around them. We target schools that are under-served due to their rural locale or special needs students, demonstrating that science is a fun and creative process to a segment of the population that might not otherwise be exposed to astronomy. Families are included in the learning experience during semi-annual `star parties'. Since last January, we have expanded the breadth and depth of our educational capabilities. We have developed new programs for use in our digital planetarium. We held the first Central Virginia Star Party, providing an atmosphere where local children from multiple schools were able to share their love for astronomy. Local government and University officials were also invited so that they could experience our focused science outreach. Most recently, we have become part of Ivy Creek School's Club Day activities, bringing our program to a new segment of the elementary school system in Albemarle County: those that have `low-incidence' disabilities, requiring special attention. We continue to develop a curriculum for after-school programs that functions as either a series of one-time activities or several months of focused outreach at one school. Many of these activities are provided on our website, http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/, for the wider astronomical community, including the new planetarium work. We have extended our book project to include two bilingual astronomy books called `Snapshots of the Universe,' one in Spanish and English, the other in French and English. These books introduce young people to some of the many wonders of the Universe through art and captions developed by DSBK volunteers.

  14. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Brian; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Bittle, L.; Borish, H.; Burkhardt, A.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Graninger, D.; Lauck, T.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Romero, C.; Sokal, K. R.; Stierwalt, S.; Walker, L.; Wenger, T.; Zucker, C.

    2014-01-01

    Our public outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) fosters science literacy in Virginia by bringing a hands-on approach to astronomy that engages children's natural excitement and curiosity. We are an entirely volunteer-run group based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia and we enthusiastically utilize astronomy as a 'gateway science.' We create long-term relationships with students during an 8 to 10 week long, after-school astronomy club at under served elementary schools in neighboring counties, and we visited 3 different schools in 2013. Additionally, we organize and participate in science events throughout the community. The fifth year of DSBK was marked by surpassing 10,000 contact hours in Spring 2013 Semester and by ringing in the fall semester with our biggest, most successful star party to date. We hosted the Third Annual Central Virginia Star Party, free and open to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Nearly four hundred people of all ages attended, double the number from previous years. Joining with local astronomical societies, we offered an enlightening and exciting night with resources rarely accessible to the public, such as an IR camera and a portable planetarium. With numerous telescopes pointed at the sky, and a beautifully clear night with views of the Milky Way, the International Space Station, and numerous meteors, the star party was a fantastic opportunity to introduce many of our guests to the natural wonders of our night sky and enjoy some of the darkest skies on the eastern seaboard.

  15. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Borish, J.; Crawford, S. B.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Jackson, L.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Prager, B.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Walker, L.; Whelan, D. G.; Zucker, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to engage young children's natural excitement and curiosity, the outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to elementary schools in Virginia. We hope to enhance children's view and understanding of science while exploring the Universe using fun activities. DSBK focuses on rural and underserved schools in Albemarle County and offers a semester-long astronomy club for third through fifth grade students. We believe regular interactions foster personal relationships between students and volunteers that encourage a life-long interest in science. In our fourth year of hosting clubs, we returned to Ivy Creek Elementary School, where we saw wonderful responses from a special group of students with `low-incidence' disabilities. DSBK has grown to realize a broader reach beyond local astronomy clubs; we hope to ignite a spark of interest in astronomy and science more widely- in more children, their families, and their teachers. We also hosted the Second Annual Central Virginia Star Party with an open invitation to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Throughout the year, DSBK now holds 'one-off' programs (akin to astronomy field days) for elementary schools and children's groups throughout Virginia. Furthermore, we are in the final stages of a project to create two bilingual astronomy books called "Snapshots of the Universe", in Spanish and French with English translations. This art book will be made available online and we are working to get a copy in every elementary school in the state. DSBK has begun to reach out to elementary school teachers in order to provide them with useful and engaging classroom material. We have adapted our volunteer-created activities into useful and ready-to-use lessons, available online. After improvements based on research through interactions and feedback from teachers, we have explicitly identified the learning goals in terms of Virginia's Standards of Learning

  16. Sequential normal compactness versur topological normal compactness in variational analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabian, Marián; Mordukhovich, B. S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2003), s. 1057-1067. ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/01/1198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : variational analysis * sequential and topological normal compactness * Banach spaces Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.354, year: 2003

  17. The lowest spatial frequency channel determines brightness perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, A; Morrone, M C

    2007-05-01

    This study investigates the role played by individual spatial scales in determining the apparent brightness of greyscale patterns. We measured the perceived difference in brightness across an edge in the presence of notch filtering and high-pass filtering for two stimulus configurations, one that elicits the perception of transparency and one that appears opaque. For both stimulus configurations, the apparent brightness of the surfaces delimited by the border decreased monotonically with progressive (ideal) high-pass filtering, with a critical cut-off at 1 c/deg. Using two octave ideal notch filtering, the maximum detrimental effect on apparent brightness was observed at about 1c/deg. Critical frequencies for apparent brightness did not vary with contrast, viewing distance, or surface size, suggesting that apparent brightness is determined by the channel tuned at 1 c/deg. Modelling the data with the local energy model [Morrone, M. C., & Burr, D. C. (1988). Feature detection in human vision: a phase dependent energy model. Proceedings of the Royal Society (London), B235, 221-245] at 1c/deg confirmed the suggestion that this channel mediates apparent brightness for both opaque and transparent borders, with no need for pooling or integration across spatial channels. PMID:17395237

  18. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  19. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from undulators and bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the maximum of the Wigner distribution (WD) of synchrotron radiation (SR) fields as a possible definition of SR source brightness. Such figure of merit was originally introduced in the SR community by Kim. The brightness defined in this way is always positive and, in the geometrical optics limit, can be interpreted as maximum density of photon flux in phase space. For undulator and bending magnet radiation from a single electron, the WD function can be explicitly calculated. In the case of an electron beam with a finite emittance the brightness is given by the maximum of the convolution of a single electron WD function and the probability distribution of the electrons in phase space. In the particular case when both electron beam size and electron beam divergence dominate over the diffraction size and the diffraction angle, one can use a geometrical optics approach. However, there are intermediate regimes when only the electron beam size or the electron beam divergence dominate. In this asymptotic cases the geometrical optics approach is still applicable, and the brightness definition used here yields back once more the maximum photon flux density in phase space. In these intermediate regimes we find a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and the approximation for undulator brightness currently used in literature. We extend the WD formalism to a satisfactory theory for the brightness of a bending magnet. We find that in the intermediate regimes the usually accepted approximation for bending magnet brightness turns out to be inconsistent even parametrically.

  20. Tank farms compacted low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the process of Low-Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report

  1. Warm compaction powder metallurgy of Cu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NGAI Tungwai Leo; WANG Shang-lin; LI Yuan-yuan; ZHOU Zho-yao; CHEN Wei-ping

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out using different admixed lubricant contents,different compaction pressures and temperatures in order to study the warm compaction of copper powder.Results show that too much admixed lubricant will lead to the squeeze out of the lubricant from the compact during the warm compaction processing of Cu powder.Results also show that blisters can be found in sintered samples that contain lubricant less than 0.15% (mass fraction).Optimal warm compaction parameters for producing high density powder metallurgy copper material are obtained.Compacts with green density of 8.6 g/cm3 and a sintered density of 8.83 g/cm3 can be produced by warm compacting the Cu powder,which contains 0.2% admixed lubricant,and is compacted at 145 ℃ with a pressure of 700 Mpa.

  2. Special issue on compact x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Simon; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Rosenzweig, James

    2014-04-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on compact x-ray sources, to appear in the winter of 2014, and invites you to submit a paper. The potential for high-brilliance x- and gamma-ray sources driven by advanced, compact accelerators has gained increasing attention in recent years. These novel sources—sometimes dubbed 'fifth generation sources'—will build on the revolutionary advance of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). New radiation sources of this type have widespread applications, including in ultra-fast imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic medicine, and studies of matter under extreme conditions. Rapid advances in compact accelerators and in FEL techniques make this an opportune moment to consider the opportunities which could be realized by bringing these two fields together. Further, the successful development of compact radiation sources driven by compact accelerators will be a significant milestone on the road to the development of high-gradient colliders able to operate at the frontiers of particle physics. Thus the time is right to publish a peer-reviewed collection of contributions concerning the state-of-the-art in: advanced and novel acceleration techniques; sophisticated physics at the frontier of FELs; and the underlying and enabling techniques of high brightness electron beam physics. Interdisciplinary research connecting two or more of these fields is also increasingly represented, as exemplified by entirely new concepts such as plasma based electron beam sources, and coherent imaging with fs-class electron beams. We hope that in producing this special edition of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (iopscience.iop.org/0953-4075/) we may help further a challenging mission and ongoing intellectual adventure: the harnessing of newly emergent, compact advanced accelerators to the creation of new, agile light sources with unprecedented capabilities

  3. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  4. THE CATALOG OF POSITIONS OF OPTICALLY BRIGHT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES OBRS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. >-100 was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3-7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  5. Bright Laser-Driven Neutron Source Based on the Relativistic Transparency of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrons are unique particles to probe samples in many fields of research ranging from biology to material sciences to engineering and security applications. Access to bright, pulsed sources is currently limited to large accelerator facilities and there has been a growing need for compact sources over the recent years. Short pulse laser driven neutron sources could be a compact and relatively cheap way to produce neutrons with energies in excess of 10 MeV. For more than a decade experiments have tried to obtain neutron numbers sufficient for applications. Our recent experiments demonstrated an ion acceleration mechanism based on the concept of relativistic transparency. Using this new mechanism, we produced an intense beam of high energy (up to 170 MeV) deuterons directed into a Be converter to produce a forward peaked neutron flux with a record yield, on the order of 1010n/sr. We present results comparing the two acceleration mechanisms and the first short pulse laser generated neutron radiograph.

  6. Powder compaction in systems of bimodal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The compaction of mixtures involving different particle sizes is discussed. The various stages of the compaction process include the rearrangement of particles, the filling of the interstices of the large particles by the smaller ones, and the change in particle size and shape upon further densification through the application of pressure. Experimental approaches and equipment used for compacting material are discussed together with the theoretical relations of the compacting process.

  7. UV written compact broadband optical couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael

    In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques.......In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques....

  8. Lamp spectrum and spatial brightness at photopic levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Atli, Deniz; Cheal, Chris; Houser, Kevin; Logadóttir, Ásta

    2015-01-01

    lower illuminance with potential reductions in energy consumption. Consideration of experimental design was used to review 70 studies of spatial brightness. Of these, the 19 studies considered to provide credible evidence of SPD effects were used to explore metrics for predicting the effect of SPD but......Light sources are available in a variety of spectral power distributions (SPDs) and this affects spatial brightness in a manner not predicted by quantities such as illuminance. Tuning light source SPD to better match the sensitivity of visual perception may allow the same spatial brightness but at...

  9. First magnitude a book of the bright sky

    CERN Document Server

    Kaler, James B

    2012-01-01

    "First Magnitude" is an entry-level book for readers with brightly lit skies. Its purpose is to show them that all is not lost, that they can still enjoy personal astronomy and have an appreciation of the heavens no matter where they live. It concentrates on the Sun, Moon, the five bright planets, and on the 23 brightest stars, which are visible from just about anywhere. The book concludes with bright ephemeral phenomena: meteors, comets, and exploding stars. The concept is a platform for introducing the reader to the wonders of the nighttime and daytime skies and serves as an introduction to

  10. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  11. Technology of compact fusion-reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An identification of future engineering needs of compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power is presented. After describing a rationale for the compact approach and a number of compact fusion reactors, key technology needs are assessed relative to the similar needs of the conventional tokamak in order to emphasize differences in required technology with respect to the well-documented mainline approaches

  12. Remnants of compact binary mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution and observability of remnants originating from the merger of compact binary systems and discuss the differences to supernova remnants. Compact binary mergers expel much smaller amounts of mass at much higher velocities, as compared to supernovae, which will affect the dynamical evolution of their remnants. The ejecta of mergers consist of very neutron rich nuclei. Some of these neutron rich nuclei will produce observational signatures in form of gamma ray lines during their decay. The composition of the ejecta might even give interesting constraints about the internal structure of the neutron star. We further discuss the possibility that merger remnants appear as recently discovered 'dark accelerators' which are extended TeV sources which lack emission in other bands.

  13. Compact torus studies: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact torus (CT) device has been proposed for use in some applications which are of interest in Laboratory programs in the areas of pulsed power and inertial confinement fusion. These applications involve compression and acceleration of CT plasmas. The RACE (Ring Accelerator Experiment) experimental program at Livermore has been initiated to study these applications. The work reported here involves studies of plasma physics and other aspects of these compact torus applications. The studies conducted identify specific problem areas associated with the CT device and examine these areas in some detail. This report contains studies of three particular problem areas of the CT applications. These three areas are: the general nonlinear properties of the CT as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, particle simulation of the compression of the CT, with a focus on the non-MHD effects, and nonlinear RF interaction problems in the CT

  14. Compact heat exchangers modeling: Condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cascales, J.R.; Vera-Garcia, F. [Technical University of Cartagena, Thermal and Fluid Engineering Department, C/Dr. Fleming, s/n 30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Gonzalvez-Macia, J.; Corberan-Salvador, J.M. [Technical University of Valencia, Applied Thermodynamic Department, Valencia (Spain); Johnson, M.W.; Kohler, G.T. [Modine Manufacturing Company, Commercial Products Group, Racine, WI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    A model for the analysis of compact heat exchangers working as either evaporators or condensers is presented. This paper will focus exclusively on condensation modeling. The model is based on cell discretization of the heat exchanger in such a way that cells are analyzed following the path imposed by the refrigerant flowing through the tubes. It has been implemented in a robust code developed for assisting with the design of compact heat exchangers and refrigeration systems. These heat exchangers consist of serpentine fins that are brazed to multi-port tubes with internal microchannels. This paper also investigates a number of correlations used for the calculation of the refrigerant side heat transfer coefficient. They are evaluated comparing the predicted data with the experimental data. The working fluids used in the experiments are R134a and R410A, and the secondary fluid is air. The experimental facility is briefly described and some conclusions are finally drawn. (author)

  15. Multipole structure of compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the applications of general relativity in relativistic astrophysics in order to solve the problem of describing the geometric and physical properties of the interior and exterior gravitational and electromagnetic fields of compact objects. We focus on the interpretation of exact solutions of Einstein's equations in terms of their multipole moments structure. In view of the lack of physical interior solutions, we propose an alternative approach in which higher multipoles should be taken into account.

  16. Flexible Profile Compact Thermal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sabry, M.-N.

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/5920) International audience Recent advances in Compact Thermal Models (CTM) have led to the emergence of a new concept allowing models to be created at any desired order of accuracy. In this paper, the concept will first be generalized to 3D parallelepiped boxes with both surface and/or volumetric heating. The second achievement is an adequate handling of heat transfer through side walls based on an ...

  17. Compact Color Schlieren Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, Donald R.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1996-01-01

    Compact, rugged optical system developed for use in rainbow schlieren deflectometry. Features unobscured telescope with focal-length/aperture-width ratio of 30. Made of carefully selected but relatively inexpensive parts. All of lenses stock items. By-product of design is optical system with loose tolerances on interlens spacing. One of resulting advantages, insensitivity to errors in fabrication of optomechanical mounts. Another advantage is ability to compensate for some of unit-to-unit variations inherent in stock lenses.

  18. Learning Compact Recurrent Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhiyun; Sindhwani, Vikas; Sainath, Tara N.

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs), including long short-term memory (LSTM) RNNs, have produced state-of-the-art results on a variety of speech recognition tasks. However, these models are often too large in size for deployment on mobile devices with memory and latency constraints. In this work, we study mechanisms for learning compact RNNs and LSTMs via low-rank factorizations and parameter sharing schemes. Our goal is to investigate redundancies in recurrent architectures where compression ca...

  19. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  20. Strings in compact cosmological spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Konechny, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    We confront the problem of giving a fundamental definition to perturbative string theory in spacetimes with totally compact space (taken to be a torus for simplicity, though the nature of the problem is very general) and non-compact time. Due to backreaction induced by the presence of even a single string quantum, the usual formulation of perturbative string theory in a fixed classical background is infrared-divergent at all subleading orders in the string coupling, and needs to be amended. The problem can be seen as a closed string analogue of D0-brane recoil under an impact by closed strings (a situation displaying extremely similar infrared divergences). Inspired by the collective coordinate treatment of the D0-brane recoil, whereby the translational modes of the D0-brane are introduced as explicit dynamical variables in the path integral, we construct a similar formalism for the case of string-induced gravitational backreaction, in which the spatially uniform modes of the background fields on the compact ...

  1. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-01

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340°C-1350°C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  2. Compact accelerator for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first clinical trial with carbon beams generated from the HIMAC was conducted in June 1994. The total number of patients treated as of October 2006 is in excess of 3,000. In view of the significant growth in the number of protocols, the Japanese government gave its approval for carbon-ion therapy at NIRS as an advanced medical technology in 2003. The impressive advances of carbon-ion therapy using HIMAC have been supported by high-reliability operation and by advanced developments of beam-delivery and accelerator technologies. Based on our ten years of experience with HIMAC, we recently proposed a compact carbon-ion therapy facility for widespread use in Japan. The key technologies of the accelerator and irradiation systems for this compact facility have been under development since April 2004, with the main thrust being focused on downsizing the facility for cost reduction. On the basis of the design and R and D studies for the compact carbon-ion facility, its construction was begun at Gunma University in April 2006. In addition, our future plans for HIMAC also include the design of a new treatment facility. The design work has already been initiated and will lead to the further development of therapy using HIMAC. The following descriptions give a summary account of the carbon-ion treatment facility and of the HIMAC facility. (author)

  3. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  4. Label transfer by measuring compactness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Robert; Nedevschi, Sergiu

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image annotation algorithm. First, we introduce a new similarity measure between images: compactness. This uses low level visual descriptors for determining the similarity between two images. Compactness shows how close test image features lie to training image feature cluster centers. The measure provides the core for a k-nearest neighbor type image annotation method. Afterward, a formalism for defining different transfer techniques is devised and several label transfer techniques are provided. The method as whole is evaluated on four image annotation benchmarks. The results on these sets validate the accuracy of the approach, which outperforms many state-of-the-art annotation methods. The method presented here requires a simple training process, efficiently combines different feature types and performs better than complex learning algorithms, even in this incipient form. The main contributions of this paper are the usage of compactness as a similarity measure that enables efficient low level feature comparison and an annotation algorithm based on label transfer. PMID:23955754

  5. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  6. 76 FR 66326 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  7. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  8. 78 FR 20355 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  9. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  10. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  11. 75 FR 17161 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... purpose of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact)....

  12. 77 FR 60475 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  13. 77 FR 20051 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  14. The nature of the nearest compact group of galaxies from precise distance measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies as those catalogued by Hickson appear to be the densest galaxy structures in the Universe. Redshift information is not sufficient to determine whether a compact group is roughly as dense in 3 dimensions as it appears in projection, or whether it is caused by a chance alignment along the line of sight within a larger galaxy system. Recent precise measurements can lift this uncertainty for the nearest compact group, situated in the Virgo cluster, and whose dominant member is M60. I perform a statistical analysis of the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distances measured by Mei et al. in Virgo, for 4 of the 5 compact group members. Taking the SBF distances at face value, M59 and NGC 4660 lie roughly 2 Mpc to the foreground of M60, NGC 4638, and the rest of the Virgo cluster. The compact group turns out to be the result of a chance alignment of 4 galaxies, with NGC 4638 lying at least 800 kpc further from us (with 99% confidence) than either M59 or NGC 4660. The first two galaxy dis...

  15. Comparing galaxy populations in compact and loose groups of galaxies II: brightest group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, Héctor J; Muriel, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the brightest galaxies (BCGs) are studied in both compact and loose groups of galaxies in order to better understand the physical mechanisms influencing galaxy evolution in different environments. Samples of BCGs are selected in the compact groups identified by McConnachie et al. (2009), and in loose groups taken from Zandivarez & Mart\\'inez (2011). The following physical properties of the BCGs in compact groups and in subsamples of loose groups are compared, defined by their mass and total luminosity. The fraction of BCGs classified as red and/or early-type as a function of galaxy luminosity are studied. The fraction of the group's total luminosity contained in the BCG and the difference in luminosity between the BCG and the second-ranked galaxy, are also analysed. Some properties of BCGs in compact and loose groups are comparable. However, BCGs in compact groups are systematically more concentrated and have larger surface brightness than their counterparts in both, high- and low-mass l...

  16. Compact and energy saving magnet technology for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the fact that funding agencies and industrial users of particle accelerators get more and more alerted about costs of civil engineering, installation and operation, only little effort has been put into development of sustainable, energy and cost saving accelerator technology. In order to reduce the total-cost-of ownership of accelerator magnets, operating at high electrical power for twenty years or more, permanent magnet based Green Magnet technology has been developed at a consortium around Danfysik's R and D team. Together with our partners from ISA, Aarhus University, the Aarhus School of Engineering, the company Sintex and Aalborg University all obstacles in applying permanent magnet technology as e.g. thermal drift and inhomogeneities of magnetic fields have been overcome. The first Green Magnet has now been operated for more than half a year in an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the ETH in Zurich. The performance of this B=0.43T 90 deg. H-type bending magnet and the most recently builtB=1T, 30 deg. C-type Green Magnet for the synchrotron light source ASTRID2 at ISA in Aarhus will be presented. Danfysik also is designing, manufacturing and testing 60 compact magnet systems, developed at MAX-Lab for the new MAXIV 3.0 GeV synchrotron light source. In addition, 12 for the 1.5 GeV light source and another 12 for the new SOLARIS light source in Krakow, Poland are buying built. Up to a dozen or more magnet functions have been integrated into one yoke of these compact magnet systems, which makes the new MAXIV light sources compact, energy saving and at the same time very bright. Test results and design concepts of the new MAXIV and SOLARIS magnets will be presented. (author)

  17. Hubble ultra deep field object surface brightness variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of adjacent pixel brightness variation in log scale was applied to ultra deep field objects captured by the Hubble telescope. The local surface brightness fluctuation has a Gaussian-like distribution implying a random accretion of material, with collisions, as a random-walk motion. The larger fluctuation of log brightness in the mid to outer regions of some galaxies is consistent with the presence of dark matter. The absence of such fluctuation enhancement in two i-drop candidates at z ∼ 3 may mean that some dark matter is the result of nucleosynthesis in the evolution process. Large fluctuation in the B+V bands in contrast to the i+z band near the center in an i-drop candidate at z ∼ 3 was interpreted to be an AGN center. The distribution average shifts towards zero for more spiral galaxies, signifying the use of local surface brightness fluctuation distribution as a morphology parameter

  18. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  19. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  20. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  1. An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Basri, Gibor; Pepper, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Surface gravity is one of a star's basic properties, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25-50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90-150 per cent photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about two per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for >150,000 stars provides an opportunity to investigate whether the variations can be used to determine surface gravities. The Fourier power of granulation on a star's surface correlates physically with surface gravity; if brightness variations on timescales of hours arise from granulation, then such variations should correlate with surface gravity. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an observational correlation between surface gravity and the root-mean-square brightness variations on timescales of less than eight hours for stars with temperatures ...

  2. Brightness, coherence, and propagation characteristics of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formalism is presented by means of which the propagation and imaging characteristics of synchrotron radiation can be studied, taking into account the effects of diffraction, electron beam emittance, and the transverse and longitudinal extent of the source. An important quantity in this approach is the Wigner distribution of the electric fields, which can be interpreted as a phase-space distribution of photon flux, and thus can be identified with the brightness. When integrated over the angular variables, the brightness becomes the intensity distribution in the spatial variables and when integrated over the spatial variables, it becomes the intensity distribution in angular variables. The brightness so defined transforms through a general optical medium in exactly the same way as in the case of a collection of geometric rays. Finally, the brightness of different electrons adds in a simple way. Optical characteristics of various synchrotron radiation sources - bending magnets, wigglers and undulators, are analyzed using this formalism

  3. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  4. Visible Color and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, S. E.; Li, J. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) collected images of the surface of Vesta at a pixel scale of 70 m in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase through its clear and seven color filters spanning from 430 nm to 980 nm. The surface of Vesta displays a large diversity in its brightness and colors, evidently related to the diverse geology [1] and mineralogy [2]. Here we report a detailed investigation of the visible colors and photometric properties of the apparently bright materials on Vesta in order to study their origin. The global distribution and the spectroscopy of bright materials are discussed in companion papers [3, 4], and the synthesis results about the origin of Vestan bright materials are reported in [5].

  5. Are solar brightness variations faculae- or spot-dominated?

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Yeo, K L; Schmutz, W K

    2016-01-01

    Regular spaceborne measurements have revealed that solar brightness varies on multiple timescales, variations on timescales greater than a day being attributed to surface magnetic field. Independently, ground-based and spaceborne measurements suggest that Sun-like stars show a similar, but significantly broader pattern of photometric variability. To understand whether the broader pattern of stellar variations is consistent with the solar paradigm we assess relative contributions of faculae and spots to solar magnetically-driven brightness variability. We investigate how the solar brightness variability as well as its facular and spot contributions depend on the wavelength, timescale of variability, and position of the observer relative to the ecliptic plane. We perform calculations with the SATIRE model, which returns solar brightness with daily cadence from solar disc area coverages of various magnetic features. Moving the observer away from the ecliptic plane increases the amplitude of 11-year variability a...

  6. Millimeter-wave brightness temperatures of military vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemarich, Joseph; Cassidy, Thomas W.; Shiner, R.; Agravante, Hiroshi H.; Dixon, David; Moffa, Philip; Quon, Bill H.; Yujiri, Larry; Dahlstrom, R.

    1999-07-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometers operating at 97 and 140 GHz were used to obtain passive MMW images and brightness temperatures of military vehicles at various altitudes and depression angles. The line-scanning radiometer system used for the measurements is described, and several passive MMW images are presented. The upper-bound MMW brightness temperatures of a number of different types of vehicles in an open area were determined and shown to have similar values at various depression angles.

  7. Night Sky Brightness and Light Pollution in Comunidad de Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Zamorano Calvo, Jaime; Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Gómez Castaño, José; Ocaña González, Francisco; Gallego Maestro, Jesús; Pila Díez, Berenice; Nievas Rosillo, Miguel; Tapia Ayuga, Carlos; Fernández Domínguez, Alberto; Pascual Ramírez, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary results of a study of the night sky background brightness around the city of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers are presented. Data-retrieval methodology includes an automatic procedure to measure from a moving vehicle which allows to speed up the data gathering. The night sky brightness, an astronomical quality parameter that accounts for luminous flux from the sky, is closely related with the light pollution. The map with the spatial distribution of the night s...

  8. Analytically derived conversion of spectral band radiance to brightness temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Alexander [Spectral Sciences, Inc., 44th Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States)], E-mail: lex@spectral.com

    2008-05-15

    Simple analytic expressions for brightness temperature have been derived in terms of band response function spectral moments. Accuracy measures are also derived. Application of these formulas to GOES-12 Sounder thermal infrared bands produces brightness temperature residuals between -5.0 and 2.5 mK for a 150-400 K temperature range. The magnitude of residuals for the five ASTER Radiometer thermal infrared bands over the same temperature range is less than 0.22 mK.

  9. Facial Expression Recognition using Entropy and Brightness Features

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Rizwan Ahmed; Meyer, Alexandre; Konik, Hubert; Bouakaz, Saïda

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper proposes a novel framework for universal facial expression recognition. The framework is based on two sets of features extracted from the face image: entropy and brightness. First, saliency maps are obtained by state-of-the-art saliency detection algorithm i.e. "frequencytuned salient region detection". Then only localized salient facial regions from saliency maps are processed to extract entropy and brightness features. To validate the performance of sali...

  10. New Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies Detected Around Nearby Spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC,672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC,2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their abs...

  11. Motion Analysis of Fiber Band in Compact Field of Compact Spinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technological process of compact spinning and the compact procedure of fiber band in compact field are briefly illustrated. The motions of fiber band in compact field are discussed theoretically from which tilting angle of suction slot in profile tube, additional twists created by fiber band's rotating around its own axis and ultimate twists in compact yarn are deduced accordingly. The existence of additional twists is also verified through experiments.

  12. Synthesizing SMOS Zero-Baselines with Aquarius Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Dinnat, E.; Le Vine, D.; Kainulainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    SMOS [1] and Aquarius [2] are ESA and NASA missions, respectively, to make L-band measurements from the Low Earth Orbit. SMOS makes passive measurements whereas Aquarius measures both passive and active. SMOS was launched in November 2009 and Aquarius in June 2011.The scientific objectives of the missions are overlapping: both missions aim at mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). Additionally, SMOS mission produces soil moisture product (however, Aquarius data will eventually be used for retrieving soil moisture too). The consistency of the brightness temperature observations made by the two instruments is essential for long-term studies of SSS and soil moisture. For resolving the consistency, the calibration of the instruments is the key. The basis of the SMOS brightness temperature level is the measurements performed with the so-called zero-baselines [3]; SMOS employs an interferometric measurement technique which forms a brightness temperature image from several baselines constructed by combination of multiple receivers in an array; zero-length baseline defines the overall brightness temperature level. The basis of the Aquarius brightness temperature level is resolved from the brightness temperature simulator combined with ancillary data such as antenna patterns and environmental models [4]. Consistency between the SMOS zero-baseline measurements and the simulator output would provide a robust basis for establishing the overall comparability of the missions.

  13. Evolution of Bright Screening-photovoltaic Spatial Optical Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the dynamical evolution of bright screening-photovoltaic (SP) spatial solitons in biased photovoltaic-photorefractive materials in the case of neglecting the material loss and the diffusion is presented. When an incident optical beam is a bright SP soliton, the beam propagates along a linear path with its shape kept unchanged. When the incident optical beam is slightly different from a bright SP soliton, the beam reshapes itself and tries to evolve into a bright SP soliton after a short distance. However, when the incident optical beam is significantly different from a SP bright soliton, the beam cannot evolve into a stable bright SP soliton, and tends to experience periodic compression and expansion. For a low-intensity input beam, the wave experiences a periodic process of compression first and then expansion during the initial part of the cycle. For a high-intensity input beam, however, the wave will initially diffract and then experiences compression during the cycle.

  14. Relating basic properties of bright early-type dwarf galaxies to their location in Abell 901/902

    CERN Document Server

    Barazza, F D; Gray, M E; Jogee, S; Balogh, M; McIntosh, D H; Bacon, D; Barden, M; Bell, E F; Boehm, A; Caldwell, J A R; Haeussler, B; Heiderman, A; Heymans, C; van Kampen, K Jahnke E; Lane, K; Marinova, I; Meisenheimer, K; Peng, C Y; Sánchez, S F; Taylor, A; Wisotzki, L; Zheng, X

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the population of bright early-type dwarf galaxies in the multiple-cluster system Abell 901/902. We use data from the STAGES survey and COMBO-17 to investigate the relation between the color and structural properties of the dwarfs and their location in the cluster. The definition of the dwarf sample is based on the central surface brightness and includes galaxies in the luminosity range -16 >= M_B <~-19 mag. Using a fit to the color magnitude relation of the dwarfs, our sample is divided into a red and blue subsample. We find a color-density relation in the projected radial distribution of the dwarf sample: at the same luminosity dwarfs with redder colors are located closer to the cluster centers than their bluer counterparts. Furthermore, the redder dwarfs are on average more compact and rounder than the bluer dwarfs. These findings are consistent with theoretical expectations assuming that bright early-type dwarfs are the remnants of transformed late-type disk galaxies involving pro...

  15. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). II. Discovery of 40 Bright Quasars Near the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Myungshin; Cho, Yunseok; Choi, Changsu; Ko, Jongwan; Song, Mimi

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of 40 bright quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at low Galactic latitude (b<20deg). The low Galactic latitude region has been considered a place to avoid when searching for extragalactic sources, because of the high Galactic extinction, as well as a large number of stars contaminating the sample selection. Bright quasars (R<~17) suffer more from such difficulties because they look like bright stars, which are numerous at low b, yet their surface number density is very low. In order to find quasars in this region of the sky less explored for extragalactic sources, we have started a survey of low Galactic latitude bright quasars as a part of the Seoul National University Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). Quasar candidates have been selected from radio and near-infrared (NIR) data. Out of 88 targets, we identify 29 bright quasars/AGNs around the antigalactic center, and 11 bright quasars/AGNs in the outskirts of the Galactic center, from two observing runs in 2006 at the Boh...

  16. The Cooling of Compact Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Page, D; Weber, F; Page, Dany; Geppert, Ulrich; Weber, Fridolin

    2005-01-01

    The cooling of a compact star depends very sensitively on the state of dense matter at supranuclear densities, which essentially controls the neutrino emission, as well as on the structure of the stellar outer layers which control the photon emission. Open issues concern the hyperon population, the presence of meson condensates, superfluidity and superconductivity, and the transition of confined hadronic matter to quark matter. This paper describes these issues and presents cooling calculations based on a broad collection of equations of state for neutron star matter and strange matter. These results are tested against the body of observed cooling data.

  17. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  18. New charged anisotropic compact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  19. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code

  20. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Hector O; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein's theory of general relativity with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of general relativity in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes and neutron stars) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating black holes and present some new results on slowly rotating neutron stars.

  1. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  2. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  3. Compact inertial confinement multireactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) commercial-applications plant-optimum driver pulse repetition rates may exceed reactor pulse-repetition-rate capabilities. Thus, more than one reactor may be required for low-cost production of electric power, process heat, fissionable fuels, etc., in ICF plants. Substantial savings in expensive reactor containment cells and blankets can be realized by placing more than one reactor in a cell and by surrounding more than one reactor cavity with a single blanket system. There are also some potential disadvantages associated with close coupling in compact multicavity blankets and multireactor cells. Tradeoffs associated with several scenarios have been studied

  4. Flux stabilization in compact groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the Born-Infeld action for symmetry-preserving, orientable D-branes in compact group manifolds. We find classical solutions that obey the flux quantization condition. They correspond to conformally invariant boundary conditions on the world sheet. We compute the spectrum of quadratic fluctuations and find agreement with the predictions of conformal field theory, up to a missing level-dependent truncation. Our results extend to D-branes with the geometry of twined conjugacy classes; they illustrate the mechanism of flux stabilization of D-branes. (author)

  5. Flux stabilization in compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bordalo, P; Schweigert, C; Bordalo, Pedro; Ribault, Sylvain; Schweigert, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    We consider the Born-Infeld action for symmetry-preserving, orientable D-branes in compact group manifolds. We find classical solutions that obey the flux quantization condition. They correspond to conformally invariant boundary conditions on the world sheet. We compute the spectrum of quadratic fluctuations and find agreement with the predictions of conformal field theory, up to a missing level-dependent truncation. Our results extend to D-branes with the geometry of twined conjugacy classes; they illustrate the mechanism of flux stabilization of D-branes.

  6. Progress in compact soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultra-high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. A crucial factor in the availability of these devices is their scale and cost. Recent breakthroughs in this field has brought closer the advent of table-top devices, suitable for applications to fields such as x-ray microscopy, chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography. In this article we review recent progress in the development of compact (table-top) soft x-ray lasers

  7. X-ray properties of G308.3-1.4 and its central compact object

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, K. A.; Hui, C. Y.; Huang, R. H. H.; Trepl, L.; Lu, T.-N.; Kong, A. K. H.; Walter, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a short Chandra observation that confirms a previous unidentified extended X-ray source, G308.3-1.4, as a new supernova remnant (SNR) in the Milky Way. Apart from identifying its SNR nature, a bright X-ray point source has also been discovered at the geometrical center. Its X-ray spectral properties are similar to those of a particular class of neutron star known as central compact objects (CCOs). On the other hand, the optical properties of this counterpart suggests it to be a lat...

  8. Discovery of Nine Intermediate Redshift Compact Quiescent Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J

    2013-01-01

    We identify nine galaxies with dynamical masses of M_dyn>10^10 M_sol as photometric point sources, but with redshifts between z=0.2 and z=0.6, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectro-photometric database. All nine galaxies have archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Surface brightness profile fitting confirms that all nine galaxies are extremely compact (with circularized half-light radii between 0.4 and 6.6 kpc and the median value of 0.74 kpc) for their velocity dispersion (1101 galaxies and the other eight objects follow the high-redshift dynamical size-mass relation.

  9. Compact Visualisation of Video Summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćalić Janko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for compact and intuitive video summarisation aimed at both high-end professional production environments and small-screen portable devices. To represent large amounts of information in the form of a video key-frame summary, this paper studies the narrative grammar of comics, and using its universal and intuitive rules, lays out visual summaries in an efficient and user-centered way. In addition, the system exploits visual attention modelling and rapid serial visual presentation to generate highly compact summaries on mobile devices. A robust real-time algorithm for key-frame extraction is presented. The system ranks importance of key-frame sizes in the final layout by balancing the dominant visual representability and discovery of unanticipated content utilising a specific cost function and an unsupervised robust spectral clustering technique. A final layout is created using an optimisation algorithm based on dynamic programming. Algorithm efficiency and robustness are demonstrated by comparing the results with a manually labelled ground truth and with optimal panelling solutions.

  10. A compact THz imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  11. Molecular Gas in Compact Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, F P

    2005-01-01

    New observations of 11 compact galaxies in the 12CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 transitions and literature data have been used to construct accurate line ratios in matched beams allowing LVG modelling of physical parameters. Fitting a single gas component to observed line ratios tends to produce physically unrealistic results, and is often not possible at all. Much better results are obtained by modelling two distinct gas components. The molecular gas is usually warm (T(kin)=50-150 K) and at least partially dense (n(H2)>3000 cm3). Most of the gas-phase carbon in these galaxies is in atomic form; only a small fraction (5%) is in carbon monoxide. Beam-averaged CO column densities are low, typically 10(16) cm2 but molecular hydrogen column densities are high, of the order of 10(22) cm2 and confirm large CO-to-H2 conversion factors, typically X = 10(21)-10(22) cm2(K kms-1) found in low-metallicity environments by other methods. From CO spectroscopy, three different types of molecular environment are distinguished in compact ...

  12. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Caniego, Marcos

    2015-12-01

    The Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources is a catalogue of sources observed over the entire sky at nine different frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz. It consists of Galactic and extragalactic objects detected in the Planck single-frequency full mission total intensity maps. Compact sources detected in the lower frequency channels are assigned to the PCCS2, while at higher frequencies they are assigned to one of two sub·catalogues, the PCCS2 or PCCS2E, depending on their location on the sky. The PCCS2 covers most of the sky and can be used to produce subsamples at higher reliabilities than the target 80% integral reliability of the catalogue. The PCCS2E contains sources located in certain regions where the complex background makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections. Both the PCCS2 and PCCS2E include polarization measurements, in the form of polarized flux densities, or upper limits, and orientation angles for all seven polarization-sensitive Planck channels.

  13. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential

  14. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  15. Night sky brightness at San Pedro Martir Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Plauchu-Frayn, I; Colorado, E; Herrera, J; Cordova, A; Cesena, U; Avila, F

    2016-01-01

    We present optical UBVRI zenith night sky brightness measurements collected on eighteen nights during 2013--2016 and SQM measurements obtained daily over twenty months during 2014--2016 at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) in Mexico. The UBVRI data is based upon CCD images obtained with the 0.84m and 2.12m telescopes, while the SQM data is obtained with a high-sensitivity, low-cost photometer. The typical moonless night sky brightness at zenith averaged over the whole period is U = 22.68, B = 23.10, V = 21.84, R = 21.04, I = 19.36, and SQM = 21.88 mag/square arcsec, once corrected for zodiacal light. We find no seasonal variation of the night sky brightness measured with the SQM. The typical night sky brightness values found at OAN-SPM are similar to those reported for other astronomical dark sites at a similar phase of the solar cycle. We find a trend of decreasing night sky brightness with decreasing solar activity during period of the observations. This trend im...

  16. The night sky brightness at Potsdam-Babelsberg

    CERN Document Server

    Puschnig, Johannes; Posch, Thomas; Schwarz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the results of a 2 years (2011--2012) time series of night sky photometry performed at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics in Potsdam (AIP). This observatory is located on top of a hill ("Babelsberg"), 22\\,km to the southwest of the center of Berlin. The measurements have been performed with a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter. We find night sky brightness values ranging from 16.5 to 20.3 mag$_{\\rm SQM}$ arcsec$^{-2}$; the latter (best) value corresponds to 4.7 times the natural zenithal night sky brightness. We discuss the influence of clouds, of the Moon and other factors on the night sky brightness. With respect to the influence of the Moon, it turns out that Potsdam-Babelsberg, despite its proximity to Berlin, still shows a circalunar periodicity of the night sky brightness, although it is much weaker than naturally. The light-pollution-enhancing effect of clouds dominates the night sky brightness by far. Overcast nights with light pollution (up to 16.5 mag$_{\\rm SQM}$ arcsec$^{-2}$) are brighter ...

  17. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  18. Bright artificial light subsensitizes a central muscarinic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsaver, S C; Majchrzak, M J

    1987-12-14

    Supersensitivity of a muscarinic mechanism is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Bright artificial light is efficacious in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). We studied the effect of constant bright light (11,500 lux) on the sensitivity of adult, male rats to oxotremorine, 1.5 mg/kg ip, using a repeated measures design. Oxotremorine challenges were proceeded by the injection of methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg ip, by 30 minutes. Temperature was telemetrically measured every 10 minutes for 120 minutes starting 10 minutes after the injection of oxotremorine. Prior to and after 7 continuous days of exposure to bright light, the sample exhibited a hypothermic response of 2.50 +/- 0.48 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) and 0.29 +/- 0.31 degrees C (mean +/- SEM), respectively (p less than 0.0014). All 7 animals exhibited blunting to the thermic response to oxotremorine. Bright light also blocked the capacity of amitriptyline to supersensitize a central muscarinic mechanism. Exposure to light at an intensity of 300 lux for 7 days had no effect on the thermic response to oxotremorine. These data are consistent with the hypotheses that the biology of depression involves supersensitivity of central muscarinic mechanisms and that the effects of bright artificial light are not the consequence of shifting circadian rhythms. PMID:3695799

  19. Opacity in compact extragalactic radio sources and the core shift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparent position of the 'core' in a parsec-scale radio jet (a compact, bright emitting region at the narrow end of the jet) depends on the observing frequency, owing to synchrotron self-absorption and external absorption. This dependency both provides a tool to probe physical conditions in the vicinity of the core and poses problems for astrometric studies using compact radio sources. We investigate the frequency-dependent shift of the positions of the cores (core shift) observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) in parsec-scale jets. We present results for 29 selected active galactic nuclei (AGN). In these AGN, the magnitude of the measured core shift between 2.3 and 8.6 GHz reaches 1.4 mas, with a median value for the sample of 0.44 mas. We discuss related physics as well as astrometry applications and plans for further studies.

  20. Opacity in compact extragalactic radio sources and the core shift effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Y Y; Lobanov, A P; Pushkarev, A B; Zensus, J A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)], E-mail: ykovalev@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: alobanov@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: apushkar@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: azensus@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2008-10-15

    The apparent position of the 'core' in a parsec-scale radio jet (a compact, bright emitting region at the narrow end of the jet) depends on the observing frequency, owing to synchrotron self-absorption and external absorption. This dependency both provides a tool to probe physical conditions in the vicinity of the core and poses problems for astrometric studies using compact radio sources. We investigate the frequency-dependent shift of the positions of the cores (core shift) observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) in parsec-scale jets. We present results for 29 selected active galactic nuclei (AGN). In these AGN, the magnitude of the measured core shift between 2.3 and 8.6 GHz reaches 1.4 mas, with a median value for the sample of 0.44 mas. We discuss related physics as well as astrometry applications and plans for further studies.

  1. Incoherent transient radio emission from stellar-mass compact objects in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Corbel, S; Fender, R P; Gallo, E; Maccarone, T J; O'Brien, T J; Paragi, Z; Rupen, M P; Rushton, A P; Sabatini, S; Sivakoff, G R; Strader, J; Woud, P A

    2015-01-01

    The universal link between the processes of accretion and ejection leads to the formation of jets and outflows around accreting compact objects. Incoherent synchrotron emission from these outflows can be observed from a wide range of accreting binaries, including black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Monitoring the evolution of the radio emission during their sporadic outbursts provides important insights into the launching of jets, and, when coupled with the behaviour of the source at shorter wavelengths, probes the underlying connection with the accretion process. Radio observations can also probe the impact of jets/outflows (including other explosive events such as magnetar giant flares) on the ambient medium, quantifying their kinetic feedback. The high sensitivity of the SKA will open up new parameter space, enabling the monitoring of accreting stellar-mass compact objects from their bright, Eddington-limited outburst states down to the lowest-luminosity quiescent levels, whose intrinsic faintnes...

  2. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Iureş; Corneliu Bob

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  3. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  4. Positron Annihilation Lifetimes in Compacted Iron Powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy has been performed on iron powder as a function of compacted powder load. The ortho-positronium lifetime increases from 1.45 to 2.55 ns with compaction load increment from 30 to 50 tons. By increasing the compaction load, the ultimate stress and hardness increases and the ductlity decreases. The result shows that there is a direct correlation between the void size and the load decrement. These results will be presented and discussed

  5. Self Compacting Concrete And Its Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mahesh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete (SCC), which flows under its own weight and doesn’t require any external vibration for compaction, has revolutionized concrete placement. Such concrete should have relatively low yield value to ensure high flow ability, a moderate viscosity to resists segregation and bleeding and must maintain its homogeneity during transportation, placing and curing to ensure adequate structural performance and long term durability. Self-compacting concrete (SCC) ca...

  6. A Computer Verified Theory of Compact Sets

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Compact sets in constructive mathematics capture our intuition of what computable subsets of the plane (or any other complete metric space) ought to be. A good representation of compact sets provides an efficient means of creating and displaying images with a computer. In this paper, I build upon existing work about complete metric spaces to define compact sets as the completion of the space of finite sets under the Hausdorff metric. This definition allowed me to quickly develop a computer ve...

  7. Bright and Not-So-Bright Prospects for Women in Physics in China-Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-An; Yang, Zhongqin; Ma, Wanyun

    2009-04-01

    Science in China-Beijing is enjoying a healthy increase in funding year by year, so the prospects for physicists are also bright. However, employment discrimination against women, formerly unthinkable, is becoming more and more explicit as the country evolves toward a market economy. Some recruitment notices bluntly state that only men will be considered, or impose restrictions upon potential female candidates. Female associate professors in many institutions are forced to retire at age 55, compared with 60 for men. This double-pinching discrimination against both younger and older women threatens to lead to a "pincer" effect, more serious than the "scissors" effect. Indeed, the ratio of senior-level women physicists in general has dropped significantly in recent years in China. Ironically, the number of female students applying for graduate studies is on the rise, as it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to compete with men in the job market with just an undergraduate degree. The Chinese Physical Society has made certain efforts to promote the image of women physicists, but it will take time and effort to reverse the trend.

  8. Constraints on Compact Star Parameters from Burst Oscillation Light Curves of the Accreting Millisecond Pulsar XTE J1814-338

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, S; Miller, M C; Markwardt, C B; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed modeling of the millisecond brightness oscillations from low mass X-ray binaries during thermonuclear bursts can provide us with important information about compact star parameters. Until now the implementation of this idea has not been entirely successful, largely because of the negligible amount of harmonic content in burst oscillation lightcurves. However, the recent discovery of unique, non-sinusoidal burst oscillation lightcurves from the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 has changed this situation. We, therefore, for the first time, make use of this opportunity to constrain compact star structure parameters effectively. In our detailed study of the lightcurves of 22 bursts we fit the burst oscillation lightcurves with fully general relativistic models that include light-bending and frame-dragging for lightcurve calculation, and compute numerically the structure of compact stars using realistic equations of state. We find that the 90% confidence interval of the dimensionless radius to m...

  9. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Compaction in Sedimentary Basins

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-01-01

    In the mathematical modelling of sediment compaction and porous media flow, the rheological behaviour of sediments is typically modelled in terms of a nonlinear relationship between effective pressure $p_e$ and porosity $\\phi$, that is $p_e=p_e(\\phi)$. The compaction law is essentially a poroelastic one. However, viscous compaction due to pressure solution becomes important at larger depths and causes this relationship to become more akin to a viscous rheology. A generalised viscoelastic compaction model of Maxwell type is formulated, and different styles of nonlinear behaviour are asymptotically analysed and compared in this paper.

  10. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  11. CANDELS+3D-HST: compact SFGs at z~2-3, the progenitors of the first quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Pacifici, C; Trump, J R; Koo, D C; Wuyts, S; Guo, Y; Bell, E; Dekel, A; Porter, L; Primack, J; Ferguson, H; Ashby, M; Caputi, K; Ceverino, D; Croton, D; Fazio, G; Giavalisco, M; Hsu, L; Kocevski, D; Koekemoer, A; Kurczynski, P; Kollipara, P; Lee, J; McIntosh, D; McGrath, E; Moody, C; Somerville, R; Papovich, C; Salvato, M; Santini, P; Williams, C C; Willner, S; Zolotov, A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either expon...

  12. Low surface brightness galaxies in the cluster A1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained deep CCD frames of apparently blank regions of sky in the hope of detecting very low surface brightness (LSB) objects in the cluster A1367. We discuss our data reduction, and image detection and selection techniques. If the galaxies detected are actually cluster members then they are dwarfs and the conclusions of a previous paper on the Fornax cluster are essentially confirmed. One area of variance is that the lowest surface brightness galaxies do not appear to be preferentially concentrated towards the cluster centre. This can be explained by there being a much larger density of dwarf galaxies over this bright galaxy-rich region of the universe. We find over our small area approximately four times as many LSB galaxies as would be expected from our Fornax data. We speculate on the possible origin and likely intensity of intergalactic light within clusters. (author)

  13. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan;

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared to the...... shapes used by now. In the present paper we describe a simple theoretical explanation of this unexpected behavior, which is based on the large difference in para-hydrogen between the values of the scattering mean free path for thermal neutrons (in the range of 1 cm) and its much larger equivalent for...

  14. Effects of Bright Light Treatment on Psychomotor Speed in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MikkoPaavoTulppo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days. A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both treatment was given every morning between 8–12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time x group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024 but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308. Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year.

  15. The possible origin of facular brightness in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the Ca ii H line core brightness on the strength and inclination of the photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the center of the solar disc. We use three simultaneous data sets that were obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of Ba ii 4554 Å line, registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in Fe i 1.56 μm lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in Ca ii H that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the Ca ii H brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, which propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature minimum height that is measured from Ba ii line. The Ca ii H brightness is maximum at locations where the phase shift between temperature and velocity oscillations lies within 0°-100°. There is an indirect influence of convective motions on the Ca ii H brightness. The higher the amplitude of convective velocities is and the greater the height is where they change their direction of motion, the brighter the facula. In summary, our results lead to conclusions that facular regions appear bright not only because of the Wilson depression in magnetic structures, but also owing to real heating.

  16. New Evidence for a Black Hole in the Compact Binary Cygnus X-3

    CERN Document Server

    Shrader, Chris; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The bright and highly variable X-ray and radio source known as Cygnus X-3 was among the first X-ray sources discovered, yet it remains in many ways an enigma. Its known to consist of a massive, Wolf-Rayet primary in an extremely tight orbit with a compact object. Yet one of the most basic of parameters - the mass of the compact object - is not known. Nor is it even clear whether its is a neutron star or a black hole. In this Paper we present our analysis of the broad-band high-energy continua covering a substantial range in luminosity and spectral morphology. We apply these results to a recently identified scaling relationship which has been demonstrated to provide reliable estimates of the compact object mass in a number of accretion powered binaries. This analysis leads us to conclude that the compact object in Cygnus X-3 has a mass greater than $4.2M_\\odot$ thus clearly indicative of a black hole and as such resolving a long-standing issue. The full range of uncertainty in our analysis and from using a ran...

  17. Compact toroid fueling for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical work indicates that deep fueling of ITER may be possible by Compact Toroid (CT) injection. CT velocities sufficient for center fueling of a reactor have been demonstrated in the RACE device. CT injections into the TdeV tokamak have achieved central penetration at 1.4 T, and have increased the particle inventory by more than 30% without disruption. Tests on the MARAUDER device have achieved CT mass-densities suitable for injection into 5 T tokamaks. Techniques for producing multiple-shot CT's with passive electric switching are being tested on CTIX. The advantages of deep fueling by CT injection include profile peaking to reach ignition, profile control, low tritium inventory and others. In this paper, the CT experimental results are summarized, a conceptual design of a CT fueler for ITER is presented, and the implications on ITER operation and fuel cycle are discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Compact anti-radon facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I., E-mail: ivan.stekl@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horská 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Fojtík, P.; Hýža, M.; Hůlka, J.; Jílek, K. [SÚRO (NRPI) National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 1450/28, 140 00 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Stoček, P.; Veselý, J. [ATEKO a.s., Resslova 956/13, 501 01Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. (Czech Republic); Busto, J. [CPPM, Universite de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  19. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  20. Compact K-edge densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed, built, and is currently testing a compact K-edge densitometer for use by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The unit, which can easily be moved from one location to another within a facility, is positioned outside a glovebox with the body of the instrument inserted into the glove. A fixture inside the glovebox fits around the body and positions a sample holder. A hand-held high-purity germanium detector powered by a battery pack and a Davidson portable multichannel analyzer (MCA) is used to measure the transmission through plutonium nitrate solutions at E/sub Y/ = 121.1 and 122.2 keV. The Davidson MCA is programmed to lead the user through the measurement procedure and perform all the data analyses. The instrument is currently installed at the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, where IAEA personnel are evaluating its accuracy, ease of operation, and safety. 5 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  1. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  2. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa -2, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency

  3. Gravitational waves from compact objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Antonio de Freitas Pacheco

    2010-01-01

    Large ground-based laser beam interferometers are presently in operation both in the USA (LIGO) and in Europe (VIRGO) and potential sources that might be detected by these instruments are revisited. The present generation of detectors does not have a sensitivity high enough to probe a significant volume of the universe and,consequently, predicted event rates are very low. The planned advanced generation of interferometers will probably be able to detect, for the first time, a gravitational signal. Advanced LIGO and EGO instruments are expected to detect few (some): binary coalescences consisting of either two neutron stars, two black holes or a neutron star and a black hole. In space, the sensitivity of the planned LISA spacecraft constellation will allow the detection of the gravitational signals, even within a "pessimistic" range of possible signals, produced during the capture of compact objects by supermassive black holes, at a rate of a few tens per year.

  4. Compact torus experiments and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of compact toroids have been studied: spheromaks and field-reversed configurations (FRC). Spheromaks, which contain both toroidal and poloidal fields, have been formed with a magnetized coaxial injector and trapped in both prolate and oblate flux conservers. As expected from theory, the prolate configuration always tilts, but the oblate configuration can be made stable even in the presence of a guide field. Observations include 150μs lifetimes, approx. 1014 cm-3, and a decrease of field fluctuations by a factor of 100 at the time of complete reconnection. Theoretical studies of the FRC (no toroidal field) have been compared with the results of two field-reversed theta-pinches, FRX-A and FRX-B

  5. A Compact UWB Diversity Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact printed ultrawideband (UWB diversity antenna with a size of 30 mm × 36 mm operating at a frequency range of 3.1–10.6 GHz is proposed. The antenna is composed of two semielliptical monopoles fed by two microstrip lines. Two semicircular slots, two rectangular slots, and one stub are introduced in the ground plane to adjust the impedance bandwidth of the antenna and improve the isolation between two feeding ports. The simulated and measured results show that impedance bandwidth of the proposed antenna can cover the whole UWB band with a good isolation of < −15 dB. The radiation patterns, peak antenna gain, and envelope correlation coefficient are also measured and discussed. The measured results show that the proposed antenna can be a good candidate for some portable MIMO/diversity UWB applications.

  6. Compact Digital High Voltage Charger

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ge

    2005-01-01

    The operation of classical resonant circuit developed for the pulse energizing is investigated. The HV pulse or generator is very compact by a soft switching circuit made up of IGBT working at over 30 kHZ. The frequencies of macro pulses andμpulses can be arbitrarily tuned below resonant frequency to digitalize the HV pulse power. Theμpulses can also be connected by filter circuit to get the HVDC power. The circuit topology is given and its novel control logic is analyzed by flowchart. The circuit is part of a system consisting of a AC or DC LV power supply, a pulse transformer, the pulse generator implemented by LV capacitor and leakage inductance of the transformer, a HV DC or pulse power supply and the charged HV capacitor of the modulators.

  7. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  8. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  9. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  10. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group A Summary on High Brightness Beam Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working group A was devoted to high brightness beam production and characterization. The presentations and discussions could be categorized as cathode physics, new photoinjector designs, computational modeling of high brightness beams, and new experimental methods and results. Several novel injector and cathode designs were presented. However, a standard 1.5 cell rf photoinjector is still the most common source for high brightness beams. New experimental results and techniques were presented and thoroughly discussed. The brightest beam produced in a rf photoinjector published at the time of the workshop is approximately 2 1014 A/(m-rad)2 at Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan with 1 nC of charge, a 9 ps FWHM long laser pulse and a normalized transverse emittance of 1.2 pm. The emittance was achieved by utilizing a temporally flat laser pulse which decreased the emittance by an estimated factor of 2 from the beam produced with a Gaussian pulse shape with an identical pulse length

  11. Height formation of bright points observed by IRIS in Mg II line wings during flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubecka, M.; Schmieder, B.; Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, P.

    2016-09-01

    Context. A flux emergence in the active region AR 111850 was observed on September 24, 2013 with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Many bright points are associated with the new emerging flux and show enhancement brightening in the UV spectra. Aims: The aim of this work is to compute the altitude formation of the compact bright points (CBs) observed in Mg II lines in the context of searching Ellerman bombs (EBs). Methods: IRIS provided two large dense rasters of spectra in Mg II h and k lines, Mg II triplet, C II and Si IV lines covering all the active region and slit jaws in the two bandpasses (1400 Å and 2796 Å) starting at 11:44 UT and 15:39 UT, and lasting 20 min each. Synthetic profiles of Mg II and Hα lines are computed with non-local thermodynamic equlibrium (NLTE) radiative transfer treatment in 1D solar atmosphere model including a hotspot region defined by three parameters: temperature, altitude, and width. Results: Within the two IRIS rasters, 74 CBs are detected in the far wings of the Mg II lines (at +/-1 Å and 3.5 Å). Around 10% of CBs have a signature in Si IV and CII. NLTE models with a hotspot located in the low atmosphere were found to fit a sample of Mg II profiles in CBs. The Hα profiles computed with these Mg II CB models are consistent with typical EB profiles observed from ground based telescopes e.g. THEMIS. A 2D NLTE modelling of fibrils (canopy) demonstrates that the Mg II line centres can be significantly affected but not the peaks and the wings of Mg II lines. Conclusions: We conclude that the bright points observed in Mg II lines can be formed in an extended domain of altitudes in the photosphere and/or the chromosphere (400 to 750 km). Our results are consistent with the theory of heating by Joule dissipation in the atmosphere produced by magnetic field reconnection during flux emergence.

  12. AEGIS: The Diversity of Bright Near-IR Selected Distant Red Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use deep and wide near infrared (NIR) imaging from the Palomar telescope combined with DEEP2 spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Chandra Space Telescope imaging to investigate the nature of galaxies that are red in NIR colors. We locate these 'distant red galaxies' (DRGs) through the color cut (J - K)vega > 2.3 over 0.7 deg2, where we find 1010 DRG candidates down to Ks = 20.5. We combine 95 high quality spectroscopic redshifts with photometric redshifts from BRIJK photometry to determine the redshift and stellar mass distributions for these systems, and morphological/structural and X-ray properties for 107 DRGs in the Extended Groth Strip. We find that many bright (J - K)vega > 2.3 galaxies with Ks 9 - 1012 M· , but with most z > 2 systems massive with M* > 1011 M·. HST imaging shows that the structural properties and morphologies of DRGs are also diverse, with the majority elliptical/compact (57%), and the remainder edge-on spirals (7%), and peculiar galaxies (29%). The DRGs at z < 1.4 with high quality spectroscopic redshifts are generally compact, with small half-light radii, and span a range in rest-frame optical properties. The spectral energy distributions for these objects differ from higher redshift DRGs: they are bluer by one magnitude in observed (I - J) color. A pure IR color selection of high redshift populations is not sufficient to identify unique populations, and other colors, or spectroscopic redshifts are needed to produce homogeneous samples

  13. On compact multipliers of topological algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that if the maximal ideal space Δ(A) of a semisimple commutative complete metrizable locally convex algebra contains no isolated points, then every compact multiplier is trivial. Particularly, compact multipliers on semisimple commutative Frechet algebras whose maximal ideal space has no isolated points are identically zero. (author). 5 refs

  14. Quantification of the compactibility of pharmaceutical powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the compactibility of pharmaceutical powders by a simple linear relationship between the diametral compressive strength of tablets and the applied compaction pressure. The mechanical strength of the tablets is characterized as the crushing...

  15. Physics of compact ignition tokamak designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models for predicting plasma performance in compact ignition experiments are constructed on the basis of theoretical and empirical constraints and data from tokamak experiments. Emphasis is placed on finding transport and confinement models which reproduce results of both ohmically and auxiliary heated tokamak data. Illustrations of the application of the models to compact ignition designs are given

  16. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  17. Interpolation of bilinear operators and compactness

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Eduardo Brandani

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of bilinear operators acting on interpolation of Banach spaces for the $\\rho$ method in relation to the compactness is analyzed. Similar results of Lions-Peetre, Hayakawa and Person's compactness theorems are obtained for the bilinear case and the $\\rho$ method.

  18. A compact lightweight aerosol spectrometer probe (CLASP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, M.K.; Brooks, B.J.; Norris, S.J.; Smith, M.H.; Brooks, I.M.; Leeuw, G. de

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) is an optical particle spectrometer capable of measuring size-resolved particle concentrations in 16 user-defined size bins spanning diameters in the range 0.24 < D < 18.5 μm at a rate of 10 Hz. The combination of its compact nature and ligh

  19. Induced corepresentations of locally compact quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kustermans, Johan

    2000-01-01

    We introduce the construction of induced corepresentations in the setting of locally compact quantum groups and prove that the resulting induced corepresentations are unitary under some mild integrability condition. We also establish a quantum analogue of the classical bijective correspondence between quasi-invariant measures and certain measures on the larger locally compact group.

  20. Compact Process Development at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  1. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and in

  2. The coeffective cohomology for compact symplectic nilmanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coeffective cohomology of symplectic manifolds was recently introduced by Bouche in [3]. He has proved that the coeffective cohomology and the truncated de Rham cohomology groups of a 2n-dimensional compact Kahler manifold are siomorphic, for degree p>- n+1. In this paper we show that the results does not hold for arbitrary compact symplectic nor indefinite Kahler manifolds. 16 refs

  3. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle;

    2006-01-01

    pair of residuals generated by Compact Disc Player. However, these residuals depend on the performance of position servos in the Compact Disc Player. In other publications of the same authors a pair of decoupled residuals is derived. However, the computation of these alternative residuals has been...

  4. DYNAMIC COMPACTION OF PURE COPPER POWDER USING PULSED MAGNETIC FORCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compaction of pure Cu powder was carried out through a series of experiments using dynamic magnetic pulse compaction, and the effects of process parameters, such as discharge energy and compacting direction, on the homogeneity and the compaction density of compacted specimens were presented and discussed. The results indicated that the compaction density of specimens increased with the augment of discharge voltage and time. During unidirectional compaction, there was a density gradient along the loading direction in the compacted specimen, and the minimum compaction density was localized to the center of the bottom of the specimen. The larger the aspect ratio of a powder body, the higher the compaction density of the compacted specimen. And high conductivity drivers were beneficial to the increase of the compaction density. The iterative and the double direction compaction were efficient means to manufacture the homogeneous and high-density powder parts.

  5. Relative Near PS-Compact L-subsets

    OpenAIRE

    HE Wei-min

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the new concept of relative near PS-compactness in L-fuzzy topological spaces is introduced. The relative near PS-compactness is described with a-net , r-ps-cover, r-finite intersection property. The relationship between relative near PS-compactness and near PS-compactness is in vestigated. It is found that near PS-compactness implies relative near PS-compactness and every LF-set of near PS-compact space is relative near PS-compact. The relative near PS-compactness possess the f...

  6. Compactly accessible categories and quantum key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Heunen, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Compact categories have lately seen renewed interest via applications to quantum physics. Being essentially finite-dimensional, they cannot accomodate (co)limit-based constructions. For example, they cannot capture protocols such as quantum key distribution, that rely on the law of large numbers. To overcome this limitation, we introduce the notion of a compactly accessible category, relying on the extra structure of a factorisation system. This notion allows for infinite dimension while retaining key properties of compact categories: the main technical result is that the choice-of-duals functor on the compact part extends canonically to the whole compactly accessible category. As an example, we model a quantum key distribution protocol and prove its correctness categorically.

  7. Secondary structures in long compact polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdorf, Richard; Ferguson, Allison; Jacobsen, Jesper L; Kondev, Jané

    2006-11-01

    Compact polymers are self-avoiding random walks that visit every site on a lattice. This polymer model is used widely for studying statistical problems inspired by protein folding. One difficulty with using compact polymers to perform numerical calculations is generating a sufficiently large number of randomly sampled configurations. We present a Monte Carlo algorithm that uniformly samples compact polymer configurations in an efficient manner, allowing investigations of chains much longer than previously studied. Chain configurations generated by the algorithm are used to compute statistics of secondary structures in compact polymers. We determine the fraction of monomers participating in secondary structures, and show that it is self-averaging in the long-chain limit and strictly less than 1. Comparison with results for lattice models of open polymer chains shows that compact chains are significantly more likely to form secondary structure. PMID:17279930

  8. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Forward Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Peipmeier, Jeffrey; Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007) [1]. It is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. One of the spaceborne instruments is an L-band radiometer with a shared single feedhorn and parabolic mesh reflector. While the radiometer measures the emission over a footprint of interest, unwanted emissions are also received by the antenna through the antenna sidelobes from the cosmic background and other error sources such as the Sun, the Moon and the galaxy. Their effects need to be considered accurately, and the analysis of the overall performance of the radiometer requires end-to-end performance simulation from Earth emission to antenna brightness temperature, such as the global simulation of L-band brightness temperature simulation over land and sea [2]. To assist with the SMAP radiometer level 1B algorithm development, the SMAP forward brightness temperature simulator is developed by adapting the Aquarius simulator [2] with necessary modifications. This poster presents the current status of the SMAP forward brightness simulator s development including incorporating the land microwave emission model and its input datasets, and a simplified atmospheric radiative transfer model. The latest simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the ability of supporting the SMAP L1B algorithm development.

  9. Matter wave interference pattern in the collision of bright solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in a quasi one-dimensional regime in a time-dependent trap and show analytically that it is possible to observe matter wave interference patterns in the intra-trap collision of two bright solitons by selectively tuning the trap frequency and scattering length.

  10. Minimum-phase distribution of cosmic source brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimum-phase distributions of brightness (profiles) for cosmic radio sources 3C 144 (the wave lambda=21 cm), 3C 338 (lambda=3.5 m), and 3C 353 (labda=31.3 cm and 3.5 m) are obtained. A real possibility for the profile recovery from module fragments of its Fourier-image is shown

  11. The HI dominated Low Surface Brightness Galaxy KKR17

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Man I; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Du, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Nan

    2014-01-01

    We present new narrow-band (H$\\alpha$ and [OIII]) imagings and optical spectrophotometry of HII regions for a gas-rich low surface brightness irregular galaxy, KKR 17. The central surface brightness of the galaxy is $\\mu_0(B)$ = 24.15 $\\pm$0.03 mag~sec$^{-2}$. The galaxy was detected by \\emph{Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey} (ALFALFA), and its mass is dominated by neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. In contrast, both the stellar masses of the bright HII and diffuse stellar regions are small. In addition, the fit to the spectral energy distribution to each region shows the stellar populations of HII and diffuse regions are different. The bright HII region contains a large fraction of O-type stars, revealing the recent strong star formation, whereas the diffuse region is dominated by median age stars, which has a typical age of $\\sim$ 600 Myrs. Using the McGaugh's abundance model, we found that the average metallicity of KKR 17 is 12 + (O/H) = 8.0 $\\pm$ 0.1. The star formation rate of KKR 17 is 0.21$\\pm$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$...

  12. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  13. Bright-dark incoherently coupled photovoltaic soliton pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Chun-Feng; Pei Yan-Bo; Zhou Zhong-Xiang; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2005-01-01

    The coupling between two mutually incoherent optical beams that propagate collinearly in open-circuit photovoltaic photorefractive media is investigated. It is shown that an incoherently coupled bright-dark spatial soliton pair can be formed due to photovoltaic effect. The physical properties of such a soliton pair are also discussed.

  14. The star-bright hour : [poems] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2003-01-01

    Autori lühitutvustus lk. 231. Sisu: The star-bright hour ; The debt ; Not a dream ; Fog-bound ; Corals in an Ancient river ; Frou-frou 1-3. Orig.: Tähetund ; Vilepuhuja ; Võlg ; "Mitte viirastus, meelepett..." ; Udus ; Korallid Emajões ; Froufrou 1-3

  15. Bright soliton trains of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Hulet, R. G.; Strecker, K.E.; Patridge, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    We variationally determine the dynamics of bright soliton trains composed of harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interatomic interactions. In particular, we obtain the interaction potential between two solitons. We also discuss the formation of soliton trains due to the quantum mechanical phase fluctuations of a one-dimensional condensate.

  16. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Tugay, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  17. Optical variability of the medium-bright quasar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variability study of the 32-member Medium-Bright Quasar Sample is reported. It is found that the star US 1953 has undergone a noticeable variation in the course of 26 hr. Apparent variations in the extragalactic object US 3498 may be illusory, owing to its partially resolved appearance. No other evidence for variability was detected. 34 refs

  18. Thermionic sources for HI-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper surveys the capabilities and limitations of modern thermionic electron sources for producing high emission density (>10 A/cm2)-high brightness beams. The emphasis is on dispenser cathodes. The capabilities of existing commercial cathodes as well as the potential for future cathode improvements as demonstrated in various prototype structures are described

  19. Enhancing the brightness of high current electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concepts such as the two-beam accelerator offer the possibility of translating pulsed power technology into a form useful to the design of high luminosity accelerators for high-energy physics applications. Realization of the promise of these concepts will require the design of electron guns which are optimized with respect to beam brightness at current levels of approximately 1 kA. Because high luminosity implies accelerator operation at high repetition rates, the high-current beam source must be designed so that the beam does not intercept the electrodes. In our investigations of electron gun configurations, we have found that the brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. To investigate the sensitivity of beam brightness to these factors in a manner suitable for modelling transient phenomena at the beam head, we have developed a Darwin approximation particle code, DPC. The main component in our experimental program is a readily modified electron gun that allows us to test many candidate cathode materials, types, and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MW/cm. We have also developed several diagnostics suitable for measuring the brightness of intense, low-emittance beams

  20. The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: The star-bright hour ; Not a dream ; The Piper ; Corals in an ancent river. Luuletused pärinevad kogumikust "Tuulelaeval valgusest on aerud = Windship with Oars of Light. (Tallinn : Huma, 2001). Orig.: Tähetund ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett ; Vilepuhuja ; Korallid Emajões

  1. The "Brightness Rules" Alternative Conception for Light Bulb Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Joel A.; Stuessy, Carol

    2006-01-01

    An alternative conception for the observed differences in light bulb brightness was revealed during an unguided inquiry investigation in which prospective elementary teachers placed identical bulbs in series, parallel, and combination direct current circuits. Classroom observations, document analyses, and video and audio transcriptions led to the…

  2. Variations in the Fe mineralogy of bright Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John; Erard, Stephane; Geissler, Paul; Singer, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Bright regions on Mars are interpreted as 'soil' derived by chemical alteration of crustal rocks, whose main pigmentary component is ferric oxide or oxyhydroxide. The mineralogy and mineralogic variability of ferric iron are important evidence for the evolution of Martian soil: mineralogy of ferric phases is sensitive to chemical conditions in their genetic environments, and the spatial distributions of different ferric phases would record a history of both chemical environments and physical mixing. Reflectance spectroscopic studies provide several types of evidence that discriminate possible pigmentary phases, including the position of a crystal field absorption near 0.9 microns and position and strengths of absorptions in the UV-visible wavelength region. Recent telescopic spectra and laboratory measurements of Mars soil analogs suggest that spectral features of bright soil can be explained based on a single pigmentary phase, hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), occurring in both 'nanophase' and more crystalline forms. Here we report on a systematic investigation of Martian bright regions using ISM imaging spectrometer data, in which we examined spatial variations in the position and shape of the approximately 0.9 microns absorption. We found both local and regional heterogeneities that indicate differences in Fe mineralogy. These results demonstrate that bright soils do not represent a single lithology that has been homogenized by eolian mixing, and suggest that weathering of soils in different geologic settings has followed different physical and chemical pathways.

  3. On the model of type 1 supernova near brightness maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some photometric and spectrophotometric data about supernovae of 1 type CH-1 are analyzed. Colour /Tsub(c)/ and spectrophotmetric /T/ temperatures of SN1972-e compared. It has been concluded that at the maximum brightness tsub(m) and before the maximum Tsub(c) approximately TTsub(c) < T after the maximum brightness. A considerable deviation of Tsub(c) from T is connected with the significant role of metal lines in the attenuation of the short-wavelength region spectrum CH-1, which becomes essential when T < 10000 deg K. Behaviour of the radius of the photosphere Rp at CH-1 is investigated on the basis of the accepted dependence of T on time. It is shown that at the maximum brightness Rp, increases linearly at the rate of about 5000 km/sec, and reaches its highest value approximately in 30-35sup(d) after the maximum brightness tsub(m) and then rather quickly decreases. The rate of the expansion of the photosphere is twice lower than the mean expansion velocity of the shell CH-1. The initial moments of separation of these CH are -25sup(d) and -16sup(d) respectively (with respect to the maximum V) have been found using an extrapolation of the Rp(t) dependence for SN 1972-e and SN 1970-j. The role of the temperature dependence of non-transparency on the behavior of the photosphere Ch-1 is discussed. Bolomeic luminosity of CH-1 at the maximum brightness is investigated. Arguments supporting the conclusion that the bolometric maximum of CH-1 comes formerly to a visual one, are given

  4. Investigation of compressibility and compactibility parameters of roller compacted Theophylline and its binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžović, Ervina; Betz, Gabriele; Hadžidedić, Seherzada; El-Arini, Silvia Kocova; Leuenberger, Hans

    2011-09-15

    Roller compaction is a dry granulation method which results in tablets with inferior tensile strength comparing to direct compaction. The effect of roller compaction on compressibility and compactibility of tablets prepared from Theophylline anhydrate powder, Theophylline anhydrate fine powder and Theophylline monohydrate was investigated by measuring tensile strength of tablets as well as calculating compressibility and compactibility parameters by Leuenberger equation. The tablets under the same conditions were prepared by direct compaction and roller compaction. The binary mixtures of Theophylline anhydrate powder, Theophylline anhydrate fine powder, Theophylline monohydrate and microcrystalline cellulose were prepared in order to determine the optimal ratio of active material and excipients which delivers a sufficient mechanical strength of tablets. Tensile strength of MCC tablets and compactibility parameters calculated by Leuenberger equation after roller compaction was significantly decreased, while THAP, THAFP and THMO tablets showed only a minor reduction in compactibility and compressibility. Adding MCC to a mixture with Theophylline showed that the right choice and ratio of excipients can enable a sufficient mechanical strength of the tablets after roller compaction. PMID:21704142

  5. A large population of ultra-compact dwarf galaxies in the Hydra I cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Misgeld, I; Hilker, M; Richtler, T; Georgiev, I Y; Schuberth, Y

    2011-01-01

    We performed a large spectroscopic survey of compact, unresolved objects in the core of the Hydra I galaxy cluster (Abell 1060), with the aim of identifying ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), and investigating the properties of the globular cluster (GC) system around the central cD galaxy NGC 3311. We obtained VIMOS medium resolution spectra of about 1200 candidate objects with apparent magnitudes 18.5 5 x 10^7 M_sun) and a half-light radius of 25 pc. This places it among the brightest and most massive UCDs ever discovered. Most of the GCs/UCDs are both spatially and dynamically associated to the central cD galaxy. The overall velocity dispersion of the GCs/UCDs is comparable to what is found for the cluster galaxies. However, when splitting the sample into a bright and a faint part, we observe a lower velocity dispersion for the bright UCDs/GCs than for the fainter objects. At a dividing magnitude of M_V = -10.75 mag, the dispersions differ by more than 200 km/s, and up to 300 km/s for objects within 5 ar...

  6. Globular Clusters, Ultra-Compact Dwarfs, and the Formation of Galaxy Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are a distinctive and ubiquitous constituent of galaxy halos. Their existence alludes to an early epoch of galaxy building characterized by the high star formation rates needed to form massive clusters, and a merging process that produced the extended, spheroidal stellar halos in today's galaxies. While studies of stellar halos are generally limited by low surface brightnesses or the faintness of individual halo stars, GCs are bright and compact, making them excellent tracers of stellar halos out to hundreds of megaparsecs. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a CFHT Large Program that has acquired imaging of the 104 square degrees within the Virgo Cluster's virial radius. This deep and contiguous imaging of the nearest galaxy cluster provides us a new view of globular clusters across the full range of galaxy morphology and mass, as well as in the regions between galaxies. It also provides the first complete census of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) in Virgo, objects which may be related to massive GCs and galaxy nuclei. In this talk, I will present what we have learned so far about extragalactic GC systems and UCDs from the NGVS, from both photometry and spectroscopy.

  7. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  8. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  9. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  10. General Relativity and Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the conceptual foundation of general relativity (GR) - equivalence principle, space-time geometry and special relativity, I train cross hairs on two characteristic predictions of GR - black holes and gravitational waves. These two consequences of GR have played a significant role in relativistic astrophysics, e.g. compact X-ray sources, quasars, blazars, coalescing binary pulsars, etc. With quantum theory wedded to GR, particle production from vacuum becomes a generic feature whenever event horizons are present. In this paper, I shall briefly discuss the fate of a `black hole atom' when Hawking radiation is taken into account. In the context of gravitational waves, I shall focus on the possible consequences of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from highly magnetized and rapidly spinning white dwarfs. The discovery of RX J0648.0-4418 system - a WD in a binary with mass slightly over 1.2 $ M_{\\odot}$, and rotating with spin period as short as 13.2 s, provides an impetus to revisit the pr...

  11. Spherically symmetric charged compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Gupta, Y.K. [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology University, Department of Mathematics, Noida, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Chowdhury, Sourav Roy [Seth Anandaram Jaipuria College, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2015-08-15

    In this article we consider the static spherically symmetric metric of embedding class 1. When solving the Einstein-Maxwell field equations we take into account the presence of ordinary baryonic matter together with the electric charge. Specific new charged stellar models are obtained where the solutions are entirely dependent on the electromagnetic field, such that the physical parameters, like density, pressure etc. do vanish for the vanishing charge. We systematically analyze altogether the three sets of Solutions I, II, and III of the stellar models for a suitable functional relation of ν(r). However, it is observed that only the Solution I provides a physically valid and well-behaved situation, whereas the Solutions II and III are not well behaved and hence not included in the study. Thereafter it is exclusively shown that the Solution I can pass through several standard physical tests performed by us. To validate the solution set presented here a comparison has also been made with that of the compact stars, like RX J 1856 - 37, Her X - 1, PSR 1937+21, PSRJ 1614-2230, and PSRJ 0348+0432, and we have shown the feasibility of the models. (orig.)

  12. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, Kd, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.)

  13. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations (flicker) of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T eff = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested

  14. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  15. High-power high-brightness 808nm QCW laser diode mini bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; DeVito, Mark; Bao, Ling; Hodges, Aaron; Zhang, Shiguo; Wise, Damian; Grimshaw, Mike; Xu, Dapeng; Bai, Chendong

    2010-02-01

    A new class of high power high brightness 808 nm QCW laser diode mini bars has been developed. With nLight's nXLT facet passivation technology and improvements in epitaxial structure, mini bars of 3 mm bar width with high efficiency design have tested to over 280 W peak power with peak efficiency over 64% on conduction cooled CS packages, equivalent to output power density near 130 mW/μm. These mini laser bars open up new applications as compact, portable, and low current pump sources. Liftests have been carried out on conduction cooled CS packages and on QCW stacks. Over 370 million (M) shots lifetest with high efficiency design has been demonstrated on CS so far without failure, and over 80 M shots on QCW stacks with accelerated stress lifetest have also proven high reliability on mini bars with high temperature design. Failure analysis determined that the failure mechanism was related to bulk defects, showing that mini laser bars are not prone to facet failure, which is consistent with the large current pulse test and failure analysis on high power single emitters.

  16. High brightness MEMS mirror based head-up display (HUD) modules with wireless data streaming capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Hachtel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    A high brightness Head-Up Display (HUD) module was demonstrated with a fast, dual-axis MEMS mirror that displays vector images and text, utilizing its ~8kHz bandwidth on both axes. Two methodologies were evaluated: in one, the mirror steers a laser at wide angles of mirror displays content on reflective multi-color emissive phosphor plates reflected off the windshield to create a virtual image for the driver. The display module is compact, consisting of a single laser diode, off-the-shelf lenses and a MEMS mirror in combination with a MEMS controller to enable precise movement of the mirror's X- and Y-axis. The MEMS controller offers both USB and wireless streaming capability and we utilize a library of functions on a host computer for creating content and controlling the mirror. Integration with smart phone applications is demonstrated, utilizing the mobile device both for content generation based on various messages or data, and for content streaming to the MEMS controller via Bluetooth interface. The display unit is highly resistant to vibrations and shock, and requires only ~1.5W to operate, even with content readable in sunlit outdoor conditions. The low power requirement is in part due to a vector graphics approach, allowing the efficient use of laser power, and also due to the use of a single, relatively high efficiency laser and simple optics.

  17. AEGIS: The Diversity of Bright Near-IR Selected Distant Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Conselice, C J; Georgakakis, A; Almaini, O; Coil, A L; Cooper, M C; Eisenhardt, P; Foucaud, S; Koekemoer, A; Lotz, J; Noeske, K F; Weiner, B; Willmer, C N A

    2006-01-01

    We use deep and wide near infrared (NIR) imaging from the Palomar telescope combined with DEEP2 spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Chandra Space Telescope imaging to investigate the nature of galaxies that are red in NIR colors. We locate these `distant red galaxies' (DRGs) through the color cut (J-K)_{vega} > 2.3 over 0.7 deg^{2}, where we find 1010 DRG candidates down to K_s = 20.5. We combine 95 high quality spectroscopic redshifts with photometric redshifts from BRIJK photometry to determine the redshift and stellar mass distributions for these systems, and morphological/structural and X-ray properties for 107 DRGs in the Extended Groth Strip. We find that many bright (J-K)_{vega}>2.3 galaxies with K_s2 systems massive with M_*>10^{11} M_solar. HST imaging shows that the structural properties and morphologies of DRGs are also diverse, with the majority elliptical/compact (57%), and the remainder edge-on spirals (7%), and peculiar galaxies (29%). The DRGs at z < 1.4 with high quality spec...

  18. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project: the bright sample

    CERN Document Server

    Massardi, Marcella; Bonavera, Laura; López-Caniego, Marcos; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Ekers, Ronald D

    2011-01-01

    The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) have provided flux density measurements at frequencies below and overlapping with Planck frequency bands of suitably chosen samples of AT20G radio sources, almost simultaneously with Planck observations. On the whole, we have observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) 482 sources in the frequency range between 4.5 and 40 GHz in the period between July 2009 and August 2010. Several sources were observed more than once. In this paper we present the aims of the project, the selection criteria, and the observation and data reduction procedures. We also present the data in total intensity for a complete sample of 189 sources with S(20 GHz)>500 mJy, Galactic latitude |b|>5{\\deg}, and declination <-30{\\deg}, and some statistical analysis of the spectral behaviour and variability of this sample, referred to as the "bright PACO sample". These data are important to investigate confusion effects affecting Planck data on radio sources. On the other hand, comp...

  19. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  20. Exceptionally bright TeV flares from the binary LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, S; Aune, T; Barnacka, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Dumm, J; Eisch, J D; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Huetten, M; Hakansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; O'Brien, S; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rousselle, J; Rulten, C; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2016-01-01

    The TeV binary system LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303 is known for its regular, non-thermal emission pattern which traces the orbital period of the compact object in its 26.5 day orbit around its B0 Ve star companion. The system typically presents elevated TeV emission around apastron passage with flux levels between 5% and 15% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula (> 300 GeV). In this article, VERITAS observations of LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303 taken in late 2014 are presented, during which bright TeV flares around apastron at flux levels peaking above 30% of the Crab Nebula flux were detected. This is the brightest such activity from this source ever seen in the TeV regime. The strong outbursts have rise and fall times of less than a day. The short timescale of the flares, in conjunction with the observation of 10 TeV photons from LS I +61$^\\circ$ 303 during the flares, provides constraints on the properties of the accelerator in the source.

  1. Exceptionally Bright TeV Flares from the Binary LS I +61 303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Brien, S.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rousselle, J.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-01-01

    The TeV binary system LS I +61° 303 is known for its regular, non-thermal emission pattern that traces the orbital period of the compact object in its 26.5 day orbit around its B0 Ve star companion. The system typically presents elevated TeV emission around apastron passage with flux levels between 5% and 15% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula (>300 GeV). In this article, VERITAS observations of LS I +61° 303 taken in late 2014 are presented, during which bright TeV flares around apastron at flux levels peaking above 30% of the Crab Nebula flux were detected. This is the brightest such activity from this source ever seen in the TeV regime. The strong outbursts have rise and fall times of less than a day. The short timescale of the flares, in conjunction with the observation of 10 TeV photons from LS I +61° 303 during the flares, provides constraints on the properties of the accelerator in the source.

  2. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, H; Paladino, R; Hull, C L H; Cortes, P; Moellenbrock, G; Fomalont, E; Asada, K; Hada, K

    2016-01-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C~286 made with the ALMA at 1.3~mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17\\%, this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or EVPA) in the core is $\\sim$\\,$39^{\\circ}$, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report ...

  3. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Hull, C. L. H.; Cortes, P.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Asada, K.; Hada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south–west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ˜39◦, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  4. Explosive compaction of CuCr alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金平; 罗守靖; 龚朝晖; 牛玮; 纪松

    2002-01-01

    The production of CuCr alloys utilizing explosive compaction was studied. Mixture powders of CuCr alloys placed in tubes with a dimension of d14.0mm×21.4mm can be compacted using explosive pads of 16.5mm or 22.5mm. Thicker pads of explosive make the compacts more porous. The effects of the ratio of me/mp, ratio of me/(mp+mt) and impact energy on the density of compacts were similar, they were chosen to control explosive compaction, respectively. When adequate value of the parameters me/mp, me/(mt+mp) and impact energy of unit area of tube was chosen, high density(7.858g/cm3), high hardness(HB189) and low conductance (13.6MS/m) of CuCr alloys could be made by explosive compaction. The general properties of CuCr alloys by explosive compaction are similar to those of CuCr alloys by traditional process.

  5. Soil compaction and fertilization in soybean productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beutler Amauri Nelson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil compaction and fertilization affect soybean development. This study evaluated the effects of soil compaction and fertilization on soybean (Glycine max cv. Embrapa 48 productivity in a Typic Haplustox under field conditions in Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil. A completely randomized design with a 5 x 2 factorial layout (compaction vs. fertilization, with four replications in each treatment, was employed. Each experimental unit (replicate consisted of a 3.6 m² useful area. After the soil was prepared by cultivation, an 11 Mg tractor passed over it a variable number of times to create five levels of compaction. Treatments were: T0= no compaction, T1= one tractor pass, T2= two, T4= four, and T6= six passes, and no fertilizer and fertilizer to give soybean yields of 2.5 to 2.9 Mg ha-1. Soil was sampled at depths of 0.02-0.05, 0.07-0.10, and 0.15-0.18 m to determine macro and microporosity, penetration resistance (PR, and bulk density (Db. After 120 days growing under these conditions, the plants were analyzed in terms of development (plant height, number of pods, shoot dry matter per plant and weight of 100 seeds and seed productivity per hectare. Soil compaction decreased soybean development and productivity, but this effect was decreased by soil fertilization, showing that such fertilization increased soybean tolerance to soil compaction.

  6. Radio and Mid-Infrared Properties of Compact Starbursts: Distancing Themselves from the Main Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, E J; Armus, L; Condon, J J; Evans, A S

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between 8.44\\,GHz brightness temperatures and 1.4 to 8.44\\,GHz radio spectral indices with 6.2\\,$\\mu$m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission and 9.7\\,$\\mu$m silicate absorption features for a sample of 36 local luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. We find that galaxies having small 6.2\\,$\\mu$m PAH equivalent widths (EQWs), which signal the presence of weak PAH emission and/or an excess of very hot dust, also have flat spectral indices. The three active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified through their excessively large 8.44\\,GHz brightness temperatures are also identified as AGN via their small 6.2\\,$\\mu$m PAH EQWs. We also find that the flattening of the radio spectrum increases with increasing silicate optical depth, 8.44\\,GHz brightness temperature, and decreasing size of the radio source even after removing potential AGN, supporting the idea that compact starbursts show spectral flattening as the result of increased free-free absorption. These correlations a...

  7. Compact X-ray source based on Compton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zelinsky, A; Karnaukhov, I; Kononenko, S; Lapshin, V G; Mytsykov, A; Telegin, Yu P; Khodyachikh, A; Shcherbakov, A; Molodkin, V; Nemoshkalenko, V; Shpak, A

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility study of an intense X-ray source based on the interaction between the electron beam in a compact storage ring and the laser pulse accumulated in an optical resonator is carried out. We propose to reconstruct the 160 MeV electron storage ring N-100, which was shutdown several years ago. A new magnetic lattice will provide a transverse of electron beam size of approx 35 mu m at the point of electron beam-laser beam interaction. The proposed facility is to generate X-ray beams of intensity approx 2.6x10 sup 1 sup 4 s sup - sup 1 and spectral brightness approx 10 sup 1 sup 2 phot/0.1%bw/s/mm sup 2 /mrad sup 2 in the energy range from 10 keV up to 0.5 MeV. These X-ray beam parameters meet the requirements for most of technological and scientific applications. Besides, we plan to use the new facility for studying the laser cooling effect.

  8. Kilonova/Macronova Emission from Compact Binary Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masaomi

    2016-01-01

    We review current understanding of kilonova/macronova emission from compact binary mergers (mergers of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole). Kilonova/macronova is optical and near-infrared emission powered by radioactive decays of r-process nuclei. Emission from the dynamical ejecta with ~0.01 Msun is likely to have a luminosity of ~10^{40}-10^{41} erg s^{-1} with a characteristic timescale of about 1 week. The spectral peak is located in red optical or near-infrared wavelengths. A subsequent accretion disk wind may provide an additional luminosity, or an earlier/bluer emission if it is not absorbed by the precedent dynamical ejecta. The detection of near-infrared excess in the afterglow of short GRB 130603B and possible optical excess in GRB 060614 supports the concept of the kilonova/macronova scenario. At 200 Mpc distance, a typical brightness of kilonova/macronova with 0.01 Msun ejecta is expected to be about 22 mag and the emission rapidly fades to >24 mag within ~10 days after the merge...

  9. Galaxy interactions in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-01-01

    I present observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new 28-inch telescope at the Wise Observatory. This galaxy group was advertised to be non-interacting, or to be in a very early interaction stage, but this is not the case. The observations reported here were done using a "luminance" filter, essentially a very broad R filter, reaching a low surface brightness level of about 26 mag per square arcsec. Additional observations were obtained in a narrow spectral band approximately centered on the rest-frame H-alpha line from the group. Contrary to previous studies, my observations show that at least two of the major galaxies have had significant interactions in the past, although probably not between themselves. I report the discovery of a faint extended tail emerging from the brightest of the group galaxies, severe isophote twisting and possible outer shells around another galaxy, and map the HII regions in all the galaxies.

  10. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Garland, C A; Guzman, R; Castander, F J; Perez-Gallego, J

    2011-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosity, blue color, and high surface brightness that sit at the critical juncture of galaxies evolving from the blue to the red sequence. As part of our multi-wavelength survey of local LCBGs, we have been studying the HI content of these galaxies using both single-dish telescopes and interferometers. Our goals are to determine if single-dish HI observations represent a true measure of the dynamical mass of LCBGs and to look for signatures of recent interactions that may be triggering star formation in LCBGs. Our data show that while some LCBGs are undergoing interactions, many appear isolated. While all LCBGs contain HI and show signatures of rotation, the population does not lie on the Tully-Fisher relation nor can it evolve onto it. Furthermore, the HI maps of many LCBGs show signatures of dynamically hot components, suggesting that we are seeing the formation of a thick disk or spheroid in at least some LCBGs....

  11. The Evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies: Disks or Spheroids?

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Rabidoux, K; Wolfe, S; Guzman, R; Perez-Gallego, J; Castander, F J

    2009-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a diverse class of galaxies characterized by high luminosities, blue colors, and high surface brightnesses. Residing at the high luminosity, high mass end of the blue sequence, LCBGs sit at the critical juncture of galaxies that are evolving from the blue to the red sequence. Yet we do not understand what drives the evolution of LCBGs, nor how they will evolve. Based on single-dish HI observations, we know that they have a diverse range of properties. LCBGs are HI-rich with M(HI)=10^{9-10.5} M(sun), have moderate M(dyn)=10^{10-12} M(sun), and 80% have gas depletion timescales less than 3 Gyr. These properties are consistent with LCBGs evolving into low-mass spirals or high mass dwarf ellipticals or dwarf irregulars. However, LCBGs do not follow the Tully-Fisher relation, nor can most evolve onto it, implying that many LCBGs are not smoothly rotating, virialized systems. GMRT and VLA HI maps confirm this conclusion revealing signatures of recent interactions and dynam...

  12. The Neutral ISM in Nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, C A; Williams, J P; Guzmán, R; Castander, F J

    2003-01-01

    We observed 20 nearby Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) in HI and CO(J=2-1) with the GBT and JCMT. These ~L^star galaxies are blue, high surface brightness, starbursting, high metallicity galaxies with an underlying older stellar population. They are common at z~1, but rare in the local Universe. It has been proposed that intermediate redshift LCBGs may be the progenitors of local dwarf ellipticals or low luminosity spirals, or that they may be more massive disks forming from the center outward to become L^star galaxies. To discriminate among various possible evolutionary scenarios, we have measured the dynamical masses and gas depletion time scales of this sample of nearby LCBGs. We find that local LCBGs span a wide range of dynamical masses, from 4 x 10^9 to 1 x 10^11 M_solar (measured within R_25). Molecular gas in local LCBGs is depleted quite quickly, in 30 to 200 million years. The molecular plus atomic gas is depleted in 30 million to 10 billion years; however, ~80% of the local LCBGs deplete thei...

  13. The nature of compact groups of galaxies from cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A

    2009-01-01

    The nature of compact groups (CGs) of galaxies, apparently so dense that the galaxies often overlap, is still a subject of debate: Are CGs roughly as dense in 3D as they appear in projection? Or are they caused by chance alignments of galaxies along the line-of-sight within larger virialized groups, or within even longer filamentary structures? The nature of CGs is re-appraised using the redshift zero outputs of three galaxy formation models, applied to the dissipationless Millennium Simulation. The same selection criteria are applied to mock galaxy catalogs from these models as have been applied by Hickson and co-workers in redshift space. We find 50 times as many mock CGs as the 'HCGs' found by Hickson within a distance corresponding to 9000 km/s. This very low (2%) completeness is caused by Hickson missing groups that were either faint, near the surface brightness threshold, of small angular size and with a dominant brightest galaxy. We find that most CGs are physically dense, regardless of the precise thr...

  14. Search for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies During Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Amorin, R; Aguerri, J A; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal poor systems going through a major starburst that cannot last for long. We have identified galaxies which may be BCDs during quiescence (QBCD), i.e., before the characteristic starburst sets in or when it has faded away. These QBCD galaxies are assumed to be like the BCD host galaxies. The SDSS/DR6 database provides ~21500 QBCD candidates. We also select from SDSS/DR6 a complete sample of BCD galaxies to serve as reference. The properties of these two galaxy sets have been computed and compared. The QBCD candidates are thirty times more abundant than the BCDs, with their luminosity functions being very similar except for the scaling factor, and the expected luminosity dimming associated with the end of the starburst. QBCDs are redder than BCDs, and they have larger HII region based oxygen abundance. QBCDs also have lower surface brightness. The BCD candidates turn out to be the QBCD candidates with the largest specific star formation rate (actually, with the largest...

  15. Subsoil Compaction as a Climate Damage Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Birkás

    2009-06-01

    Soil compaction has become a soil management problem during the last decade as a result of the occurrence of periods of water-logging as well as droughts. This study contains an evaluation of factors relating to subsoil compaction, as indicator of climate effects on arable fields. This paper is based on soil condition monitoring and measuring that was started 32 years ago and on short and long-term experiments modeling and checking the extension of compaction in the soil. The survey comprised 1526 monitoring places and 38 experimental plots. The following five points were chosen for monitoring: 1 root zone state (to a depth of 0-60 cm; 2 occurrence of compacted layer (indicating likelihood of risk; 3 extension of the compacted layer (indicating the degree of damage; 4 long term effects of tillage (soil state deterioration or improvement, and 5 tillage-induced water-logging and drought damage impacts on yield loss. The main objectives of the experiments were: 1 occurrence and the extent of tillage-pan damage in soils of different susceptibility to compaction; 2 consequences on water management in each of the years covered by the experiments; 3 soil quality consequences, and 4 alleviation of pan-compaction by mechanical and biological methods. Long-term field monitoring and experimental work have both convincingly proven a correlation between subsoil compaction and the degree of climatic damage. In view of the findings, trends in soil tillage can be grouped into the following two categories: climate damage mitigating and climate-stress increasing ones. The formation and location of compacted layers provided information concerning the depth, the method and the type of tillage applied, along with the expected risk for crop production under extreme climate conditions.

  16. Self Compacting Concrete And Its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahesh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC, which flows under its own weight and doesn’t require any external vibration for compaction, has revolutionized concrete placement. Such concrete should have relatively low yield value to ensure high flow ability, a moderate viscosity to resists segregation and bleeding and must maintain its homogeneity during transportation, placing and curing to ensure adequate structural performance and long term durability. Self-compacting concrete (SCC can be defined as a fresh concrete which possesses superior flow ability under maintained stability (i.e. no segregation thus allowing self-compaction that is, material consolidation without addition of energy. Self-compacting concrete is a fluid mixture suitable for placing in structures with Congested reinforcement without vibration and it helps in achieving higher quality of surface finishes. However utilization of high reactive Metakaolin and Flyash asan admixtures as an effective pozzolan which causes great improvement in the porestructure. The relative proportions of key components are considered by volumerather than by mass. self compacting concrete (SCC mix design with 29% of coarse aggregate, replacement of cement with Metakaolin and class F flyash, combinations of both and controlled SCC mix with 0.36 water/cementitious ratio(by weight and388 litre/m3 of cement paste volume. Crushed granite stones of size 16mm and12.5mm are used with a blending 60:40 by percentage weight of total coarse aggregate. Self-compacting concrete compactibility is affected by the characteristics of materials and the mix proportions; it becomes necessary to evolve a procedure formix design of SCC. The properties of different constituent materials used in this investigation and its standard tests procedures for acceptance characteristics of self compacting concrete such as slump flow, V-funnel and L-Box are presented.

  17. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  18. The relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture. Selection of frequency range for microwave remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of brightness temperature data acquired from field and aircraft experiments demonstrates a linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. However, the analysis of brightness temperature data acquired by the Skylab radiometer demonstrates a non-linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. In view of the above and also because of recent theoretical developments for the calculation of the dielectric constant and brightness temperature under varying soil moisture profile conditions, an attempt is made to study the theoretical relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture as a function of frequency. Through the above analysis, the appropriate microwave frequency range for soil moisture studies is recommended

  19. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, Arlan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  20. Model Building with Non-Compact Cosets

    CERN Document Server

    Croon, Djuna

    2016-01-01

    We explore Goldstone boson potentials in non-compact cosets of the form SO(n,1)/SO(n). We employ a geometric approach to find the scalar potential, and focus on the conditions under which it is compact in the large field limit. We show that such a potential is found for a specific misalignment of the vacuum. This result has applications in different contexts, such as in Composite Higgs scenarios and theories for the Early Universe. We work out an example of inflation based on a non-compact coset which makes predictions which are consistent with the current observational data.

  1. The formation of compact groups of galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马駬; 俞允强

    1999-01-01

    In the compact group of galaxies the galaxies can merge into a few massive ones in a very short time, so they must be formed very recently. On the other hand, according to the theory of structure formation, the denser system should form earlier. By analyzing the apparent paradox, we suggest that the merging process of CDM halo plays an important role in the formation of the compact groups of galaxies: it delays the formation of compact groups of galaxies, and makes the groups of galaxies much denser.

  2. Subsoil Compaction as a Climate Damage Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Birkás

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Some forms of soil compaction occur on arable lands both in Hungary (1.82 million ha and in Croatia (0.97 million ha having negative impacts on agricultural production. Tillage-induced subsoil compaction has oft en occurred in the Pannonian region in relation to traffic-induced compaction.Soil compaction has become a soil management problem during the last decade as a result of the occurrence of periods of water-logging as well as droughts. This study contains an evaluation of factors relating to subsoil compaction, as indicator of climate effects on arable fields. This paper is based on soil condition monitoring and measuring that was started 32 years ago and on short and long-term experiments modeling and checking the extension of compaction in the soil. The survey comprised 1526 monitoring places and 38 experimental plots. The following five points were chosen for monitoring: 1 root zone state (to a depth of 0-60 cm; 2 occurrence of compacted layer (indicating likelihood of risk; 3 extension of the compacted layer (indicating the degree of damage; 4 long term effects of tillage (soil state deterioration or improvement, and 5 tillage-induced water-logging and drought damage impacts on yield loss. The main objectives of the experiments were: 1 occurrence and the extent of tillage-pan damage in soils of different susceptibility to compaction; 2 consequences on water management in each of the years covered by the experiments; 3 soil quality consequences, and 4 alleviation of pan-compaction by mechanical and biological methods. Long-term field monitoring and experimental work have both convincingly proven a correlation between subsoil compaction and the degree of climatic damage. In view of the findings, trends in soil tillage can be grouped into the following two categories: climate damage mitigating and climate-stress increasing ones. The formation and location of compacted layers provided information concerning the depth, the method and the

  3. L^2-homology for compact quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kyed, David

    2006-01-01

    A notion of L^2-homology for compact quantum groups is introduced, generalizing the classical notion for countable, discrete groups. If the compact quantum group in question has tracial Haar state, it is possible to define its L^2-Betti numbers and Novikov-Shubin invariants/capacities. It is proved that these L^2-Betti numbers vanish for the Gelfand dual of a compact Lie group and that the zeroth Novikov-Shubin invariant equals the dimension of the underlying Lie group. Finally, we relate our...

  4. PICOBIT: A Compact Scheme System for Microcontrollers

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Amour, Vincent; Feeley, Marc

    Due to their tight memory constraints, small microcontroller based embedded systems have traditionally been implemented using low-level languages. This paper shows that the Scheme programming language can also be used for such applications, with less than 7 kB of total memory. We present PICOBIT, a very compact implementation of Scheme suitable for memory constrained embedded systems. To achieve a compact system we have tackled the space issue in three ways: the design of a Scheme compiler generating compact bytecode, a small virtual machine, and an optimizing C compiler suited to the compilation of the virtual machine.

  5. Generalized model for anisotropic compact stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, S K; Ray, Saibal; Deb, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    In the present investigation an exact generalized model for anisotropic compact stars of embedding class one is sought for under general relativistic background. The generic solutions are verified by exploring different physical aspects, viz. energy conditions, mass-radius relation, stability of the models, in connection to their validity. It is observed that the model present here for compact stars is compatible with all these physical tests and thus physically acceptable as far as the compact star candidates $RXJ~1856-37$, $SAX~J~1808.4-3658~(SS1)$ and $SAX~J~1808.4-3658~(SS2)$ are concerned.

  6. Compact vs. Exponential-Size LP Relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.D.; Lancia, G.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we introduce by means of examples a new technique for formulating compact (i.e. polynomial-size) LP relaxations in place of exponential-size models requiring separation algorithms. In the same vein as a celebrated theorem by Groetschel, Lovasz and Schrijver, we state the equivalence of compact separation and compact optimization. Among the examples used to illustrate our technique, we introduce a new formulation for the Traveling Salesman Problem, whose relaxation we show equivalent to the subtour elimination relaxation.

  7. Relativistic Solutions of Anisotropic Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bikash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of new relativistic solutions with anisotropic fluid for compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The interior space-time geometry considered here for compact objects are described by parameters namely, $\\lambda$, $k$, $A$, $R$ and $n$. The values of the geometrical parameters are determined here for obtaining a class of physically viable stellar models. The energy-density, radial pressure and tangential pressure are finite and positive inside the anisotropic stars. Considering some stars of known mass we present stellar models which describe compact astrophysical objects with nuclear density.

  8. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  9. The Role of Clustering of Sub-Clumps in Bright Elliptical Galaxy Formation from a Low-Spin Seed Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, D

    2001-01-01

    We reveal the role of clustering of sub-clumps, which is expected in the cold dark matter (CDM) universe, in forming a bright elliptical galaxy (BEG) from a low-spin seed galaxy. This can be done by comparing the evolution of a low-spin seed galaxy including small-scale density fluctuations expected in the CDM universe (Model 1) with that of a completely uniform one (Model 2), using numerical experiments. We show that Model 2 cannot reproduce the properties of BEGs and forms a disk which is too compact and too bright due to the conservation of the initial-small angular momentum. In Model 1 clustering of the sub-clumps caused by initial small-scale density fluctuations leads to angular momentum transfer from the baryon component to the dark matter and consequently a nearly spherical system supported by random motions is formed. Moreover the collisionless property of the stars formed in the sub-clumps prevents the dissipative contraction of the system, leading to a large measured half-light radius. As a result,...

  10. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.) 45 refs.

  11. A compact tritium AMS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-23

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

  12. On the Compactly Locally Uniformly Rotund Points of Orlicz Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lili Chen; Yunan Cui

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, locally uniformly rotund points and compactly locally uniformly rotund points are introduced. Moreover, criteria for compactly locally uniformly rotund points in Orlicz spaces are given.

  13. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the very metal-deficient blue compact dwarf galaxy Tol 1214--277

    CERN Document Server

    Fricke, K J; Papaderos, P; Guseva, N G; Thuan, T X

    2001-01-01

    We present a spectrophotometric study based on VLT/FORS I observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, Tol 1214-277 (Z ~ Zsun/25). The data show that roughly half of the total luminosity of the BCD originates from a bright and compact starburst region located at the northeastern tip of a faint dwarf galaxy with cometary appearance. The starburst has ignited less than 4 Myr ago and its emission is powered by several thousands O7V stars and ~ 170 late-type nitrogen Wolf-Rayet stars located within a compact region with < 500 pc in diameter. For the first time in a BCD, a relatively strong [Fe V] 4227 emission line is seen which together with intense He II 4686 emission indicates the presence of a very hard radiation field in Tol 1214-277. We argue that this extraordinarily hard radiation originates from both Wolf--Rayet stars and radiative shocks in the starburst region. The structural properties of the low-surface-brightness (LSB) component underlying the starburst...

  14. Automatic brightness and contrast adjustments for digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital chest radiographs are often too bright and/or lack contrast (especially those of intensive care unit patients) when viewed on a video display. Automatically adjusting the brightness and contrast reduces viewer interaction and improves displayed image quality. This paper reports on an algorithm developed that analyzes the gray-level histogram of a chest radiograph and determines the breakpoints that separate patient background, soft tissues, and dense tissues. From the breakpoint values, a piece-wise linear look-up table (LUT) is generated that reduces background contrast (this darkens the image), maintains soft- tissue contrast, and increases dense-tissue contrast (for example, in the mediastinum and subdiaphragm). The resulting UT is applied to the original image via video display

  15. Improvement in brightness of multicusp-plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Q.; Jiang, X.; King, T-J.; Leung, K-N.; Standiford, K.; Wilde, S.B.

    2002-05-24

    The beam brightness of a multicusp-plasma ion source has been substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. The current density of a 2 keV He{sup +} beam extracted from a 7.5-cm-diameter source operating at 2.5 kW RF power is {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2}, which is {approx}10 times larger than that of a beam extracted from a 5-cm-diameter source operating at 1 kW RF power. A smaller focused beam spot size is achieved with a counter-bored extractor instead of a conventional (''through-hole'') extractor, resulting another order of magnitude improvement in beam current density. Measured brightness can be as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2}Sr, which represents a 30 times improvement over prior work.

  16. Temporal properties of bright BGO GRBs detected by Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We present results of an analysis of a sample of bright Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi-GBM up to more than 1 MeV, which were collected during six years of Fermi operations. In particular, we focus on the GRB durations over several energy bands of the prompt emission of a subsample of bright GRBs detected up to 10 MeV by GBM and, when possible, up to 1 GeV by Fermi-LAT, thus expanding the Duration-Energy relationship in GRB light curves to high energies for the first time. We find that the relationship for these energetic GRBs is flatter than reported for other samples, suggesting that the high- and low-energy emission mechanisms are closely related.

  17. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for Precision Photometry of Bright Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Rucinski, S M; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Scholtz, A L

    2013-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.

  18. Bright solitons in a PT-symmetric chain of dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Kirikchi, Omar B; Susanto, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence and stability of fundamental bright discrete solitons in a parity-time (PT)-symmetric coupler composed by a chain of dimers, that is modelled by linearly coupled discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equations with gain and loss terms. We use a perturbation theory for small coupling between the lattices to perform the analysis, which is then confirmed by numerical calculations. Such analysis is based on the concept of the so-called anti-continuum limit approach. We consider the fundamental onsite and intersite bright solitons. Each solution has symmetric and antisymmetric configurations between the arms. The stability of the solutions is then determined by solving the corresponding eigenvalue problem. We obtain that both symmetric and antisymmetric onsite mode can be stable for small coupling, on the contrary of the reported continuum limit where the antisymmetric solutions are always unstable. The instability is either due to the internal modes crossing the origin or the appearance of a quart...

  19. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Wijnholds, S J; Abdalla, F B; Brouw, W N; Ciardi, B; Iliev, I T; Harker, G J A; Mellema, G; Bernardi, G; Zarka, P; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Hassall, T E; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Reich, W; van Nieuwpoort, R; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with LOFAR, similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of t...

  20. VLA observations of the Palomar bright quasar survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have optically surveyed some 10000 square degrees of the northern sky to search for bright quasars. Their final sample contains about 100 quasars. The B magnitudes of the sample range from 13.1 to 16.5, with most in the range 15.0-16.2. The redshifts range from 0.03 to over 2, considerably concentrated toward smaller values (median of 0.18). They observed 94 of these quasars with the partially complete VLA in November/December 1979, and detected radio emission from 27 of them, or 29%, to a limit of 1-2 mJy. It is concluded that bright quasars are definitely more likely to be detectable radio sources. (Auth.)