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Sample records for bright radio-quiet quasar

  1. Discovery of Universal Elliptical Outflow Structures in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Lovegrove, Justin; Leiter, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-nine quasars in the background of the Magellanic Clouds had brightness records monitored by the MACHO project during the years 1992 - 99. Because the circumpolar fields of these quasars had no seasonal sampling defects, their observation produced data sets well suited to further careful analysis. Following a preliminary report wherein we showed the existence of reverberation in the data for one of the radio-quiet quasars in this group, we now show that similar reverberations have been seen in all of the 55 radio-quiet quasars with adequate data, making possible the determination of the quasar inclination to the observer's line of sight. The reverberation signatures indicate the presence of large-scale elliptical outflow structures similar to that predicted by the Elvis (2000) and "dusty torus" models of quasars, whose characteristic sizes vary within a surprisingly narrow range of scales. More importantly the observed opening angle relative to the polar axis of the universal elliptical outflow structure...

  2. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Hickox, Ryan C; Ho, Luis C; Krolik, Julian H; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Strauss, Michael A; Geach, James E; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively-driven outflow. In this paper we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ~300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z<1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [NeII] and [NeIII] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while PAH emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 micron fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should...

  3. Radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars: one population, different epochs of observation

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    I bring together evidence for the rapidity with which quasars' radio synchrotron lobe emission fades and for the intermittency with which jet plasma is ejected from individual quasars and radio galaxies and affirm the picture presented by Nipoti et al (2005) that the radio-loudness of quasars is a function of the epoch at which they are observed. I briefly illustrate this account with examples of successive episodes of jet activity where the axis along which jet plasma is launched appears to have precessed. A new model for the weak core radio emission from radio-quiet quasars, that is not any kind of jet ejecta, is also briefly described.

  4. Radio and X-ray emission from disc winds in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Steenbrugge, K C; Kuncic, Z; Blundell, K M

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that the radio spectra of radio-quiet quasars is produced by free-free emission in the optically thin part of an accretion disc wind. An important observational constraint on this model is the observed X-ray luminosity. We investigate this constraint using a sample of PG radio-quiet quasars for which XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are available. Comparing the predicted and measured luminosities for 0.5, 2 and 5 keV, we conclude that all of the studied PG quasars require a large hydrogen column density absorber, requiring these quasars to be close to or Compton-thick. Such a large column density can be directly excluded for PG 0050+124, for which a high-resolution RGS spectrum exists. Further constraint on the column density for a further 19 out of the 21 studied PG quasars comes from the EPIC spectrum characteristics such as hard X-ray power-law photon index and the equivalent width of the Fe Kalpha line; and the small equivalent width of the C IV absorber present in UV spectra. For 2 sources: P...

  5. Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet BAL Quasars: A Detailed Ultraviolet Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Rochais, Thomas B; Myers, Adam D; Brotherton, Michael S; Runnoe, Jessie C; Hall, Shannon W

    2014-01-01

    Studies of radio-loud (RL) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars indicate that popular orientation-based BAL models fail to account for all observations. Are these results extendable to radio-quiet (RQ) BAL quasars? Comparisons of RL and RQ BAL quasars show that many of their properties are quite similar. Here we extend these analyses to the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectral properties, using a sample of 73 RL and 473 RQ BAL quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each RQ quasar is individually matched to a RL quasar in both redshift (over the range $1.5 < z < 3.5$) and continuum luminosity. We compare several continuum, emission line, and absorption line properties, as well as physical properties derived from these measurements. Most properties in the samples are statistically identical, though we find slight differences in the velocity structure of the BALs that cause apparent differences in CIV emission line properties. Differences in the velocities may indicate an interaction bet...

  6. Intranight Optical Variability of Radio-Quiet Weak Emission Line Quasars-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Parveen; Gopal-Krishna,

    2016-01-01

    We report an extension of our program to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intra-night optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intra-night CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 hours. For each session, differential light curves (DLCs) of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of $\\sim 3\\%$ for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude $\\psi >$ 10\\%), hence blazar-like. We briefly point o...

  7. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet weak emission line quasars - IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2016-09-01

    We report an extension of our programme to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intranight optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intranight CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 h. For each session, differential light curves of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of ˜3 per cent for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude ψ > 10 per cent), hence blazar-like. We briefly point out the prospects of an appreciable rise in the estimated INOV duty cycle for RQWLQs with a relatively modest increase in sensitivity for monitoring these rather faint objects.

  8. Observations of Feedback from Radio-Quiet Quasars: I. Extents and Morphologies of Ionized Gas Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guilin; Greene, Jenny E; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Black hole feedback -- the strong interaction between the energy output of supermassive black holes and their surrounding environments -- is routinely invoked to explain the absence of overly luminous galaxies, the black hole vs. bulge correlations and the similarity of black hole accretion and star formation histories. Yet direct probes of this process in action are scarce and limited to small samples of active nuclei. We present Gemini IFU observations of the distribution of ionized gas around luminous, obscured, radio-quiet (RQ) quasars at z~0.5. We detect extended ionized gas nebulae via [O III]5007 emission in every case, with a mean diameter of 28 kpc. These nebulae are nearly perfectly round. The regular morphologies of nebulae around RQ quasars are in striking contrast with lumpy or elongated nebulae seen around radio galaxies at low and high redshifts. We present the uniformly measured size-luminosity relationship of [O III] nebulae around Seyfert 2 galaxies and type 2 quasars spanning 6 orders of ma...

  9. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Neal; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    We present VLA detections of radio emission in four four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS0810+2554, RXJ0911+0511, HE0435$-$1223 and SDSSJ0924+0219, and e-MERLIN observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5$\\mu$Jy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini-AGN, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the req...

  10. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209

    CERN Document Server

    Kammoun, E S; Stern, D; Jun, H D; Graham, M; Celotti, A; Behar, E; Elvis, M; Harrison, F A; Matt, G; Walton, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the joint $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$ observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported $z=1.77$ to $z=0.532$, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, $\\log (M_{\\rm BH}/M_{\\odot}) = 9.08 \\pm 0.18$. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power-law of photon index $\\Gamma = 1.82 \\pm 0.05$ with $E_{\\rm cut} = 152_{-54}^{+103}\\,{\\rm keV}$, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonisation model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be $kT_{\\rm e}=42\\pm 3 \\,{\\rm keV}$ and $kT_{\\rm e}= 56 \\pm 3\\,{\\rm keV}$ for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local AGN, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity ($L_{2-10} = 1.93\\times 10^{45}\\,{\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}}$). The quasar is X-ray lo...

  11. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Jun, H. D.; Graham, M.; Celotti, A.; Behar, E.; Elvis, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported z = 1.77 to z = 0.532, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, log (MBH/M⊙) = 9.08 ± 0.18. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power law of photon index Γ = 1.82 ± 0.05 with E_cut = 152_{-54}^{+103} keV, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonization model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be kTe = 42 ± 3 keV and kTe = 56 ± 3 keV for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local active galactic nuclei, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity (L2 - 10 = 1.93 × 1045 erg s-1). The quasar is X-ray loud, with an unusually flat observed optical-to-X-ray spectral slope αOX = 1.00 ± 0.02, and has an exceptionally strong optical [O III] line. Assuming that both the X-ray emission and the [O III] line are isotropic, these two extreme properties can be explained by a nearly edge-on disc, leading to a reduction in the observed ultraviolet continuum light.

  12. X-Ray Observations of Optically Selected, Radio-quiet Quasars. I. The ASCA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Netzer, H.; Laor, A.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Nandra, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2000-03-01

    We present the result of 27 ASCA observations of 26 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) from the Palomar-Green (PG) survey. The sample is not statistically complete, but it is reasonably representative of RQQs in the PG survey. For many of the sources, the ASCA data are presented here for the first time. All the RQQs were detected except for two objects, both of which contain broad absorption lines in the optical band. We find the variability characteristics of the sources to be consistent with Seyfert 1 galaxies. A power law offers an acceptable description of the time-averaged spectra in the 2-10 keV (quasar frame) band for all but one data set. The best-fitting values of the photon index vary from object to object over the range 1.5~=2 and dispersion σ(Γ2-10)~=0.25. The distribution of Γ2-10 is therefore similar to that observed in other RQ active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and seems to be unrelated to X-ray luminosity. No single model adequately describes the full 0.6-10 keV (observed frame) continuum of all the RQQs. Approximately 50% of the sources can be adequately described by a single power law or by a power law with only very subtle deviations. All but one of the remaining data sets were found to have convex spectra (flattening as one moves to higher energies). The exception is PG 1411+442, in which a substantial column density (NH,z~2x1023 cm-2) obscures ~98% of the continuum. We find only five (maybe six) of 14 objects with z<~0.25 to have ``soft excesses'' at energies <~1 keV, but we find no universal shape for these spectral components. The spectrum of PG 1244+026 contains a rather narrow emission feature centered at an energy ~1 keV (quasar frame). The detection rate of absorption due to ionized material in these RQQs is lower than that seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. In part, this may be due to selection effects. However, when detected, the absorbers in the RQQs exhibit a similar range of column density and ionization parameter as Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find

  13. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paolillo, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II di Napoli, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kaspi, Shai [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Vignali, Cristian [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università degli studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Gibson, Robert R., E-mail: ohad@unt.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  14. Deep optical spectroscopy of extended Lyman alpha emission around three radio-quiet z=4.5 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Courbin, F; Eigenbrod, A; Chelouche, D

    2008-01-01

    We report the first results of a spectroscopic search for Lyman alpha, envelopes around three z=4.5 radio-quiet quasars. Our observational strategy uses the FORS2 spectrograph attached to the UT1 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the multi-slit mode. This allows us to observe simultaneously the quasars and several PSF stars. The spectra of the latter are used to remove the point-like quasar from the data, and to unveil the faint underlying Lyman alpha, envelopes associated with the quasars with unprecedented depth. We clearly detect an envelope around two of the three quasars. These envelopes measure respectively 10" and 13" in extent (i.e. 67 kpc and 87 kpc). This is 5 to 10 times larger than predicted by the models of Haiman & Rees (2001) and up to 100 times fainter. Our observations better agree with models involing a clumpy envelope as in Alam & Miralda-Escude (2002) or Chelouche et al. (2008). We find that the brighter quasars also have the brighter envelopes but that the extend of the envelop...

  15. 3C 57 as an Atypical Radio-Loud Quasar: Implications for the Radio-Loud/Radio-Quiet Dichotomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sulentic, J W; Marziani, P; del Olmo, A; Stirpe, G M; Zamfir, S; Plauchu-Frayn, I

    2015-01-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among Type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar "main sequence" with both extreme optical FeII emission (R_{FeII} ~ 1) and a large CIV 1549 profile blueshift (~ -1500 km/s). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year ...

  16. 3C 57 as an atypical radio-loud quasar: implications for the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.; Marziani, P.; del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Zamfir, S.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar `main sequence' with both extreme optical Fe II emission (R_{Fe II} ˜ 1) and a large C IV λ1549 profile blueshift (˜-1500 km s-1). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year time-scale consistent with compact steep-spectrum (or young LD) over core-dominated morphology. In the 4DE1 context where LD RL are usually low L/LEdd quasars, we suggest that 3C 57 is an evolved RL quasar (i.e. large blackhole mass) undergoing a major accretion event leading to a rejuvenation reflected by strong Fe II emission, perhaps indicating significant heavy metal enrichment, high bolometric luminosity for a low-redshift source and resultant unusually high Eddington ratio giving rise to the atypical C IV λ1549.

  17. Storm in a "Teacup": a radio-quiet quasar with ~10kpc radio-emitting bubbles and extreme gas kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, C M; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Edge, A C; Hogan, M T; Mullaney, J R; Swinbank, A M

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) VLA data, combined with VIMOS IFU data and HST imaging, of a z=0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L(1.4GHz)~5e23 W/Hz and L(AGN)~2e45 erg/s). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the Teacup AGN in the literature. We identify "bubbles" of radio emission that are extended ~10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the Teacup AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ~0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v=-760 km/s. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on >~10...

  18. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Swinbank, A. M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S7 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

  19. Storm in a "Teacup": A Radio-quiet Quasar with ≈10 kpc Radio-emitting Bubbles and Extreme Gas Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Mullaney, J. R.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L 1.4 GHz ≈ 5 × 1023 W Hz-1 and L AGN ≈ 2 × 1045 erg s-1). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the "Teacup" active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify "bubbles" of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the "Teacup" AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = -740 km s-1. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on >~ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally "radio-quiet" the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

  20. Radio Quiet AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Czerny, B; Karas, V; Ponti, G

    2005-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei are powered by accretion onto massive black holes. Although radio-quiet objects are not as spectacular sources of very high energy photons as radio-loud ones this class of objects also represents a challenge for modeling high energy processes close to a black hole. Both a hot optically thin plasma and a cooler optically thick accretion disk are usually thought to be present in the vicinity of a black hole although the details of the accretion flow are still under discussion. The role of the disk seems to decrease with a drop in the Eddington ratio: in sources like quasars and Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies disk flow dominates while in Seyfert galaxies the disk retreats, and in sources like LINERS or Sgr A* a disk is most likely absent. Shocks and reconnections are possibly taking place in an inner hot flow and in the magnetic corona above the cold disk. Uncollimated outflow is also present and it may carry significant fraction of available mass and energy.

  1. The transition from quasar radio-loud to radio-quiet state in the framework of the black hole scalability hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Marecki, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    There are several lines of evidence that active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be regarded as scaled-up X-ray binaries (XRB). The timescales of the evolutionary phenomena in these two classes are proportional to the black hole (BH) masses. Consequently, unlike in the case of XRBs, the evolution of AGNs is too slow to be followed directly. What could be done, however, is to assign particular types of active galaxies to different evolutionary stages observable in XRBs. We studied such an assignment for three quasars with clear signatures of a recent transition from the radio-loud to the radio-quiet state. The quasars we investigated have large-scale radio lobes that are clearly asymmetric -- one lobe is of Fanaroff-Riley II type, while the other one is a diffuse relic devoid of a hotspot. We suggest that the prime cause of the asymmetry of these radio sources is that the nuclei of their host galaxies currently produce no jets. To prove that, we observed them with milliarcsecond resolution to check if they are simila...

  2. An Accretion Disc-Irradiation Hybrid Model for The Optical/UV Variability in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-01-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However,the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model (Li & Cao 2008), which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous timescale of accretion disc to the variability times...

  3. An accretion disc-irradiation hybrid model for the optical/UV variability in radio-quiet quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng; Guo, Hengxiao

    2016-10-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However, the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model, which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous time-scale of accretion disc to the variability time-scale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively consistent with recent observations.

  4. An Accretion Disc-Irradiation Hybrid Model for The Optical/UV Variability in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hui; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-01-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However,the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model (Li & Cao 2008), which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous timescale of accretion disc to the variability timescale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively con...

  5. Radio-quiet Fast Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shocks in the interplanetary medium that produce type II radio emission. These CMEs are faster and wider on the average, than the general population of CMEs. However, when we start from fast (speed > 900 km/s) and wide (angular width > 60 degrees), more than half of them are not associated with radio bursts. In order to understand why these CMEs are radio quiet, we collected all the fast and wide (FW) CMEs detected by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and isolated those without associated type II radio bursts. The radio bursts were identified in the dynamic spectra of the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) Experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We also checked the list against metric type II radio bursts reported in Solar Geophysical Data and isolated those without any radio emission. This exercise resulted in about 140 radio-quiet FW CMEs. We identified the source regions of these CMEs using the Solar Geophysical Data listings, cross-checked against the eruption regions in the SOHO/EIT movies. We explored a number of possibilities for the radio-quietness: (i) Source region being too far behind the limb, (ii) flare size, (iii) brightness of the CME, and (iv) the density of the ambient medium. We suggest that a combination of CME energy and the Alfven speed profile of the ambient medium is primarily responsible for the radio-quietness of these FW CMEs.

  6. Radio Loud and Radio Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I; Kimball, A E; Perley, R A; Ivezic, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    We discuss 6 GHz JVLA observations covering a volume-limited sample of 178 low redshift ($0.2 5 \\mathrm{~mJy~beam}^{-1}$ ($log(L) \\gtrsim 24$). The radio luminosity function of optically selected QSOs and the extended radio emission associated with RLQs are both inconsistent with simple "unified" models that invoke relativistic beaming from randomly oriented QSOs to explain the difference between RLQs and RQQs. Some intrinsic property of the AGNs or their host galaxies must also determine whether or not a QSO appears radio loud.

  7. Galaxies at Z=2 extensions around radio-quiet QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Aretxaga, I; Terlevich, R J

    1995-01-01

    We have been conducting an imaging survey to detect host galaxies of radio-quiet QSOs at high redshift (z = 2), in order to compare them with those of radio-loud objects. Six QSOs were observed in the R passband with the auxiliary port of the 4.2m WHT of the {\\it Observatorio de Roque de los Muchachos} indir August 1994. The objects were selected to be bright (M(B) < -28~mag) and have bright stars in the field, which could enable us to define the point spread function (PSF) accurately. The excellent seeing of La Palma (<0.9 arcsec thoughout the run) allowed us to detect extensions to the nuclear PSFs around three (one radio-loud and two radio-quiet) QSOs, out of 4 suitable targets. The extensions are most likely due to the host galaxies of these QSOs, with luminosities of at least 3-7% of the QSO luminosity. The most likely values for the luminosity of the host galaxies lie in the range 6-18% of the QSO luminosity. Our observations show that, if the extensions we have detected are indeed galaxies, extra...

  8. Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lupin Chun-Che

    2016-09-01

    A radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar is a neutron star that has significant γ-ray pulsation but without observed radio emission or only limited emission detected by high sensitivity radio surveys. The launch of the Fermi spacecraft in 2008 opened a new epoch to study the population of these pulsars. In the 2nd Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog of γ-ray pulsars, there are 35 (30 % of the 117 pulsars in the catalog) known samples classified as radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars with radio flux density (S1400) of less than 30 μJy. Accompanying the observations obtained in various wavelengths, astronomers not only have the opportunity to study the emitting nature of radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars but also have proposed different models to explain their radiation mechanism. This article will review the history of the discovery, the emission properties, and the previous efforts to study pulsars in this population. Some particular cases known as Geminga-like pulsars (e.g., PSR J0633+1746, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026, and so on) are also specified to discuss their common and specific features.

  9. The jet-disc connection: evidence for a reinterpretation in radio loud and radio quiet active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Garofalo, David

    2013-01-01

    To constrain models of the jet-disc connection, we explore Eddington ratios reported in Foschini (2011) and interpret them in relation to the values in Sikora et al. across the active galactic nuclei population from radio loud quasars, their flat spectrum radio quasar subclass, the recently discovered gamma-ray loud narrow-line type 1 Seyfert galaxies, Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies and radio quiet quasars of the Palomar Green survey. While appeal to disc truncation in radiatively inefficient flow appears to explain the observed inverse relation between radio loudness and Eddington ratio in radio loud and radio quiet quasars, FR I objects, scale invariance and recent data on powerful jets in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies offer compelling arguments in favour of a reinterpretaion of the jet-disc connection.

  10. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...

  11. Compact radio cores in radio-quiet AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Alessandro; Norris, Ray P; Giovannini, Gabriele; Spitler, Lee R

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of radio emission in radio-quiet (RQ) active galactic nuclei (AGN) is still debated and might arise from the central AGN, from star formation activity in the host, or from either of these sources. A direct detection of compact and bright radio cores embedded in sources that are classified as RQ can unambiguously determine whether a central AGN significantly contributes to the radio emission. We search for compact, high-surface-brightness radio cores in RQ AGNs that are caused unambiguously by AGN activity. We used the Australian Long Baseline Array to search for compact radio cores in four RQ AGNs located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). We also targeted four radio-loud (RL) AGNs as a control sample. We detected compact and bright radio cores in two AGNs that are classified as RQ and in one that is classified as RL. Two RL AGNs were not imaged because the quality of the observations was too poor. We report on a first direct evidence of radio cores in RQ AGNs at cosmological reds...

  12. The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS): DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Monroe, TalaWanda R; Tejos, N; Worseck, G; Hennawi, Joseph F; Schmidt, Tobias; Tumlinson, Jason; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We present the first data release (DR1) from our UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) for new $z \\sim 1$ active galactic nuclei (AGN) across the sky. Using simple GALEX UV and WISE near-IR color selection criteria, we generated a list of 1450 primary candidates with $FUV 0.5$. Including a small set of observed secondary candidates, we report the discovery of 217 AGN with $FUV < 18$ mag that had no previously reported spectroscopic redshift. These are excellent potential targets for UV spectroscopy before the end of the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} mission. The main data products are publicly released through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  13. Spectroscopy of bright quasars: emission lines and internal extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Bachev, R; Semkov, E; Mihov, B

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to improve the existing knowledge about the most powerful engines in the Universe - quasars. Although a lot is already known, we still have only a vague idea how these engines work exactly, why they behave as they do, and what the relation is between their evolution and the evolution of their harboring galaxy. Methods we used are based on optical spectroscopy of visually bright quasars, many of which have recently been discovered as X-ray sources, but eventually missed in color-selected surveys. The spectra typically cover the 4200-7000 AA region, allowing measurements of the characteristics of the hydrogen lines, the FeII contribution, and other lines of interest. We present accurate redshift estimates and Seyfert type classification of the objects. We also show that the contribution of the host galaxy to the optical continuum is non-negligible in many cases, as is the intrinsic AGN absorption. Consequences of not correcting for those factors when estimating different quasar ...

  14. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  15. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  16. The Radio Loud \\/ Radio Quiet dichotomy news from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cirasuolo, M; Celotti, A; Danese, L

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a sample of radio-detected quasars, obtained by matching together objects from the FIRST and 2dF Quasar Redshift Surveys. The dataset consists of 113 sources, spanning a redshift range 0.3 < z < 2.2, with optical magnitudes 18.25 < b_J < 20.85 and radio fluxes S_{1.4 GHz} < 1 mJy. These objects exhibit properties such as redshift and colour distribution in full agreement with those derived for the whole quasar population, suggestive of an independence of the mechanism(s) controlling the birth and life-time of quasars of their level of radio emission. The long debated question of radio-loud (RL)/radio-quiet (RQ) dichotomy is then investigated for the combined FIRST-2dF and FIRST-LBQS sample, since they present similar selection criteria. We find the fraction of radio detections to increase with magnitude from < 3% at the faintest levels up to 20% for the brightest sources. The classical RL/RQ dichotomy, in which the distribution of radio-to-optical ratios and...

  17. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...... functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison......, and discussion of these mass functions will be made with other existing black hole mass functions, notably that based on the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog. We present the relationships used to estimate the black hole mass based on the MgII emission line; the relations are calibrated to the Hbeta and CIV relations...

  18. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  19. The cluster environments of powerful radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN

    CERN Document Server

    McLure, R J

    2000-01-01

    The spatial clustering amplitude (B_{gq}) is determined for a sample of 44 powerful AGN at z~0.2. No significant difference is detected in the richness of the cluster environments of the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-samples, both of which typically inhabit environments as rich as Abell Class ~0. Comparison with radio luminosity-matched samples from Hill & Lilly (1991) and Wold et al. (2000a) suggests that there is no epoch-dependent change in environment richness out to at least z>=0.5 for either radio galaxies or radio quasars. Comparison with the APM cluster survey shows that, contrary to current folklore, powerful AGN do not avoid rich clusters, but rather display a spread in cluster environment which is perfectly consistent with being drawn at random from the massive elliptical population. Finally, we argue that virtually all Abell class ~0 clusters contained an active galaxy during the epoch of peak quasar activity at z~2.5.

  20. Radio Quiet Pulsars with Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1998-01-01

    The notable absence of radio pulsars having measured magnetic dipole surface field strengths above $B_0\\sim 3\\times 10^{13}$ Gauss naturally raises the question of whether this forms an upper limit to pulsar magnetization. Recently there has been increasing evidence that neutron stars possessing higher dipole spin-down fields do in fact exist, including a growing list of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) with long periods and spinning down with high period derivatives, implying surface fields of $10^{14}$--$10^{15}$ Gauss. Furthermore, the recently reported X-ray period and period derivative for the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater (SGR) source SGR1806-20 suggest a surface field around $10^{15}$ Gauss. None of these high-field pulsars have yet been detected as radio pulsars. We propose that high-field pulsars should be radio-quiet because electron-positron pair production in their magnetospheres, thought to be essential for radio emission, is efficiently suppressed in ultra-strong fields ($B_0\\gtrsim 4\\times 10^{13}$ Gau...

  1. Local area networking in a radio quiet environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Edwin L.; Hunt, Gareth; Brandt, Joseph J.

    2002-11-01

    The Green Bank facility of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is spread out over 2,700 acres in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia. Good communication has always been needed between the radio telescopes and the control buildings. The National Radio Quiet Zone helps protect the Green Bank site from radio transmissions that interfere with the astronomical signals. Due to stringent Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) requirements, a fiber optic communication system was used for Ethernet transmissions on the site and coaxial cable within the buildings. With the need for higher speed communications, the entire network has been upgraded to use optical fiber with modern Ethernet switches. As with most modern equipment, the implementation of the control of the newly deployed Green Bank Telescope (GBT) depends heavily on TCP/IP. In order to protect the GBT from the commodity Internet, the GBT uses a non-routable network. Communication between the control building Local Area Network (LAN) and the GBT is implemented using a Virtual LAN (VLAN). This configuration will be extended to achieve isolation between trusted local user systems, the GBT, and other Internet users. Legitimate access to the site, for example by remote observers, is likely to be implemented using a virtual private network (VPN).

  2. Discovery of Millimeter-Wave Excess Emission in Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Horesh, Assaf; Stevens, Jamie; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2015-01-01

    The physical origin of radio emission in Radio Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei (RQ AGN) remains unclear, whether it is a downscaled version of the relativistic jets typical of Radio Loud (RL) AGN, or whether it originates from the accretion disk. The correlation between 5 GHz and X-ray luminosities of RQ AGN, which follows $L_R = 10^{-5}L_X$ observed also in stellar coronae, suggests an association of both X-ray and radio sources with the accretion disk corona. Observing RQ AGN at higher (mm-wave) frequencies, where synchrotron self absorption is diminished, and smaller regions can be probed, is key to exploring this association. Eight RQ AGN, selected based on their high X-ray brightness and variability, were observed at 95 GHz with the CARMA and ATCA telescopes. All targets were detected at the $1-10$ mJy level. Emission excess at 95~GHz of up to $\\times 7$ is found with respect to archival low-frequency steep spectra, suggesting a compact, optically-thick core superimposed on the more extended structures that...

  3. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  4. The New Generation Atlas of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions from Radio to X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Zhaohui; Wills, Beverley J; Wills, Derek; Cales, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A; Green, Richard F; Runnoe, Jessie; Nemmen, Rodrigo S; Gallagher, Sarah; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C; Kelly, Benjamin; Kriss, Gerard A; Li, Jun; Tang, Baitian; Xie, Yanxia

    2011-01-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. (1994) by using high-quality data obtained with several space and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared IRS spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite spectral energy distributions for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar...

  5. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  6. RADIOASTRON OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUASAR 3C273: A CHALLENGE TO THE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE LIMIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kardashev, N. S.; Voitsik, P. A.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Sokolovsky, K. V. [Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Lobanov, A. P.; Zensus, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.; Bach, U.; Kraus, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 (Germany); Johnson, M. D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gurvits, L. I. [Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC, P.O. Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jauncey, D. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ghigo, F. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Rt. 28/92, Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 (United States); Ghosh, T.; Salter, C. J. [Arecibo Observatory, NAIC, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, PR 00612 (United States); Petrov, L. Yu. [Astrogeo Center, 7312 Sportsman Drive, Falls Church, VA 22043 (United States); Romney, J. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of 10{sup 11.5} K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of 10{sup 13} K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C 273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 μas (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of 10{sup 13} K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require a much higher Doppler factor than what is determined from jet apparent kinematics.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy survey around 20 UV-bright quasars (Prochaska+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, J. X.; Weiner, B.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooksey, K. L.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    We selected 20 fields accessible from Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) (DEC<25°) surrounding UV-bright quasars. These quasars and their UV spectroscopic data sets are summarized in Table 1. All of the fields in our survey were imaged with the Swope 40" telescope using a direct imaging camera in B and R filter. The data were obtained in a series of dithered exposures intended to map at least a 20'x20' FOV, between 2000 Oct 26 and 2003 Apr 8. We performed multi-slit spectroscopy on each field with the WFCCD spectrometer using the blue grism and the Tek 5 CCD, between 2001 Apr 17 and 2003 Jun 6. (21 data files).

  8. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE II. the bright end of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 5

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ~ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 5. Combined our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range 4.7 <= z < 5.4 and -29 < M1450 <= -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/Va method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as alpha = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope beta = -3.58+/-0.24 and a fainter break magnitude M*1450 = -26.98+/-0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a lum...

  9. An Apparent Redshift Dependence of Quasar Continuum: Implication for Cosmic Dust Extinction?

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., $\\alpha_{\

  10. Reverberation in the UV-Optical Continuum Brightness Fluctuations of MACHO Quasar 13.5962.237

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E; Protopapas, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    We examine the nature of brightness fluctuations in the UV-Optical spectral region of an ordinary quasar with 881 optical brightness measurements made during the epoch 1993 - 1999. We find evidence for systematic trends having the character of a pattern of reverberations following an initial disturbance. The initial pulses have brightness increases of order 20% and pulse widths of 50 days, and the reverberations have typical amplitudes of 12% with longer mean pulse widths of order 80 days and pulse separations of order 90 days. The repeat pattern occurs over the same time scales whether the initial disturbance is a brightening or fading. The lags of the pulse trains are comparable to the lags seen previously in reverberation of the broad blue-shifted emission lines following brightness disturbances in Seyfert galaxies, when allowance is made for the mass of the central object. In addition to the burst pulse trains, we find evidence for a semi-periodicity with a time scale of 2 years. These strong patterns of ...

  11. Galaxy clustering around nearby luminous quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, K B; Kirhakos, S; Schneider, D P; Fisher, Karl B; Bahcall, John N; Schneider, Donald P

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z 100 kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  12. Subaru high-$z$ exploration of low-luminosity quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-$z$ Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multi-band imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg$^2$ of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes ($z_{\\rm AB} < 23.5$ mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-$z$ quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-br...

  13. Rapid infrared and optical variability in the bright quasar 3C273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, T.J.-L.; Robson, E.I.; Hughes, D.H.; Blecha, A.; Bouchet, P.; Schwarz, H.E.; Krisciunas, K.

    1988-09-22

    We have observed variations by a factor of two in the infrared flux from the bright quasar 3C273 on a timescale as short as one day. In February 1988, the behaviour of the source changed from having a stable infrared flux and slow optical variations to a state characterized by recurrent infrared and optical flaring. The optical variations were of several per cent per day, changing from increase to decrease approximately every week. The amplitude of the repeated optical flares was 30-40%. The data are consistent with re-injection/acceleration of electrons followed by rapid cooling. The inferred magnetic field is 0.7 gauss and the data are marginally consistent with no relativistic beaming.

  14. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  15. Ubiquitous Giant Lyα Nebulae around the Brightest Quasars at z ∼ 3.5 Revealed with MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lilly, Simon J.; Marino, Raffaella A.; Gallego, Sofia G.; Bacon, Roland; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouché, Nicolas; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C. Marcella; Caruana, Joseph; Finley, Hayley; Herenz, Edmund C.; Richard, Johan; Schaye, Joop; Straka, Lorrie A.; Turner, Monica L.; Urrutia, Tanya; Verhamme, Anne; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    Direct Lyα imaging of intergalactic gas at z∼ 2 has recently revealed giant cosmological structures around quasars, e.g., the Slug Nebula. Despite their high luminosity, the detection rate of such systems in narrow-band and spectroscopic surveys is less than 10%, possibly encoding crucial information on the distribution of gas around quasars and the quasar emission properties. In this study, we use the MUSE integral-field instrument to perform a blind survey for giant {Ly}α nebulae around 17 bright radio-quiet quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 that does not suffer from most of the limitations of previous surveys. After data reduction and analysis performed with specifically developed tools, we found that each quasar is surrounded by giant {Ly}α nebulae with projected sizes larger than 100 physical kiloparsecs and, in some cases, extending up to 320 kpc. The circularly averaged surface brightness profiles of the nebulae appear to be very similar to each other despite their different morphologies and are consistent with power laws with slopes ≈ -1.8. The similarity between the properties of all these nebulae and the Slug Nebula suggests a similar origin for all systems and that a large fraction of gas around bright quasars could be in a relatively “cold” (T ∼ 104 K) and dense phase. In addition, our results imply that such gas is ubiquitous within at least 50 kpc from bright quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 independently of the quasar emission opening angle, or extending up to 200 kpc for quasar isotropic emission. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programs 094.A-0396, 095.A-0708, 096.A-0345, 094.A-0131, 095.A-0200, and 096.A-0222.

  16. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Strauss, Michael A.; Wang, Feige; Jiang, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μJy beam‑1 and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μJy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be TB = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 107 K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  17. The optical-UV emissivity of quasars: dependence on black hole mass and radio loudness

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James; Buckland, Rachel; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof; Sivakoff, Gregory; Dai, Xinyu; Richardson, Kayleigh; Riley, Jack; Gray, James; La Franca, Fabio; Altamirano, Diego; Croston, Judith; Gandhi, Poshak; Hoenig, Sebastian F; McHardy, Ian; Middleton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a large sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasar spectra at redshift 1.0 < z < 1.2 to compare the inferred underlying quasar continuum slopes (after removal of the host galaxy contribution) with accretion disk models. The latter predict redder (decreasing) alpha_3000 continuum slopes (L_\

  18. Narrow CIV lambda 1549A Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2001-01-01

    A large, high-quality spectral data base of well-selected, moderate-redshift radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars is used to characterize the incidence of narrow associated CIV lambda 1549 absorption, and how this may depend on some quasar properties, including radio-type. Preliminary results...

  19. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, H; Paladino, R; Hull, C L H; Cortes, P; Moellenbrock, G; Fomalont, E; Asada, K; Hada, K

    2016-01-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C~286 made with the ALMA at 1.3~mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17\\%, this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or EVPA) in the core is $\\sim$\\,$39^{\\circ}$, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report ...

  20. BeppoSAX observations of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, F.; Mineo, T.; Laor, A.; Giallongo, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results from recent BeppoSAX observations of low redshift (z<0.4, PG sample) and high redshift (2radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars. Significant curvature has been detected in the spectra of the observed PGs: the spectrum flattens by 0.5 above 2 keV. The possible presence of narrow features in the MECS spectra is discussed. Intrinsic absorption has been measured in the z=3.9 radio-loud quasar 1745+624. The z=2.3 radio-quiet quasar HE1104-1805 has been found at a very low flux level, in comparison with previous ROSAT and ASCA observations, implying large (factor of {approx} 4) variability on years timescales.

  1. RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: a Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Y Y; Kellermann, K I; Lobanov, A P; Johnson, M D; Gurvits, L I; Voitsik, P A; Zensus, J A; Anderson, J M; Bach, U; Jauncey, D L; Ghigo, F; Ghosh, T; Kraus, A; Kovalev, Yu A; Lisakov, M M; Petrov, L Yu; Romney, J D; Salter, C J; Sokolovsky, K V

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of $10^{11.5}$ K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of $10^{13}$ K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 $\\mu$as (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of $10^{13}$ K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require much higher jet speeds than are observed.

  2. A very bright i=16.44 quasar in the `redshift desert' discovered by LAMOST

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zuo, Wenwen; Zhao, Yongheng; Luo, Ali; Bai, Zhongrui; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Haotong; Yan, Hongliang; Ren, Juanjuan; Sun, Shiwei; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yeping; Lu, Qishuai; Wang, You; Ni, Jijun; Wang, Hai; Kong, Xu; Shen, Shiyin

    2010-01-01

    The redshift range from 2.2 to 3, is known as the 'redshift desert' of quasars because quasars with redshift in this range have similar optical colors as normal stars and are thus difficult to be found in optical sky surveys. A quasar candidate, SDSS J085543.40-001517.7, which was selected by a recently proposed criterion involving near-IR $Y-K$ and optical $g-z$ colors, was identified spectroscopically as a new quasar with redshift of 2.427 by the LAMOST commissioning observation in December 2009 and confirmed by the observation made with the NAOC/Xinglong 2.16m telescope in March 2010. This quasar was not targeted in the SDSS spectroscopic survey because it locates in the stellar locus of the optical color-color diagrams, while it is clearly separated from stars in the $Y-K$ vs. $g-z$ diagram. Comparing with other SDSS quasars we found this new quasar with $i$ magnitude of 16.44 is apparently the brightest one in the redshift range from 2.3 to 2.7. From the spectral properties we derived its central black h...

  3. Spitzer observations of a gravitationally lensed quasar, QSO 2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Agol, Eric; Gorjian, Varoujan; Kimball, Amy; 10.1088/0004-637X/697/2/1010

    2009-01-01

    The four-image gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237+0305 is microlensed by stars in the lens galaxy. The amplitude of microlensing variability can be used to infer the relative size of the quasar as a function of wavelength; this provides a test of quasar models. Toward this end, we present Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations of QSO 2237+0305, finding the following. (1) The infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) is similar to that of other bright radio-quiet quasars, contrary to an earlier claim. (2) A dusty torus model with a small opening angle fits the overall shape of the IR SED well, but the quantitative agreement is poor due to an offset in wavelength of the silicate feature. (3) The flux ratios of the four lensed images can be derived from the IRAC data despite being unresolved. We find that the near-IR fluxes are increasingly affected by microlensing toward shorter wavelengths. (4) The wavelength dependence of the IRAC flux ratios is ...

  4. Radio Luminosity,Black Hole Mass and Eddington Ratio for Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hao Bian; Yan-Mei Chen; Chen Hu; Kai Huang; Yan Xu

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the MBH-O'.relation for radio-loud quasars with redshift z<0.83 in Data Release 3 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).The sample consists of 3772 quasars with better models of the H/~ and [O III] lines and available radio luminosity,including 306 radio-loud quasars,3466 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity or upper-limit of radio luminosity (181 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity).The virial supermassive black hole mass (MBH) is calculated from the broad H/line,and the host stellar velocity dispersion (σ*) is traced by the core [O III] gaseous velocity dispersion.The radio luminosity and radio loudness are derived from the FIRST catalog.Our results are as follows:(1) For radio-quiet quasars,we confirm that there is no obvious deviation from the MBH-O".relation defined for inactive galaxies when the uncertainties in MBH and the luminosity bias are concerned.(2) We find that the radio-loud quasars deviate more from the MBH-σ.relation than do the radio-quiet quasars.This deviation is only partly due to a possible cosmological evolution of the MBH-σ* relation and the luminosity bias.(3) The radioluminosity is proportional to M128+0.23-0.16 BH(LBol/LEdd)1.29+0.31-0.24 for radio-quiet quasars and to M3.10+0.6.-0.70(LBol.LEdd)4.18+1.40-1.10 for radio-loud quasars.The weaker dependence of the radio luminosity on the mass and the Eddington ratio for radio-loud quasars shows that other physical effects would account for their radio luminosities,such as the spin of the black hole.

  5. Probing the IGM/Galaxy Connection IV: The LCO/WFCCD Galaxy Survey of 20 Fields Surrounding UV Bright Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Chen, H -W; Cooksey, K L; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    We publish the survey for galaxies in 20 fields containing ultraviolet bright quasars (with z_em 0.1 to 0.5) that can be used to study the association between galaxies and absorption systems from the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM). The survey is magnitude limited (R~19.5 mag) and highly complete out to 10' from the quasar in each field. It was designed to detect dwarf galaxies (L ~ 0.1 L*) at an impact parameter rho 1Mpc (z=0.1) from a quasar. The complete sample (all 20 fields) includes R-band photometry for 84718 sources and confirmed redshifts for 2800 sources. This includes 1198 galaxies with 0.005 < z < (z_em - 0.01) at a median redshift of 0.18, which may associated with IGM absorption lines. All of the imaging was acquired with cameras on the Swope 40" telescope and the spectra were obtained via slitmask observations using the WFCCD spectrograph on the Dupont 100" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO). This paper describes the data reduction, imaging analysis, photometry, and spectral ana...

  6. Correlations between Optical Variability and Physical Parameters of Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wenwen Zuo; Xue-Bing Wu; Yi-Qing Liu; Cheng-Liang Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical variability is an important feature of quasars. Taking advantage of a larger sample of 7658 quasars from SDSS Stripe 82 and relatively more photometric data points for each quasar, we estimate their variability amplitudes and divide the sample into small bins of various parameters. An anticorrelation between variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength is found. Variability increases as either luminosity or Eddington ratio decreases. The relationship between variability and black hole mass is uncertain. The intrinsic distribution of variability amplitudes for radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. Both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars exhibit a bluer-when-brighter chromatism. With the Shakura–Sunyaev disk model, we find that changes of accretion rate play an important role in producing the observed optical variability. However, the predicted positive correlation between variability and black hole mass seems to be inconsistent with the observed negative correlation between them in small bins of Eddington ratio, which suggests that other physical mechanisms may still need to be considered in modifying the simple accretion disk model. The different mechanisms in radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are discussed.

  7. A Comparison of Radio-loud and Radio-quiet E+A Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Yssavo; Wallack, Nicole; Learis, Anna; Liu, Charles

    2015-01-01

    E+A galaxies are systems undergoing an important evolutionary transition. Their optical spectra show significant numbers of A-type stars in an elliptical galaxy that has little to no star formation (SF). These galaxies have likely experienced a recent starburst (types. We find that the radio-loud and radio-quiet samples exhibit statistically insignificant differences in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared bands. We also compare the two samples on a (J-H) vs. (H-K) color-color diagram. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST-1004583 to the CUNY College of Staten Island, and grant AST-1004591 to the American Museum of Natural History.

  8. Blind search for radio-quiet and radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, G I

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed more than a hundred of gamma-ray pulsars, about one third of which are radio-quiet, i.e. not detected at radio frequencies. The most of radio-loud pulsars are detected by Fermi LAT by using the radio timing models, while the radio-quiet ones are discovered in a blind search. The difference in the techniques introduces an observational selection bias and, consequently, the direct comparison of populations is complicated. In order to produce an unbiased sample, we perform a blind search of gamma-ray pulsations using Fermi-LAT data alone. No radio data or observations at optical or X-ray frequencies are involved in the search process. We produce a gamma-ray selected catalog of 25 non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars found in a blind search, including 16 radio-quiet and 9 radio-loud pulsars. This results in the direct measurement of the fraction of radio-quiet pulsars $\\varepsilon_{RQ} = 64\\pm 10\\%$, which is in agreement with the existing estimates from the population ...

  9. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grandi, P. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF, Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Montez, R., E-mail: kharb@cis.rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the

  10. The Halo Occupation Distribution of X-ray-Bright Active Galactic Nuclei: A Comparison with Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jonathan W; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam; Hickox, Ryan C

    2013-01-01

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z~1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGN in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z~1.2, we derive a median mass of (1.02+0.21/-0.23)x10^{13} Msun/h for halos hosting central AGN and an upper limit of ~10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5-sigma level) that X-ray AGN reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically-selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z~1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGN is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests tha...

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) DR1 (Monroe+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, T. R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Tejos, N.; Worseck, G.; Hennawi, J. F.; Schmidt, T.; Tumlinson, J.; Shen, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We have performed an all-sky survey for z~1, FUV-bright quasars selected from GALEX and WISE photometry. We generated a list of 1450 primary candidates (Table1). In several of the observing runs, conditions were unexpectedly favorable and we exhausted the primary candidates at certain right ascension ranges. To fill the remaining observing time, we generated a secondary candidate list. This secondary set of candidates is provided in Table2. We proceeded to obtain discovery-quality longslit spectra (i.e., low-dispersion, large wavelength coverage, modest signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of our UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) candidates in one calendar year. Our principal facilities were: (i) the dual Kast spectrometer on the 3m Shane telescope at the Lick Observatory; (ii) the Boller & Chivens (BCS) spectrometer on the Irenee du Pont 100'' telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory; and (iii) the Calar Alto Faint Object Spectrograph on the CAHA 2.2m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA). We acquired an additional ~20 spectra on larger aperture telescopes (Keck/ESI, MMT/MBC, Magellan/MagE) during twilight or under poor observing conditions. Typical exposure times were limited to <~200s, with adjustments for fainter sources or sub-optimal observing conditions. Table3 provides a list of the observed candidates. There are 93 sources with a good quality spectrum for which we cannot recover a secure redshift. The majority of these have been previously cataloged as blazars (or BL Lac objects). Table6 lists the sample of these unknowns. (6 data files).

  12. Differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars as revealed by Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Takata, J; Ng, C W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    By comparing the properties of non-recycled radio-loud $\\gamma-$ray pulsars and radio-quiet $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, we have searched for the differences between these two populations. We found that the $\\gamma-$ray spectral curvature of radio-quiet pulsars can be larger than that of radio-loud pulsars. Based on the full sample of non-recycled $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, their distributions of the magnetic field strength at the light cylinder are also found to be different. We notice that this might be resulted from the observational bias. In re-examining the previously reported difference of $\\gamma-$ray-to-X-ray flux ratios, we found the significance can be hampered by their statistical uncertainties. In the context of outer gap model, we discuss the expected properties of these two populations and compare with the possible differences identified in our analysis.

  13. XMM-Newton observations of 4 luminous radio-quiet AGN, and the soft X-ray excess problem

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ammando, F; Jimenez-Bailon, E; Matt, G

    2008-01-01

    The nature and origin of the soft X-ray excess in radio quiet AGN is still an open issue. The interpretation in terms of thermal disc emission has been challanged by the discovery of the constancy of the effective temperature despite the wide range of Black Hole masses of the observed sources. Alternative models are reflection from ionized matter and absorption in a relativistically smeared wind. We analyzed XMM-Newton observations of four luminous radio quiet AGN with the aim of characterising their main properties and in particular the soft excess. Different spectral models for the soft excess were tried: thermal disc emission, Comptonization, ionized reflection, relativistically smeared winds. Comptonization of thermal emission and the smeared winds provide the best fits, but the other models also provide acceptable fits. All models, however, return parameters very similar from source to source, despite the large differences in luminosities, Black Hole masses and Eddington ratios. Moreover, the smeared win...

  14. Evidence for ultrafast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs - III. Location and energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-05-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photoionization modelling of blueshifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this Letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval ˜0.0003-0.03 pc (˜ 102-104rs) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disc winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between ˜0.01 and 1 M⊙ yr-1, corresponding to >rsim5-10 per cent of the accretion rates. The average lower/upper limits on the mechanical power are log? 42.6-44.6 erg s-1. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN cosmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyfert galaxies.

  15. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs: III - Location and Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photo-ionization modelling of blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultrafast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval approx.0.0003-0.03pc (approx.10(exp 2)-10(exp 4)tau(sub s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between approx.0.01- 1 Stellar Mass/y, corresponding to approx. or >5-10% of the accretion rates. The average lower-upper limits on the mechanical power are logE(sub K) approx. or = 42.6-44.6 erg/s. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs are indeed capable to provide a significant contribution to the AGN r.osmological feedback, in agreement with theoretical expectations and the recent observation of interactions between AGN outflows and the interstellar medium in several Seyferts galaxies .

  16. The Braking Index of Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Camilo, F; Johnson, T J; Kerr, M; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Beer, C; Bock, O; Cuéllar, A; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Nieder, L

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 $\\mu$Jy. By timing this pulsar's gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be $n = 2.598 \\pm 0.001 \\pm 0.1$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2,700 yr, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its you...

  17. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs: III - location and energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Braito, V

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of a previous X-ray photo-ionization modelling of blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines on a sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton, in this letter we estimate the location and energetics of the associated ultra-fast outflows (UFOs). Due to significant uncertainties, we are essentially able to place only lower/upper limits. On average, their location is in the interval ~0.0003-0.03pc (~10^2-10^4 r_s) from the central black hole, consistent with what is expected for accretion disk winds/outflows. The mass outflow rates are constrained between ~0.01-1 M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, corresponding to >5-10% of the accretion rates. The average lower-upper limits on the mechanical power are log\\dot{E}_K~42.6-44.6 erg s^{-1}. However, the minimum possible value of the ratio between the mechanical power and bolometric luminosity is constrained to be comparable or higher than the minimum required by simulations of feedback induced by winds/outflows. Therefore, this work demonstrates that UFOs ...

  18. Multiwavelength polarization observations of the γ-ray bright quasar PKS 0420-014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitskiy I.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze total and polarized intensity images of the quasar PKS 0420-014 obtained monthly with the VLBA at 43 GHz during 2008–2012 along with γ-ray data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and multi-color photometric and polarimetric measurements collected by different optical telescopes. During this period the quasar underwent a number of optical flares, which were accompanied by rapid rotation of polarization angle, an increase of activity in γ-rays, and the appearance of new superluminal knots in the parsec-scale jet. We investigate the fine structure of the flares at different wavelengths and in polarized light, and determine kinematic parameters of the knots. We compare the rapid evolution of the optical polarization with the polarization of the VLBI core and knots. We interpret the multi-wavelength behavior within a model that places the blazar “dissipation zone” at the millimeter-wave core of the parsec-scale jet.

  19. Radio-quiet and radio-loud pulsars: similar in Gamma-rays but different in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Salvetti, D; Hartog, P R Den; Wolff, M T

    2015-01-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  20. Black Hole Mass Estimates of Radio Selected Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Oshlack, Alicia; Webster, Rachel; Whiting, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The black hole (BH) mass in the centre of AGN has been estimated for a sample of radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars to investigate the relationship between BH mass and radio properties of quasars. We have used the virial assumption with measurements of the H$\\beta$ FWHM and luminosity to estimate the central BH mass. In contrast to previous studies we find no correlation between BH mass and radio power in these AGN. We find a range in BH mass similar to that seen in radio-quiet quasars from...

  1. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hickox, Ryan, E-mail: jonathan.richardson@uchicago.edu, E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

  2. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 μJy. By timing this pulsar’s gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be n = 2.598 ± 0.001 ± 0.1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2700 years, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its young age, the pulsar is not associated with any known supernova remnant or pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar’s inferred dipolar surface magnetic field strength is 3.8 × 1013 G, almost 90% of the quantum-critical level. We investigate some potential physical causes of the braking index deviating from the simple dipole model but find that LAT data covering a longer time interval will be necessary to distinguish between these.

  3. Black-hole mass estimates for a homogeneous sample of bright flat-spectrum radio quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Castignani, Gianluca; Lapi, Andrea; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Celotti, Annalisa; Danese, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    We have selected a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) from the WMAP 7-yr catalog within the SDSS area, all with measured redshift, and have compared the black hole mass estimates based on fitting a standard accretion disk model to the `blue bump' with those obtained from the commonly used single epoch virial method. The sample comprises 79 objects with a flux density limit of 1 Jy at 23 GHz, 54 of which (68%) have a clearly detected `blue bump'. Thirty-four of the latter have, in the literature, black hole mass estimates obtained with the virial method. The mass estimates obtained from the two methods are well correlated. If the calibration factor of the virial relation is set to $f=4.5$, well within the range of recent estimates, the mean logarithmic ratio of the two mass estimates is equal to zero with a dispersion close to the estimated uncertainty of the virial method. The fact that the two independent methods agree so closely in spite of the potentially large uncertainties associated ...

  4. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzidimitriou D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ∼ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame. We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t−5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ∼10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  5. Double Lobed Radio Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W H; Becker, R H; White, R L

    2005-11-10

    We have combined a sample of 44 984 quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3, with the FIRST radio survey. Using a novel technique where the optical quasar position is matched to the complete radio environment within 450'', we are able to characterize the radio morphological make-up of what is essentially an optically selected quasar sample, regardless of whether the quasar (nucleus) itself has been detected in the radio. About 10% of the quasar population have radio cores brighter than 0.75 mJy at 1.4 GHz, and 1.7% have double lobed FR2-like radio morphologies. About 75% of the FR2 sources have a radio core (> 0.75mJy). A significant fraction ({approx}40%) of the FR2 quasars are bent by more than 10 degrees, indicating either interactions of the radio plasma with the ICM or IGM. We found no evidence for correlations with redshift among our FR2 quasars: radio lobe flux densities and radio source diameters of the quasars have similar distributions at low (mean 0.77) and high (mean 2.09) redshifts. Using a smaller high reliability FR2 sample of 422 quasars and two comparison samples of radio-quiet and non-FR2 radio-loud quasars, matched in their redshift distributions, we constructed composite optical spectra from the SDSS spectroscopic data. Based on these spectra we can conclude that the FR2 quasars have stronger high-ionization emission lines compared to both the radio quiet and non-FR2 radio loud sources. This is consistent with the notion that the emission lines are brightened by ongoing shock ionization of ambient gas in the quasar host as the radio source expands.

  6. The Global Implications of the Hard Excess. II. Analysis of the Local Population of Radio-quiet AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, M. M.; Turner, T. J.; Miller, L.; Reeves, J. N.; DiLiello, J.; Gofford, J.; Patrick, A.; Clayton, M.

    2016-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) show evidence for reprocessing gas, outflowing from the accreting black hole. The combined effects of absorption and scattering from the circumnuclear material likely explain the “hard excess” of X-ray emission above 20 keV, compared with the extrapolation of spectra from lower X-ray energies. In a recent Suzaku study, we established that the ubiquitous hard excess in hard, X-ray-selected, radio-quiet type 1 AGNs is consistent with a reprocessing of the X-ray continuum in an ensemble of clouds, located tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the nuclear black hole. Here we add hard X-ray-selected, type 2 AGNs to extend our original study and show that the gross X-ray spectral properties of the entire local population of radio-quiet AGNs may be described by a simple unified scheme. We find a broad, continuous distribution of spectral hardness ratio and Fe Kα equivalent width across all AGN types, which can be reproduced by varying the observer's sightline through a single, simple model cloud ensemble, provided that the radiative transfer through the model cloud distribution includes not only photoelectric absorption but also three-dimensional (3D) Compton scattering. Variation in other parameters of the cloud distribution, such as column density or ionization, should be expected between AGNs, but such variation is not required to explain the gross X-ray spectral properties.

  7. The Global Implications of the Hard Excess II: Analysis of the Local population of Radio Quiet AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Tatum, M M; Miller, L; Reeves, J N; DiLiello, J; Gofford, J; Patrick, A; Clayton, M

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) show evidence for reprocessing gas, outflowing from the accreting black hole. The combined effects of absorption and scattering from the circumnuclear material likely explains the `hard excess' of X-ray emission above 20 keV, compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower X-ray energies. In a recent {\\it Suzaku} study, we established the ubiquitous hard excess in hard X-ray-selected, radio-quiet type\\,1 AGNs to be consistent with reprocessing of the X-ray continuum an ensemble of clouds, located tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the nuclear black hole. Here we add hard X-ray-selected, type\\,2 AGN to extend our original study and show that the gross X-ray spectral properties of the entire local population of radio quiet AGN may be described by a simple unified scheme. We find a broad, continuous distribution of spectral hardness ratio and Fe\\,K$\\alpha$ equivalent width across all AGN types, which can be reproduced by varying the observer's sightline through a single, ...

  8. Double-peaked Balmer line emission in the radio-quiet AGN RX J1042+1212

    CERN Document Server

    Puchnarewicz, E M; Carrera, F J

    1996-01-01

    We present optical and X-ray spectra of a radio-quiet X-ray selected AGN, RX J1042+1212 ($z$=0.271). The Halpha and Hbeta emission lines are very broad (with full widths at half maximum of ~10000 km s-1) and have double-peaked profiles. Such features are rarely observed in AGN in general but are even more unusual in radio-quiet objects. The analysis of the ROSAT PSPC data reveals a non-varying, unabsorbed spectrum with an energy spectral index, alphax=1.2 and little or no emission from a soft X-ray excess. The slope of the optical spectrum is similar, alphaopt=1.0, and is consistent with an extrapolation of the X-ray spectrum, suggesting that the same power-law continuum may dominate throughout and that the big blue bump component is relatively weak. We look for a link between these various properties and investigate models of double-peaked Balmer line emission in AGN. An accretion disc origin is unlikely in RX J1042+1212 as this model predicts that lines emitted by a disc should have a net gravitational reds...

  9. Bright [CII] and dust emission in three z>6.6 quasar host galaxies observed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Zschaechner, L; Decarli, R; De Rosa, G; Findlay, J R; McMahon, R G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA detections of the [CII] 158 micron emission line and the underlying far-infrared continuum of three quasars at 6.6~6 quasar hosts correlate with the quasar's bolometric luminosity. In one quasar, the [CII] line is significantly redshifted by ~1700 km/s with respect to the MgII broad emission line. Comparing to values in the literature, we find that, on average, the MgII is blueshifted by 480 km/s (with a standard deviation of 630 km/s) with respect to the host galaxy redshift, i.e. one of our quasars is an extreme outlier. Through modeling we can rule out a flat rotation curve for our brightest [CII] emitter. Finally, we find that the ratio of black hole mass to host galaxy (dynamical) mass is higher by a factor 3-4 (with significant scatter) than local relations.

  10. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  11. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-alpha emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a "cosmic web", where the majority of baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-alpha emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently "illuminated" by bright quasars at z=2.3. With a projected size of approximately 460 physical kpc, the Lyman-alpha emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark matter halo. The estimated cold gas mass of the nebula from the observed emission is at least ten times larger than what is typically found by cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with sub-kpc siz...

  12. Search for differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar populations with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Observations by Fermi LAT enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with the set of 89 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than radio-quiet one and is located at smaller galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most of radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio-band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi LAT data alone using all point sources from 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike preceding blind search, the present catalog is constructed with novel semi-coherent method and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in the catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 26 of which are radio-quiet. There are no statistically si...

  13. PKS 0347+05: a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus system triggered in a major galaxy merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadhunter, C. N.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Morganti, R.; Holt, J.; Rose, M.; Dicken, D.; Inskip, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present optical, infrared (IR) and radio observations of the powerful Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio source PKS 0347+05 (z = 0.3390), and demonstrate that it is a rare example of a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, comprising a weak-line radio galaxy (WLRG)

  14. Is optical Fe II emission related to the soft X-ray properties of quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; Mchardy, Ian

    1987-01-01

    Radio-quiet quasars generally show broad, blended multiplets of Fe II emission in their optical and UV spectra. Radio-loud quasars also show UV Fe II emission, but their optical Fe II emission is generally weaker. No satisfactory theory connecting the generation of Fe II and radio emission has been found to explain this effect. A second, well-established distinction between the two clases of quasar is in their X-ray properties: radio-loud quasars are more X-ray luminous, and recent results have shown that they also have systematically flatter soft X-ray slopes. Here it is proposed that the second effect causes the first; i.e., that the primary factor controlling the optical Fe II emission is the soft X-ray spectrum. This proposition is supported by X-ray and optical data for nine quasars, which shows a correlation between the soft X-ray slope and the strength of the optical Fe II emission. One of these quasars (1803+676) is radio-quiet, and yet its optical spectrum shows no evidence for Fe II emission. This quasar is also unusual in that it has a flat X-ray spectrum. This further supports the proposal that the X-ray spectrum is important in determining the relative strengths of UV and optical Fe II emission.

  15. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  16. Spectral Variability in Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minfeng Gu

    2014-09-01

    The spectral variability of a sample of 44 Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) and 18 Steep-Spectrum Radio Quasars (SSRQs) in SDSS stripe 82 region is investigated. Twenty-five of 44 FSRQs show a bluer-when-brighter trend (BWB), while only one FSRQ shows a redder-when-brighter trend, which is in contrast to our previous results. Eight of 18 SSRQs display a BWB. We found an anticorrelation between the Eddington ratio and the variability amplitude in the band for SSRQs, which is similar to that in radio-quiet AGNs. This implies that the thermal emission from the accretion disk may be responsible for the variability in SSRQs. The spectral variability from SDSS multi-epoch spectroscopy also shows BWB for several SSRQs, which is consistent with that from photometry.

  17. RADIO-QUIET AND RADIO-LOUD PULSARS: SIMILAR IN GAMMA-RAYS BUT DIFFERENT IN X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Luca, A. De; Salvetti, D. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Parkinson, P. M. Saz [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hartog, P. R. Den [Stanford University HEPL/KIPAC, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Wolff, M. T., E-mail: marelli@iasf-milano.inaf.it [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet (RQ) γ-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from γ-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for a ∼10″-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. and confirm that, on average, the γ-ray-to-X-ray flux ratios (F{sub γ}/F{sub X}) of RQ pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud (RL) ones. Furthermore, while the F{sub γ}/F{sub X} distribution features a single peak for the RQ pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the RL ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  18. PKS0347+05: a radio-loud/radio-quiet double AGN system triggered in a major galaxy merger

    CERN Document Server

    Tadhunter, C; Morganti, R; Holt, J; Rose, M; Dicken, D; Inskip, K

    2012-01-01

    We present optical, infrared and radio observations of the powerful FRII radio source PKS0347+05 (z=0.3390), and demonstrate that it is a rare example of a radio-loud/radio-quiet double AGN system, comprising a weak line radio galaxy (WLRG) separated by 25 kpc (in projection) from a Seyfert 1 nucleus at the same redshift. Our deep Gemini optical images show a highly disturbed morphology, with a warped dust lane crossing through the halo and nuclear regions of the radio galaxy host, tidal tails, and a bridge connecting the radio galaxy to the Seyfert 1 nucleus. Spectral synthesis modelling of our Gemini optical spectrum of the radio galaxy shows evidence for a reddened young stellar population of age <100 Myr. Further evidence for recent star formation activity in this source is provided by the detection of strong PAH features in mid-IR Spitzer/IRS spectra. Together, these observations support a model in which both AGN have been triggered simultaneously in a major galaxy merger. However, despite the presenc...

  19. TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 QUASARS IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Ridgway

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 or \\obscured" AGN have long been identi ed at low AGN luminosities (e.g. Seyfert 2s or through their radio luminosities (e.g. radio galaxies. But radio-quiet quasars (RQQs are many times more common than radio-loud quasars, and it's therefore unsurprising that recent searches have revealed that radio-quiet quasar 2s also form a signi cant population. Finding the numbers, properties, and redshift distribution of quasar 2s will be very important to resolving questions about the formation and co-evolution of black holes and galaxies. We have selected a sample of Type 2 and Type 1 quasars matched in their mid-infrared luminosity from the Spitzer First Look Survey by selecting on their mid-infrared dust emission properties (as measured by Spitzer IRAC photometry. This emission provides a distinctive signature of AGN activity but should not be a cted by orientation or torus opening angle. We have obtained mid-infrared IRS spectroscopy of these samples to study star formation activity in the host galaxies and the dust environments of the AGN, using measurements of the PAH features, the shape of the mid-infrared SED, and the equivalent width of the silicate features at 10 microns. We nd that the quasar 2s have more diverse mid-IR spectral properties, and that obscuration of the AGN is linked to star formation activity in the host.

  20. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs: II - detailed photo-ionization modeling of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Palumbo, G G C; Braito, V; Dadina, M

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet AGNs. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000km/s and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted FeK absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. In the present paper we report a detailed curve of growth analysis and directly model the FeK absorbers with the Xstar photo-ionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35%. The outflow velocity distribution spans from \\sim10,000km/s (\\sim0.03c) up to \\sim100,000km/s (\\sim0.3c), with a peak and mean value of \\sim42,000km/s (\\sim0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log\\xi 3-6erg s^{-1} cm, with a mean value of log\\xi 4.2 erg s^{-1} cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N_H\\sim10^{22}-10^{24...

  1. Bright [CII] 158$\\mu$m emission in a quasar host galaxy at $z=6.54$

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Walter, F; Venemans, B P; Farina, E P; Fan, X

    2015-01-01

    The [CII] 158$\\mu$m fine-structure line is known to trace regions of active star formation and is the main coolant of the cold, neutral atomic medium. In this \\textit{Letter}, we report a strong detection of the [CII] line in the host galaxy of the brightest quasar known at $z>6.5$, the Pan-STARRS1 selected quasar PSO J036.5078+03.0498 (hereafter P036+03), using the IRAM NOEMA millimeter interferometer. Its [CII] and total far-infrared luminosities are $(5.8 \\pm 0.7) \\times 10^9 \\,L_\\odot$ and $(7.6\\pm1.5) \\times 10^{12}\\,L_\\odot$, respectively. This results in a $L_{[CII]} /L_{TIR}$ ratio of $\\sim 0.8\\times 10^{-3}$, which is at the high end for those found for active galaxies, though it is lower than the average found in typical main sequence galaxies at $z\\sim 0$. We also report a tentative additional line which we identify as a blended emission from the $3_{22} - 3_{13}$ and $5_{23} - 4_{32}$ H$_2$O transitions. If confirmed, this would be the most distant detection of water emission to date. P036+03 riva...

  2. Radio spectra and polarisation properties of a bright sample of Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Salerno, E; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Carballo, R; Benn, C R; González-Serrano, J I; Holt, J; Jiménez-Luján, F

    2012-01-01

    The origin of broad-absorption-line quasars (BAL QSOs) is still an open issue. Accounting for ~20% of the QSO population, these objects present broad absorption lines in their optical spectra generated from outflows with velocities up to 0.2c. In this work we present the results of a multi-frequency study of a well-defined radio-loud BAL QSO sample, and a comparison sample of radio-loud non-BAL QSOs, both selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We aim to test which of the currently-popular models for the BAL phenomenon - `orientation' or 'evolutionary' - best accounts for the radio properties of BAL quasars. Observations from 1.4 to 43 GHz have been obtained with the VLA and Effelsberg telescopes, and data from 74 to 408 MHz have been compiled from the literature. The fractions of candidate GHz-peaked sources are similar in the two samples (36\\pm12% vs 23\\pm8%), suggesting that BAL QSOs are not generally younger than non-BAL QSOs. BAL and non-BAL QSOs show a large range of spectral indices, consist...

  3. Multi-Epoch VLBA Observations of EGRET-Detected Quasars and BL Lac Objects Superluminal Motion of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Jorstad, S G; Mattox, J R; Wehrle, A E; Bloom, S D; Yurchenko, A V; Jorstad, Svetlana G; Marscher, Alan P; Mattox, John R; Wehrle, Ann E; Bloom, Steven D; Yurchenko, Alexei V

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a program to monitor the structure of the radio emission in 42 $\\gamma$-ray bright blazars (31 quasars and 11 BL Lac objects) with the VLBA at 43, 22, and occasionally 15 and 8.4 GHz, over the period from November 1993 to July 1997. We determine proper motions in 33 sources and find that the apparent superluminal motions in $\\gamma$-ray sources are much faster than for the general population of bright compact radio sources. This follows the strong dependence of the $\\gamma$-ray flux on the level of relativistic beaming for both external-radiation Compton and synchrotron self-Compton emission. There is a positive correlation (correlation coefficient $r$=0.45) between the flux density of the VLBI core and the $\\gamma$-ray flux and a moderate correlation (partial correlation coefficient $r$=0.31) between $\\gamma$-ray apparent luminosity and superluminal velocities of jet components, as expected if the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates in a very compact region of the relativistic jet and ...

  4. The nuclear to host galaxy relation of high redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kotilainen, J K; Labita, M; Treves, A; Uslenghi, M

    2007-01-01

    We present near-infrared imaging with ESO VLT+ISAAC of the host galaxies of low luminosity quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 2, aimed at investigating the relationship between the nuclear and host galaxy luminosities at high redshift. This work complements our previous study to trace the cosmological evolution of the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars (Falomo et al. 2004). The new sample includes 15 low luminosity quasars, nine radio-loud (RLQ) and six radio-quiet (RQQ). They have similar distribution of redshift and optical luminosity, and together with the high luminosity quasars they cover a large range (~4 mag) of the quasar luminosity function. The host galaxies of both types of quasars are in the range of massive inactive ellipticals between L* and 10 L*. RLQ hosts are systematically more luminous than RQQ hosts by a factor of ~2. This difference is similar to that found for the high luminosity quasars. This luminosity gap appears to be independent of the rest-frame U-band luminosity but...

  5. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  6. A large sample of Kohonen-selected SDSS quasars with weak emission lines: selection effects and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H

    2014-01-01

    We performed a search for WLQs in the spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 based on Kohonen self-organising maps for nearly 10^5 quasar spectra. The final sample consists of 365 quasars and includes in particular a subsample of 46 WLQs with equivalent widths W(MgII) 1500 A. The variability in the optical and UV is relatively low, even taking the variability-luminosity anti-correlation into account. The percentage of radio detected quasars and of core-dominant radio sources is significantly higher than for the control sample, whereas the mean radio-loudness is lower. The properties of our WLQ sample can be consistently understood assuming that it consists of a mix of quasars at the beginning of a stage of increased accretion activity and of beamed radio-quiet quasars. (Abstract modified to match the arXiv format)

  7. The AGN content of deep radio surveys and radio emission in radio-quiet AGN. Why every astronomer should care about deep radio fields

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Miller, N; Kellermann, K I; Mainieri, V; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2014-01-01

    We present our very recent results on the sub-mJy radio source populations at 1.4 GHz based on the Extended Chandra Deep Field South VLA survey, which reaches ~ 30 {\\mu}Jy, with details on their number counts, evolution, and luminosity functions. The sub-mJy radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN evolving at a similar, strong rate and declining radio-loud AGN. While the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star-forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-mJy sky. Our results shed also light on a fifty-year-old issue, namely radio emission from radio-quiet AGN, and suggest that it is closely related to star formation, at least at z ~ 1.5 - 2. The implications of our findings for future, deeper radio surveys, including those with the Square Kilometre Array, are also discussed. One of the main messages, especially to non-radio astronomers, is that radio surveys are reaching such f...

  8. Direct Microlensing-Reverberation Observations of the Intrinsic magnetic Structure of AGN in Different Spectral States: A Tale of Two Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E; Robertson, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    We show how direct microlensing-reverberation analysis performed on two well-known Quasars (Q2237 - The Einstein Cross and Q0957 - The Twin) can be used to observe the inner structure of two quasars which are in significantly different spectral states. These observations allow us to measure the detailed internal structure of quasar Q2237 in a radio quiet high-soft state, and compare it to quasar Q0957 in a radio loud low-hard state. We find that the observed differences in the spectral states of these two quasars can be understood as being due to the location of the inner radii of their accretion disks relative to the co-rotation radii of rotating intrinsically magnetic supermassive compact objects in the centers of these quasars.

  9. Exploration of the Radio-Loud/Radio Quiet Dichotomy for QSO: Using Radio Morphology and 4D Eigenvector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, Sebastian; Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Dultzin, D.

    2007-12-01

    The reality of a RL/RQ Dichotomy for QSO remains an open problem. Recent studies not only provide us with contradictory results, but also display the confusion of comparing conclusions drawn on the basis of different views on "what means radio-loud"? We propose a definition of radio loudness based on three criteria (simultaneously applied): radio morphology, radio luminosity and radio-optical flux density ratio. Fanaroff-Riley II radio sources (FRIIs) are assumed to be the parent population of RL quasars, while the core dominated RL quasars are assumed to be preferentially aligned FRIIs. Orientation-unification then suggests the RQ-RL boundary is set by the least radio luminous FRII and by the lowest radio-optical ratio for an FRII. We also consider RL and RQ quasars in the context of a 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) Parameter Space that is defined independently of any radio measure. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data for 400+ QSO (z<0.7 and brighter than psf g =17.5), coupled with FIRST and NVSS radio surveys (1.4GHz), we show that classical RL sources distribute very differently from the RQ majority of QSO.

  10. Evidence for Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-shell Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s-1 and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from ~10,000 km s-1 (~0.03c) up to ~100,000 km s-1 (~0.3c), with a peak and mean value of ~42,000 km s-1 (~0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log ξ ~ 3-6 erg s-1 cm, with a mean value of log ξ ~ 4.2 erg s-1 cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N H ~ 1022-1024 cm-2, with a mean value of N H ~ 1023 cm-2. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can

  11. Evidence for Ultra-Fast Outflows in Radio-Quiet AGNs. 2; Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-Shell Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Clapp, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet AGNs. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000km/s and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blue shifted FeK absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. In the present paper we report a detailed curve of growth analysis and directly model the FeK absorbers with the Xstar photo-ionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35%. The outflow velocity distribution spans from \\sim10,000km/s (\\sim0.03c) up to \\siml00,000kmis (\\sim0.3c), with a peak and mean value of\\sim42,000km/s (\\sim0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log\\xi 3-6 erg s/cm, with a mean value of log\\xi 4.2 erg s/cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N_H\\siml0(exp 22)-10(exp 24)/sq cm, with a mean value of N_H\\siml0(exp23)/sq cm. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can provide important clues on the connection between accretion disks, winds and jets.

  12. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs. I. Detection and statistical incidence of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Yaqoob, T.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines have been detected in recent years between 7 and 10 keV in the X-ray spectra of several radio-quiet AGNs. The derived blue-shifted velocities of the lines can often reach mildly relativistic values, up to 0.2-0.4c. These findings are important because they suggest the presence of a previously unknown massive and highly ionized absorbing material outflowing from their nuclei, possibly connected with accretion disk winds/outflows. Aims: The scope of the present work is to statistically quantify the parameters and incidence of the blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines through a uniform analysis on a large sample of radio-quiet AGNs. This allows us to assess their global detection significance and to overcome any possible publication bias. Methods: We performed a blind search for narrow absorption features at energies greater than 6.4 keV in a sample of 42 radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. A simple uniform model composed by an absorbed power-law plus Gaussian emission and absorption lines provided a good fit for all the data sets. We derived the absorption lines parameters and calculated their detailed detection significance making use of the classical F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We detect 36 narrow absorption lines on a total of 101 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observations. The number of absorption lines at rest-frame energies higher than 7 keV is 22. Their global probability to be generated by random fluctuations is very low, less than 3 × 10-8, and their detection have been independently confirmed by a spectral analysis of the MOS data, with associated random probability UFOs) those highly ionized absorbers with outflow velocities higher than 104 km s-1, then the majority of the lines are consistent with being associated to UFOs and the fraction of objects with detected UFOs in the whole sample is at least ~35%. This fraction is similar for type 1 and type 2 sources. The global covering fraction of

  13. A Hybrid Spin-Down Model and its Application to the Radio Quiet X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张灵娣; 彭秋和; 罗新炼

    2003-01-01

    A series of newly published papers are focusing on the formation of the absorption features discovered by Chandra and XMM-Newton from the young radio quiet x-ray pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209. We try to interpret it as cyclotron absorption lines since this possibility could not be ruled out. With new development and application of a hybrid model, i.e., the magnetic dipole spin-down model combined with the neutrino cyclotron radiation spin-down model, we can easily avoid the contradiction between the normal rotation energy loss rate and the relatively lower magnetic field, and then we obtain the possible initial spin period (~0.420s). We suppose that the progenitor of 1E 1207.4-5209 may be a white dwarf.

  14. Probing the Radio Loud/Quiet AGN dichotomy with quasar clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Retana-Montenegro, E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the clustering properties of 45441 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 3493 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) drawn from a joint use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) surveys in the range $0.3quasar sample allow us to investigate the clustering signal dependence on radio-loudness and black hole (BH) virial mass. We find that RLQs are clustered more strongly than RQQs in all the redshift bins considered. We find a real-space correlation length of $r_{0}=6.59_{-0.24}^{+0.33}\\,h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc}$ and $r_{0}=10.95_{-1.58}^{+1.22}\\,h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc}$ {\

  15. Disclosing the Radio Loudness Distribution Dichotomy in Quasars: An Unbiased Monte Carlo Approach Applied to the SDSS-FIRST Quasar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Balokovic, Mislav; Ivezic, Zeljko; Zamorani, Gianni; Schinnerer, Eva; Kelly, Brandon C

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modelling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8,300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with 12+/-1 % of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for it...

  16. Observational constraints on the structure and evolution of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brandon C.

    2008-01-01

    I use X-ray and optical data to investigate the structure of quasars, and its dependence on luminosity, redshift, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. In order to facilitate my work, I develop new statistical methods of accounting for measurement error, non-detections, and survey selection functions. The main results of this thesis follow. (1) The statistical uncertainty in the broad line mass estimates can lead to significant artificial broadening of the observed distribution of black hole mass. (2) The z = 0.2 broad line quasar black hole mass function falls off approximately as a power law with slope ~ 2 for M BH [Special characters omitted.] 10 8 [Special characters omitted.] . (3) Radio-quiet quasars become more X-ray quiet as their optical/UV luminosity, black hole mass, or Eddington ratio increase, and more X-ray loud at higher redshift. These correlations imply that quasars emit a larger fraction of their bolometric luminosity through the accretion disk component, as compared to the corona component, as black hole mass and Eddington ratio increase. (4) The X- ray spectral slopes of radio-quiet quasars display a non-monotonic trend with Eddington ratio, where the X-ray continuum softens with increasing Eddington ratio until L/L Edd ~ 0.3, and then begins to harden. This observed non- monotonic trend may be caused by a change in the structure of the disk/corona system at L/L Edd ~ 0.3, possibly due to increased radiation pressure. (5) The characteristic time scales of quasar optical flux variations increase with increasing M BH , and are consistent with disk orbital or thermal time scales. In addition the amplitude of short time scale variability decreases with increasing M BH . I interpret quasar optical light curves as being driven by thermal fluctuations, which in turn are driven by some other underlying stochastic process with characteristic time scale long compared to the disk thermal time scale. The stochastic model I use is able to explain both short

  17. $\\textit{Herschel}$-ATLAS:The connection between star formation and AGN activity in radio-loud and radio-quiet active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gurkan, G; Jarvis, M J; Smith, D J B; Bourne, N; Dunne, L; Maddox, S; Ivison, R J; Fritz, J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the relationship between star formation and AGN activity by constructing matched samples of local ($0radio-quiet AGN in the $\\textit{Herschel}$-ATLAS fields. Radio-loud AGN are classified as high-excitation and low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs, LERGs) using their emission lines and $\\textit{WISE}$ 22-$\\mu$m luminosity. AGN accretion and jet powers in these active galaxies are traced by [OIII] emission-line and radio luminosity, respectively. Star formation rates (SFRs) and specific star formation rates (SSFRs) were derived using $\\textit{Herschel}$ 250-$\\mu$m luminosity and stellar mass measurements from the SDSS$-$MPA-JHU catalogue. In the past, star formation studies of AGN have mostly focused on high-redshift sources to observe the thermal dust emission that peaks in the far-infrared, which limited the samples to powerful objects. However, with $\\textit{Herschel}$ we can expand this to low redshifts. Our stacking analyses show that SFRs and SSFRs of both radio-l...

  18. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs: I - detection and statistical incidence of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Palumbo, G G C; Yaqoob, T; Braito, V; Dadina, M

    2010-01-01

    We performed a blind search for narrow absorption features at energies greater than 6.4 keV in a sample of 42 radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. We detect 36 narrow absorption lines on a total of 101 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observations. The number of absorption lines at rest-frame energies E>7 keV is 22. Their global probability to be generated by random fluctuations is very low, less than 3x10^-8, and their detection have been independently confirmed by a spectral analysis of the MOS data, with associated random probability <10^-7. We identify the lines as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonant absorption. They are systematically blue-shifted, with a velocity distribution ranging from zero up to 0.3c, with a peak and mean value at 0.1c. We detect variability of the lines on both EWs and blue-shifted velocities among different observations even on time-scales as short as a few days, possibly suggesting somewhat compact absorbers. Moreover, we find no significant correlation between the cosmological red-sh...

  19. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J1813$-$1246

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; Pizzocaro, D; De Luca, A; Wood, K S; Caraveo, P; Salvetti, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Acero, F

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the new deep {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of bo...

  20. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J1813–1246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; De Luca, A.; Caraveo, P.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Harding, A. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Acero, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universit Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-11-10

    We have analyzed the new deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the energetic, radio-quiet pulsar J1813–1246. The X-ray spectrum is nonthermal, very hard, and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available Fermi ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The γ-ray light curve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardening toward the bridge. Surprisingly, both X-ray peaks lag behind the γ-ray ones by a quarter of phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with INTEGRAL, which is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and γ-ray emission of J1813. The unique X-ray and γ-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.

  1. An X-Ray Study of Lobe-Dominated Radio-Loud Quasars with XMM-Newton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We report on our results of X-ray spectral analysis for a sample of radio-loud quasars covering a wide range of the radio core-dominance parameter, R, from core-dominated to lobe-dominated objects, using data obtained mostly with the XMM-Newton Observatory. We find that the spectral shape of the underlying power-law continuum is flat even for the lobe-dominated objects (average photon index ~ 1.5), indistinguishable from that of core-dominated quasars. For lobe-dominated objects, contribution of X-rays from the jets is expected to be very small based on previous unification schemes, more than one order of magnitude lower than the observed X-ray luminosities. Assuming that radio-loud quasars follow the same X-ray-UV/optical luminosity relation for the disk-corona emission as found for radio-quiet quasars, we estimate the X-ray flux contributed by the disk-corona component from the optical/UV continuum. We find that neither the luminosity, nor the spectral shape, of the disk-corona X-ray emission can account for the bulk of the observed X-ray properties. Thus in lobe-dominated quasars, either the disk-corona X-ray emission is much enhanced in strength and flatter in spectral shape (photon index~1.5) compared to normal radio-quiet quasars, or their jet X-ray emission is much enhanced compared to their weak radio core-jet emission. If the latter is the case, our result may imply that the jet emission in X-rays is less Doppler beamed than that in the radio. As a demonstrating example, we test this hypothesis by using a specific model in which the X-ray jet has a larger opening angle than the radio jet.

  2. The unification of powerful quasars and radio galaxies and their relation to other massive galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B

    2015-01-01

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that radio galaxies and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from star-forming galaxies.

  3. THE UNIFICATION OF POWERFUL QUASARS AND RADIO GALAXIES AND THEIR RELATION TO OTHER MASSIVE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podigachoski, Pece; Barthel, Peter [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Haas, Martin [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr Universität, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Leipski, Christian [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wilkes, Belinda, E-mail: podigachoski@astro.rug.nl [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies (RGs) and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that RGs and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming (SF) galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from SF galaxies.

  4. Intranight optical variability of radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an optical photometric monitoring program of 10 extremely radio loud broad absorption line quasars (RL-BALQSOs) with radio-loudness parameter, R, greater than 100 and magnitude g_i < 19. Over an observing run of about 3.5-6.5 hour we found a clear detection of variability for one of our 10 radio-loud BALQSOs with the INOV duty cycle of 5.1 per cent, while on including the probable variable cases, a higher duty cycle of 35.1 per cent is found; which are very similar to the duty cycle of radio quiet broad absorption line quasars (RQ-BALQSOs). This low duty cycle of clear variability per cent in radio-loud sub-class of BALQSOs can be understood under the premise where BALs outflow may arise from large variety of viewing angles from the jet axis or perhaps being closer to the disc plane.

  5. Chandra Observations of the Highest Redshift Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Shemmer, O; Brandt, W N; Brinkmann, J; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Strauss, M A; Anderson, Scott F.; Brinkmann, Jon; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations of 21 z>4 quasars, including 11 sources at z>5. These observations double the number of X-ray detected quasars at z>5, allowing investigation of the X-ray spectral properties of a substantial sample of quasars at the dawn of the modern Universe. By jointly fitting the spectra of 15 z>5 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs), including sources from the Chandra archive, with a total of 185 photons, we find a mean X-ray power-law photon index of Gamma=1.95^{+0.30}_{-0.26}, and a mean neutral intrinsic absorption column density of N_H5 RQQs, excluding broad absorption line quasars, is alpha_ox=-1.69+/-0.03, which is consistent with the value predicted from the observed relationship between alpha_ox and ultraviolet luminosity. Four of the sources in our sample are members of the rare class of weak emission-line quasars, and we detect two of them in X-rays. We discuss the implications our X-ray observations have for the nature of these mysterious sources and, in particular, whether their wea...

  6. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has discovered a quasar the brightly-shining, active nucleus of a galaxy abruptly turning on in what appears to be the fastest such transition ever seen in such an object.A Rapid TransitionQuasars are expected to show variations in brightness on timescales of hours to millions of years, but its not often that we get to study their major variability in real time! So far, weve discovered only a dozen changing-look quasars active galactic nuclei that exhibit major changes in their spectral class and brightness between observations. Roughly half of these were quasars that turned on and half were quasars that turned off, generally on timescales of maybe 5 or 10 years.The dramatic change in spectrum of iPTF 16bco between the archival SDSS data from 2004 (bottom) and the follow-up spectroscopy from Keck 2+DEIMOS in 2016 (top). [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]In June 2016, however, a team of scientists led by Suvi Gezari (University of Maryland) discovered iPTF 16bco, a nuclear transient that wasnt there the last time Palomar checked in 2012. A search through archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX data in addition to some follow-up X-ray imaging and spectroscopic observations told the team what they needed to know: iPTF 16bco is a quasar that only just turned on within the 500 days preceding the iPTF observations.This source, in fact, is a 100-million-solar-mass black hole located at the center of a galaxy at a redshift of z= 0.237. In just over a year, the source changed classification from a galaxy with weak narrow-line emission to a quasar with characteristic strong, broad emission lines and a ten-fold increase in continuum brightness! What caused this sudden transition?Instabilities at Fault?iPTF 16bco and the other known changing-look quasars with disappearing (red circles) and appearing (blue circles) broad-line emission. [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]Gezari and collaborators used the large number of recent

  7. On the statistical characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet halo coronal mass ejections and their associated flares during solar cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Nishant; Sharma, Joginder; Verma, Virendar Kumar; Garg, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the characteristics of radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) front side halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) (angular width 360°) observed between the time period years 1996-2014. RL-HCMEs are associated with type II radio bursts, while RQ-HCMEs are not associated with type II radio bursts. CMEs near the Sun in the interplanetary medium associated with radio bursts also affect the magnetosphere. The type II radio burst data was observed by WIND/WAVES instrument and HCMEs were observed by LASCO/ SOHO instruments. In our study, we have examined the properties of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs and found that RL-HCMEs follow the solar cycle variation. Our study also shows that the 26% of slow speed HCMEs and 82% of fast speed HCMEs are RL. The average speed of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs are 1370 km/s and 727 km/s, respectively. Most of the RQ-HCMEs occur around the solar disc center while most of RL-HCMEs are uniformly distributed across the solar disc. The mean value of acceleration of RL-HCMEs is more than twice that of RQ-HCMEs and mean value of deceleration of RL- HCMEs is very small compare to RQ-HCMEs events. It is also found that RQ-HCMEs events are associated with C- and M-class of SXR flares, while RL-HCMEs events are associated with M and X-class of SXR flares, which indicates that the RQ-HCMEs are less energetic than the RL-HCMEs. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view of recent scenario of solar physics.

  8. EVIDENCE OF THE DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC JET LAUNCHING IN QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punsly, Brian, E-mail: brian.punsly1@verizon.net [1415 Granvia Altamira, Palos Verdes Estates CA, USA 90274 and ICRANet, Piazza della Repubblica 10 Pescara I-65100 (Italy)

    2015-06-10

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra of the EUV, the optically thick emission from the innermost accretion flow onto the central supermassive black hole, indicate that radio loud quasars (RLQs) tend to be EUV weak compared to the radio-quiet quasars; yet the remainder of the optically thick thermal continuum is indistinguishable. The deficit of EUV emission in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. This article is an examination of the evidence for a distribution of magnetic flux tubes in the innermost accretion flow that results in magnetically arrested accretion (MAA) and creates the EUV deficit. These same flux tubes and possibly the interior magnetic flux that they encircle are the sources of the jet power as well. In the MAA scenario, islands of large-scale vertical magnetic flux perforate the innermost accretion flow of RLQs. The first prediction of the theory that is supported by the HST data is that the strength of the (large-scale poloidal magnetic fields) jets in the MAA region is regulated by the ram pressure of the accretion flow in the quasar environment. The second prediction that is supported by the HST data is that the rotating magnetic islands remove energy from the accretion flow as a Poynting flux dominated jet in proportion to the square of the fraction of the EUV emitting gas that is displaced by these islands.

  9. Evidence of the Dynamics of Relativistic Jet Launching in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra of the EUV, the optically thick emission from the innermost accretion flow onto the central supermassive black hole, indicate that radio loud quasars (RLQs) tend to be EUV weak compared to the radio-quiet quasars; yet the remainder of the optically thick thermal continuum is indistinguishable. The deficit of EUV emission in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. This article is an examination of the evidence for a distribution of magnetic flux tubes in the innermost accretion flow that results in magnetically arrested accretion (MAA) and creates the EUV deficit. These same flux tubes and possibly the interior magnetic flux that they encircle are the sources of the jet power as well. In the MAA scenario, islands of large-scale vertical magnetic flux perforate the innermost accretion flow of RLQs. The first prediction of the theory that is supported by the HST data is that the strength of the (large-scale poloidal magnetic fields) jets in the MAA region is regulated by the ram pressure of the accretion flow in the quasar environment. The second prediction that is supported by the HST data is that the rotating magnetic islands remove energy from the accretion flow as a Poynting flux dominated jet in proportion to the square of the fraction of the EUV emitting gas that is displaced by these islands.

  10. The Redshift Distribution of Intervening Weak MgII Quasar Absorbers and a Curious Dependence on Quasar Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Jessica L; Murphy, Michael T; Nielsen, Nikole M; Klimek, Elizabeth S

    2013-01-01

    We have identified 469 MgII doublet systems having W_r >= 0.02 {\\AA} in 252 Keck/HIRES and UVES/VLT quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 = 1.0 {\\AA}) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ~ 25% higher than toward faint quasars (10 sigma at low redshift, 0.4 <= z <= 1.4, and 4 sigma at high redshift, 1.4 < z <= 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ~ 20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10 sigma at low redshift and 4 sigma at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  11. AN APPARENT REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM: IMPLICATION FOR COSMIC DUST EXTINCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun, E-mail: ssy@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., α{sub ν12} (1000 ∼ 2000 Å) and α{sub ν24} (2000 ∼ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher α{sub ν}) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both α{sub ν12} and α{sub ν24} show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed α{sub ν} − z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσ{sub v} ∼ 10{sup −5}h Mpc{sup −1} at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  12. A Quasar Catalog with Simultaneous UV, Optical and X-ray Observations by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jian; Grupe, Dirk; Koch, Scott; Gelbord, Jonathan; Schneider, Donald P; Gronwall, Caryl; Wesolowski, Sarah; Porterfield, Blair L

    2012-01-01

    We have compiled a catalog of optically-selected quasars with simultaneous observations in UV/optical and X-ray bands by the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer. Objects in this catalog are identified by matching the Swift pointings with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog. The final catalog contains 843 objects, among which 637 have both UVOT and XRT observations and 354 of which are detected by both instruments. The overall X-ray detection rate is ~60% which rises to ~85% among sources with at least 10 ks of XRT exposure time. We construct the time-averaged spectral energy distribution for each of the 354 quasars using UVOT photometric measurements and XRT spectra. From model fits to these SEDs, we find that the big blue bump contributes about 0.3 dex to the quasar luminosity. We re-visit the alpha_ox-L_uv relation by selecting a clean sample with only type 1 radio-quiet quasars; the dispersion of this relation is reduced by at least 15% compared to studies that use non-simultaneous UV/opt...

  13. Testing Disk-Wind Models with Quasar CIV 1549Å Associated Absorption Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Narrow associated C IV 1549Å absorption lines (NALs) with a rest equivalent width EW =3 Å detected in z ˜ 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, (a) exhibit evidence of an origin in radiatively accelerated gas, and (b) may be closely related to broad absorption line (BAL) outflows. These NALs...... and the few BALs detected in this quasar sample obey key predictions of models of radiatively driven disk-winds in which (1) the local disk luminosity launches the wind, (2) the central UV radiation drives it outwards, and (3) the wind acceleration (i.e., terminal velocity) depends on the strength of the X......-ray to UV emission ratio, i.e., aOX. The latter means that quasars with flat aOX (like radio-louds) should not have strong, high-velocity (BAL-like) outflows. These results are of interest not only to studies of disk wind scenarios and quasar structure, but also to studies of quasar feedback: NALs...

  14. Dusty Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Hewett, Paul C; Ross, Nicholas P; Hall, P B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ~35,000 uniformly-selected quasars with 00.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)>0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index (${\\alpha}_{\\lambda}$) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger ionizing spectral lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former indicating either smaller BH mass or more face-on orientation.

  15. Near-infrared imaging of the host galaxies of three radio-loud quasars at z = 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Falomo, R; Treves, A; Falomo, Renato; Kotilainen, Jari; Treves, Aldo

    2000-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution near-infrared H-band (1.65 microns) images, taken with ISAAC on UT1 of ESO VLT, of three radio-loud quasars at z = 1.5, as a pilot study for imaging of a larger sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 2. We are able to clearly detect the host galaxy in two quasars (PKS 0000-177 and PKS 0348-120) and marginally in the third (PKS 0402-362). The host galaxies appear compact (average bulge scale-length R(e) = 4 kpc) and luminous (average M(H) = -27.6+-0.1). They are 2.5 mag more luminous than the typical galaxy luminosity (M*(H) = -25.0+-0.2), and are comparable to the hosts of low redshift radio-loud quasars (M(H) = -26), taking into account passive stellar evolution. Their luminosities are also similar to those of high redshift radio galaxies. All three quasars have at least one close companion galaxy at a projected distance < 50 kpc from the quasar, assuming they are at the same redshift.

  16. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years Period in the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. K. Manchanda

    2002-09-01

    We report the observation of nearest quasar 3C273 made with LASE instrument on November 20th, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20–200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20–200 keV with power law spectral index = 226 ± 0.07. This is in complete contrast to the reported data from OSSE and BeppoSAX which suggest the value of 1.3 to 1.6 for the power law index in the X-ray energy band, but is quite consistent with the value derived for the high energy gamma ray data. A single power law fit in the X-ray and gamma ray energy bands points to a common origin of these photons and the absence of spectral break around 1 MeV as suggested in literature. We have reanalyzed the available data to study the temporal variability of the spectrum in the hard X-ray band. Our analysis reveals that 50 keV flux from the source, shows a strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years. The analysis of the optical light curve of the source also supports the 5000 day period.We discuss the emission mechanism and the possible sites for X-ray photons along with the implications of the long term periodicity with respect to source geometry.

  17. Broadband nuclear emission in two radio-loud BAL quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Janiuk, A

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray weakness of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars in comparison to non-BAL objects is possibly caused by the absorption of X-ray emission by the shielding material near the equatorial plane. On the other hand, the radio-loud BALQSOs are more X-ray loud than the radio-quiet ones. This suggests that part of the X-ray emission may arise from the radio jet. To investigate this possibility, we modelled the nuclear spectra of two radio-loud BALQSOs. We focus on the emission from the very centres of these two objects. The source of emission was approximated by a single, homogeneous component that produces synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. The simplicity of the model allowed us to estimate the basic physical parameters of the emitting regions, using a universal analytic approach. Such methods have already been used in blazars. For the first time we propose this solution for quasars. In addition, we modelled the radiation spectra of the accretion disk and its corona to compare them with the jets'...

  18. X-ray Lighthouses of the High-Redshift Universe. II. Further Snapshot Observations of the Most Luminous z>4 Quasars with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Kaspi, S

    2005-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of a sample of 11 optically luminous (Mb4 quasars known and hence represent ideal witnesses of the end of the "dark age ''. Nine quasars are detected by Chandra, with ~2-57 counts in the observed 0.5-8 keV band. These detections increase the number of X-ray detected AGN at z>4 to ~90; overall, Chandra has detected ~85% of the high-redshift quasars observed with snapshot (few kilosecond) observations. PSS 1506+5220, one of the two X-ray undetected quasars, displays a number of notable features in its rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum, the most prominent being broad, deep SiIV and CIV absorption lines. The average optical-to-X-ray spectral index for the present sample (=-1.88+/-0.05) is steeper than that typically found for z>4 quasars but consistent with the expected value from the known dependence of this spectral index on quasar luminosity. We present joint X-ray spectral fitting for a sample of 48 radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 3.99-6.28 for which Chandra observati...

  19. The Extreme Ultraviolet Deficit and Magnetically Arrested Accretion in Radio Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope composite quasar spectra presented in Telfer et al. show a significant deficit of emission in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for the radio loud component of the quasar population (RLQs), compared to the radio quiet component of the quasar population (RQQs). The composite quasar continuum emission between 1100 \\AA\\, and $\\sim$580 \\AA\\, is generally considered to be associated with the innermost regions of the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The deficit between 1100 \\AA\\, and 580 \\AA\\, in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. It is proposed that this can be the result of islands of large scale magnetic flux in RLQs that are located close to the central black hole that remove energy from the accretion flow as Poynting flux (sometimes called magnetically arrested accretion). These magnetic islands are natural sites for launching relativistic jets. Based on the Telfer et al. da...

  20. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Crichton, Devin; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A; Zakamska, Nadia L; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Devlin, Mark J; Hill, J Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, John P; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jonathan L; Sifon, Cristobal; Staggs, Suzanne T; Viero, Marco P; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalog, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy densities via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-SPIRE data. We constrain the form and evolution of the far-infrared emission finding 3-4$\\sigma$ evidence for the presence of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the millimetre bands. We find this signal to be characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy $(6.2 \\pm 1.7) \\times 10^{60}$erg. This amount of thermal energy is an order of magnitude greater than would be expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of $(1-5)\\times 10^{12}h^{-1}$M$_\\odot$ that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. We find that our measurements are consistent with a scenario in which quasars depo...

  1. A multi-wavelength survey of obscured and reddened quasars at the peak of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    While in the nearby universe the unification model seems firmly established, we are now seeing hints that at the peak of quasar activity and black hole growth (z~2.5) both obscured and reddened quasars may represent not just a specific quasar orientation but instead a unique stage of quasar evolution. Our group has developed several observational techniques to identify obscured and highly reddened quasars at z~2.5 using a combination of the SDSS spectroscopy and WISE photometry. Our sample contains objects with some of the most extreme ionized gas velocities observed (> 5000 km/s), indicating wind speeds too large to be contained by the galaxy potential though they are radio quiet. I will present both our sample selection and initial results from multi-wavelength follow-up of this sample using near-infrared spectroscopy, Keck spectropolarimentry and the VLA to test the AGN unification model and search for evidence of galaxy-wide quasar winds. High levels of polarized light (reaching ~20% of the total continuum emission in some cases) and changes in the polarization fraction and position angle across emission lines may argue for the presence of dusty outflows in our objects. This is supported by evidence from stacking analysis in the radio that presents a correlation between the observed outflow speeds in ionized gas (as measured by [OIII]) and the radio luminosity—arguing for a wind origin for the radio emission in these objects as well. The most extreme of these objects may thus represent the “blowout phase” of AGN evolution that proceeds or accompanies the cessation of star formation in the host galaxy due to the effects of radiatively-driven quasar driven winds.

  2. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Sifon, Cristobal; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Viero, Marco P.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  3. LAMOST Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the Chinese LAMOST spectroscopic quasar survey is to discover 0.4 million new quasars from 1 million quasar candidates brighter than the magnitude limit i=20.5 in the next 5 years. This will hopefully provide the largest quasar sample for the further studies of AGN physics and cosmology. The improved quasar selection criteria based on the UKIDSS near-IR and SDSS optical colors are presented, and their advantages in uncovering the missing quasars in the quasar 'redshift desert' are demonstrated. In addition, some recent discoveries of new quasars during the LAMOST commissioning phase are presented.

  4. Ubiquitous giant Lyman $\\alpha$ nebulae around the brightest quasars at $z\\sim3.5$ revealed with MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Borisova, Elena; Lilly, Simon J; Marino, Raffaella A; Gallego, Sofia G; Bacon, Roland; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouché, Nicolas; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C Marcella; Caruana, Joseph; Finley, Hayley; Herenz, Edmund C; Richard, Johan; Schaye, Joop; Straka, Lorrie A; Turner, Monica L; Urrutia, Tanya; Verhamme, Anne; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Direct Lyman a imaging of fluorescent emission from intergalactic gas at z~2 has recently revealed giant cosmological structures around luminous quasars with unexpected physical properties, e.g. the Slug Nebula (Cantalupo et al. 2014). Despite their high luminosity, the detection rate of such systems in narrow-band and spectroscopic surveys is very low, i.e. less than 10%. If intrinsic and not due to observational limitations, such a low detection frequency would encode crucial information on the distribution and properties of cold gas around quasars, their emission opening angle and duty cycle. In this study, we exploit the unique capabilities of the MUSE ESO/VLT to perform a blind survey for giant Ly $\\alpha$ nebulae around 17 of the brightest radio-quiet quasars at 3quasar is asso...

  5. Infrared observations of the X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared observations of the recently discovered X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178 are reported. Broadband photometry of both quasars was conducted in the 1.25 to 20 micron range and spectrophotometry of 0241+622 was carried out from 1.5 to 2.5 microns. The IR energy distributions of 0241+622, MR2251-178 and the X-ray quasar 3C273 are presented, noting that for wavelengths less than 10 microns, the energy distributions of all three quasars are similar and cannot be distinguished from those of other low redshift quasars. The observed IR, visual and X-ray luminosities of the three quasars are compared and are found not to be strongly correlated. It is remarked, however, that the three X-ray quasars are the brightest known quasars at IR and visual wavelengths, which supports the suggestion that all quasars are bright X-ray emitters.

  6. Investigating the radio-loud phase of BAL quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Pedani, M; Benn, C R; Mack, K -H; Holt, J; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Jiménez-Luján, F

    2014-01-01

    Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) are present in the spectra of ~20% of quasars (QSOs), indicating the presence of fast outflows (up to 0.2c) intercepting the observer's line of sight. Radio-Loud (RL) BAL QSOs are even more rare, being four times less common than Radio-Quiet (RQ) BAL QSOs. The reason for that is still not clear, leaving open questions about the nature of the BAL-producing outflows and their connection with the radio jet. We explored the spectroscopic characteristics of RL and RQ BAL QSOs, aiming at finding a possible explanation for the rarity of the former. We identified two samples of genuine BAL QSOs from SDSS optical spectra, one RL and one RQ, in a suitable redshift interval (2.5< z <3.5) that allowed us to observe the Mg II and H$\\beta$ emission lines in the adjacent Near-Infrared (NIR) band. We collected NIR spectra of the two samples using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, Canary Islands). Using relations known in the literature, we could estimate black hole mass, broad line re...

  7. Wide Field Multiband Imaging of Low Redshift Quasar Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Jennifer E; Bechtold, Jill; Ellingson, Erica; Thibodeau, Christopher; Richmond, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present photometry of the large scale environments of a sample of twelve broad line AGN with $0.06 < z < 0.37$ from deep images in the SDSS $u$, $g$, $r$, and $i$ filters taken with the 90Prime prime focus camera on the Steward Observatory Bok Telescope. We measure galaxy clustering around these AGN using two standard techniques: correlation amplitude (B$_{gq}$) and the two point correlation function. We find average correlation amplitudes for the 10 radio quiet objects in the sample equal to (9$\\pm$18, 144$\\pm$114, -39$\\pm$56, 295$\\pm$260) Mpc$^{1.77}$ in ($u$, $g$, $r$, $i$), all consistent with the expectation from galaxy clustering. Using a ratio of the galaxy-quasar cross-correlation function to the galaxy autocorrelation function, we calculate the relative bias of galaxies and AGN, $b_{gq}$. The bias in the $u$ band, $b_{gq}=3.08\\pm0.51$ is larger compared to that calculated in the other bands, but it does not correlate with AGN luminosity, black hole mass, or AGN activity via the luminosity of...

  8. Evidence of the Dynamics of Relativistic Jet Launching in Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV), the optically thick emission from the innermost accretion flow onto the central supermassive black hole, indicate that RLQs tend to be EUV weak compared to the radio quiet quasars (RQQs); yet the remainder of the optically thick thermal continuum is indistinguishable. The deficit of EUV emission in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. This article is an examination of the evidence for a distribution of magnetic flux tubes in the innermost accretion flow that results in magnetically arrested accretion (MAA) and creates the EUV deficit. These same flux tubes and possibly the interior magnetic flux that they encircle are the source of the jet power as well. In the MAA scenario, islands of large scale magnetic vertical flux perforate the innermost accretion flow of RLQs. The first prediction of the theory that is supported by the HST data is t...

  9. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness?

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R; Madsen, K K; Matt, G; Ogle, P; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Teng, S H; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2013-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ~400-600 hard X-ray (>10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH<1E24 cm^{-2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH~7E24 cm^{-2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We d...

  10. The Final SDSS High-Redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A; Banados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7quasars with $z_{\\rm AB}\\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\\le z_{\\rm AB}\\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\\rm AB}\\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\\le M_{1450}\\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\\beta=-2.8\\pm0.2$. Due to the...

  11. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  12. iPTF Discovery of the Rapid “Turn-on” of a Luminous Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Hung, T.; Cenko, S. B.; Blagorodnova, N.; Yan, Lin; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mooley, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cantwell, T. M.; Yu, P. C.; Cao, Y.; Fremling, C.; Neill, J. D.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P. E.; Wozniak, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present a radio-quiet quasar at z = 0.237 discovered “turning on” by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). The transient, iPTF 16bco, was detected by iPTF in the nucleus of a galaxy with an archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum with weak narrow-line emission characteristic of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER). Our follow-up spectra show the dramatic appearance of broad Balmer lines and a power-law continuum characteristic of a luminous ({L}{bol}≈ {10}45 erg s‑1) type 1 quasar 12 yr later. Our photometric monitoring with PTF from 2009–2012 and serendipitous X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey in 2011 and 2015 constrain the change of state to have occurred less than 500 days before the iPTF detection. An enhanced broad Hα/[O iii] λ5007 line ratio in the type 1 state relative to other changing-look quasars also is suggestive of the most rapid change of state yet observed in a quasar. We argue that the >10 increase in Eddington ratio inferred from the brightening in UV and X-ray continuum flux is more likely due to an intrinsic change in the accretion rate of a preexisting accretion disk than an external mechanism such as variable obscuration, microlensing, or the tidal disruption of a star. However, further monitoring will be helpful in better constraining the mechanism driving this change of state. The rapid “turn-on” of the quasar is much shorter than the viscous infall timescale of an accretion disk and requires a disk instability that can develop around a ∼ {10}8 {M}ȯ black hole on timescales less than 1 yr.

  13. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Jiang Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); DeGraf, Colin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Ge Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina, E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  14. Environments of Nearby Quasars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lietzen, H; Nurmi, P; Tago, E; Saar, E; Liivamagi, J; Tempel, E; Einasto, M; Einasto, J; Gramann, M; Takalo, L O

    2009-01-01

    For the first time spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys are reaching the scales where galaxies can be studied together with the nearest quasars. This gives an opportunity to study the dependence between the activity of a quasar and its environment in a more extensive way than before. We study the spatial distribution of galaxies and groups of galaxies in the environments of low redshift quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our aim is to understand how the nearby quasars are embedded in the local and global density field of galaxies and how the environment affects quasar activity. We analyse the environments of nearby quasars using number counts of galaxies. We also study the dependence of group properties to their distance to the nearest quasar. The large scale environments are studied by analysing the locations of quasars in the luminosity density field. Our study of the number counts of galaxies in quasar environments shows an underdensity of bright galaxies at a few Mpc from quasars. Also, the ...

  15. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  16. An intense and broad FeKalpha line observed in the X-ray luminous quasar Q0056-363 with XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Porquet, D; Porquet, Delphine

    2003-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton observation of the radio-quiet quasar Q0056-363 (z=0.162). This is the first time that this quasar is observed in the hard X-ray range (above 2 keV). We find that Q0056-363 is a powerful X-ray quasar, with a 0.3-12 keV unabsorbed luminosity of about 1.2 x 10^45 erg s-1 with the largest part (~67%) emitted below 2 keV. The spectrum reveals a large featureless soft X-ray excess below 2 keV and a strong broad FeKalpha line at 6.4 keV (in the quasar frame). The FeK alpha line is due to low to moderate ionization states of iron (i.e., < Fe XVII), with an equivalent width of about 250 eV and a velocity width of about 25,000 km s-1. Q0056-363 is presently the most luminous AGN known to exhibit such a broad and intense FeKalpha line profile from near neutral iron. The line can be fitted with a relativistic profile from an accretion disc around either a Schwarzschild (non-rotating) or a Kerr (rotating) black hole. A combination of two thermal Comptonization components and a disc reflection ...

  17. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs of quasars bound together by gravity. Binary quasars, like other quasars, are thought to be the product of galaxy mergers. Until now, however, binary quasars have not been seen in galaxies that are unambiguously in the act of merging. But images of a new binary quasar from the Carnegie Institution's Magellan telescope in Chile show two distinct galaxies with "tails" produced by tidal forces from their mutual gravitational attraction. "This is really the first case in which you see two separate galaxies, both with quasars, that are clearly interacting," says Carnegie astronomer John Mulchaey who made observations crucial to understanding the galaxy merger. Most, if not all, large galaxies, such as our galaxy the Milky Way, host super-massive black holes at their centers. Because galaxies regularly interact and merge, astronomers have assumed that binary super-massive black holes have been common in the Universe, especially during its early history. Black holes can only be detected as quasars when they are actively accreting matter, a process that releases vast amounts of energy. A leading theory is that galaxy mergers trigger accretion, creating quasars in both galaxies. Because most such mergers would have happened in the distant past, binary quasars and their associated galaxies are very far away and therefore difficult for most telescopes to resolve. The binary quasar, labeled SDSS J1254+0846, was initially detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large scale astronomical survey of galaxies and over 120,000 quasars. Further observations by Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and colleagues* using NASA's Chandra's X-ray Observatory and telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona and Palomar

  18. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  19. Data Mining for Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine learning techniques and demonstrate that a two step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step we use catalog-level information ($griz$+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to preselect targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (Gradient-Boosted Trees), to form a final set of cand...

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum;

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z zz 1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar...

  1. A New Class of Radio Quiet Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    The complete absence of radio pulsars with periods exceeding a few seconds has lead to the popular notion of the existence of a high $P$ death line. In the standard picture, beyond this boundary, pulsars with low spin rates cannot accelerate particles above the stellar surface to high enough energies to initiated pair cascades through curvature radiation, and the pair creation needed for radio emission is strongly suppressed. In this paper we postulate the existence of another pulsar ``death line,'' corresponding to high magnetic fields $B$ in the upper portion of the $\\dot{P}$--$P$ diagram, a domain where few radio pulsars are observed. The origin of this high $B$ boundary, which occurs when $B$ becomes comparable to or exceeds $10^{13}$ Gauss, is again due to the suppression of magnetic pair creation $\\gamma\\to e^+e^-$, but in this instance, primarily because of ineffective competition with the exotic QED process of magnetic photon splitting. This paper describes the origin, shape and position of the new ``...

  2. DETECTION OF REST-FRAME OPTICAL LINES FROM X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shemmer, Ohad [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Trakhtenbrot, Benny [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wu, Jianfeng, E-mail: rplotkin@umich.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 6, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 15 yr, examples of exotic radio-quiet quasars with intrinsically weak or absent broad emission line regions (BELRs) have emerged from large-scale spectroscopic sky surveys. Here, we present spectroscopy of seven such weak emission line quasars (WLQs) at moderate redshifts (z = 1.4–1.7) using the X-shooter spectrograph, which provides simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy covering the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical. These new observations effectively double the number of WLQs with spectroscopy in the optical rest-frame, and they allow us to compare the strengths of (weak) high-ionization emission lines (e.g., C iv) to low-ionization lines (e.g., Mg ii, Hβ, Hα) in individual objects. We detect broad Hβ and Hα emission in all objects, and these lines are generally toward the weaker end of the distribution expected for typical quasars (e.g., Hβ has rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 15–40 Å). However, these low-ionization lines are not exceptionally weak, as is the case for high-ionization lines in WLQs. The X-shooter spectra also display relatively strong optical Fe ii emission, Hβ FWHM ≲ 4000 km s{sup −1}, and significant C iv blueshifts (≈1000–5500 km s{sup −1}) relative to the systemic redshift; two spectra also show elevated UV Fe ii emission, and an outflowing component to their (weak) Mg ii emission lines. These properties suggest that WLQs are exotic versions of “wind-dominated” quasars. Their BELRs either have unusual high-ionization components, or their BELRs are in an atypical photoionization state because of an unusually soft continuum.

  3. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2007-06-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, and color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and the co-evolution of spheroids and supermassive black holes (BHs). High-redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from the progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of ``active'' BH/host populations at each epoch. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in ``quasar remnants'' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late) type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an ``intermediate'' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations as a function of mass reveals that this ``intermediate'' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation activity at the given epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/termination epoch of ellipticals predicts quasar clustering at all observed redshifts without any model dependence or assumptions about quasar light curves, lifetimes, or accretion rates. This is not true for disks or quasar halos; i.e., quasars do not generically trace star formation or halo assembly. Quasar clustering at all redshifts is consistent with ~4×1012 h-1 Msolar, similar to group scales. This supports scenarios in which major mergers dominate the bright, high-redshift quasar populations. We show how improved clustering measurements can be used to constrain lower luminosity AGN fueling and whether or not accretion/star formation can ``shut down'' at z>3.

  4. Changing Look Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; MacLeod, Chelsea; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes (BH) illuminates fascinating physics from the stellar mass BHs in Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) to the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in Seyferts and quasars. Alas, BH accretion regions are too compact to be spatially resolved. Temporal changes in XRB spectral states have gone a long way to unravel the accretion physics in XRBs, and suggest powerful theoretical and observational analogies to quasars. However, simple mass scaling to SMBHs suggests impractically long timescales (millenia) for accretion state transitions in quasars. However, large spectral state changes in quasars have now been detected that both inform and invigorate debates about accretion theory and the nature of historical quasar classes (e.g., Type 1 vs Type 2). In the last couple of years, a dozen luminous "changing-look quasars" (CLQs) were discovered to exhibit strong, persistent changes in luminosity, accompanied by the dramatic emergence or disappearance of broad emission-line (BEL) components. The availability of repeat spectroscopy for large samples of quasars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its ongoing Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) now extend this rare and remarkable phenomenon to regimes of luminosity and redshift that overlap the huge cosmological samples of quasars in the SDSS. We review the current understanding of these events, and upcoming possibilities for their detection, characterization and modeling.

  5. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  6. False periodicities in quasar time-domain surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, S; Markowitz, A G; Huppenkothen, D; Middleton, M J; Alston, W N; Scargle, J D; Farr, W M

    2016-01-01

    There have recently been several reports of apparently periodic variations in the light curves of quasars, e.g. PG 1302-102 by Graham et al. (2015a). Any quasar showing periodic oscillations in brightness would be a strong candidate to be a close binary supermassive black hole and, in turn, a candidate for gravitational wave studies. However, normal quasars -- powered by accretion onto a single, supermassive black hole -- usually show stochastic variability over a wide range of timescales. It is therefore important to carefully assess the methods for identifying periodic candidates from among a population dominated by stochastic variability. Using a Bayesian analysis of the light curve of PG 1302-102, we find that a simple stochastic process is preferred over a sinusoidal variations. We then discuss some of the problems one encounters when searching for rare, strictly periodic signals among a large number of irregularly sampled, stochastic time series, and use simulations of quasar light curves to illustrate ...

  7. Blowin' in the wind: both `negative' and `positive' feedback in an obscured high-z Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Cresci, G; Brusa, M; Marconi, A; Perna, M; Mannucci, F; Piconcelli, E; Maiolino, R; Feruglio, C; Fiore, F; Bongiorno, A; Lanzuisi, G; Merloni, A; Schramm, M; Silverman, J D; Civano, F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to over-grow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring `positive' AGN feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively-driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z=1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km/s) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [OIII] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Ha emission and the re...

  8. Correlations among Jet, Accretion Disk, and Broad Line Region of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin; He, Jian-Jian; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The SEDs of 18 GeV FSRQs are collected and compiled from literature, in which both the jet emission and the accretion disk radiation can be observed, in order to investigate the correlations among their jet power (P_jet), accretion disk luminosity (L_disk), and luminosity of broad line region (BLR, L_BLR). On the basis of the SED fits with the jet radiation and accretion disk radiation models, we calculate P_jet and L_disk. No correlation between P_jet with either L_disk or L_BLR is found. With a sub-sample of L_BLR for 13 GeV FSRQs, it is observed that L_BLR is strongly correlated with their L_disk. We also study the BLR covering factors of the GeV FSRQs in our sample, averagely which are smaller than that of the large samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars. P_jet of some GeV FSRQs is higher than L_disk, but P_jet of all the GeV FSRQs is lower than the accretion power of black hole (BH), which is estimated by \\dot{M}c^2=L_disk/0.1, indicating that the total accretion power of BH is sufficient to drive...

  9. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  10. Probing Quasar Outflows with Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, T; Charlton, J C; Ganguly, R; Tytler, D; Kirkman, D; Suzuki, N; Lubin, D

    2006-01-01

    We present statistical and monitoring results of narrow absorption lines that are physically related to quasars (i.e., intrinsic NALs). We use Keck/HIRES spectra of 37 optically bright quasars at z=2-4, and identify 150 NAL systems that contain 124 C IV, 12 N V, and 50 Si IV doublets. Among them, 39 are classified as intrinsic systems based on partial coverage analysis. At least 50% of quasars host intrinsic NALs. We identify two families of intrinsic systems based on their ionization state. Some intrinsic systems have detectable low-ionization NALs at similar velocities as higher-ionization NALs, although such low-ionization lines are rare in broad absorption line (BAL) systems. We also have observed an optically bright quasar, HS1603+3820, eight times with Subaru/HDS and HET/MRS over an interval of 4.2 years (1.2 years in the quasar rest frame), for the purpose of monitoring a variable C IV mini-BAL system. We find that all the troughs of the system vary in concert. However, no other correlations are seen b...

  11. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ~ 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high velocity ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (~5000 Angstroms) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we combine host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [OIII] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to < 30% of elliptical galaxies that are highly st...

  12. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs): New z > 6 Quasar Survey with Subaru/HSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; SHELLQs Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at high redshift are an important and unique probe of the distant Universe, for understanding the origin and progress of cosmic reionization, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and the evolution of quasar host galaxies and their dark matter halos, among other topics. We are currently carrying out a new spectroscopic survey, called SHELLQs (Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars), to search for low-luminosity quasars at z > 6. By exploiting the exquisite imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we aim to probe quasar luminosities down to M1450 ~ -22 mag, i.e., below the classical threshold between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm. A large spectroscopic observing program is underway, using Subaru/FOCAS, GTC/OSIRIS, and Gemini/GMOS; in particular, SHELLQs has been approved as a Subaru intensive program to use 20 nights in the coming four semesters. As of August 2016, we have discovered ~40 quasars and bright galaxies at z ~ 6 and beyond, from the first 100 deg2 of the HSC survey (Matsuoka et al. 2016, ApJ, 828, 26). Surprisingly, we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of high-z galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~ 24 mag. Multi-wavelength follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  13. Astrometric Redshifts for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarczik, Michael C; Mehta, Sajjan S; Schlegel, David J

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes differential chromatic refraction (DCR), whereby objects imaged at different optical/UV wavelengths are observed at slightly different positions in the plane of the detector. Strong spectral features induce changes in the effective wavelengths of broad-band filters that are capable of producing significant positional offsets with respect to standard DCR corrections. We examine such offsets for broad-emission-line (type 1) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spanning 0quasar spectrum with the SDSS bandpasses as a function of redshift and airmass. This astrometric information can be used to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts of quasars (or other emission-line sources) and, for extreme cases, may be suitable for determining "astrometric redshifts". On the SDSS's southern equatorial stripe, where it is pos...

  14. Lensed Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Keeton, C R; Falco, E E; Kochanek, C S; Lehár, J; McLeod, B A; Peng, Chien Y.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Keeton, Charles R.; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Chris S.; Lehar, Joseph; Leod, Brian A. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational lensing assists in the detection of quasar hosts by amplifying and distorting the host light away from the unresolved quasar core images. We present the results of HST observations of 30 quasar hosts at redshifts 1 1.7 is a factor of 3--6 higher than the local value. But, depending on the stellar content the ratio may decline at z>4 (if E/S0-like), flatten off to 6--10 times the local value (if Sbc-like), or continue to rise (if Im-like). We infer that galaxy bulge masses must have grown by a factor of 3--6 over the redshift range 3>z>1, and then changed little since z~1. This suggests that the peak epoch of galaxy formation for massive galaxies is above z~1. We also estimate the duty cycle of luminous AGNs at z>1 to be ~1%, or 10^7 yrs, with sizable scatter.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, R; Arav, N; Heap, S R; Wisotzki, L; Aldcroft, T L; Alloin, D; Behar, E; Canalizo, G; Crenshaw, D M; De Kool, M; Chambers, K; Cecil, G; Chatzichristou, E T; Everett, J; Gabel, J; Gaskell, C M; Galliano, E; Green, R F; Hall, P B; Hines, D C; Junkkarinen, V T; Kaastra, J S; Kaiser, M E; Kazanas, D; Konigl, A; Korista, K T; Kriss, G A; Laor, A; Leighly, K M; Mathur, S; Ogle, P; Proga, D; Sabra, B; Sivron, R; Snedden, S A; Telfer, R; Vestergaard, M; Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum; Heap, Sara R.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Alloin, Danielle; Behar, Ehud; Canalizo, Gabriela; Kool, Martijn de; Chambers, Kenneth; Cecil, Gerald; Chatzichristou, Eleni; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Galliano, Emmanuel; Green, Richard F.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hines, Dean C.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Konigl, Arieh; Korista, Kirk T.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Laor, Ari; Leighly, Karen M.; Mathur, Smita; Ogle, Patrick; Proga, Daniel; Sabra, Bassem; Sivron, Ran; Snedden, Stephanie; Telfer, Randal; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar, HE0441-2826, contains extremely weak emission lines and our spectrum is consistent with a simple power-law continuum. The quasar is radio-loud, but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated morphology, which argues against it being a blazar. The unusual spectrum of this quasar resembles the spectra of the quasars PG1407+265, SDSSJ1136+0242, and PKS1004+13 for which several possible explanations have been entertained.

  16. Exploratory Chandra observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Bian, Fuyan

    2016-01-01

    We report exploratory \\chandra\\ observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30. The quasar is clearly detected by \\chandra\\ with a possible component of extended emission. The rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity is 9.0$^{+9.1}_{-4.5}$ $\\times$ 10$^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$ with inferred photon index of $\\Gamma$ = 3.03$^{+0.78}_{-0.70}$. This quasar is X-ray bright, with inferred X-ray-to-optical flux ratio \\aox\\ $=-1.22^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, higher than the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The properties inferred from this exploratory observation indicate that this ultraluminous quasar might be growing with super-Eddington accretion and probably viewed with small inclination angle. Deep X-ray observation will help to probe the plausible extended emission and better constraint the spectral features for this ultraluminous quasar.

  17. Quasars : The Observational Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Shields, Greg; Gaskell, Martin; Boroson, Todd; Laor, Ari; Hawkins, Michael; Pronik, Vladimir; Sergeev, Sergey; Dultzin, Deborah; Grupe, Dirk; Richards, Gordon; Morganti, Raffaella; Volvach, Aleksander; Zamfir, Sebastian; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar; Elvis, Martin; Turner, Tracey Jane; Kembhavi, Ajit; Foschini, Luigi; Neshpor, Yuri; Franceschini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The empirical basis of quasar astronomy can be overawing especially in the twenty-first century. A first source of intricacy involves the nomenclature that has evolved to label the multifold phenomenological manifestations now united under the umbrella of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A further com

  18. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S. [University of Wyoming, Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Runnoe, J. C. [Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 413 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Green, R. F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  19. Cross-Correlation of SDSS DR7 Quasars and DR10 BOSS Galaxies: The Weak Luminosity Dependence of Quasar Clustering at z~0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; White, Martin; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D; Guo, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K; Ross, Nicholas P; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Zehavi, Idit; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8,198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) quasars and 349,608 DR10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at redshift ~0.5 (0.3=0.53 from the CCF measurements. This linear bias corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ~4x10^12 M_sun/h, compared to ~10^13 M_sun/h characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be db_Q/dlogL=0.20+-0.34 or 0.11+-0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities -23.5>M_i(z=2)>-25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering for the bright end of the quasar population at ~0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest quasars reside in a broad range of host halos, and the host halo mass distributions...

  20. Dust Obscured Quasars: A Missing Link in Quasar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A.; Lacy, M.

    2007-12-01

    A host of observational evidence over several decades of research has suggested a formation and evolutionary link between the growth of supermassive black holes, quasar activity and the build-up of the stellar populations in their host galaxies. Such evolutionary scenarios have been invoked to explain the presence of buried AGN seen in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, a high fraction of which also show evidence of merging and interaction. However, the morphologies of luminous, blue quasars show no signs of interaction. Their hosts are mostly undistrubed elliptical galaxies. These seemingly conflicting observations suggest a missing link in the evolutionary path where the dust that completely buried the ULIRG is being cleared, eventually to reveal an unobscured, luminous quasar. This missing link may be a population of highly reddened, but not completely obscured quasars. We have constructed asample of dust obscured quasars using FIRST and 2MASS. We find that for K CRATES flat-spectrum radio catalog.

  1. Data mining for gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target-selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine-learning techniques and demonstrate that a two-step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step, we use catalogue-level information (griz+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to pre-select targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (gradient-boosted trees), to form a final set of candidates. The results from this procedure can be used to further refine the simpler SQLS algorithms, with a twofold (or threefold) gain in purity and the same (or 80 per cent) completeness at target-selection stage, or a purity of 70 per cent and a completeness of 60 per cent after the candidate-selection step. Simpler photometric searches in griz+WISE based on colour cuts would provide samples with 7 per cent purity or less. Our technique is extremely fast, as a list of candidates can be obtained from a Stage III experiment (e.g. DES catalogue/data base) in a few CPU hours. The techniques are easily extendable to Stage IV experiments like LSST with the addition of time domain information.

  2. Quasars in the Cosmic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Dultzin, Deborah; Richards, Gordon; Knapen, Johan; Shlosman, Isaac; Morganti, Raffaella; Falomo, Renato; Hawkins, Mike; Cavaliere, Alfonso; McLure, Ross; Shields, Greg; Netzer, Hagai; Proga, Daniel; Franceschini, Alberto; Fan, Xiaoui; Elvis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We now consider the environment of quasars in the widest possible sense, from the circumnuclear regions to very large scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The circumgalactic environment of nearby quasars has been widely studied since the late 1960s in an attempt to test its influence on the triggering

  3. Witnessing the Birth of a Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu; Menou, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    The coalescence of a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) is thought to be accompanied by an electromagnetic (EM) afterglow, produced by the viscous infall of the surrounding circumbinary gas disk after the merger. It has been proposed that once the merger has been detected in gravitational waves (GWs) by LISA, follow-up EM searches for this afterglow can help identify the EM counterpart of the LISA source. Here we study whether the afterglows may be sufficiently bright and numerous to be detectable in EM surveys alone. The viscous afterglow, which lasts for years to decades for SMBHBs in LISA's sensitivity window, is characterized by rapid increases in both the bolometric luminosity and in the spectral hardness of the source. If quasar activity is triggered by the same major galaxy mergers that produce SMBHBs, then the afterglow could be interpreted as a signature of the birth of a quasar. Using an idealized model for the post-merger viscous spreading of the circumbinary disk and the resulting light curve,...

  4. Quasars Probing Quasars VI. Excess HI Absorption Within One Proper Mpc of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S G; Ellison, Sara L; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Martin, Crystal L; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H R; Simcoe, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the HI Lya absorption transverse to luminous, z~2 quasars at proper separations of 30kpc 17.3) at separations R<200kpc, which decreases to ~20% at R~1Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function xi_QA(r) = (r/r_0)^gamma with a large correlation length r_0 = 12.5+2.7-1.4 Mpc/h (comoving) and gamma = 1.68+0.14-0.30. The HI absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos Mhalo~10^12.5 Msun at z~2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased towards producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence th...

  5. AzTEC 1.1 mm images of 16 radio galaxies at 0.5quasar at z=6.3

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, A; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Yun, M S; Cybulski, R; Wilson, Grant W; Austermann, J; Ezawa, H; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Perera, T; Scott, K; Sánchez-Arguelles, D; Gutermuth, R

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.5radio quiet quasar at z=6.3, obtained using the AzTEC bolometer array mounted on the ASTE or the JCMT. This paper more than doubles the number of high-z radio galaxies imaged at millimetre/sub-millimetre wavelengths. We detect probable millimetre-wave counterparts for 11 of the active galaxies. The 6 active galaxies which do not have a probable millimetre counterpart in our images nevertheless have one or more likely associated millimetric source. Thus, we conclude that powerful (radio-loud) active galaxies at high-z are beacons for finding luminous millimetre/sub-millimetre galaxies at high-z. The flux densities of our AzTEC counterparts imply star formation rates ranging from <200 to ~1300 M./yr. In addition, we find that for the radio galaxoes the 1.1 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galax...

  6. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2001-01-01

    In order to derive information on the star formation history in the early universe we observed 6 high-redshift (z=3.4) quasars in the near-infrared to measure the relative iron and \\mgii emission strengths. A detailed comparison of the resulting spectra with those of low-redshift quasars show essentially the same FeII/MgII emission ratios and very similar continuum and line spectral properties, indicating a lack of evolution of the relative iron to magnesium abundance of the gas since z=3.4 in bright quasars. On the basis of current chemical evolution scenarios of galaxies, where magnesium is produced in massive stars ending in type II SNe, while iron is formed predominantly in SNe of type Ia with a delay of ~1 Gyr and assuming as cosmological parameters H_o = 72 km/s Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7$, we conclude that major star formation activity in the host galaxies of our z=3.4 quasars must have started already at an epoch corresponding to z_f ~= 10, when the age of the universe was less than 0....

  7. Dust and Molecular Gas from the Optically Faint Quasars at z 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, C.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Wagg, J.; Walter, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Omont, A.; Cox, P.; Menten, K.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present millimeter observations of the twelve z 6 quasars discovered from the SDSS southern survey. These objects are typically one or two magnitudes fainter in the optical (i.e., 20.6 Max Plank Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO) on the IRAM-30m telescope and three of them have been detected. We also searched for Molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three MAMBO detections with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and two of them have been detected. The millimeter continuum and CO detections in the optically faint quasars at z 6 reveal strong FIR emission from 40 to 60 K warm dust and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. The molecular gas masses of the two CO detections are all about 10^10 Msun, which are comparable to that of the CO-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. Their FIR-to-CO luminosity ratios are also consistent with that of the previous CO-detected quasars at z 2 to 6 and the dusty starbusrt systems, e.g., the submillimeter galaxies. However, their FIR-to-UV luminosity ratios are higher than that of the millimeter-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. This confirms the shallow nonlinear FIR-to-AGN luminosity relationship found with other AGN-starburst systems at local and high-z universe. All these results suggest massive star formation coeval with rapid black hole accretion in the host galaxies of the millimeter-detected optically faint quasars at z 6. Further high-resolution imaging of the Molecular CO emission (e.g., with ALMA) will be important to measure the dynamical masses of the spheroidal hosts and understand the black hole-bulge relationship of the optically faint quasars at the earliest epoch.

  8. The discovery of gas-rich, dusty starbursts in luminous reddened quasars at z ∼ 2.5 with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, M.; Carilli, C. L.; Jones, G.; Wagg, J.; McMahon, R. G.; Hewett, P. C.; Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Feruglio, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present ALMA observations of cold dust and molecular gas in four high-luminosity, heavily reddened (AV ∼ 2.5-6 mag) type 1 quasars at z ∼ 2.5 with virial MBH ∼ 1010 M⊙, to test whether dusty, massive quasars represent the evolutionary link between submillimetre-bright galaxies and unobscured quasars. All four quasars are detected in both the dust continuum and in the 12CO(3-2) line. The mean dust mass is 6 × 108 M⊙ assuming a typical high-redshift quasar spectral energy distribution (T = 41 K, β = 1.95 or T = 47 K, β = 1.6). The implied star formation rates are very high - ≳1000 M⊙ yr-1 in all cases. Gas masses estimated from the CO line luminosities cover ∼1-5× 1010(αCO/0.8)M⊙ and the gas depletion time-scales are very short - ∼5-20 Myr. A range of gas-to-dust ratios is observed in the sample. We resolve the molecular gas in one quasar - ULASJ2315+0143 (z = 2.561) - which shows a strong velocity gradient over ∼20 kpc. The velocity field is consistent with a rotationally supported gas disc but other scenarios, e.g. mergers, cannot be ruled out at the current resolution of these data. In another quasar - ULASJ1234+0907 (z = 2.503) - we detected molecular line emission from two millimetre-bright galaxies within 200 kpc of the quasar, suggesting that this quasar resides in a significant overdensity. The high detection rate of both cold dust and molecular gas in these sources, suggests that reddened quasars could correspond to an early phase in massive galaxy formation associated with large gas reservoirs and significant star formation.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z zz 1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasa...

  10. The Road to Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2014-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of 3C 48 and other quasi stellar radio sources was discussed as early as 1960 by John Bolton and others, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be unrealistically high radio and optical luminosities. Not until the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, which led Maarten Schmidt to identify 3C 273 with an apparent stellar object at a redshift of 0.16, was the true nature understood. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as the very luminous nuclei of galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first cataloged in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio inte...

  11. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Weedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A population of quasars at z ~ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities vLv(7.8 um) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio vLv(0.25 um)/vLv(7.8 um) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust which produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest frame 7.8 um are determined for quasars in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 um sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest frame 7.8 um, but the ratio Lv(100 um)/Lv(7.8 um) is about three times high...

  12. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, A; Roche, P F; Hernan-Caballero, A; Aretxaga, I; Martinez-Paredes, M; Almeida, C Ramos; Pereira-Santaella, M; Diaz-Santos, T; Levenson, N A; Packham, C; Colina, L; Esquej, P; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Ichikawa, K; Imanishi, M; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Telesco, C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies ($\\log L_{\\rm IR}\\ge 11.4\\,L_\\odot$) and quasars. We use high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 0.3-0.4 arcsec $\\sim$ few hundred parsecs) $8-13\\,\\mu$m ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear $11.3\\,\\mu$m PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or...

  13. SDSS spectroscopy for blazars in the Fermi LAT bright AGN sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Yu Chen; Min-Feng Gu; Zhong-Hui Fan; Xin-Wu Cao

    2009-01-01

    We have collected all available spectra and photometric data from the SDSS catalog for bright AGNs complied from the first three months of the Fermi large area telescope all-sky survey.Based on the 106 high-confidence and 11 low-confidence associated bright AGN list,the photometry data are collected from SDSS DR7 for 28 sources (12 BL Lacs and 16 FSRQs),two of which are low-confidence associated bright AGNs.Among these 28 SDSS photometric sources,SDSS spectra are available for 20 sources (6 BL Lacs and 14 FSRQs).The black hole masses MBH and the broad line region (BLR) luminosity were obtained for 14 FSRQs by measuring the line-widths and strengths of broad emission lines from the SDSS spectra.The broad emission line measurements of five FSRQs are presented for the first time in this work.The optical continuum emission of these 14 FSRQs is found to be likely dominated by the non-thermal jet emission by comparing the relationship between the broad Mg Ⅱ line and continuum luminosity to that of radio-quiet AGNs.The black hole mass of the 14 FSRQs ranges from 10~(8.2) M_⊙ to 10~(9.9) M_⊙,with most of the sources larger than 10~9 M_⊙.The Eddington ratio L_(bol)/L_(Edd) ranges from 10~(-1.5) to~1.This implies that an optically thin,geometrically thick accretion disk may exist in these FSRQs.

  14. VLA and VLBI observations of core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA observations of the total intensity and linear polarization of 24 powerful, core dominated quasars have been made at 5 GHz, as well as the first millisecond linear polarization observations of 3C 273. For ten quasars the resolution of the VLA was sufficient to reveal details of the compact extended emission surrounding the bright cores. The former all exhibit one sided jets, and most show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission is sufficient for those to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the linear polarization structure of the jets and terminal hotspots. If these quasars are similar to powerful lobe dominated sources but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight, the large degrees of polarization observed in the hotspots suggest that they are travelling at speeds {upsilon} > 0.5c. The superluminal quasar 3C 345 has been imaged with a variety of resolutions. In spite of the bending on the millisecond scale, the author finds that the jet of 3C 345 is very straight for the first 2 and then has two knots which show an abrupt shift in azimuth. The inferred magnetic field in the jet is offset {approximately}30{degree} from a perpendicular orientation with respect to the jet axis. This quasar also appears to have a faint counter jet, with the jet/counter jet luminosity ratio suggesting jet speeds {upsilon} > 0.56c. There is also an asymmetric diffuse halo. Milliarsecond polarization observations of 3C 273 show that the core (component D) is very weakly polarized. Appreciable polarized flux was detected from five of the superluminal components in the jet, with the fractional polarization increasing with distance from D.

  15. No overdensity of Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies around a quasar at z~5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchelli, C; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Venemans, B P; Walter, F; Overzier, R

    2016-01-01

    Bright quasars, observed when the Universe was less than one billion years old (z>5.5), are known to host massive black holes (~10$^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are selected through broad-band filters only. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512-16.0417 at z~5.73, through narrow band, deep imaging with FORS2 at the VLT. We study an area of 37 arcmin$^{2}$, i.e. ~206 comoving Mpc$^{2}$ at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence for an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank field studies. Possible explanations for these findings include ...

  16. Detailed Characterization of H_beta emission line profile in low z SDSS quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Zamfir, S.; Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P; D. Dultzin

    2009-01-01

    We explore the properties of the H_beta emission line profile in a large, homogeneous and bright sample of N~470 low redshift quasars extracted from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR5). We approach the investigation from two complementary directions: composite/median spectra and a set of line diagnostic measures (asymmetry index, centroid shift and kurtosis) in individual quasars. The project is developed and presented in the framework of the so-called 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) Parameter Space, with...

  17. NIR brightening of the Quasar PKS0735+17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Escobedo, G.; Recillas, E.; Chabushyan, V.; Carraminana, A.; Mayya, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the NIR brightening of the intermediate redshift quasar PKS0735+17 (z=0.424), also known as CGRaBSJ04738+1742, associated with the gamma-ray source 2FGL0738.0+1742. Our NIR photometry for this source shows that, on Jan 7th,2014 (JD2456664.848838), the object brightness corresponded to J = 13.39 +/- 0.04, H = 12.582 +/- 0.03 and Ks = 11.826 +/- 0.03. These values are about 0.5 magnitud brighter than our previous photometry, obtained on JD2456306, for this field.

  18. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  19. Extremely red quasars in BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T.; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W. Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual `wingless' line profiles, large N V/Lyα, N V/C IV, Si IV/C IV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [O III] λ5007. Here we present a new catalogue of C IV and N V emission-line data for 216 188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR colour, secondarily on REW(C IV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a `core' sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 ≥ 4.6 (AB) and REW(C IV) ≥ 100 Å at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity ˜ 47.1, sky density 0.010 deg-2, surprisingly flat/blue UV spectra given their red UV-to-mid-IR colours, and common outflow signatures including BALs or BAL-like features and large C IV emission-line blueshifts. Their SEDs and line properties are inconsistent with normal quasars behind a dust reddening screen. We argue that the core ERQs are a unique obscured quasar population with extreme physical conditions related to powerful outflows across the line-forming regions. Patchy obscuration by small dusty clouds could produce the observed UV extinctions without substantial UV reddening.

  20. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place...... are not significantly absorbed (NH ≲ 1024 cm-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain...... statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%....

  1. Cygnus X-2 in a radio quiet state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, A.; Bach, U.; Spencer, R.; Kadler, M.; Church, M.; Balucinska-Church, M.; Wilms, J.; Hanke, M.; Zola, S.; Schulz, N.

    2009-05-01

    The neutron star X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 was observed using the e- EVN (European VLBI Network) on May 12/13th 2009 between 23:00-13:00 UT at 5 GHz. The radio telescopes participating with the e-EVN at 5 GHz were Effelsberg, Medicina, Onsala 25m, Torun, Sheshan, Yebes, Jodrell Bank MKII, Cambridge and Knockin. A maximum data rate of 1024 Mbps were achieved from four telescopes (Effelsberg, Onsala, Torun and Jodrell Bank MKII).

  2. The time-delay of the gravitationally lensed double quasar UM 673

    CERN Document Server

    Akhunov, T A; Burkhonov, O; Gaynullina, E R; Gottlöber, S; Mirtadjieva, K; Nuritdinov, S N; Tadjibaev, I; Wambsganss, J; Wisotzki, L; Bruevich, V V; Gusev, A S; Sergeyev, A; Smirnov, G

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a monitoring campaign of the gravitational double quasar UM 673 at Maydanak observatory from August 2001 to December 2006. We obtained light curves in the V-filter (101 nights) and the R-filter (208 nights), split up into five observing seasons. We find brightness variations and V-R colour variations of the quasar on time scales of several years. The observing conditions at the telescope limited individual observing seasons to less than 150 days, which makes the estimation of the time-delay between the two lensed images by light curve correlation difficult. To overcome this problem we introduce a novel technique to measure the time-delay from the variation of the V-R colour of the quasar, and use this to obtain a time-delay Delta t=(106.8 days\\pm 17.0) days at 68 per cent confidence (image A leading).

  3. The Antennae Ultraluminous X-Ray Source, X-37, Is A Background Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D M; Eikenberry, S S; Brandl, B R; Wilson, J C; Carson, J C; Henderson, C P; Hayward, T L; Barry, J; Ptak, A F; Colbert, E J M

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report that a bright, X-ray source in the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9), previously identified as an ultra-luminous X-ray source, is in fact a background quasar. We identify an isolated infrared and optical counterpart within 0.3+/-0.5 arcseconds the X-ray source X-37. After acquiring an optical spectrum of its counterpart, we use the narrow [OIII] and broad H_alpha emission lines to identify X-37 as a quasar at a redshift of z=0.26. Through a U, V, and K_s photometric analysis, we demonstrate that most of the observable light along this line of sight is from the quasar. We discuss the implications of this discovery and the importance of acquiring spectra for optical and IR counterparts to ULXs.

  4. A Population of Short-Period Variable Quasars from PTF as Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Charisi, M; Haiman, Z; Price-Whelan, A M; Graham, M J; Bellm, E C; Laher, R R; Marka, S

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) at sub-parsec separations should be common in galactic nuclei, as a result of frequent galaxy mergers. Hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary discs predict strong periodic modulation of the mass accretion rate on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the binary. As a result, SMBHBs may be recognized by the periodic modulation of their brightness. We conducted a statistical search for periodic variability in a sample of 35,383 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the photometric database of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We analysed Lomb-Scargle periodograms and assessed the significance of our findings by modeling each individual quasar's variability as a damped random walk (DRW). We identified 50 quasars with significant periodicity beyond the DRW model, typically with short periods of a few hundred days. We find 33 of these to remain significant after a re-analysis of their periodograms including additional optical data from the intermediate-PT...

  5. Vanishing Absorption and Blueshifted Emission in FeLoBAL Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Rafiee, Alireza; Hall, Patrick B; Galati, Natalee; Rogerson, Jesse; Ameri, Abtin

    2016-01-01

    We study the dramatic decrease in iron absorption strength in the iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar SDSS J084133.15+200525.8. We report on the continued weakening of absorption in the prototype of this class of variable broad absorption line quasar, FBQS J140806.2+305448. We also report a third example of this class, SDSS J123103.70+392903.6; unlike the other two examples, it has undergone an increase in observed continuum brightness (at 3000~\\AA\\ rest-frame) as well as a decrease in iron absorption strength. These changes could be caused by absorber transverse motion or by ionization variability. We note that the \\mgii\\ and UV \\feii\\ lines in several FeLoBAL quasars are blueshifted by thousands of \\kms\\ relative to the \\Hb\\ emission line peak. We suggest that such emission arises in the outflowing winds normally seen only in absorption.

  6. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  7. Extremely Red Quasars in BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D; Greene, Jenny E; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual "wingless" line profiles, large NV/Lya, NV/CIV, SiIV/CIV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [OIII] 5007. Here we present a new catalog of CIV and NV emission-line data for 216,188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR color, secondarily on REW(CIV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a "core" sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 > 4.6 (AB) and REW(CIV) > 100 A at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity log L (ergs/s) ~ 47.1, sk...

  8. Population mixtures and searches of lensed and extended quasars across photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-04-01

    Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near-infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic preselection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalogue-based magnitudes and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian mixture model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10 per cent of the SDSS footprint, and provide the catalogue of the 43 SDSS object with the highest 'lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including two known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.

  9. Evolution of the Quasar Luminosity Function Over 3 < z < 5 in the COSMOS Survey Field

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Daniel; Salvato, Mara; Civano, Francesca; Mobasher, Bahram; Siana, Brian; Hasinger, Guenther; Impey, Christopher; Nagao, Tohru; Trump, Jonathan; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Elvis, Martin; Scoville, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the high-redshift quasar luminosity function (QLF) down to an apparent magnitude of I(AB) = 25 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS). Careful analysis of the extensive COSMOS photometry and imaging data allows us to identify and remove stellar and low-redshift contaminants, enabling a selection that is nearly complete for type-1 quasars at the redshifts of interest. We find 155 likely quasars at z > 3.1, 39 of which have prior spectroscopic confirmation. We present our sample in detail and use these confirmed and likely quasars to compute the rest-frame UV QLF in the redshift bins 3.1 3 is similar to what has been found for more luminous optical and X-ray quasars. We compare the rest-frame UV luminosity functions found here with the X-ray luminosity function at z > 3, and find that they evolve similarly between z \\sim 3.2 and z \\sim 4; however, the different normalizations imply that roughly 75% of X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) at z \\sim 3 - 4 are optically obscured. This fractio...

  10. VLBI Detections of Parsec-Scale Nonthermal Jets in Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Kono, Yusuke; Oyama, Tomoaki; Fujisawa, Kenta; Takaba, Hiroshi; Sudou, Hiroshi; Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Yamauchi, Aya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Nanako; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Nakai, Naomasa; Sorai, Kazuo; Kawai, Eiji; Sekido, Mamoru; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Asano, Shoichiro; Uose, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    We conducted radio detection observations at 8.4 GHz for 22 radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Third Data Release, by a very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique. The VLBI instrument we used was developed by the Optically ConnecTed Array for VLBI Exploration project (OCTAVE), which is operated as a subarray of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN). We aimed at selecting BAL quasars with nonthermal jets suitable for measuring their orientation angles and ages by subsequent detailed VLBI imaging studies to evaluate two controversial issues of whether BAL quasars are viewed nearly edge-on, and of whether BAL quasars are in a short-lived evolutionary phase of quasar population. We detected 20 out of 22 sources using the OCTAVE baselines, implying brightness temperatures greater than 10^5 K, which presumably come from nonthermal jets. Hence, BAL outflows and nonthermal jets can be generated simultaneously in these central engines. We also found four...

  11. The LAMOST Survey of Background Quasars in the Vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies -- II. Results from the Commissioning Observations and the Pilot Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Yan, Lin; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Du, Bing; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Lei, Ya-Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guang-Wei; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Jian; Li, Xin-Nan; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Gen-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Qi-Shuai; Luo, A-Li; Luo, Yu; Men, Li; Ni, Ji-Jun; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Jian-Rong; Shi, Huo-Ming; Sun, Shi-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tian, Yuan; Tu, Liang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Wang, Feng-Fei; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Yue; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, En-Peng; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the LAMOST during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available SDSS, KPNO 4 m telescope, XSTPS optical, and WISE near infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ~135 sq. deg from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey datasets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ~100 sq. deg that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning datasets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62 and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively, of which 5, 20 and 75 are newly-discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable c...

  12. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  13. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of 13 gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Quimby, Robert M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ( ≲ 2 arcsec) confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs ≈ 4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  14. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of thirteen gravitationally lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    More, Anupreeta; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A; Santiago, Basilio X; Mosquera, Ana M; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S; Rusu, Cristian E; Brownstein, Joel R; da Costa, Luiz N; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A G; Quimby, Robert M; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ($\\lesssim$2") confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs$\\approx$4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  15. Quasar structure from microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher Warren

    2008-02-01

    I analyze microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars to yield measurements of the structure of their continuum emission regions. I first describe our lensed quasar monitoring program and RETROCAM, the auxiliary port camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I describe the application of our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to SDSS 0924+0219, a system with a highly anomalous optical flux ratio. For an inclination angle i, I find an optical scale radius log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] . I extrapolate the best-fitting light curves into the future to find a roughly 45% probability that the anomalous image (D) will brighten by at least an order of magnitude during the next decade. I expand our method to make simultaneous estimates of the time delays and structure of HE1104-1805 and QJ0158-4325, two doubly-imaged quasars with microlensing and intrinsic variability on comparable time scales. For HE1104- 1805 I find a time delay of D t AB = t A - t B = [Special characters omitted.] days and estimate a scale radius of log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] at 0.2mm in the rest frame. I am unable to measure a time delay for QJ0158-4325, but the scale radius is log[( r s /cm) [Special characters omitted.] ] = 14.9 ±1 0.3 at 0.3mm in the rest frame. I then apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to the optical light curves of 11 lensed quasar systems to show that quasar accretion disk sizes at 2500Å are related to black hole mass ( M BH ) by log( R 2500 /cm) = (15.7 ± 0.16) + (0.64± 0.18) log( M BH /10 9 [Special characters omitted.] ). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R 0( [Special characters omitted.] ), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(e) = -1.54 ± 0.36 + log( L/L E ) where e=3D L / ( M c 2 ). These sizes are also larger, by a factor of ~ 3, than

  16. Decoding quasars: gravitationally redshifted spectral lines !

    CERN Document Server

    Kantharia, Nimisha G

    2016-01-01

    Further investigation of data on quasars, especially in the ultraviolet band, yields an amazingly coherent narrative which we present in this paper. Quasars are characterised by strong continuum emission and redshifted emission and absorption lines which includes the famous Lyman $\\alpha$ forest. We present irrefutable evidence in support of (1) the entire line spectrum arising in matter located inside the quasar system, (2) the range of redshifts shown by the lines being due to the variable contribution of the gravitational redshift in the observed line velocity, (3) existence of rotating black holes and of matter inside its ergosphere, (4) quasars located within cosmological redshifts $\\sim 3$, (5) $\\gamma$ ray bursts being explosive events in a quasar. These results are significant and a game-changer when we realise that the absorbing gas has been postulated to exist along the line-of-sight to the quasar and observations have accordingly been interpreted. In light of these definitive results which uniquely...

  17. BLOWIN' IN THE WIND: BOTH ''NEGATIVE'' AND ''POSITIVE'' FEEDBACK IN AN OBSCURED HIGH-z QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresci, G.; Mannucci, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisco di Arcetri, largo E. Fermi 5, I-50127, Firenze (Italy); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Lanzuisi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Marconi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto F.no, Firenze (Italy); Piconcelli, E.; Feruglio, C.; Fiore, F.; Bongiorno, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Maiolino, R. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Merloni, A [Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Schramm, M.; Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Civano, F., E-mail: gcresci@arcetri.astro.it [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Quasar feedback in the form of powerful outflows is invoked as a key mechanism to quench star formation in galaxies, preventing massive galaxies to overgrow and producing the red colors of ellipticals. On the other hand, some models are also requiring ''positive'' active galactic nucleus feedback, inducing star formation in the host galaxy through enhanced gas pressure in the interstellar medium. However, finding observational evidence of the effects of both types of feedback is still one of the main challenges of extragalactic astronomy, as few observations of energetic and extended radiatively driven winds are available. Here we present SINFONI near infrared integral field spectroscopy of XID2028, an obscured, radio-quiet z = 1.59 QSO detected in the XMM-COSMOS survey, in which we clearly resolve a fast (1500 km s{sup –1}) and extended (up to 13 kpc from the black hole) outflow in the [O III] lines emitting gas, whose large velocity and outflow rate are not sustainable by star formation only. The narrow component of Hα emission and the rest frame U-band flux from Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging enable to map the current star formation in the host galaxy: both tracers independently show that the outflow position lies in the center of an empty cavity surrounded by star forming regions on its edge. The outflow is therefore removing the gas from the host galaxy (''negative feedback''), but also triggering star formation by outflow induced pressure at the edges (''positive feedback''). XID2028 represents the first example of a host galaxy showing both types of feedback simultaneously at work.

  18. Constraining the lifetime and opening angle of quasars using fluorescent Ly a emission: the case of Q0420-388

    CERN Document Server

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by the quasar lifetime. We then compare the predictions of this model to a sample of high equivalent width Ly a emitters (EW0 > 100 A) that were identified in a deep narrow-band 36x36 arcmin2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420-388. These are identified to the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, then the two most distant sources require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60 degrees or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum 30 degrees. The overall distribution of all of the sources across the field gives best fit lifetimes in the range 20 < t < 50 Myr for openi...

  19. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Dietrich, Matthias; Hamann, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Quasars are among the most luminous objects in the universe, and they can be studied in detail up to the highest known redshift. Assuming that the gas associated with quasars is closely related to the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, quasars can be used as tracer of the star formation history in the early universe. We have observed a small sample of quasars at redshifts 3= 10, corresponding to an age of the universe of less than 5*10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7).

  20. The Stacked Lyman-Alpha Emission Profile from the Circum-Galactic Medium of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Battaia, Fabrizio Arrigoni; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the FLASHLIGHT survey, we obtained deep narrow band images of 15 $z\\sim2$ quasars with GMOS on Gemini-South in an effort to measure Ly$\\alpha$ emission from circum- and inter-galactic gas on scales of hundreds of kpc from the central quasar. We do not detect bright giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebulae (SB~10$^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ at distances >50 kpc) around any of our sources, although we routinely ($\\simeq47$%) detect smaller scale <50 kpc Ly$\\alpha$ emission at this SB level emerging from either the extended narrow emission line regions powered by the quasars or by star-formation in their host galaxies. We stack our 15 deep images to study the average extended Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile around $z\\sim2$ quasars, carefully PSF-subtracting the unresolved emission component and paying close attention to sources of systematic error. Our analysis, which achieves an unprecedented depth, reveals a surface brightness of SB$_{\\rm Ly\\alpha}\\sim10^{-19}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}...

  1. Functional Regression for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ciollaro, Mattia; Freeman, Peter; Genovese, Christopher; Lei, Jing; O'Connell, Ross; Wasserman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest is a portion of the observed light spectrum of distant galactic nuclei which allows us to probe remote regions of the Universe that are otherwise inaccessible. The observed Lyman-alpha forest of a quasar light spectrum can be modeled as a noisy realization of a smooth curve that is affected by a `damping effect' which occurs whenever the light emitted by the quasar travels through regions of the Universe with higher matter concentration. To decode the information conveyed by the Lyman-alpha forest about the matter distribution, we must be able to separate the smooth `continuum' from the noise and the contribution of the damping effect in the quasar light spectra. To predict the continuum in the Lyman-alpha forest, we use a nonparametric functional regression model in which both the response and the predictor variable (the smooth part of the damping-free portion of the spectrum) are function-valued random variables. We demonstrate that the proposed method accurately predicts the unobserv...

  2. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Ostrovski, F.; Reed, S. L.; Lidman, C.; Kochanek, C.; Davis, T. M.; Sharp, R.; Uddin, S.; King, A.; Wester, W.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carollo, D.; Childress, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Macaulay, E.; O'Neill, C. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a study of quasar selection using the supernova fields of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. In all cases, we considered only objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g ‑ i and i-W1), and a mixture of Vista Hemisphere Survey and DES colors (g ‑ i and i ‑ K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSO, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band χ 2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i 85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1263 spectroscopically confirmed quasars from three years of OzDES observation in the 30 deg2 of the DES supernova fields. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z ∼ 4 and brighter than i = 22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up to this magnitude limit.

  3. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Ostrovski, F.; Reed, S. L.; Lidman, C.; Kochanek, C.; Davis, T. M.; Sharp, R.; Uddin, S.; King, A.; Wester, W.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carollo, D.; Childress, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Macaulay, E.; O’Neill, C. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-02-14

    We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the WISE mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g-i and i-W1) and a mixture of VHS and DES colors (g-i and i-K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSOz, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band chi2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i<19.8 mag and i<22 mag. For sources with W1 and W2 detections, the W1-W2 color or XDQSOz method combined with variability gives the highest completenesses of >85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1,263 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars taken by the OzDES survey. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z~4 and brighter than i=22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up this magnitude limit.

  4. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  5. The Neutrino Ball Model of a Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Manka, R; Karczewska, D

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that the nonorthodox model of a quasar as a neutrino ball described in terms of the standard model extended by adding right-handed neutrinos and the Majorana scalar field can be presented in order to explain a quasar as a body of weak interacting neutrinos. Neutrino interaction with the scalar Majorana field violates the lepton number and produces the mass splitting of the neutrino due to the sea-saw mechanism. In this model a quasar is an object which appears in the result of the first order cosmological phase transition. In this interpretation a quasar may be regarded as a ball filled with Dirac neutrinos and can be treated as a remnant of phase transition with unbroken global lepton symmetry. In this paper we study the macroscopic parameters of such a configuration. In the result the mass-radius curve M(R) for the quasar is obtained.

  6. Quasar Evolution Driven by Galaxy Encounters in Hierarchical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Poli, F; Vittorini, V

    2003-01-01

    We link the evolution of the galaxies in the hierarchical clustering scenario with the changing accretion rates of cold gas onto the central massive black holes that power the quasars. We base on galaxy interactions as main triggers of accretion; the related scaling laws are taken up from Cavaliere & Vittorini (2000), and grafted to a semi-analytic code for galaxy formation. As a result, at high $z$ the protogalaxies grow rapidly by hierarchical merging; meanwhile, much fresh gas is imported and also destabilized, so the holes are fueled at their full Eddington rates. At lower $z$ the galactic dynamical events are mostly encounters in hierarchically growing groups; now the refueling peters out, as the residual gas is exhausted while the destabilizing encounters dwindle. So, with no parameter tuning other than needed for stellar observables, our model uniquely produces at $z>3$ a rise, and at $z\\lesssim 2.5 $ a decline of the bright quasar population as steep as observed. In addition, our results closely f...

  7. [Bright light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R; Cambron, L

    2007-01-01

    Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.

  8. Observations Supporting the Existence of an Intrinsic Magnetic Moment Inside the Central Compact Object Within the Quasar Q0957+561

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, R E; Robertson, S L; Schild, Rudolph E.; Leiter, Darryl J.; Robertson, Stanley L.

    2005-01-01

    Recent auto-correlation and fluctuation analysis of time series data in the brightness curves and micro-lensing size scales seen in Q0957+561 A,B has produced important information about the existence and characteristic physical dimensions of a new non-standard internal structure contained within this quasar. We find that the new internal quasar structure, which we shall call the Schild-Vakulik Structure, can be consistently explained in terms of a new calss of gravitationally collapsing solutions to the Einstein field equations which describe highly redshifted, Eddington limited, Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects (MECO) that contain intrinsic magnetic moments. Since observation of the Schild-Vakulik structure within Q0957+561 implies that this quasar contains an observable intrinsic magnetic moment, this represents strong evidence that this quasar does not have an event horizon

  9. Adaptive optics imaging of low and intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Márquez, I; Theodore, B; Bremer, M; Monnet, G; Beuzit, J L

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of adaptive-optics imaging in the H and K bands of 12 low and intermediate redshift (z15.0) themselves as reference for the correction, have typical spatial resolution of FWHM~0.3 arcsec before deconvolution. The deconvolved H-band image of PG1700+514 has a spatial resolution of 0.16 arcsec and reveals a wealth of details on the companion and the host-galaxy. Four out of the twelve quasars have close companions and obvious signs of interactions. The two-dimensional images of three of the host-galaxies unambiguously reveal bars and spiral arms. The morphology of the other objects are difficult to determine from one dimensional surface brightness profile and deeper images are needed. Analysis of mocked data shows that elliptical galaxies are always recognized as such, whereas disk hosts can be missed for small disk scale lengths and large QSO contributions.

  10. A NIR Flare of the Quasar PKS0446+112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Escobedo, G.; Recillas, E.; Chabushyan, V.; Carraminana, A.; Mayya, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the NIR flare of the high redshift quasar PKS0446+112 (z=1.207), also known as CGRaBSJ0449+1121, associated with the gamma-ray source 1FGL0448.6+1118. The source has shown Gamma-ray flares in the past. Our NIR photometry for this source shows that on Jan 4th,2014 (JD2456661.773275), the object brightness corresponded to J = 15.43+/- 0.04, H = 14.210 +/- 0.04 and Ks = 13.455 +/- 0.06. These values are about 1 magnitud brighter than our previous photometry, obtained on JD2456609, for this field.

  11. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  12. Tracing dark energy with quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Średzińska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Kurcz, A; Marziani, P; Pollo, A; Pych, W; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark energy, driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important issues in modern astrophysics. In order to understand this phenomenon, we need precise astrophysical probes of the universal expansion spanning wide redshift ranges. Quasars have recently emerged as such a probe, thanks to their high intrinsic luminosities and, most importantly, our ability to measure their luminosity distances independently of redshifts. Here we report our ongoing work on observational reverberation mapping using the time delay of the Mg II line, performed with the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  13. Strong Variability of Overlapping Iron Broad Absorption Lines in five Radio-selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Shi, Xiheng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Shufen

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a variability study of broad absorption lines (BALs) in a uniformly radio-selected sample of 28 BAL quasars using the archival data from the first bright quasar survey (FBQS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), as well as those obtained by ourselves, covering time scales $\\sim 1-10$ years in the quasar's rest-frame. The variable absorption troughs are detected in 12 BAL quasars. Among them, five cases showed strong spectral variations and are all belong to a special subclass of overlapping iron low ionization BALs (OFeLoBALs). The absorbers of \\ion{Fe}{2} are estimated to be formed by a relative dense (\\mbox{$n\\rm _{e} > 10^6~cm^{-3}$}) gas at a distance from the subparsec scale to the dozens of parsec-scale from the continuum source. They differ from those of invariable non-overlapping FeLoBALs (non-OFeLoBALs), which are the low-density gas and locate at the distance of hundreds to thousands parsecs. OFeLoBALs and non-OFeLoBALs, i.e., FeLoBALs with/without strong BAL variations...

  14. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  15. Quasar bolometric corrections: theoretical considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S

    2010-01-01

    Bolometric corrections based on the optical-to-ultraviolet continuum spectrum of quasars are widely used to quantify their radiative output, although such estimates are affected by a myriad of uncertainties, such as the generally unknown line-of-sight angle to the central engine. In order to shed light on these issues, we investigate the state-of-the-art models of Hubeny et al. that describe the continuum spectrum of thin accretion discs and include relativistic effects. We explore the bolometric corrections as a function of mass accretion rates, black hole masses and viewing angles, restricted to the parameter space expected for type-1 quasars. We find that a nonlinear relationship log L_bol=A + B log(lambda L_lambda) with B<=0.9 is favoured by the models and becomes tighter as the wavelength decreases. We calculate from the model the bolometric corrections corresponding to the wavelengths lambda = 1450A, 3000A and 5100A. In particular, for lambda=3000A we find A=9.24 +- 0.77 and B=0.81 +- 0.02. We demons...

  16. In Search of Quasar Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Ciardullo, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Accretion-powered and star formation activity have been shown to coincide, motivating us to search for the star-forming regions in the host galaxies of quasars and to determine the star-formation rates. In this work we use calibrated narrow band emission line (H-beta and Pa-alpha) WFPC2 and NICMOS images as maps for total star formation rate. The main challenge in imaging quasar host galaxies is the separation of the quasar light from the galaxy light, especially in the case of z approximately 0.1 quasars in WFPC2 images where the PSF radius closely matches the expected host scale radius. To this this end we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light, which we have validated through extensive simulations using artificial quasar+galaxy images. The other significant challenge in mapping and measuring star forming regions is correcting for extinction, which we address using extinction maps created from the Pa-alpha/H-beta ratio. To determine the source of excitation, we utilize H-beta along with [OIII]5007 and [OII]3727 images in diagnostic line ratio (BPT) diagrams. We detect extended line emission in our targets on scales of order 1-2 kpc. A preliminary analysis suggests star formation rates of order 10 solar masses per year.

  17. Halo Occupation Distribution of Infrared Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kaustav

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars that are observed in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope with counter-parts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release (DR)-8 quasar catalog at a median redshift of $z\\sim 1.04 (\\pm 0.58)$. Using a four parameter HOD model we derive the host mass scales of WISE selected quasars. Our results show that the median halo masses of central and satellite quasars lie in the range $M_{\\mathrm{cen}} = (5 \\pm 1.0) \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\mathrm{sat}} = 8 (^{+7.8} _{-4.8}) \\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}$, respectively. The derived satellite fraction is $f_{\\mathrm{sat}}= 5.5 (^{+35} _{-5.0})\\times 10^{-3}$. Previously Richardson et al.\\ used the SDSS DR7 quasar clustering data to obtain the halo mass distributions of $z\\sim 1.4$ quasars. Our results on the HOD of central quasars are in excellent agreement with Richardson et al.\\ but the host mass scale of satellite ...

  18. Quasar Proximity Zones and Patchy Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, A; Zaldarriaga, M; Hernquist, L; Dutta, S; Lidz, Adam; Quinn, Matthew Mc; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    Lyman-alpha forest absorption spectra towards quasars at z ~ 6 show regions of enhanced transmission close to their source. Several authors have argued that the apparently small sizes of these regions indicate that quasar ionization fronts at z >~ 6 expand into a largely or partly neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). Assuming that the typical region in the IGM is reionized by z <= 6, as is suggested by Ly-a forest observations, we argue that at {\\em least} 50% of the volume of the IGM was reionized before the highest redshift quasars turned on. Further, even if the IGM is as much as 50% neutral at quasar turn-on, the quasars are likely born into large galaxy-generated HII regions. The HII regions during reionization are themselves clustered, and using radiative transfer simulations, we find that long skewers through the IGM towards quasar progenitor halos pass entirely through ionized bubbles, even when the IGM is half neutral. These effects have been neglected in most previous analyses of quasar proximity ...

  19. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  20. Quasars Probing Quasars IV: Joint Constraints on the Circumgalactic Medium from Absorption and Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hennawi, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick HI gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly-a emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly-a scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive slit-spectroscopic search (1-sigma limits of SB_Lya ~= 3e-18 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2) for diffuse Ly-a emission in the environments of the foreground quasars is conducted. We fail to detect large-scale ~ 100 kpc Ly-a emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, w...

  1. Mass Models and Environment of the New Quadruply Lensed Quasar SDSS J1330+1810

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-09

    We present the discovery of a new quadruply lensed quasar. The lens system, SDSS J1330+1810 at z{sub s} = 1.393, was identified as a lens candidate from the spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Optical and near-infrared images clearly show four quasar images with a maximum image separation of 1.76 inch, as well as a bright lensing galaxy. We measure a redshift of the lensing galaxy of z{sub 1} = 0.373 from absorption features in the spectrum. We find a foreground group of galaxies at z = 0.31 centred {approx} 120 inch southwest of the lens system. Simple mass models fit the data quite well, including the flux ratios between images, although the lens galaxy appears to be {approx} 1 mag brighter than expected by the Faber-Jackson relation. Our mass modeling suggests that shear from nearby structure is affecting the lens potential.

  2. The Stacked LYα Emission Profile from the Circum-Galactic Medium of z ˜ 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni Battaia, Fabrizio; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the FLASHLIGHT survey, we obtained deep narrowband images of 15 z ˜ 2 quasars with the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph on Gemini South in an effort to measure Lyα emission from circum- and intergalactic gas on scales of hundreds of kpc from the central quasar. We do not detect bright giant Lyα nebulae (SB ˜ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 at distances >50 kpc) around any of our sources, although we routinely (≃47%) detect smaller-scale Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  3. Quasars as Extreme Case of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nasiri, S

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a phenomenological investigation of the evolution and large scale distribution of quasars using a modified version of the Field and Colgate gravitational contraction model for proto-galaxies. By studying the distribution of about 7000 quasars in 5 luminosity classes, it seems that, such a model is capable of solving the energy problem and discussing some of the observational properties of these objects. A sketch of luminosity function of the quasars and the normal galaxies shows a unified aspect for these objects. The large scale distribution of the quasars in the galactic coordinate shows the existence of filamentary structures and voids in the same sence that have been resolved by exploring the clusters of galaxies.

  4. Local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results from a comprehensive investigation of the most luminous mergers in the local universe, the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and the quasars. First, the frequency of occurrence and importance of black hole driven nuclear activity in ULIRGs are discussed using the latest sets of optical, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and X-ray spectra on these objects. Obvious trends with luminosity, infrared color, and morphology are pointed out. Next, the host galaxy properties of ULIRGs are described in detail and then compared with local quasar hosts and inactive spheroids. By and large, these data are consistent with the scenario where ULIRGs are intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies in formation and in the process of becoming moderate-luminosity optical quasars. The powerful galactic winds detected in many ULIRGs may help shed any excess gas during this transformation. However, this evolutionary scenario does not seem to apply to all ULIRGs and quasars: Ultraluminous infrared m...

  5. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Petrogalli, F; Pych, W; Kurcz, A; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to $z = 7$, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 ($z = 0.900$) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  6. Quasars as probes of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient sources in the epoch of cosmological reionization (i.e., which ended a billion years after the Big Bang, corresponding to a redshift of z ~ 5), and are powerful probes of the inter-galactic medium at that time. This review covers current efforts to identify high-redshift quasars and how they have been used to constrain the reionization history. This includes a full description of the various processes by which neutral hydrogen atoms can absorb/scatter ultraviolet photons, and which lead to the Gunn-Peterson effect, dark gap and dark pixel analyses, quasar near zones and damping wing absorption. Finally, the future prospects for using quasars as probes of reionization are described.

  7. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Theuns, T

    2005-01-01

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  8. Line and continuum variability of two intermediate-redshift, high-luminosity quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevese, D.; Paris, D.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vagnetti, F.; Zitelli, V.

    2007-08-01

    Context: It has been shown that the luminosity of active galactic nuclei and the size of their broad line region obey a simple relation of the type R_BLR=a Lγ, from faint Seyfert nuclei to bright quasars, allowing single-epoch determination of the central black hole mass M_BH= b Lγ Δ^2_Hβ from their luminosity L and width of Hβ emission line. Adopting this mass determination for cosmological studies requires the extrapolation to high redshift and luminosity of a relation whose calibration relies so far on reverberation mapping measurements performed for L ⪉ 1046 erg s-1 and redshift z ⪉ 0.4. Aims: We initiated a campaign for the spectrophotometric monitoring of a few luminous, intermediate redshift quasars whose apparent magnitude, V BH from reverberation mapping. Methods: We have repeatedly performed simultaneous spectrophotometric observations of quasars and reference stars to determine relative variability of continuum and emission lines. We describe the observations and methods of analysis. Results: For the quasars PG 1634+706 and PG 1247+268 we obtain light-curves respectively for CIII] (λλ1909 Å), MgII(λλ2798 Å) and for CIV(λλ1549 Å), CIII] (λλ1909 Å) emission lines with the relevant continua. During 3.2 years of observation, in the former case no continuum variability was detected and the evidence for line variability is marginal, while in the latter case both continuum and line variability are detected with high significance and the line variations appear correlated with continuum variations. Conclusions: The detection of the emission line variability in a quasar with L ~ 1047 erg s-1 encourages the continuation of the monitoring campaign which should provide a black hole mass estimate in another 5-6 years, constraining the mass-luminosity relation in a poorly explored range of luminosity.

  9. Expanding Space, Quasars and St. Augustine's Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashchina, Olga; Silagadze, Zurab

    2015-10-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  10. Expanding space, quasars and St. Augustine's fireworks

    CERN Document Server

    Chashchina, O I

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  11. The environment of low redshift quasar pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrinelli, Angela; Treves, Aldo; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Uslenghi, Michela

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxy environment of a sample of 14 low redshift (z $<$ 0.85) quasar physical pairs extracted from SDSS DR10 archives. The pairs have a systemic radial velocity difference $\\Delta V_\\parallel \\leqslant$ 600 $km \\ s^{-1}$ (based on [OIII]5007 \\AA \\ line) and projected distance $ R_\\bot \\leqslant$ 600 kpc. The physical association of the pairs is statistically confirmed at a level of $\\sim$ 90 %. For most of the images of these quasars we are able to resolve their host galaxies that turn out to be on average similar to those of quasars not in pairs. We also found that quasars in a pair are on average in region of modest galaxy overdensity extending up 0.5 Mpc from the QSO. This galaxy overdensity is indistinguishable from that of a homogeneous sample of isolated quasars at the same redshift and with similar host galaxy luminosity. These results, albeit derived from a small (but homogeneous) sample of objects, suggest that the rare activation of two quasars with small phy...

  12. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  13. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  14. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  15. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data III A Color Selected Sample at i^*<20 in the Fall Equatorial Stripe

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, X; Richards, G T; Newman, J A; Becker, R H; Schneider, D P; Gunn, J E; Davis, M; White, R L; Lupton, R H

    2000-01-01

    This is the third paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the SDSS during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we first present the observations of 14 bright high-redshift quasars (3.66quasars in the same region of the sky. Combined with the quasars presented in previous papers, we define a color-selected flux-limited sample of 39 quasars at 3.6 < z < 5.0 and i^*<20, covering a total effective area of 182 deg^2. From this sample, we estimate the average spectral power law slope in the rest-frame ultraviolet for quasars at z~4 to be -0.79 with a standard deviation of 0.34, and the average rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly alpha+N V emission line to be 69 A with a standard deviation of 18 A. The selection completeness of this multicolor sample is determined from the mo...

  16. The Discovery of Gas-Rich, Dusty Starbursts in Luminous Reddened Quasars at $z\\sim2.5$ with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Jones, G; Wagg, J; McMahon, R G; Hewett, P C; Alaghband-Zadeh, S; Feruglio, C

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA observations of cold dust and molecular gas in four high-luminosity, heavily reddened (A$_{\\rm{V}} \\sim 2.5-6$ mag) Type 1 quasars at $z\\sim2.5$ with virial M$_{\\rm{BH}} \\sim 10^{10}$M$_\\odot$, to test whether dusty, massive quasars represent the evolutionary link between submillimetre bright galaxies (SMGs) and unobscured quasars. All four quasars are detected in both the dust continuum and in the $^{12}$CO(3-2) line. The mean dust mass is 6$\\times$10$^{8}$M$_\\odot$ assuming a typical high redshift quasar spectral energy distribution (T=41K, $\\beta$=1.95 or T=47K, $\\beta$=1.6). The implied star formation rates are very high - $\\gtrsim$1000 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ in all cases. Gas masses estimated from the CO line luminosities cover $\\sim$1-5$\\times10^{10}$($\\alpha_{\\rm{CO}} / 0.8$)M$_\\odot$ and the gas depletion timescales are very short - $\\sim5-20$Myr. A range of gas-to-dust ratios is observed in the sample. We resolve the molecular gas in one quasar - ULASJ2315$+$0143 ($z=2.561$) - which show...

  17. CA BrightStor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CA推出的BrightStor系列存储管理解决方案已经成为企业电子商务体系架构管理战略中举足轻重的组成部分。BrightStor是一整套企业级的智能化存储管理解决方案,定位在存储硬件设备和上层应用之间,通过各种集成化的产品和工具为驻留在企业任何位置的数据提供全方位的、有效的存储管理和保护。

  18. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  19. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    intervening galaxy can act as a lens," said Bautz. "Now imagine that the distant lensed quasar suddenly became brighter. The mirage images of the quasar will brighten up at different times depending on the difference in the light travel delay." Unlike ordinary galaxies, quasars do vary greatly in their intensity, especially in the X-ray waveband, said Gordon Garmire, Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State. This is caused by the violent and erratic flow of gas into the black hole that is powering the quasar. In quasar RX J0911.4+0551, the astronomers saw a sudden brightening of X-ray intensity that lasted for about 2,000 seconds. This was observed in one of the four mirage images. Measuring the time-delay of the 2,000-second flare--or any flare-- from mirage to mirage can provide the absolute distance to the deflector (intervening galaxy) and can thus be used to estimate the expansion rate of the universe. Sjur Refsdal first proposed this promising method in 1964. The method avoids many uncertainties associated with the classic distance-ladder technique used to measure objects and the Hubble constant. The main difficulty in measuring time-delays is that the brightness of each image has to be carefully monitored over several periods of the time-delay. Also, the quasar has to show sufficient variability over time scales smaller than the time-delay. Most attempts to measure time-delays until now have been made in the optical and radio bands. The modest variability of quasars in these wavebands, however, has made it extremely difficult to place accurate constraints on time-delays. X-ray observations of gravitationally lensed quasars, on the other hand, show strong variability over time scales of hours to days. For example, it has taken almost 20 years of optical and radio monitoring to obtain a universal accepted time-delay for the lensed quasar Q0957+561 to an accuracy of 3percent. Chandra has the potential, the team has found, to determine the time

  20. The Optical Variability of SDSS Quasars from Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. III. A Sudden UV Cutoff in Quasar SDSS J2317+0005

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hengxiao; Gu, Minfeng; Li, Linlin; Prochaska, J Xavier; Ma, Jingzhe; You, Bei; Zafar, Tayyaba; Liao, Mai

    2016-01-01

    We have collected near-infrared to X-ray data of 20 multi-epoch heavily reddened SDSS quasars to investigate the physical mechanism of reddening. Of these, J2317+0005 is found to be a UV cutoff quasar. Its continuum, which usually appears normal, decreases by a factor 3.5 at 3000{\\AA}, compared to its more typical bright state during an interval of 23 days. During this sudden continuum cut-off, the broad emission line fluxes do not change, perhaps due to the large size of the Broad Line Region (BLR), r > 23 / (1+z) days. The UV continuum may have suffered a dramatic drop out. However, there are some difficulties with this explanation. Another possibility is that the intrinsic continuum did not change, but was temporarily blocked out, at least towards our line of sight. As indicated by X-ray observations, the continuum rapidly recovers after 42 days. A comparison of the bright state and dim states would imply an eclipse by a dusty cloud with a reddening curve having a remarkably sharp rise shortward of 3500{\\A...

  1. Discovery of a New Blue Quasar: SDSS J022218.03-062511.1

    CERN Document Server

    Fix, Mees B; Tucker, Douglas L; Wester, William; Annis, James

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a bright blue quasar: SDSS J022218.03-062511.1. This object was discovered spectroscopically while searching for hot white dwarfs that may be used as calibration sources for large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey or the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project. We present the calibrated spectrum, spectral line shifts and report a redshift of z = 0.521 +/- 0.0015 and a rest-frame g-band luminosity of 8.71 X 10^11 L(Sun).

  2. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Oogi, Taira; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z=4 (a few 1e+11 Msun) to z=1 (a few 1e+12 Msun), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar--galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increas...

  3. Red quasars not so dusty

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, C R; Carballo, R; González-Serrano, J I; Sánchez, S F

    1997-01-01

    Webster et al (1995) claimed that up to 80% of QSOs may be obscured by dust. They inferred the presence of this dust from the remarkably broad range of B-K optical-infrared colours of a sample of flat-spectrum PKS radio QSOs. If such dust is typical of QSOs, it will have rendered invisible most of those which would otherwise been have detected by optical surveys. We used the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma to obtain K infrared images of 54 B3 radio quasars selected at low frequency (mainly steep-spectrum), and we find that although several have very red optical-infrared colours, most of these can be attributed to an excess of light in K rather than a dust-induced deficit in B. We present evidence that some of the infrared excess comes from the light of stars in the host galaxy (some, as previously suggested, comes from synchrotron radiation associated with flat-spectrum radio sources). The B-K colours of the B3 QSOs provide no evidence for a large reddened population. Either the Webster et al QSOs are ...

  4. Quasar evolution and gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.; Messina, A.

    1983-06-01

    The paper presents three convergent results concerning the sources in theactive nuclei of quasars and radio galaxies that derive their power fromconversion of gravitational energy. We first derive, for several leading modelsbased on liberation of gravitational energy from mass in a compact supply, thelaws governing the secular change L of the primary power driving the individual sources, and identify their common and key property: L increases, and eventually decreases, linearly or faster with the power itself, so that the associated time scales t/sub s/ = L/Vertical BarLVertical Bar obey dt/sub s/, (L)/dL<0. We then describe a general statistical framework to populate with sources the (luminosity, cosmic time)-plane, based on a continuity equation that embodies a given L. We show how the main features of the populations depend primarily on L, while the memory of the initial details is easily erased. With L as derived above, we obtain basic evolutions of the density (L>0) and of the luminosity (L<0) type, with a global differential character. Finally we compute the full evolution functions, comprising a brightening (L>0) and a dimming (L<0) phase, corresponding to three such models. Sub-Eddington accretion onto a massive black hole from a star cluster that self-destroys by collisions is close to reproduce the general course of the empirical models for the optical QSO population.

  5. Emergence of a Quasar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, F; Hidalgo, P Rodriguez; Prochaska, J X; Herbert-Fort, S

    2008-01-01

    We report the first discovery of the emergence of a high-velocity broad-line outflow in a luminous quasar, J105400.40+034801.2 at redshift z ~ 2.1. The outflow is evident in ultraviolet CIV and SiIV absorption lines with velocity shifts v ~ 26,300 km/s and deblended widths FWHM ~ 4000 km/s. These features are marginally strong and broad enough to be considered broad absorption lines (BALs), but their large velocities exclude them from the standard BAL definition. The outflow lines appeared between two observations in the years 2002.18 and 2006.96. A third observation in 2008.48 showed the lines becoming ~40% weaker and 10% to 15% narrower. There is no evidence for acceleration or for any outflow gas at velocities 21.2 and average space density n_H > 2 x 10^5 cm^-3. We attribute the emergence of the outflow lines to a substantial flow structure moving across our line of sight, possibly near the ragged edge of the main BAL flow or possibly related to the onset of a BAL evolutionary phase.

  6. Long Term Variability of SDSS Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, W; White, R; Becker, Bob; Vries, Wim de; White, Rick

    2003-01-01

    We use a sample of 3791 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Early Data Release (EDR), and compare their photometry to historic plate material for the same set of quasars in order to study their variability properties. The time base-line we attain this way ranges from a few months to up to 50 years. In contrast to monitoring programs, where relatively few quasars are photometrically measured over shorter time periods, we utilize existing databases to extend this base-line as much as possible, at the cost of sampling per quasar. Our method, however, can easily be extended to much larger samples. We construct variability Structure Functions and compare these to the literature and model functions. From our modeling we conclude that 1) quasars are more variable toward shorter wavelengths, 2) their variability is consistent with an exponentially decaying light-curve with a typical time-scale of ~2 years, 3) these outbursts occur on typical time-scales of ~200 years. With the upcoming first data release...

  7. On the Search for Quasar Light Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli

    2007-01-01

    The UV radiation from a quasar leaves a characteristic pattern in the distribution of ionized hydrogen throughout the surrounding space. This pattern or light echo propagates through the intergalactic medium at the speed of light, and can be observed by its imprint on the Ly-alpha forest spectra of background sources. As the echo persists after the quasar has switched off, it offers the possibility of searching for dead quasars, and constraining their luminosities and lifetimes. We outline a technique to search for and characterize these light echoes. To test the method, we create artificial Ly-alpha forest spectra from cosmological simulations at z=3, apply light echoes and search for them. We show how the simulations can also be used to quantify the significance level of any detection. We find that light echoes from the brightest quasars could be found in observational data. With absorption line spectra of 100 redshift z~3-3.5 quasars or galaxies in a 1 square degree area, we expect that ~10 echoes from qua...

  8. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Christina M; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Schmidt, Kasper B; Ivezić, Željko; Ross, Nicholas P; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Riegel, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a pilot investigation to determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. We use a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 35,820 type 1 quasar candidates in a 239 square degree field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, using a combination of optical photometry and variability. Color analysis is performed on 5-band single- and multi-epoch SDSS optical photometry to a depth of r ~22.4. From these data, variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law model using 10 to >100 observations over timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type-1 quasars, largely from the SDSS. Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency ...

  9. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  10. A large sample of binary quasars: Does quasar bias tracks from Mpc scale to kpc scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the most precise estimate to date of the bias of quasars on very small scales, based on a measurement of the clustering of 47 spectroscopically confirmed binary quasars with proper transverse separations of ~25 h^{-1} kpc. The quasars in our sample, which is an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE) applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over most of the SDSS area. Our sample is "complete," in that all possible pairs of binary quasars across our area of interest have been spectroscopically confirmed from a combination of previous surveys and our own long-slit observational campaign. We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar W_p) in four bins of proper transverse scale over the range 17.0 \\lesssim R_{prop} \\lesssim 36.2 h^{-1} kpc. Due to our large sample size, our measured projected correlation function in each of these four bins of scale is more than twice as precise as any previous measurement made over our {\\em full} range of scales. We also measure the bias of our quasar sample in four slices of redshift across the range 0.43 \\le z \\le 2.26 and compare our results to similar measurements of how quasar bias evolves on Mpc-scales. This measurement addresses the question of whether it is reasonable to assume that quasar bias evolves with redshift in a similar fashion on both Mpc and kpc scales. Our results can meaningfully constrain the one-halo term of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of quasars and how it evolves with redshift. This work was partially supported by NSF grant 1515404.

  11. VLBI observations of a flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    CERN Document Server

    An, Tao; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sandor; Gurvits, Leonid I; Gabanyi, Krisztina E

    2016-01-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift ($z=2.133$) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached $-30.0$ during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15 GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22 and 43 GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. ...

  12. The Gamma-ray Activity of the high-z Quasar 0836+71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorstad Svetlana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Fermi LAT detected an increase in γ-ray activity of the quasar 0836+710 (z=2.17 in Spring 2011 that culminated in a sharp γ-ray flare at the end of 2011 when the source reached a flux of 2.9×10−6 phot s−1cm−2 at 0.1-200 GeV. We monitor the quasar at optical wavelengths in photometric and polarimetric modes, at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths, and with the VLBA at 43 GHz. The optical brightness of the quasar increased by ~0.5 mag in R band and the degree of polarization oscillated between ~1% and ~6% during the highest γ-ray state, while the position angle of polarization rotated by ~300°. We have identified in the VLBA images a strong, highly polarized component that moves with an apparent speed of ~20 c. The component emerged from the core in the beginning of the γ-ray event and reached a flux maximum at the peak of the γ-ray outburst. We present the results of a correlative analysis of variations at different wavelengths along with the kinematic parameters of the parsec scale jet. We discuss the location of the high γ-ray emission in the relativistic jet, as well as the emission mechanisms responsible for γ-ray production.

  13. Line and continuum variability of two intermediate-redshift, high-luminosity quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trevese, D; Stirpe, G M; Vagnetti, F; Zitelli, V

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that the luminosity of AGNs and the size of their broad line region obey a simple relation of the type R=a L^g, from faint Seyfert nuclei to bright quasars, allowing single-epoch determination of the central black hole mass M=b L^g D^2 from their luminosity L and width of H_beta emission line. Adopting this mass determination for cosmological studies requires the extrapolation to high z and L of a relation whose calibration relies so far on reverberation mapping measurements performed for L10^47 erg/s, and determining eventually their M_BH from reverberation mapping. We have repeatedly performed simultaneous observations of quasars and reference stars to determine relative variability of continuum and emission lines. We describe the observations and methods of analysis. For the quasars PG1634+706 and PG1247+268 we obtain light-curves respectively for CIII], MgII and for CIV, CIII] emission lines with the relevant continua. During 3.2 years of observation, in the former case no continuum vari...

  14. A population of short-period variable quasars from PTF as supermassive black hole binary candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charisi, M.; Bartos, I.; Haiman, Z.; Price-Whelan, A. M.; Graham, M. J.; Bellm, E. C.; Laher, R. R.; Márka, S.

    2016-12-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) at sub-parsec separations should be common in galactic nuclei, as a result of frequent galaxy mergers. Hydrodynamical simulations of circum-binary discs predict strong periodic modulation of the mass accretion rate on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the binary. As a result, SMBHBs may be recognized by the periodic modulation of their brightness. We conducted a statistical search for periodic variability in a sample of 35 383 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the photometric data base of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We analysed Lomb-Scargle periodograms and assessed the significance of our findings by modelling each individual quasar's variability as a damped random walk (DRW). We identified 50 quasars with significant periodicity beyond the DRW model, typically with short periods of a few hundred days. We find 33 of these to remain significant after a re-analysis of their periodograms including additional optical data from the intermediate-PTF and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey. Assuming that the observed periods correspond to the redshifted orbital periods of SMBHBs, we conclude that our findings are consistent with a population of unequal-mass SMBHBs, with a typical mass ratio as low as q ≡ M2/M1 ≈ 0.01.

  15. Discovery of the Lensed Quasar System DES J0408-5354

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H.; et al.

    2017-01-31

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the quad-like lensed quasar system DES J0408-5354 found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 (Y1) data. This system was discovered during a search for DES Y1 strong lensing systems using a method that identified candidates as red galaxies with multiple blue neighbors. DES J0408-5354 consists of a central red galaxy surrounded by three bright (i < 20) blue objects and a fourth red object. Subsequent spectroscopic observations using the Gemini South telescope confirmed that the three blue objects are indeed the lensed images of a quasar with redshift z = 2.375, and that the central red object is an early-type lensing galaxy with redshift z = 0.597. DES J0408-5354 is the first quad lensed quasar system to be found in DES and begins to demonstrate the potential of DES to discover and dramatically increase the sample size of these very rare objects.

  16. The Sudden Death of the Nearest Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Schawinski, Kevin; Virani, Shanil; Urry, C Megan; Keel, William C; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Lintott, Chris J; Manning, Anna; Coppi, Paolo; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bamford, Steven P; Jozsa, Gyula I G; Garrett, Michael; van Arkel, Hanny; Gay, Pamela; Fortson, Lucy; 10.1088/2041-8205/724/1/L30

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy formation is significantly modulated by energy output from supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies which grow in highly efficient luminous quasar phases. The timescale on which black holes transition into and out of such phases is, however, unknown. We present the first measurement of the shutdown timescale for an individual quasar using X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy IC 2497, which hosted a luminous quasar no more than 70,000 years ago that is still seen as a light echo in `Hanny's Voorwerp', but whose present-day radiative output is lower by at least 2 and more likely by over 4 orders of magnitude. This extremely rapid shutdown provides new insights into the physics of accretion in supermassive black holes, and may signal a transition of the accretion disk to a radiatively inefficient state.

  17. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...... that the black hole masses are very large, of order 1 to 10 billion solar masses, even at the highest redshifts of 4 to 6. The black holes must build up their mass very fast in the early universe. Yet they do not grow much larger than that: a maximum mass of about 10 billion solar masses is also observed....... Preliminary mass functions of active black holes are presented for several quasar samples, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, common concerns related to the application of the mass scaling relations, especially for high redshift quasars, are briefly discussed....

  18. Detecting the First Quasars with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2010-05-01

    We show that ALMA is the first telescope that can probe the dust-obscured central region of quasars at z > 5 with a maximum resolution of ~ 30 pc employing the 18 km baseline. We explore the possibility of detecting the first quasars with ALMA (Schleicher, Spaans, & Klessen 2009). For this purpose, we adopt the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as a reference system and calculate the expected fluxes if this galaxy were placed at high redshift. This choice is motivated by the detailed observations available for this system and the absence of any indication for an evolution in metallicity in high-redshift quasars. It is a conservative choice due to the moderate column densities in NGC 1068, leading to moderate fluxes.

  19. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  20. The LAMOST survey of background quasars in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies. II. Results from the commissioning observations and the pilot surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Bing; Jia, Lei; Lei, Ya-Juan [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Xiao-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yan, Lin [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Hu, Hong-Zhuan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cui, Xiang-Qun; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jiang, Fang-Hua, E-mail: zhiyinghuo@bao.ac.cn [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China); and others

    2013-06-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, also named the Guoshoujing Telescope, during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 m telescope, Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey optical, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer near-infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ∼135 deg{sup 2} from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey data sets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ∼100 deg{sup 2} that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning data sets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62, and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5, and 18.0, respectively, of which 5, 20, and 75 are newly discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable collection with which to probe the kinematics and chemistry of the interstellar/intergalactic medium in the Local Group of galaxies. A total of 93 quasars are now known with locations within 2.°5 of M31, of which 73 are newly discovered. Tens of quasars are now known to be located behind the Giant Stellar Stream, and hundreds are behind the extended halo and its associated substructures of M31. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 can potentially be utilized to construct a perfect astrometric reference frame to measure the minute proper motions (PMs) of M31 and M33, along with the PMs of substructures associated with the Local Group of galaxies. Those PMs are some of the most fundamental properties of the Local

  1. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O’Dea, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500–920 Å) of high-luminosity quasars using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (low to intermediate redshift sample) and Sloan Digital sky Survey (SDSS) (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} compared to \\lt 1.5× {10}7 s. Based on an excess variance analysis, for time intervals \\lt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 10% of the quasars (4/40) show evidence of EUV variability. Similarly, for time intervals \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 55% of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between 2.5× {10}7 {{s}} and 3.16× {10}7 {{s}} (1 year). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these timescales. A threshold timescale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall time to the plunge region of the optically thin surface layer of the slim disk that is responsible for the preponderance of the EUV flux emission (primarily within 0–7 black hole radii from the inner edge of the disk) is consistent with the empirically determined variability timescale.

  2. Dual-frequency VSOP Imaging of a High-redshift Radio Quasar PKS 1402+044

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, J; Lobanov, A; Frey, S; Hong, X Y; Yang, Jun; Gurvits, Leonid; Lobanov, Andrei; Frey, Sandor; Hong, Xiao-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Based on the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz, we find that the luminous high-redshift (z=3.215) quasar PKS 1402+044 (J1405+0415) has a pronounced 'core--jet' structure. The jet shows a steeper spectral index and lower brightness temperature with the increase of the distance from the core. The variation of brightness temperature is basically consistent with the shock-in-jet model. Assuming that the jet is collimated by the ambient magnetic field, we estimate the mass of the central object as ~10^9 M_sun. The upper limit of the jet proper motion of PKS 1402+044 is 0.03 mas/yr (~3c) in the east-west direction.

  3. Quasar polarization with ultralight (pseudo-)scalars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ki-Young choi; Subhayan Mandal; Chang Sub Shin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that the absence of circular polarization of visible light from quasars severely constrains the interpretation of axion-like particles (ALPs) as a solution for the generation of linear polarization. Furthermore, the new observation of linear polarization in radio wavelength from quasars, similar to the earlier observation performed in the optical bands, makes the ALPs scenario inconsistent with at least one of the two observations. In this study, we extend this scenario by including more scalars. We find that the effects from scalar and pseudoscalar neutralize each other, thereby suppressing the circular polarization, while preserving consistent linear polarization, as observed in both the visible and radio wave bands.

  4. Evolution of a Powerful Radio Loud Quasar 3C186 and its Impact on the Cluster Environment at z=1

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Burke, Doug; Bechtold, Jill; Cheung, C C; LaMassa, Stephanie; Worrall, Diana M

    2007-01-01

    X-ray cluster emission has been observed mainly in clusters with "inactive" cD galaxies (L_bol ~1E40-1E43erg/sec), which do not show signs of accretion onto a SMBH. Our recent Chandra discovery of ~100kpc scale diffuse X-ray emission revealed the presence of an X-ray cluster associated with the radio loud quasar 3C186 at redshift z=1.1 and suggests interactions between the quasar and the cluster. In contrast to the majority of X-ray clusters the 3C186 cluster contains a quasar in the center whose radiative power alone exceeds that which would be needed to quench the cluster cooling. We present the Chandra X-ray data and new deep radio and optical images of this cluster. The 3C186 quasar is a powerful Compact Steep Spectrum radio source expanding into the cluster medium. The 2arcsec radio jet is unresolved in the Chandra observation, but its direction is orthogonal to the elliptical surface brightness of the cluster. The radio data show the possible presence of old radio lobes on 10 arcsec scale in the directi...

  5. Discovery of Balmer broad absorption lines in the quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuo Ji; Ting-Gui Wang; Hong-Yan Zhou; Hui-Yuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of Balmer broad absorption lines (BALs) in the quasar LBQS 1206+1052 and present a detailed analysis of the peculiar absorption line spectrum.Besides the Mg Ⅱ λλ2796,2803 doublet,BALs are also detected in the He Ⅰ* multiplet at λλ2946,3189,3889(A) arising from the metastable helium 23S level,and in Hα and Hβ from the excited hydrogen H Ⅰ* n =2 level,which are rarely seen in quasar spectra.We identify two components in the BAL troughs of △v ~2000 km s-1 width:One component shows an identical profile in H Ⅰ*,He Ⅰ* and Mg Ⅱ with its centroid blueshifted by —vc ≈ 726 km s-1.The other component is detected in He Ⅰ* and Mg Ⅱ with —vc ≈ 1412 km s-1.We estimate the column densities of H Ⅰ*,He Ⅰ*,and Mg Ⅱ,and compare them with possible level population mechanisms.Our results favor the scenario that the Balrner BALs originate in a partially ionized region with a column density of NH ~ 1021 - 1022 cm-2 for an electron density of ne ~ 106 - 108 cm-3 via Lyα resonant scattering pumping.The harsh conditions needed may help to explain the rarity of Balmer absorption line systems in quasar spectra.With ani-band PSF magnitude of 16.50,LBQS 1206+1052 is the brightest Balmer-BAL quasar ever reported.Its high brightness and unique spectral properties make LBQS 1206+1052 a promising candidate for followup high-resolution spectroscopy,multi-band observations,and long-term monitoring.

  6. Simple stellar population modelling of low S/N galaxy spectra and quasar host galaxy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, G.; Tremonti, C. A.; Hooper, E. J.; Wolf, M. J.; Sheinis, A. I.; Richards, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on their host galaxies it is important to study the hosts when the SMBH is near its peak activity. A method to investigate the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars is to obtain optical spectra at positions offset from the nucleus where the relative contribution of the quasar and host is comparable. However, at these extended radii the galaxy surface brightness is often low (20-22 mag arcsec-2) and the resulting spectrum might have such low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) that it hinders analysis with standard stellar population modelling techniques. To address this problem, we have developed a method that can recover galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) from rest-frame optical spectra with S/N ˜ 5 Å-1. This method uses the statistical technique diffusion k-means to tailor the stellar population modelling basis set. Our diffusion k-means minimal basis set, composed of four broad age bins, is successful in recovering a range of galaxy SFHs. Additionally, using an analytic prescription for seeing conditions, we are able to simultaneously model scattered quasar light and the SFH of quasar host galaxies (QHGs). We use synthetic data to compare results of our novel method with previous techniques. We also present the modelling results on a previously published QHG and show that galaxy properties recovered from a diffusion k-means basis set are less sensitive to noise added to this QHG spectrum. Our new method has a clear advantage in recovering information from QHGs and could also be applied to the analysis of other low S/N galaxy spectra such as those typically obtained for high redshift objects or integral field spectroscopic surveys.

  7. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    La Plante, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled $N$-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models include two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function (QLF) given a halo catalog from an $N$-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurem...

  8. A Census of Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines in the Spectra of Quasars at z = 2-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Toru; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Ganguly, Rajib; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David; Suzuki, Nao; Lubin, Dan

    2007-07-01

    We use Keck HIRES spectra of 37 optically bright quasars at z=2-4 to study narrow absorption lines that are intrinsic to the quasars (intrinsic NALs, produced in gas that is physically associated with the quasar central engine). We identify 150 NAL systems, which contain 124 C IV, 12 N V, and 50 Si IV doublets, of which 18 are associated systems (within 5000 km s-1 of the quasar redshift). We use partial coverage analysis to separate intrinsic NALs from NALs produced in cosmologically intervening structures. We find 39 candidate intrinsic systems (28 reliable determinations and 11 that are possibly intrinsic). We estimate that 10%-17% of C IV systems at blueshifts of 5000-70,000 km s-1 relative to quasars are intrinsic. At least 32% of quasars contain one or more intrinsic C IV NALs. Considering N V and Si IV doublets showing partial coverage as well, at least 50% of quasars host intrinsic NALs. This result constrains the solid angle subtended by the absorbers to the background source(s). We identify two families of intrinsic NAL systems, those with strong N V absorption and those with negligible absorption in N V but with partial coverage in the C IV doublet. We discuss the idea that these two families represent different regions or conditions in accretion disk winds. Of the 26 intrinsic C IV NAL systems, 13 have detectable low-ionization absorption lines at similar velocities, suggesting that these are two-phase structures in the wind rather than absorbers in the host galaxy. We also compare possible models for quasar outflows, including radiatively accelerated disk-driven winds, magnetocentrifugally accelerated winds, and pressure-driven winds, and we discuss ways of distinguishing between these models observationally. The data presented here were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  10. Optical Spectrophotometric Monitoring of Fermi/LAT Bright Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Patiño-Álvarez, V; León-Tavares, J; Valdés, J R; Carramiñana, A; Carrasco, L; Torrealba, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe an ongoing optical spectrophotometric monitoring program of a sample of Fermi/LAT bright sources showing prominent and variable {\\gamma}-ray emission, with the 2.1m telescope at Observatorio Astrof\\'isico Guillermo Haro (OAGH) located in Cananea, Sonora, M\\'exico. Our sample contains 11 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) and 1 Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxy. Our spectroscopic campaign will allow us to study the spectroscopic properties (FWHM, EW, flux) of broad-emission lines in the optical (e.g. H{\\beta}) and mid-UV (e.g. Mg II {\\lambda}2800) regimes, depending on the redshift of the source. The cadence of the broad emission lines monitoring is about five nights per month which in turn will permit us to explore whether there is a correlated variability between broad emission line features and high levels of {\\gamma}-ray emission.

  11. New quasar surveys with WIRO: Searching for high redshift (z~6) quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze Nunez, Evan; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William Bradford; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    High redshift quasars (z~6) are of great interest to fundamental astronomy due to the information they hold about the early universe. With their low number density in the sky, however, they are elusive objects. Reported here is our search for these high redshift quasars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3m telescope. We search for potential candidates that have been detected by surveys such as WISE, which have been mostly redshifted out of the optical. The main emission feature of these quasars (the Lyman-Alpha line at ~1216 Angstroms rest-frame) would be redshifted to the z-band or beyond. This means that the quasars should have very low levels of i-band flux. These objects are known as i-dropouts. By imaging the quasars in the i-band and running photometric analysis on our fields, candidates can be identified or rejected by whether or not they appear in our fields. We also provide an analysis of the colors of our candidate high-redshift quasars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST1560461

  12. THE LARGE SKY AREA MULTI-OBJECT FIBER SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE QUASAR SURVEY: QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Dong, Xiaoyi [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zuo, Wenwen; Shen, S.-Y. [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Yang, M.; Wu, H.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences 100012, Beijing (China); Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo, E-mail: aiyl@pku.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical–infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  13. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Obied, Georges; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at $0.24quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modeling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration -- inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27\\dg$\\pm$9\\dg) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1 / type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has a $\\sim 40\\%$ chan...

  14. Effects of Quasar Feedback in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of quasar feedback on distributions of baryons in galaxy groups using high-resolution numerical simulations. We use the entropy-conserving Gadget code that includes gas cooling and star formation, modified to include a physically-based model of quasar feedback. For a sample of ten galaxy group-sized dark matter halos with masses in the range of 1 to $5\\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}/h$, star formation is suppressed by more than 30% in the inner regions due to the additional pressure support by quasar feedback, while gas is driven from the inner region towards the outer region of the halos. As a result, the average gas density is 20% lower in the inner region and 10% higher in the outer region in the simulation, compared to a similar simulation with no quasar feedback. Gas pressure is also higher in the outer region, while temperature and entropy are enhanced in the inner region. The total group gas fraction in the two simulations generally differs by less than 10%. We also find a small enhancemen...

  15. Measuring Distances to Remote Galaxies and Quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of spectroscopy and the redshift to measure how far an object is by measuring how fast it is receding from earth. Lists the most distant quasars yet found. Tables include "Redshift vs. Distance" and "Distances to Celestial Objects for Various Cosmologies." (CW)

  16. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  17. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Chiara; Piconcelli, Enrico; Menci, Nicola; Aussel, Herve'; Lamastra, Alessandra; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution the transformation of young star-forming galaxies into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched, is often explained by invoking a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead to the black hole "suicide" for starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, since outflows previously observed in quasars are associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occur in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdBI to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. We detect broad wings of the CO line, with velocities up to 750 km/s and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. Such broad CO wings trace a giant molecular o...

  18. Theoretical spectroscopy of quasars within Karlsson's law

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The law introduced by Karlsson in spectroscopy of low-redshift quasars involves the Lyman spectrum of hydrogen atoms. Thus, it appears necessary to study the concepts introduced by a standard spectroscopy of quasars, studied here, with those deducted from $\\Lambda$-CDM.A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a long path without perturbations as collisions or cosmological redshift. Spectra of absorbed, saturated lines of quasars obeying Karlsson's law mainly result from interactions of natural, thermal light radiated by quasar with relatively cold, low presure atomic hydrogen. These lines are produced by three processes: a) A conventional absorption in a relatively cold gas produces a set of lines; b) These lines are multiplied by absorption after fundamental 3K or 4K redshifts, where K is Karlsson's constant: Spectra show that redshifts 3K (or 4K) exactly bring absorbed Lyman beta (or gamma) line on Lyman alpha: redshift almost disappears, and gas lines are intensely abso...

  19. Magnetic Fields in Quasar Cores, 2

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G B

    1999-01-01

    Multi-frequency polarimetry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescope has revealed absolute Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) in excess of 1000 rad/m/m in the central regions of 7 out of 8 strong quasars studied (e.g., 3C 273, 3C 279, 3C 395). Beyond a projected distance of ~20 pc, however, the jets are found to have |RM| < 100 rad/m/m. Such sharp RM gradients cannot be produced by cluster or galactic-scale magnetic fields, but rather must be the result of magnetic fields organized over the central 1-100 pc. The RMs of the sources studied to date and the polarization properties of BL Lacs, quasars and galaxies are shown to be consistent so far with the predictions of unified schemes. The direct detection of high RMs in these quasar cores can explain the low fractional core polarizations usually observed in quasars at centimeter wavelengths as the result of irregularities in the Faraday screen on scales smaller than the telescope beam. Variability in the RM of the core is reported for 3C 279 between ...

  20. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Shields, J C; Constantin, A; Heidt, J; Jäger, K; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note that this also appears to be the era of re-ionization of the universe. Finally, there is some evidence for a positive lum...

  1. Quasar absorption lines and the intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Jannuzi, B T

    1996-01-01

    The importance of HST for the study of quasar absorption lines and of the nature of the intergalactic medium is illustrated by reviewing selected results from past HST observations. Topics reviewed include the study of Ly-alpha absorbers at low redshift and the search for a diffuse IGM at high redshifts.

  2. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O'Dea, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500 - 920 $\\AA$) of high luminosity quasars using HST (low to intermediate redshift sample) and SDSS (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is $> 2\\times 10^{7}$ sec compared to $2\\times 10^{7}$ sec in the quasar rest frame, $55\\%$ of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between $2.5\\times 10^{7}$ sec and $3.16\\times 10^{7}$ sec (1 yr). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these time scales. A threshold time scale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall...

  3. REVERBERATION MAPPING WITH INTERMEDIATE-BAND PHOTOMETRY: DETECTION OF BROAD-LINE Hα TIME LAGS FOR QUASARS AT 0.2 < z < 0.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morganson, Eric [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Windhorst, Rogier A., E-mail: jiangKIAA@pku.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    We present a reverberation mapping (RM) experiment that combines broad- and intermediate-band photometry; it is the first such attempt targeting 13 quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.9. The quasars were selected to have strong Hα or Hβ emission lines that are located in one of three intermediate bands (with FWHM around 200 Å) centered at 8045, 8505, and 9171 Å. The imaging observations were carried out in the intermediate bands and the broad i and z bands using the prime-focus imager 90Prime on the 2.3 m Bok telescope. Because of the large (∼1 deg{sup 2}) field of view (FOV) of 90Prime, we included the 13 quasars within only five telescope pointings or fields. The five fields were repeatedly observed over 20–30 epochs that were unevenly distributed over a duration of 5–6 months. The combination of the broad- and intermediate-band photometry allows us to derive accurate light curves for both optical continuum emission (from the accretion disk) and line emission (from the broad-line region, or BLR). We detect Hα time lags between the continuum and line emission in six quasars. These quasars are at relatively low redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.4. The measured lags are consistent with the current BLR size–luminosity relation for Hβ at z < 0.3. While this experiment appears successful in detecting lags of the bright Hα line, further investigation is required to see if it can also be applied to the fainter Hβ line for quasars at higher redshifts. Finally we demonstrate that, by using a small telescope with a large FOV, intermediate-band photometric RM can be efficiently executed for a large sample of quasars at z > 0.2.

  4. Galaxy Zoo : 'Hanny's Voorwerp', a quasar light echo?

    CERN Document Server

    Lintott, Chris; Keel, William; van Arkel, Hanny; Bennert, Nicola; Edmondson, Edward; Thomas, Daniel; Smith, Daniel; Herbert, Peter; Jarvis, Matt; Virani, Shanil; Andreescu, Dan; Bamford, Steven; Land, Kate; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert; Raddick, Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alex; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of an unusual object near the spiral galaxy IC 2497, discovered by visual inspection of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. The object, known as Hanny's Voorwerp, is bright in the SDSS g band due to unusually strong OIII 4959-5007 emission lines. We present the results of the first targeted observations of the object in the optical, UV and X-ray, which show that the object contains highly ionized gas. Although the line ratios are similar to extended emission-line regions near luminous AGN, the source of this ionization is not apparent. The emission-line properties, and lack of x-ray emission from IC 2497, suggest either a highly obscured AGN with a novel geometry arranged to allow photoionization of the object but not the galaxy's own circumnuclear gas, or, as we argue, the first detection of a quasar light echo. In this case, either the luminosity of the central source has decreased dramatically or else the obscuration in the system has increased wit...

  5. MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756: Microlensing and a new time delay

    CERN Document Server

    Giannini, E; Wambsganß, J; Alsubai, K; Andersen, J M; Anguita, T; Bozza, V; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Novati, S Calchi; Damerdji, Y; Diehl, C; Dodds, P; Dominik, M; Elyiv, A; Fang, X; Jaimes, R Figuera; Finet, F; Gerner, T; Gu, S; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Juncher, D; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Liebig, C; Lund, M N; Lundkvist, M S; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Masi, G; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M; Proft, S; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Sahu, K; Schäfer, S; Schönebeck, F; Skottfelt, J; Snodgrass, C; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Vilela, C; Wertz, O; Zimmer, F

    2016-01-01

    We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. The quasar WFI2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of $\\Delta t= 7.6\\pm1.8$ days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consisten...

  6. MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756: microlensing and a new time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, E.; Schmidt, R. W.; Wambsganss, J.; Alsubai, K.; Andersen, J. M.; Anguita, T.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Dodds, P.; Dominik, M.; Elyiv, A.; Fang, X.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Gu, S.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Hundertmark, M.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Masi, G.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M.; Proft, S.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Sahu, K.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wertz, O.; Zimmer, F.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Methods: Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. Results: The quasar WFI 2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE 0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of Δt = (7.6 ± 1.8) days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI 2033-4723 and HE 0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consistent with previous studies. Based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory.

  7. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  8. Soft X-ray Variability of the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chulhee Kim

    2001-12-01

    We present the results from ROSAT observations of 3C273 in the soft X-ray band. The light variation of 3C273 was investigated for three different energy bands of soft, medium, and hard. The maximum variability with a factor of 2 for 551 dayswas confirmed at all three different bands. This appears to be a periodic variation within the period of roughly 6 months. However, the short-term or micro variation was not so distinct and the light variation of each band did not show any correlation between them. The hardness ratio for hard and soft bands shows irregular variation but there was no correlation between them. There is no distinct variation of the photon index in the case of simple power law model fitting. For power law + free absorption model fitting, the average photon index () is 2.08.

  9. An X-shooter composite of bright 1 < z < 2 quasars from UV to infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Selsing, Jonatan; Christensen, Lise; Krogager, Jens-Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectral templates are important both to QSO physics and for investigations that use QSOs as probes of intervening gas and dust. However, combinations of various QSO samples obtained at different times and with different instruments so as to expand a composite and to cover a wider rest frame wavelength region may create systematic effects, and the contribution from QSO hosts may contaminate the composite. We have constructed a composite spectrum from luminous blue QSOs at 1 < z < 2.1 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The observations with X-shooter simultaneously cover ultraviolet (UV) to near- infrared (NIR) light, which ensures that the composite spectrum covers the full rest-frame range from Ly$\\beta$ to 11350 $\\AA$ without any significant host contamination. Assuming a power-law continuum for the composite we find a spectral slope of $\\alpha_\\lambda$ = 1.70+/-0.01, which is steeper than previously found in the literature. We attribute the differences to ou...

  10. Multiwavelength observations of the γ-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Hovatta, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multifrequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and γ-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi γ-ray telescope, Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope and MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring programmes, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24 and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright γ-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4 ± 0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and γ-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the γ-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the value and direction of the linear polarization and the Faraday rotation measure. The value of the intrinsic brightness temperature of the core is above the equipartition state, while its value as a function of distance from the core is well approximated by the power law. Altogether these results show that the radio flaring activity of the quasar is accompanied by injection of relativistic particles and energy losses at the jet base, while S4 1030+61 has a stable, straight jet well described by standard conical jet theories.

  11. Obscuration of Quasars by Dust and the Reddening Mechanism in Parkes-Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, F J

    1998-01-01

    A majority of quasar surveys have been based on criteria which assume strong blue continua or a UV-excess. Any amount of dust along the line-of-sight is expected to drastically extinguish the optical/UV flux leading to a selection bias. Radio surveys however should suffer no bias against extinction by dust. Recently, a large complete sample of radio-selected quasars has become available (the `Parkes sample'). A majority of these sources exhibit optical--to--near-infrared continua that are exceedingly `red', very unlike those of quasars selected optically. The purpose of this thesis, broadly speaking, is to explore the problem of incompleteness in optical quasar surveys due to obscuration by dust, and to interpret the relatively `red' continua observed in the Parkes quasar sample. The first part of this thesis explores the observational consequences of an intervening (foreground) cosmological dust component, such as that located in galaxies and clusters. The second part examines the continuum properties of Par...

  12. Optical Monitoring of Quasars; 1, Variability

    CERN Document Server

    García, A; Jablonski, F J; Terlevich, R J

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of quasar variability from data collected during a photometric monitoring of 50 objects carried out at CNPq/Laboratorio Nacional de Astrofisica, Brazil, between March 1993 and July 1996. A distinctive feature of this survey is its photometric accuracy, ~ 0.02 V mag, achieved through differential photometry with CCD detectors, what allows the detection of faint levels of variability. We find that the relative variability, delta = sigma / L, observed in the V band is anti-correlated with both luminosity and redshift, although we have no means of discovering the dominant relation, given the strong coupling between luminosity and redshift for the objects in our sample.We introduce a model for the dependence of quasar variability on frequency that is consistent with multi-wavelength observations of the nuclear variability of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. We show that correcting the observed variability for this effect slightly increases the significance of the trends of variability with lumin...

  13. Do Quasar Ley Lines Really Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A.

    1982-10-01

    The hypothesis that the distribution of the quasars on the celestial sphere contains an unexpectedly large number of well-aligned triples is tested by applying, to the Cerro Tololo objective-prism sample, a shape-statistic which was originally developed to investigate whether neolithic standing stones were deliberately sited on ley lines. It is found that alignment in triples is not a conspicuous feature of the quasars in this sample. The sample does contain one well-aligned triple whose properties resemble those of two triples found earlier in a different field by Arp & Hazard, but the probability of this being a chance alignment is not low. The same authors have noted a total of four well-collimated triples which they consider remarkable, but an approximate probability calculation based on the shape-statistic indicates that they need not have a low probability of occurring by chance.

  14. An X-ray view of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P

    2013-01-01

    I present an overview of observational studies of quasars of all types, with particular emphasis on X-ray observational studies. The presentation is based on the most popularly accepted unified picture of quasars - collectively referred to as AGN (active galactic nuclei) in this review. Characteristics of X-ray spectra and X-ray variability obtained from various X-ray satellites over the last 5 decades have been presented and discussed. The contribution of AGN in understanding the cosmic X-ray background is discussed very briefly. Attempt has been made to provide up-to-date information; however, this is a vast subject and this presentation is not intended to be comprehensive.

  15. Large groups in the Chile-UK quasar survey

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, P R; Campusano, L E; Graham, M J; Newman, Peter R.; Clowes, Roger G.; Campusano, Luis E.; Graham, Matthew J.

    1997-01-01

    The Chile-UK quasar survey, a new-generation 140 deg^2 UVX survey to B = 20, is now \\sim 25 per cent complete. The catalogue currently contains 319 quasars and 93 emission line galaxies. Using the minimal-spanning tree method, we have independently confirmed the \\sim 200 h^-1 Mpc group of quasars at z \\simeq 1.3 discovered by Clowes & Campusano (1991). We have discovered a new \\sim 150 h^-1 Mpc group of 13 quasars at median z \\simeq 1.51. The null hypothesis of a uniform, random distribution is rejected at a level of significance of 0.003 for both groups.

  16. Physical properties of absorbers in high redshift quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies based on quasar emission lines suggest that quasar environments are typicaly metal rich, with metallicities near or above the solar value at even the highest observed redshifts. Due to the large uncertainties in- herent in emission line abundance analysis, we employ another technique, absorption line analysis, to corroborate the evidence gleaned so far in order to better constrain the de- tected metallicities. We are also interested in the physical nature of these absorbers, their relationship to quasar outows, and their role in quasar-host galaxy evolution.

  17. Mining for Dust in Type 1 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Hall, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ˜35,000 uniformly selected quasars with 0\\lt z≤slant 5.3 in order to better understand their intrinsic optical/ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions. Using rest-frame optical-UV photometry taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 7th data release, cross-matched to WISE in the mid-infrared, 2MASS and UKIDSS in the near-infrared, and GALEX in the UV, we isolate outliers in the color distribution and find them well described by an SMC-like reddening law. A hierarchical Bayesian model with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method was used to find distributions of power law indices and E(B-V) consistent with both the broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL samples. We find that, of the ugriz color-selected type 1 quasars in SDSS, 2.5% (13%) of the non-BAL (BAL) sample are consistent with E(B-V)\\gt 0.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)\\gt 0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index ({{α }λ }) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger high-ionization emission lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former pointing to differences in black hole mass and/or orientation.

  18. X-ray emission from red quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A dozen red quasars were observed with the Einstein Observatory in order to determine their X-ray properties. The observations show that for all these sources, the infrared-optical continuum is so steep that when extrapolated to higher frequencies, it passes orders of magnitude below the measured X-ray flux. The X-ray emission is better correlated with the radio than with the infrared flux, suggesting a connection between the two. By applying the synchrotron-self-Compton model to the data, it is found that the infrared-optical region has a size of 0.01 pc or more and a magnetic field more than 0.1 G, values considerably different than are found in the radio region. Unlike other quasars, the ionizing continuum is dominated by the X-ray emission. The peculiar line ratios seen in these objects can be understood with a photoionization model, provided that the photon to gas density ratio (ionization parameter) is an order of magnitude less than in typical quasars.

  19. Fe II Diagnostic Tools for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Verner, E; Verner, D; Johansson, S; Kallman, T; Gull, T R

    2004-01-01

    The enrichment of Fe, relative to alpha-elements such as O and Mg, represents a potential means to determine the age of quasars and probe the galaxy formation epoch. To explore how \\ion{Fe}{2} emission in quasars is linked to physical conditions and abundance, we have constructed a 830-level \\ion{Fe}{2} model atom and investigated through photoionization calculations how \\ion{Fe}{2} emission strengths depend on non-abundance factors. We have split \\ion{Fe}{2} emission into three major wavelength bands, \\ion{Fe}{2} (UV), \\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt1), and \\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt2), and explore how the \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Mg}{2}, \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt1) and \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt2) emission ratios depend upon hydrogen density and ionizing flux in broad-line regions (BLR's) of quasars. Our calculations show that: 1) similar \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Mg}{2} ratios can exist over a wide range of physical conditions; 2) the \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt1) and \\ion{Fe}{2}(UV)/\\ion{Fe}{2}(Opt2) ratios serve to constrain...

  20. Quasar Selection Based on Photometric Variability

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, C L; Ivezic, Z; Kochanek, C S; Gibson, R; Meisner, A; Kozlowski, S; Sesar, B; Becker, A C; de Vries, W

    2010-01-01

    We develop a method for separating quasars from other variable point sources using SDSS Stripe 82 light curve data for ~10,000 variable objects. To statistically describe quasar variability, we use a damped random walk model parametrized by a damping time scale, tau, and an asymptotic amplitude (structure function), SF_inf. With the aid of an SDSS spectroscopically confirmed quasar sample, we demonstrate that variability selection in typical extragalactic fields with low stellar density can deliver complete samples with reasonable purity (or efficiency, E). Compared to a selection method based solely on the slope of the structure function, the inclusion of the tau information boosts E from 60% to 75% while maintaining a highly complete sample (98%) even in the absence of color information. For a completeness of C=90%, E is boosted from 80% to 85%. Conversely, C improves from 90% to 97% while maintaining E=80% when imposing a lower limit on tau. With the aid of color selection, the purity can be further booste...

  1. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-al...

  2. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Y L; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y -X; Yuan, H -L; Song, Y -H; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M; Wu, H; Shen, S -Y; Shi, J -R; He, B -L; Lei, Y -J; Li, Y -B; Luo, A -L; Zhao, Y -H; Zhang, Hao-Tong

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in Large Sky Area Multi- Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes pilot survey and the first year regular survey. There are 3921 quasars identified with reliability, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the H{\\alpha}, H{\\beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photo- metric data with model fitting as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, and flags indicating the selec- tion methods, broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are available online. 28% of the 3921 quasars are selected with optical- infrared colours independently, indicating that the method is quite promising in completeness of quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the on-g...

  3. The Multi-Wavelength Quasar Survey Ⅲ.Quasars in Field 836

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bai; Yang Chen; Xiang-Tao He; Jiang-Hua Wu; Qing-Kang Li; Richard F.Green; Wolfgang Voges

    2007-01-01

    This is the third Paper in a series connected with our Multiwavelength Quasar Survey.The survey is aimed to provide a quasar sample more complete than any previous survey by using a combined selection technique to reduce selection effects.we present the observational results for the X-ray candidates in field f836.We found 15 X-ray AGNs in this field of which eight are new discoveries.The X-ray data and optical spectra of these AGNs are given.We give the X-ray candidate selection criteria.which proved to be highly efficient in isolating X-ray AGNs.

  4. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    OpenAIRE

    Xinguang Cao; Hiroyuki Ito

    2011-01-01

    Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours) for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of t...

  5. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h˜ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h˜ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5-2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  6. Doubly Imaged Quasar SDSS J1515+1511: Time Delay and Lensing Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalyapin, Vyacheslav N.; Goicoechea, Luis J.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze new optical observations of the gravitational lens system SDSS J1515+1511. These include a 2.6-year photometric monitoring with the Liverpool Telescope (LT) in the r band, as well as a spectroscopic follow-up with the LT and the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). Our r-band LT light curves cover a quiescent microlensing period of the doubly imaged quasar at {z}{{s}} = 2.049, which permits us to robustly estimate the time delay between the two images A and B: 211 ± 5 days (1σ confidence interval; A is leading). Unfortunately, the main lensing galaxy (G1) is so faint and close to the bright quasar that it is not feasible to accurately extract its spectrum through the GTC data. However, assuming the putative redshift {z}{{G}1} = 0.742, the GTC and LT spectra of the distant quasar are used to discuss the macrolens magnification, and the extinction and microlensing effects in G1. The new constraints on the time delay and macrolens magnification ratio essentially do not change previous findings on the mass scale of G1 and external shear, while the redshift of the lensing mass is found to be consistent with the assumed value of {z}{{G}1}. This is clear evidence that G1 is indeed located at {z}{{G}1} = 0.742. From the GTC data, we also obtain the redshift of two additional objects (the secondary galaxy G2 and a new absorption system) and discuss their possible roles in the lens scenario.

  7. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a promine...

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: tenth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Éric; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Borde, Arnaud; Brinkmann, Jon; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Cook, Benjamin A; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Ho, Shirley; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marchante, Moses; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew; Riffel, Rogério; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G

    2013-01-01

    We present the Data Release 10 Quasar (DR10Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the first 2.5 years of the survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra. The catalog also includes known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 166,583 quasars (74,454 are new discoveries since SDSS-DR9) detected over 6,373 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (117,668) is $\\sim$5 times greater than the number of $z>2.15$ quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII, MgII). The catalog identifies 16,461 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-...

  9. Searching for the Physical Drivers of Eigenvector-1 From Quasars to Nano-Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P

    2002-01-01

    We point out an analogy between two accreting white dwarfs with jets (CH Cyg and MWC 560) and powerful quasars. In spite of the enormous difference in the mass of the central object (a factor about 10^7), the emission lines are strikingly similar to those of I Zw1 (the prototype "Narrow Line Seyfert 1" nucleus whose spectrum is widely used as an FeII template for almost all quasars). The spectral similarity give us the unique possibility to consider the optical Eigenvector-1 diagram using objects less massive by a factor of millions. Our results reinforce the interpretation of the "Eigenvector-1 correlations" found for low redshift quasars as driven mainly by the source luminosity to central compact object mass ratio(L/M). The accreting white dwarfs CH Cyg and MWC 560, their jets and emission lines, may well represent the low energy, non relativistic end of the accretion phenomena, which encompass the most powerful quasars and the microquasars. The remarkable similarities suggest that they may be legitimately...

  10. Serendipitous discovery of an extended X-ray jet without a radio counterpart in a high-redshift quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Simionescu, A; Ichinohe, Y; Cheung, C C; Jamrozy, M; Siemiginowska, A; Hagino, K; Gandhi, P; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z=2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 10-12", corresponding to a projected length of 80-100 kpc, with a possible hot spot as far as 35" from the quasar. The archival high resolution VLA maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.4" away from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the $\\propto (1+z)^{4}$ amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias which must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet pr...

  11. Multi-wavelength observations of the gamma-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchenko, E V; Hovatta, T; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multi-frequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and gamma-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi gamma-ray telescope, OVRO 40-m telescope and MOJAVE VLBA monitoring programs, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24, and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright gamma-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4+-0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and gamma-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the gamma-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the val...

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Quasars at z~3 and Estimates of Their Supermassive Black Hole Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Yuriko; Minowa, Yosuke; Morokuma, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Minezaki, Takeo; Oi, Nagisa; Nagao, Tohru; Kawatatu, Nozomu; Matsuoka, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of new infrared spectroscopic observations of 37 quasars at z~3, selected based on the optical r'-band magnitude and the availability of nearby bright stars for future imaging follow-up with Adaptive Optics system. The supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses (M_BH) were successfully estimated in 28 out of 37 observed objects from the combination of the H_beta emission linewidth and continuum luminosity at rest-frame 5100A. Comparing these results with those from previous studies of quasars with similar redshift, our sample exhibited slightly lower (~ -0.11 dex in median) Eddington ratios; and, the SMBH masses are slightly (~ 0.38 dex in median) higher. The SMBH growth time, t_grow, was calculated by dividing the estimated SMBH mass by the mass accretion rate measured using optical luminosity. We found, given reasonable assumptions, that t_grow was smaller than the age of the universe at the redshift of individual quasars for a large fraction of observed sources, suggesting that the SMBHs ...

  13. Quasar Variability Measurements With SDSS Repeated Imaging and POSS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Juric, M; Anderson, S; Hall, P B; Richards, G T; Rockosi, C M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Turner, E L; Knapp, G R; Gunn, J E; Schlegel, D J; Strauss, M A; Schneider, D P

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the properties of quasar variability using repeated SDSS imaging data in five UV-to-far red photometric bands, accurate to 0.02 mag, for 13,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The observed time lags span the range from 3 hours to over 3 years, and constrain the quasar variability for rest-frame time lags of up to two years, and at rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 Ang. to 6000 Ang. We demonstrate that 66,000 SDSS measurements of magnitude differences can be described within the measurement noise by a simple function of only three free parameters. The addition of POSS data constrains the long-term behavior of quasar variability and provides evidence for a turn-over in the structure function. This turn-over indicates that the characteristic time scale for optical variability of quasars is of the order 1 year.

  14. Luminous, High-z, Type-2 Quasars are Still Missing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rivera, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    A simple unified model suggests that there should be roughly equal numbers of type-1 (unobscured) and type 2 (obscured) quasars. However, we argue that the expected population of luminous, high-z, type-2 quasars are still missing. While large numbers of type-2 AGNs have now been identified (both via spectroscopy and through color-based arguments in the optical, IR, and X-ray), the vast majority of these are low-luminosity objects at zmodel" predict similar numbers of type-1 and type-2 quasars, this conspicuous lack of luminous type-2 quasars at high-redshift constitutes a major unsolved problem. To uncover these missing type-2 quasars, we explore a candidate selection algorithm that utilizes the sky area of AllWISE, the depth/resolution of large-area Spitzer-IRAC surveys, and optical data from the SDSS.

  15. Simple Stellar Population Modeling of Low S/N Galaxy Spectra and Quasar Host Galaxy Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mosby, Gregory; Hooper, Eric; Wolf, Marsha; Sheinis, Andrew; Richards, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on their host galaxies it is important to study the hosts when the SMBH is near its peak activity. A method to investigate the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars is to obtain optical spectra at positions offset from the nucleus where the relative contribution of the quasar and host are comparable. However, at these extended radii the galaxy surface brightness is often low (20-22 mag per arcsec$^{2}$) and the resulting spectrum might have such low S/N that it hinders analysis with standard stellar population modeling techniques. To address this problem we have developed a method that can recover galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) from rest frame optical spectra with S/N $\\sim$ 5~\\AA$^{-1}$. This method uses the statistical technique diffusion k-means to tailor the stellar population modeling basis set. Our diffusion k-means minimal basis set, composed of 4 broad age bins, is successful in recovering a range of galaxy SFHs. Additionally, using an...

  16. A Characteristic Division Between the Fueling of Quasars and Seyferts: Five Simple Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2008-01-01

    Given the existence of the M_BH-sigma relation, models of self-regulated black hole (BH) growth require both a fuel supply and growth of the host bulge to deepen the potential, or else the system will either starve or self-regulate without sustained activity. This suggests that bright quasars must be triggered in major mergers: a large fraction of the galaxy must be converted to new bulge mass in a dynamical time or less. Low-luminosity AGN, in contrast, require little bulge growth and small gas supplies, and could be triggered in more common non-merger events. This predicts a transition to merger-induced fueling around the traditional quasar-Seyfert luminosity divide (growth of BH masses above/below 10^7 M_sun). We compile observations to test several predictions of such a division, including: (1) A transition to bulge-dominated hosts. (2) A transition between 'pseudobulges' and 'classical' bulges hosting the remnant BHs: pseudobulges are formed in secular processes and minor mergers, whereas classical bulge...

  17. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Low-redshift Damped Lyman-alpha Quasar Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, M R; Kulkarni, V P; Takamiya, M; Chun, Mark R.; Gharanfoli, Soheila; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Takamiya, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a high angular resolution near-infrared imaging study of the fields of 6 quasars with 7 strong absorption line systems at z < 0.5, using the Hokupa'a adaptive optics system and the QUIRC near-infrared camera on the Gemini-North telescope. These absorption systems include 4 classical damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs), 2 sub-DLAs, and one Lyman-limit system. Images were obtained in the H or K' filters with FWHM between 0.2"-0.5" with the goal of detecting the absorbing galaxies and identifying their morphologies. Features are seen at projected separations of 0.5"-16.0" from the quasars and all of the fields show features at less than 2" separation. We find candidate absorbers in all of the seven systems. With the assumption that some of these are associated with the absorbers, the absorbers are low luminosity < 0.1 L*_H or L*_K; we do not find any large bright candidate absorbers in any of our fields. Some fields show compact features that are too faint for quantitative morphology, b...

  18. Quasars Probing Quasars VIII. The Physical Properties of the Cool Circumgalactic medium Surrounding z ~ 2-3 Massive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Marie Wingyee; Hennawi, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the physical properties of the cool T ~ 10^4 K circumgalactic medium surrounding z ~ 2-3 quasar host galaxies, which are predicted to evolve into present day massive ellipticals. Using a statistical sample of 14 quasar pairs with projected separation 100 cm^-3 and subparsec scale gas clumps.

  19. Clustering Analyses of 300,000 Photometrically Classified Quasars--I. Luminosity and Redshift Evolution in Quasar Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, A D; Nichol, R C; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Bahcall, N A; Myers, Adam D.; Brunner, Robert J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2006-01-01

    Using ~300,000 photometrically classified quasars, by far the largest quasar sample ever used for such analyses, we study the redshift and luminosity evolution of quasar clustering on scales of ~50 kpc/h to ~20 Mpc/h from redshifts of z~0.75 to z~2.28. We parameterize our clustering amplitudes using realistic dark matter models, and find that a LCDM power spectrum provides a superb fit to our data with a redshift-averaged quasar bias of b_Q = 2.41+/-0.08 ($P_{99.6% using our data set alone, increasing to >99.9999% if stellar contamination is not explicitly parameterized. We measure the quasar classification efficiency across our full sample as a = 95.6 +/- ^{4.4}_{1.9}%, a star-quasar separation comparable with the star-galaxy separation in many photometric studies of galaxy clustering. We derive the mean mass of the dark matter halos hosting quasars as MDMH=(5.2+/-0.6)x10^{12} M_solar/h. At z~1.9 we find a $1.5\\sigma$ deviation from luminosity-independent quasar clustering; this suggests that increasing our ...

  20. Simultaneous observations of the quasar 3C 273 with INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and RXTE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Beckmann, V.; Bourban, G.

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRAL has observed the bright quasar 3C 273 on 3 epochs in January 2003 as one of the first observations of the open programme. The observation on January 5 was simultaneous with RXTE and XMM-Newton observations. We present here a first analysis of the continuum emission as observed by these 3...... satellites in the band from similar or equal to3 keV to similar or equal to500 keV. The continuum spectral energy distribution of 3C 273 was observed to be weak and steep in the high energies during this campaign. We present the actual status of the cross calibrations between the instruments on the three...

  1. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561 A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar II Results for the second observing season

    CERN Document Server

    Colley, W N; Abajas, C; Alcalde, D; Aslan, Z; Bikmaev, I F; Chavushyan, V H; Chinarro, L; Cournoyer, J P; Crowe, R; Dudinov, V; Kathinka, A; Evans, D; Jeon, Y B; Goicoechea, L J; Golbasi, O; Khamitov, I; Kjernsmo, K; Lee, H J; Lee, J; Lee, K W; Lee, M G; López-Cruz, O; Mediavilla, E; Moffatt, A F J; Mujica, R; Ullán, M; Oscoz, A; Park, M G; Purves, N; Sakhibullin, N A; Sinelnikov, I; Stabell, R; Stockton, A; Teuber, J; Thompson, R; Woo, H S; Zheleznyak, A T; Colley, Wesley N.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Abajas, Cristina; Alcalde, David; Aslan, Zeki; Bikmaev, Ilfan; Chavushyan, Vahram; Chinarro, Luis; Cournoyer, Jean-Philippe; Crowe, Richard; Dudinov, Vladimir; Kathinka, Anna; Evans, Dalland; Jeon, Young-Beom; Goicoechea, Luis J.; Golbasi, Orhan; Khamitov, Irek; Kjernsmo, Kjetil; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jonghwan; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Mediavilla, Evencio; Moffatt, Anthony F.J.; Mujica, Raul; Ullan, Aurora M.; Oscoz, Alexander; Park, Myeong-Gu; Purves, Norman; Sakhibullin, Nail; Sinelnikov, Igor; Stabell, Rolf; Stockton, Alan; Teuber, Jan; Thompson, Roy; Woo, Hwa-Sung

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observing campaign in March 2001 to monitor the brightness of the later arriving Q0957+561 B image in order to compare with the previously published brightness observations of the (first arriving) A image. The 12 participating observatories provided 3543 image frames which we have analyzed for brightness fluctuations. From our classical methods for time delay determination, we find a 417.09 +/- 0.07 day time delay which should be free of effects due to incomplete sampling. During the campaign period, the quasar brightness was relatively constant and only small fluctuations were found; we compare the structure function for the new data with structure function estimates for the 1995--6 epoch, and show that the structure function is statistically non-stationary. We also examine the data for any evidence of correlated fluctuations at zero lag. We discuss the limits to our ability to measure the cosmological time delay if the quasar's emitting surface is time resolved, as seems likely.

  2. A new model for quasar absorption clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G. (Academy of Sciences of USSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. of Applied Mathematics); Muecket, J.P.; Mueller, V. (Academy of Sciences of GDR, Potsdam (German Democratic Republic). Central Inst. for Astrophysics)

    1990-09-15

    A local model for intervening absorption clouds in quasar spectra is discussed. At the boundary of cold clouds in the hot intergalactic gas a non-linear temperature profile results from electron heat conductivity and radiative energy losses both depending on ionization rates. This transition region causes the excitation of a wide range of ionization levels in the heavy elements of the gas. The predicted column densities along the line-of-sight are comparable with data from identified metal absorption systems at high redshifts. (author).

  3. Parsec-scale radio structures in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, G.; Paragi, Z.; Gurvits, L.

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) con su nueva extensión para el radio telescopio orbital, VSOP/HALCA, ofrece una incomparable resolución angular alcanzando escalas de milisegundos y submilisegundos de arco a longitudes de onda de centímetros. En este trabajo presentamos observaciones y análisis de estructuras en radio, en escalas de parsec, para 3 radio fuentes extragalácticas de la muestra de VSOP Survey y 1 quasar, 1442+101, del proyecto `VSOP High Redshift'.

  4. Discovery of a 2 Kpc Binary Quasar

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, G. A.; Junkkarinen, V.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, R. D.; Hamann, F.; Lyons, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    LBQS 0103$-$2753 is a binary quasar with a separation of only 0.3 arcsec. The projected spacing of 2.3 kpc at the distance of the source (z = 0.848) is much smaller than that of any other known binary QSO. The binary nature is demonstrated by the very different spectra of the two components and the low probability of a chance pairing. LBQS 0103$-$2753 presumably is a galaxy merger with a small physical separation between the two supermassive black holes. Such objects may provide important con...

  5. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255 II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    CERN Document Server

    Saturni, F G; Vagnetti, F; Perna, M; Dadina, M

    2015-01-01

    The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of the quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. In this study, we aim at measuring the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at $z=3.911$ through reverberation mapping, and at updating and extending the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Thanks to 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations, we perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve, in order to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of $\\sim 900$ rest-frame days for both Si IV and ...

  6. CO(1-0) in z>2 Quasar Host Galaxies: No Evidence for Extended Molecular Gas Reservoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Riechers, Dominik A; Maddalena, Ronald J; Hodge, Jacqueline; Harris, Andrew I; Baker, Andrew J; Walter, Fabian; Wagg, Jeff; Bout, Paul A Vanden; Weiss, Axel; Sharon, Chelsea E

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission in the strongly lensed high-redshift quasars IRAS F10214+4724 (z=2.286), the Cloverleaf (z=2.558), RX J0911+0551 (z=2.796), SMM J04135+10277 (z=2.846), and MG 0751+2716 (z=3.200), using the Expanded Very Large Array and the Green Bank Telescope. We report lensing-corrected CO(1-0) line luminosities of L'(CO) = 0.34-18.4 x 10^10 K km/s pc^2 and total molecular gas masses of M(H2) = 0.27-14.7 x 10^10 Msun for the sources in our sample. Based on CO line ratios relative to previously reported observations in J>=3 rotational transitions and line excitation modeling, we find that the CO(1-0) line strengths in our targets are consistent with single, highly-excited gas components with constant brightness temperature up to mid-J levels. We thus do not find any evidence for luminous extended, low excitation, low surface brightness molecular gas components. These properties are comparable to those found in z>4 quasars with existing CO(1-0) observations. These findings stand in...

  7. Comparing different indicators of quasar orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Gorkom, Kyle J; Rauch, Andreas P; Gobeille, Doug B

    2015-01-01

    Radio core dominance, the rest-frame ratio of core to lobe luminosity, has been widely used as a measure of Doppler boosting of a quasar's radio jets and hence of the inclination of the central engine's spin axis to the line of sight. However, the use of the radio lobe luminosity in the denominator (essentially to try and factor out the intrinsic power of the central engine) has been criticized and other proxies for the intrinsic engine power have been proposed. These include the optical continuum luminosity, and the luminosity of the narrow-line region. Each is plausible, but so far none has been shown to be clearly better than the others. In this paper we evaluate four different measures of core dominance using a new sample of 126 radio loud quasars, carefully selected to be as free as possible of orientation bias, together with high quality VLA images and optical spectra from the SDSS. We find that normalizing the radio core luminosity by the optical continuum luminosity yields a demonstrably superior orie...

  8. Quantitative Interpretation of Quasar Microlensing Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2004-01-01

    We develop a general method for analyzing the light curves of microlensed quasars and apply it to the OGLE light curves of the four-image lens Q2237+0305. We simultaneously estimate the effective source velocity, the average stellar mass, the stellar mass function, and the size and structure of the quasar accretion disk. The light curves imply an effective source plane velocity of 10200 km/s ) =0.037h^2 solar masses (0.0059h^2 /Msun < 0.20h^2). We were unable to distinguish a Salpeter mass function from one in which all stars had the same mass, but we do find a strong lower bound of 50% on the fraction of the surface mass density represented by the microlenses. Our models favor a standard thin accretion disk model as the source structure over a simple Gaussian source. For a face-on, thin disk radiating as a black body with temperature profile T_s ~ R^(-3/4), the radius r_s where the temperature matches the filter pass band (2000 Angstroms or T_s(r_s)=70000K) is (1.4 x 10^15)/h cm < r_s < (4.5 x 10^15...

  9. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as following: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's M_sigma mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hyper velocity stars out of their hosts, giving ris...

  10. The First High Redshift Quasar from Pan-STARRS

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, Eric; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Chambers, Ken; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Price, Paul; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of the first high redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i dropoutout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Widefield InfraRed Camera (SWIRC) at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph (TWIN) at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 x 10^47 erg/s and a black hole mass of 6.9 x 10^9 solar masses. It is a Broad Absorption Line quasar with a prominent Ly-beta peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than a hundred i dropout quasars, and could potentially find more than 10...

  11. Similarity of ionized gas nebulae around unobscured and obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guilin; Greene, Jenny E

    2014-01-01

    Quasar feedback is suspected to play a key role in the evolution of massive galaxies, by removing or reheating gas in quasar host galaxies and thus limiting the amount of star formation. In this paper we continue our investigation of quasar-driven winds on galaxy-wide scales. We conduct Gemini Integral Field Unit spectroscopy of a sample of luminous unobscured (type 1) quasars, to determine the morphology and kinematics of ionized gas around these objects, predominantly via observations of the [O III]5007 emission line. We find that ionized gas nebulae extend out to ~13 kpc from the quasar, that they are smooth and round, and that their kinematics are inconsistent with gas in dynamical equilibrium with the host galaxy. The observed morphological and kinematic properties are strikingly similar to those of ionized gas around obscured (type 2) quasars with matched [O III] luminosity, with marginal evidence that nebulae around unobscured quasars are slightly more compact. Therefore in samples of obscured and unob...

  12. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  13. Measuring Quasar Variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, E; Chambers, K C; Green, P J; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Marshall, P J; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Rix, H -W; Chlafly, E F S; Tonry, J L; Walter, F

    2014-01-01

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 10,000 square degree surveys. We use 100,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal time scales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01 to 10 years. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS dataset can efficiently distinguish between quasars and non-varying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in datasets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in del...

  14. Quasar feedback at the peak of the galaxy formation epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia; Liu, Guilin; Greene, Jenny; Strauss, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Feedback from accreting supermassive black holes is now a standard ingredient in galaxy formation models. It is seen as necessary for limiting the maximal masses of galaxies and for establishing the black- hole / bulge correlations. Using Gemini GMOS, we demonstrated that powerful ionized gas winds are a ubiquitous feature in luminous obscured z=0.5 quasars. We now propose to extend this discovery to the epoch of peak galaxy formation and quasar activity - to the era at which feedback was most prominent and the galaxy / black hole correlations were established. We request 4.5 hours of Gemini-NIFS LGS adaptive- optics observations of an extremely luminous moderately obscured quasar at z=2.3 to map the morphology and kinematics of the ionized gas and to determine whether it exhibits the signs of black hole feedback in the form of an unbound ionized gas outflow. We will observe H(beta) and [OIII](lambda)5007Ain the H-band and H(alpha) and [NII](lambda)(lambda)6548,6583Ain the K-band on sub-galactic and galaxy-wide scales (spatial resolution 0.8 kpc, field of view 24 kpc). Obscured quasars likely constitute the majority of the quasar population and may represent the relatively early enshrouded phase of the black hole growth; thus, luminous obscured quasars are the most likely sites of quasar feedback, in agreement with our findings at low redshift.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: Twelfth data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A.; Albareti, Franco D.; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Niel Brandt, W.; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G.; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H.; Zhu, Liu

    2017-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi [z = 2] 2.15 (184 101, of which 167 742 are new discoveries) is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z > 2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (C iv, C iii], Mg ii). The catalog identifies 29 580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and Palomar Transient Factory multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra, covering the wavelength region 3600-10 500 Å at a spectral resolution in the range 1300 < R < 2500, can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server. We also provide a supplemental list of an additional 4841 quasars that have been identified serendipitously outside of the superset defined to derive the main quasar catalog.

  16. Consecutive Bright Pulses in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Palfreyman, Jim L; Dickey, John M; Young, Timothy G; Hotan, Claire E; 10.1088/2041-8205/735/1/L17

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  17. How do optically-similar quasars look elsewhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Ma, Bin; Brotherton, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    As too many spectroscopic and physical parameters complicates the study of quasars, reducing the number of parameters can help to isolate many problems in general. Using spectral principal component analysis, we selected from SDSS a pilot sample of quasars with virtually identical spectral features in H-beta region. We found that they also show very similar spectral features outside the H-beta region in the optical band. We also explore their properties in other available wavelength bands and plan to study the accretion, ionization, and possibly geometry of quasars using this controlled sample.

  18. Understanding the IGM Through the Use of a Lensed Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panurach, Teresa; O'Dowd, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Quasars are among the brightest objects in the universe. In rare gravitationally lensed quasars, their light is split and travels along multiple paths through an intervening lensing galaxy. The light that follows these different paths encounters various parts of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and may show different absorption features, indicating the varying composition of the IGM. By analyzing spectra from a gravitationally lensed quasar, B1422+231, observed by the Gemini North Telescope, we compare the absorption features identified in the lensed images to form a small-scale structure of the IGM.

  19. A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis

    2005-12-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

  20. Extreme Brightness Temperatures and Refractive Substructure in 3C273 with RadioAstron

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D; Gwinn, Carl R; Gurvits, Leonid I; Narayan, Ramesh; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Jauncey, David L; Voitsik, Peter A; Anderson, James M; Sokolovsky, Kirill V; Lisakov, Mikhail M

    2016-01-01

    Earth-space interferometry with RadioAstron provides the highest direct angular resolution ever achieved in astronomy at any wavelength. RadioAstron detections of the classic quasar 3C273 on interferometric baselines up to 171,000 km suggest brightness temperatures exceeding expected limits from the "inverse-Compton catastrophe" by two orders of magnitude. We show that at 18 cm, these estimates most probably arise from refractive substructure introduced by scattering in the interstellar medium. We use the scattering properties to estimate an intrinsic brightness temperature of 7*10^12 K, which is consistent with expected theoretical limits, but which is ~15 times lower than estimates that neglect substructure. At 6 cm, the substructure influences the measured values appreciably but gives an estimated brightness temperature that is comparable to models that do not account for the substructure. At 1.3 cm, the substructure does not affect the extremely high inferred brightness temperatures, in excess of 10^13 K....

  1. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  2. The Co-Formation of Spheroids and Quasars Traced in their Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, P F; Hernquist, L; Coil, A L; Myers, A D; Cox, T J; Spergel, D N; Hopkins, Philip F.; Lidz, Adam; Hernquist, Lars; Coil, Alison L.; Myers, Adam D.; Cox, Thomas J.; Spergel, David N.

    2006-01-01

    We compare observed clustering of quasars and galaxies as a function of redshift, mass, luminosity, & color/morphology, to constrain models of quasar fueling and spheroid-BH co-evolution. High redshift quasars are shown to be drawn from progenitors of local early-type galaxies, with the characteristic quasar luminosity L* reflecting a characteristic mass of 'active' BH/host populations at each redshift. Evolving observed high-z quasar clustering to z=0 predicts a trend of clustering in 'quasar remnants' as a function of stellar mass identical to that observed for early-types. However, quasar clustering does not simply reflect observed early (or late)-type populations; at each redshift, quasars cluster as an 'intermediate' population. Comparing with the age of elliptical stellar populations reveals that this 'intermediate' population represents those ellipticals undergoing or terminating their final significant star formation at each epoch. Assuming that quasar triggering is associated with the formation/t...

  3. The Doppler Effect: A Consideration of Quasar Redshifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kurtiss J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information on the calculation of the redshift to blueshift ratio introduced by the transverse Doppler effect at relativistic speeds. Indicates that this shift should be mentioned in discussions of whether quasars are "local" rather than "cosmological" objects. (GS)

  4. 30 GHz monitoring of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Ceglowski, Maciej; Pazderska, Bogna; Gawronski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Broad absorption line (BAL) quasars have been studied for over thirty years. Yet it is still unclear why and when we observe broad absorption lines in quasars. Is this phenomenon caused by geometry or is it connected with the evolution process? Variability of the BAL quasars, if present, can give us information about their orientation, namely it can indicate whether they are oriented more pole-on. Using the Torun 32-metre dish equipped with the One Centimetre Receiver Array (OCRA) we have started a monitoring campaign of a sample of compact radio-loud BAL quasars. This 30 GHz variability monitoring program supplements the high-resolution interferometric observations of these objects we have carried out with the EVN and VLBA.

  5. Distribution of Doppler Redshifts of Associated Absorbers of SDSS Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cai-Juan Pan; Zhi-Fu Chen

    2013-12-01

    Doppler redshifts of a sample of Mg II associated absorbers of SDSS DR7 quasars are analysed. We find that there might be three Gaussian components in the distribution of the Doppler redshift. The first Gaussian component, with the peak being located at Dopp = -0.0074, probably arises from absorbers with outflow histories observed in the direction close to jets of quasars. The second Gaussian component, with the peak being located at Dopp = -0.0017, possibly arises from absorbers with outflow histories observed in the direction far away from jets of quasars. Whereas, the third Gaussian component, with the peak being located at Dopp = -0.0004, might arise from the random motion of absorbers with respect to quasars.

  6. A Survey for Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Shelley R.

    1995-12-01

    I have been conducting a deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars and will present information on how my candidates, which are awaiting spectroscopic confirmation, have been selected. The survey involves direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.2 5 candidates have large r - i values and g - r values near zero. Before beginning the survey, test observations using this selection method were made of two known quasars with redshifts of 4.5 and 4.7. The quasars were successfully relocated by the technique and several candidates, which will also be observed for spectroscopic confirmation, were selected from those two fields. To date, 13 square degrees have been surveyed.

  7. Measuring the dark energy with quasar clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Calvão, M O; Waga, I

    2002-01-01

    We show, through Monte Carlo simulations, that the Alcock-Pazynski test, as applied to quasar clustering, is a powerful tool to probe the cosmological density and equation of state parameters, Omega_{m0}, Omega_{x0} and w. By taking into account peculiar velocity corrections to the correlation function we obtain, for the Two-Degree Field QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ), the predicted 1\\sigma and 2\\sigma confidence contours. It turns out that the test is competitive with future supernova and galaxy number count ones, besides being complementary to them, for fixed curvature. In particular, we find out that it is especially sensitive to the difference Omega_{m0}-Omega_{Lambda 0}, thus being ideal to combine with CMB results.

  8. Quasar Absorption Lines and SDSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Emileigh Suzanne; Scott, Jennifer E.; Oldak, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low redshift quasars (0.06 COS that lie within the footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use both the SDSS DR12 galaxy photometric data, including photometric redshifts, and the measured properties of the absorbers along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and the circumgalactic medium of galaxies to assign the most probable galaxy matches for each absorber in the sample, using estimated galaxy luminosities and virial radii as a discriminator. We show that the scheme can recover known galaxy-absorber matches found from spectroscopic data and thus provides a method for identifying likely pairs in photometric data sets as well as targets for spectroscopic follow up.

  9. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  10. Quasar absorption spectra and the structure of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of the spacing between absorption-line systems in quasar spectra and comparison against deep optical survey data for the separation between superclusters of galaxies indicates that the absorption originates in the superclusters. Supported by analogous data on the absorbing gas in the galactic and Magellanic Cloud halos, this inference sharpens theoretical conclusions as to the properties of superclusters. The problem of the unidentified quasar absorption lines is discussed.

  11. From local active galactic nuclei to early quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.

    1985-09-15

    To close the gap between the local luminosity function of the optically selected active galactic nuclei and the population properties of distant (z< or approx. =2) quasars, we propose a model of differential luminosity evolution which is astrophysically based and contains a minimal number of free parameters. We discuss the advantages of the model and its predictions, and indicate how to extend it for z > 2 to cover the beginning of the quasar era.

  12. Correlations between different line-forming regions in quasar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Hamann, Fred; Lundgren, Britt

    2017-01-01

    The early stage of massive galaxy evolution can involve outflows driven by a starburst or a central quasar plus cold mode accretion (infall) adding to the mass build-up in the galaxies. We are using SDSS-BOSS DR12 database to study the nature of infall and outflows in quasar environments by examining the relationships of their narrow absorption lines (NALs) at positive and negative velocity shifts to other quasar properties such as their broad absorption line (BAL) outflows, emission line characteristics, radio-loudness, and reddening by dust. We also test for extreme high-velocity NAL outflows (with speeds 0.1-0.2c) based on relationships to low-speed NALs and quasar properties, and we perform detailed analyses of particular cases of rich multi-component NAL complexes that might result from high-speed quasar outflows shredding and dispersing interstellar clouds in the host galaxies. Our results show that low-velocity NALs and rich NAL complexes correlate strongly with BALs, suggesting a physical relationship. Infalling systems are less common in quasars with BALs, suggesting that BAL outflows can halt or disrupt gas accretion. The extreme high-velocity NALs (at 0.1-0.2c) show a weak relationship to BALs and a strong dependence on low-velocity NALs, indicating that a significant fraction of these systems is ejected from the quasars (and are *not* unrelated intervening clouds). We find no correlations between radio flux and low-velocity NALs, infalling systems, or rich complexes, which indicates that none of these features are closely tied to quasar radio properties. We analyze the relationship of the N V/C IV line strengths (a possible abundance/metallicity probe) in emission versus absorption lines and find no correlation between them.

  13. Does circular polarisation reveal the rotation of quasar engines?

    OpenAIRE

    Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2002-01-01

    Many radio sources like quasars, blazars, radio galaxies, and micro-quasars exhibit circular polarisation (CP) with surprising temporal persistent handedness. As a possible explanation we propose that the CP is due to Faraday conversion (FC) of linear polarisation (LP) synchrotron light which propagates along a line-of-sight (LOS) through twisted magnetic fields. The rotational nature of accretion flows onto black holes naturally generates the required magnetic twist in the emission region, i...

  14. The far-infrared emission of the radio-loud quasar 3C318

    CERN Document Server

    Podigachoski, P; Peletier, R F; Steendam, S

    2016-01-01

    3C318, a radio-loud quasar at z=1.574, is a subgalactic-sized radio source, and a good test-bed for the interplay between black hole and galaxy growth in the high-z Universe. Based on its IRAS, ISO, and SCUBA detections, it has long been considered as one of the most intrinsically luminous (L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ > 10$^{13}$ L$_{\\odot}$) infrared sources in the Universe. Recent far-infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory reveal that most of the flux associated with 3C318 measured with earlier instruments in fact comes from a bright nearby source. Optical imaging and spectroscopy show that this infrared-bright source is a strongly star-forming pair of interacting galaxies at z=0.35. Adding existing Spitzer and SDSS photometry, we perform a spectral energy distribution analysis of the pair, and find that it has a combined infrared luminosity of L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ = 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{12}$ L$_{\\odot}$, comparable to other intermediate-redshift ultra-luminous infrared galaxies studied with Herschel. Isolating ...

  15. Parsec-scale jet properties of the gamma-ray quasar 3C 286

    CERN Document Server

    An, T; Zhao, W; Mohan, P; Cheng, X -P; Cui, Y -Z; Zhang, Z -L

    2016-01-01

    The quasar 3C~286 is one of two compact steep spectrum sources detected by the {\\it Fermi}/LAT. Here, we investigate the radio properties of the parsec(pc)-scale jet and its (possible) association with the $\\gamma$-ray emission in 3C~286. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images at various frequencies reveal a one-sided core--jet structure extending to the southwest at a projected distance of $\\sim$1 kpc. The component at the jet base showing an inverted spectrum is identified as the core, with a mean brightness temperature of $2.8\\times 10^{9}$~K. The jet bends at about 600 pc (in projection) away from the core, from a position angle of $-135^\\circ$ to $-115^\\circ$. Based on the available VLBI data, we inferred the proper motion speed of the inner jet as $0.013 \\pm 0.011$ mas yr$^{-1}$ ($\\beta_{\\rm app} = 0.6 \\pm 0.5$), corresponding to a jet speed of about $0.5\\,c$ at an inclination angle of $48^\\circ$ between the jet and the line of sight of the observer. The brightness temperature, jet speed an...

  16. A New Model for Dark Matter Halos Hosting Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-01-01

    A new model for quasar-hosting dark matter halos, meeting two physical conditions, is put forth. First, significant interactions are taken into consideration to trigger quasar activities. Second, satellites in very massive halos at low redshift are removed from consideration, due to their deficiency of cold gas. We analyze the {\\em Millennium Simulation} to find halos that meet these two conditions and simultaneously match two-point auto-correlation functions of quasars and cross-correlation functions between quasars and galaxies at $z=0.5-3.2$. %The found halos have some distinct properties worth noting. The masses of found quasar hosts decrease with decreasing redshift, with the mass thresholds being $[(2-5)\\times 10^{12}, (2-5)\\times 10^{11}, (1-3)\\times 10^{11}]\\msun$ for median luminosities of $\\sim[10^{46}, 10^{46}, 10^{45}]$erg/s at $z=(3.2, 1.4, 0.53)$, respectively, an order of magnitude lower than those inferred based on halo occupation distribution modeling. In this model quasar hosts are primarily...

  17. Dissecting the Quasar Main Sequence: Insight from Host Galaxy Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiayi; Shen, Yue

    2015-05-01

    The diverse properties of broad-line quasars appear to follow a well-defined main sequence along which the optical Fe ii strength increases. It has been suggested that this sequence is mainly driven by the Eddington ratio (L/LEdd) of the black hole (BH) accretion. Shen & Ho demonstrated with quasar clustering analysis that the average BH mass decreases with increasing Fe ii strength when quasar luminosity is fixed, consistent with this suggestion. Here we perform an independent test by measuring the stellar velocity dispersion σ* (hence, the BH mass via the M-σ* relation) from decomposed host spectra in low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars. We found that at fixed quasar luminosity, σ* systematically decreases with increasing Fe ii strength, confirming that the Eddington ratio increases with Fe ii strength. We also found that at fixed luminosity and Fe ii strength, there is little dependence of σ* on the broad Hβ FWHM. These new results reinforce the framework that the Eddington ratio and orientation govern most of the diversity seen in broad-line quasar properties.

  18. Eight-Dimensional Mid-Infrared/Optical Bayesian Quasar Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Lacy, Mark; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Zakamska, Nadia L; Brunner, Robert J; Brandt, W N; Gray, Alexander G; Parejko, John K; Ptak, Andrew; Schneider, Donald P; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J; Szalay, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    We explore the multidimensional, multiwavelength selection of quasars from mid-IR (MIR) plus optical data, specifically from Spitzer-IRAC and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We apply modern statistical techniques to combined Spitzer MIR and SDSS optical data, allowing up to 8-D color selection of quasars. Using a Bayesian selection method, we catalog 5546 quasar candidates to an 8.0um depth of 56uJy over an area of ~24 sq. deg; ~70% of these candidates are not identified by applying the same Bayesian algorithm to 4-color SDSS optical data alone. Our selection recovers 97.7% of known type 1 quasars in this area and greatly improves the effectiveness of identifying 3.5quasars. Even using only the two shortest wavelength IRAC bandpasses (3.6 and 4.5um), it is possible to use our Bayesian techniques to select quasars with 97% completeness and as little as 10% contamination. This sample has a photometric redshift accuracy of 93.6% (DeltaZ +/- 0.3), remaining roughly constant when the two reddest MI...

  19. An extinction curve template for intrinsically reddened quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Fynbo, Johan P U; Krogager, Jens-Kristian; Zafar, Nosheen; Saturni, Francesci G; Geier5, Stefan; Venemans, Bram P

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the near-infrared to UV data of 16 quasars with redshifts ranging from 0.71 $<$ $z$ $<$ 2.13 to investigate dust extinction properties. The sample presented in this work is obtained from the High $A_V$ Quasar (HAQ) survey. The quasar candidates were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and follow-up spectroscopy was carried out at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the New Technology Telescope (NTT). To study dust extinction curves intrinsic to the quasars, from the HAQ survey we selected 16 cases where the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) law could not provide a good solution to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We derived the extinction curves using Fitzpatrick & Massa 1986 (FM) law by comparing the observed SEDs to the combined quasar template from Vanden Berk et al. 2001 and Glikman et al. 2006. The derived extinction, $A_V$, ranges from 0.2-1.0 mag. All the individual extinction curves of our quasars are steeper ($...

  20. Host Galaxies of Young Dust-Reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, T.; Lacy, M.; Becker, R.; Glikman, E.

    2009-10-01

    We present results on a multiwavelength campaign to identify the nature of dust-reddened Type 1 quasars. These quasars were selected by matching FIRST, 2MASS and very red optical counterparts with r'-K > 5. We find a very high fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (LoBALs) among AGN selected with this method, perhaps a sign of quasar feedback. From X-ray observations and Balmer decrement measurements, the obscuring dust is most likely located in a cold absorber such as the host galaxy, rather than from a torus near the AGN. Hubble ACS imaging of a sub-sample of these sources showed a very high fraction of interacting and merging systems. The quasars appear to be very young in which dust from the merging galaxies is still settling in. Spitzer IRS and MIPS data show star formation signatures and deep Silicate absorption features in these objects, but overall the quasar is the dominant source in the Mid-infrared.

  1. New Quasar Surveys With WIRO: Planning and Depth of Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Haze Nunez, Evan; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    The Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3-meter telescope is used to observe a section of sky behind the outer regions of the galaxy M33 with the goal of identifying previously undiscovered quasar candidates. We choose the regions based on visibility during the time of year the observations are taken as well as regions in which few quasars have been detected by previous surveys. DS9 and Python are used to determine the coordinates of our desired field centers for photometric observations in the u, g, r, and i Sloan filters. Exposure times are chosen such that the depth in each filter is greater than an apparent magnitude of 21. This depth allows us to identify quasar candidates which are fainter than other quasar surveys in the same vicinity. Future spectroscopic observations will be able to confirm if the candidates are indeed quasars and spectra of the confirmed quasars can be used to study the extended gaseous region of M33. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1560461.

  2. DISSECTING THE QUASAR MAIN SEQUENCE: INSIGHT FROM HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiayi [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The diverse properties of broad-line quasars appear to follow a well-defined main sequence along which the optical Fe ii strength increases. It has been suggested that this sequence is mainly driven by the Eddington ratio (L/L{sub Edd}) of the black hole (BH) accretion. Shen and Ho demonstrated with quasar clustering analysis that the average BH mass decreases with increasing Fe ii strength when quasar luminosity is fixed, consistent with this suggestion. Here we perform an independent test by measuring the stellar velocity dispersion σ{sub *} (hence, the BH mass via the M–σ{sub *} relation) from decomposed host spectra in low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars. We found that at fixed quasar luminosity, σ{sub *} systematically decreases with increasing Fe ii strength, confirming that the Eddington ratio increases with Fe ii strength. We also found that at fixed luminosity and Fe ii strength, there is little dependence of σ{sub *} on the broad Hβ FWHM. These new results reinforce the framework that the Eddington ratio and orientation govern most of the diversity seen in broad-line quasar properties.

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: twelfth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A; Albareti, Franco D; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, W Niel; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A C; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B; Jian, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properti...

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

  5. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  6. On the Iwasawa-Taniguchi effect of radio-quiet AGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bianchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La existencia de una anticorrelación entre la anchura equivalente (EW de la línea de emisión de hierro Kα y la luminosidad 2-10 keV (el efecto X-ray Baldwin ó Iwasawa-Taniguchi ha sido debatida en los últimos años. Nuestro objetivo es someter a prueba este resultado, utilizando el mayor catálogo de AGN ‘radio callados’ con espectros de alta calidad en rayos-X que ha sido publicado hasta la fecha. Nuestro catálogo comprende 157 fuentes. Buscamos una relación entre la EW de la línea de hierro con la luminosidad en rayos X, y también con la masa del agujero negro, el cociente de Eddington y la distancia cosmológica. Los datos aquí presentados han sido analizados homogéneamente, todos los espectros son del mismo instrumento y tienen una relación señal-ruido alta. El ajuste lineal entre la EW y la luminosidad 2-10 keV es muy significativo y produce log(EW = (1.73 +-0.03+(-0.17 +- 0.03 log(LX, donde EW es la EW de la línea de hierro neutro Kα en eV y LX es la luminosidad 2-10 keV en unidades de 10 44 erg sֿ¹. La anticorrelación con el cociente de Eddington es también muy significativa, pero no hay una clara dependencia de la EW del hierro con la masa del agujero negro.

  7. On the nature of the 'radio-quiet' black hole binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleri, Paolo; Fender, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The coupling between accretion processes and ejection mechanisms in accreting black holes in binary systems can be investigated by empirical relations between the X-ray/radio and X-ray/optical-infrared luminosities. These correlations are valid over several orders of magnitude and were initially tho

  8. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C J; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit a...

  9. An astrophysics data program investigation of a synoptic study of quasar continua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the program is presented. The major product of the program, an atlas of quasar energy distributions, is presented in the appendices along with papers written as a result of this research. The topics covered in the papers include: (1) accurate galactic N(sub h) values toward quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN); (2) weak bump quasars; (3) millimeter measurements of hard x ray selected active galaxies- implications for the nature of the continuous spectrum; (3) persistence and change in the soft x ray spectrum of the quasar PG1211+143; (4) the soft x ray excess in einstein quasar spectra; and (5) EXOSAT x ray spectra of quasars.

  10. SDSS quasars in the WISE preliminary data release and quasar candidate selection with the optical/infrared colors

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zhang, Yanxia; Peng, Nanbo

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 37842 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, which have counterparts within 6$"$ in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Data Release. The overall WISE detection rate of the SDSS quasars is 86.7%, and it decreases to less than 50.0% when the quasar magnitude is fainter than $i=20.5$. We derive the median color-redshift relations based on this SDSS-WISE quasar sample and apply them to estimate the photometric redshifts of the SDSS-WISE quasars. We find that by adding the WISE W1 and W2-band data to the SDSS photometry we can increase the photometric redshift reliability, defined as the percentage of sources with the photometric and spectroscopic redshift difference less than 0.2, from 70.3% to 77.2%. We also obtain the samples of WISE detected normal and late-type stars with SDSS spectroscopy, and present a criterion in the $z-W1$ vs. $g-z$ color-color diagram, $z-W1>0.66(g-z)+2.01$, to separate quasars from stars. With this criterion we can...

  11. The quasar-galaxy cross SDSS J1320+1644: A probable large-separation lensed quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Rusu, Cristian E; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Shin, Min-Su; Sluse, Dominique; Strauss, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of quasars at $z=1.487$, with a separation of $8\\farcs585\\pm0\\farcs002$. Subaru Telescope infrared imaging reveals the presence of an elliptical and a disk-like galaxy located almost symmetrically between the quasars, creating a cross-like configuration. Based on absorption lines in the quasar spectra and the colors of the galaxies, we estimate that both galaxies are located at redshift $z=0.899$. This, as well as the similarity of the quasar spectra, suggests that the system is a single quasar multiply imaged by a galaxy group or cluster acting as a gravitational lens, although the possibility of a binary quasar cannot be fully excluded. We show that the gravitational lensing hypothesis implies these galaxies are not isolated, but must be embedded in a dark matter halo of virial mass $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{14}\\ h_{70}^{-1}\\ {M}_\\odot$ assuming an NFW model with a concentration parameter of $c_{vir}=6$, or a singular isothermal sphere profile with a velocity dispersion of $\\sim 6...

  12. A NEW MODEL FOR DARK MATTER HALOS HOSTING QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cen, Renyue [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher, E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    A new model for quasar-hosting dark matter halos, meeting two physical conditions, is put forth. First, significant interactions are taken into consideration to trigger quasar activities. Second, satellites in very massive halos at low redshift are removed from consideration due to their deficiency in cold gas. We analyze the Millennium Simulation to find halos that meet these two conditions and simultaneously match two-point auto-correlation functions of quasars and cross-correlation functions between quasars and galaxies at z = 0.5-3.2. The masses of the quasar hosts found decrease with decreasing redshift, with the mass thresholds being [(2-5) × 10{sup 12}, (2-5) × 10{sup 11}, (1-3) × 10{sup 11}] M {sub ☉} for median luminosities of ∼[10{sup 46}, 10{sup 46}, 10{sup 45}] erg s{sup –1} at z = (3.2, 1.4, 0.53), respectively, an order of magnitude lower than those inferred based on halo occupation distribution modeling. In this model, quasar hosts are primarily massive central halos at z ≥ 2-3 but increasingly dominated by lower mass satellite halos experiencing major interactions toward lower redshift. However, below z = 1, satellite halos in groups more massive than ∼2 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} do not host quasars. Whether for central or satellite halos, imposing the condition of significant interactions substantially boosts the clustering strength compared to the total population with the same mass cut. The inferred lifetimes of quasars at z = 0.5-3.2 of 3-30 Myr are in agreement with observations. Quasars at z ∼ 2 would be hosted by halos of mass ∼5 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} in this model, compared to ∼3 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} previously thought, which would help reconcile with the observed, otherwise puzzling high covering fractions for Lyman limit systems around quasars.

  13. A NEOWISE Survey of Quasars in the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohui

    Luminous quasars at high redshift provide direct probes of the evolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and intergalactic medium (IGM) at early cosmic time. More than 100 quasars have now been discovered at z>6, with the highest redshift at z=7.1. Detections of such objects indicate the existence of billion solar mass BHs merely a few hundred Myrs after the first star formation in the universe, challenging the theory of BH growth and BH-galaxy coevolution at early epoch. Absorption spectra of the highest redshift quasars reveal complete Gunn-Peterson absorption from an increasing neutral IGM, marking the end of the reionization epoch at z>6. Combined with observations of CMB polarization and high-redshift Ly alpha galaxies, current data strongly suggest a peak of reionization activity and emergence of the earliest galaxies and AGNs at 77, and a handful at z>6.5. In this ADAP program, we will carry out the first comprehensive survey of z>=7 quasars, using a WISE-based selection algorithm, deep mid-IR photometry from coadded NEOWISE data and deep optical and near-IR photometry from new wide-field imaging surveys. We will select and follow-up quasar candidates over >20,000 deg^2 of high galactic latitude sky, aiming at finding 10-15 quasars at z>=7 in the next three years. There are two main technical components of our program. (1) WISE-based quasar selection. We have developed a highly successful selection method by combining WISE and optical/near-IR photometry to search for luminous quasars at z = 4.5-6.5, resulted in the discovery of the first known supermassive black holes with 10 billion solar mass BHs in the early universe. We will expand and optimize the algorithm for the redshift range of 6.5 measure the density of luminous quasars and their BH masses at z>=7, and place constraint on the existence of z>8 quasars. These measurements will test whether super-Eddington accretion or direct formation of intermediate-mass BHs are needed for early BH growth

  14. Testing quasar unification: radiative transfer in clumpy winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Sim, S. A.; Higginbottom, N.; Mangham, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to 1043 erg s-1. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of ˜0.01 moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Lyα and C IV 1550 Å at low inclinations. At high inclinations, the spectra possess prominent LoBAL features. Despite these successes, we cannot reproduce all emission lines seen in quasar spectra with the correct equivalent-width ratios, and we find an angular dependence of emission line equivalent width despite the similarities in the observed emission line properties of BAL and non-BAL quasars. Overall, our work suggests that biconical winds can reproduce much of the qualitative behaviour expected from a unified model, but we cannot yet provide quantitative matches with quasar properties at all viewing angles. Whether disc winds can successfully unify quasars is therefore still an open question.

  15. Are quasar jets dominated by Poynting flux?

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, M; Madejski, G M; Lasota, J P; Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The formation of relativistic astrophysical jets is presumably mediated by magnetic fields threading accretion disks and central, rapidly rotating objects. As it is accelerated by magnetic stresses, the jet's kinetic energy flux grows at the expense of its Poynting flux. However, it is unclear how efficient is the conversion from magnetic to kinetic energy and whether there are any observational signatures of this process. We address this issue in the context of jets in quasars. Using data from all spatial scales, we demonstrate that in these objects the conversion from Poynting-flux-dominated to matter-dominated jets is very likely to take place closer to the black hole than the region where most of the Doppler boosted radiation observed in blazars is produced. We briefly discuss the possibility that blazar activity can be induced by global MHD instabilities, e.g., via the production of localized velocity gradients that lead to dissipative events such as shocks or magnetic reconnection, where acceleration of...

  16. How fast black holes spin in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto; Petkova, Margarita; Perego, Albino; Volonteri, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Mass and spin are often referred to as the two `hairs' of astrophysical black holes, as they are the only two parameters needed to completely characterize them in General Relativity. The interaction between black holes and their environment is where complexity lies, as the relevant physical processes occur over a large range of scales. This is particularly relevant in the case of super-massive black holes (SMBHs), hosted in galaxy centers and surrounded by swirling gas and various generations of stars, that compete with the SMBH for gas consumption, and affect the thermodynamics of the gas itself. How dynamics and thermodynamics in such fiery environment affect the angular momentum of the gas accreted onto SMBHs, and hence black hole spins is uncertain. We explore the interaction between SMBHs and their environment during active phases through simulations of circum-nuclear discs (CND) around black holes in quasars hosted in the remnants of galaxy mergers. These are the first 3D (sub-)parsec resolution simulat...

  17. A portable modeler of lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, P; Saha, Prasenjit; Williams, Liliya L.R.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce and implement two novel ideas for modeling lensed quasars. The first idea is to require different lenses to agree about H_0. This means that some models for one lens can be ruled out by data on a different lens. We explain using two worked examples. One example models 1115+080, 1608+656 (time-delay quads) and 1933+503 (a prospective time-delay system) all together, yielding time-delay predictions for the third lens and a 90%-confidence estimate of 1/H_0=14.6_{-1.7}^{+9.4} Gyr (H_0=67_{-26}^{+9} km/s/Mpc) assuming Omega_M=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7. The other example models the time-delay doubles 1520+530, 1600+434, 1830-211, and 2149-275, which gives 1/H_0=14.5_{-1.5}^{+3.3} Gyr (H_0=67_{-13}^{+8} km/s/Mpc). Our second idea is to write the whole modeling software as a highly interactive Java applet, which can be used both for coarse-grained results inside a browser and for fine-grained results on a workstation. Several obstacles come up in trying to implement a numerically-intensive method thus, but w...

  18. Quasar Variability in the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Ashby, Matthew L N; Assef, Roberto J; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R; Jannuzi, Buell T; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Decadal IRAC Bootes Survey (DIBS) is a mid-IR variability survey of the ~9 sq. deg. of the NDWFS Bootes Field and extnds the time baseline of its predecessor, the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS), from 4 to 10 years. The Spitzer Space Telescope visited the field five times between 2004 and 2014 at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We provide the difference image analysis photometry for a half a million mostly extragalactic sources. In the mid-IR color-color plane, sources with quasar colors constitute the largest variability class (75%), 16% of the variable objects have stellar colors and the remaining 9% have the colors of galaxies. Adding the fifth epoch doubles the number of variable AGNs for the same false positive rates as in SDWFS, or increases the number of sources by 20% while decreasing the false positive rates by factors of 2-3 for the same variability amplitude. We quantify the ensemble mid-IR variability of ~1500 spectroscopically confirmed AGNs using single power-law structure functions, which we f...

  19. Structure of radiation dominated gravitoturbulent quasar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Dib, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Self-gravitating accretion discs in a gravitoturbulent state, including radiation and gas pressures, are studied using a set of new analytical solutions. While the Toomre parameter of the disc remains close to its critical value for the onset of gravitational instability, the dimensionless stress parameter is uniquely determined from the thermal energy reservoir of the disc and its cooling rate. Our solutions are applicable to the accretion discs with dynamically important radiation pressure like in the quasars discs. We show that physical quantities of a gravitoturbulent disc in the presence of radiation are significantly modified compared to solutions with only gas pressure. We show that the dimensionless stress parameter is an increasing function of the radial distance so that its steepness strongly depends on the accretion rate. In a disc without radiation its slope is 4.5, however, we show that in the presence of radiation, it varies between 2 and 4.5 depending on the accretion rate and the central mass....

  20. Dissecting the complex environment of a distant quasar with MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Husband, K; Stanway, E R; Lehnert, M D

    2015-01-01

    High redshift quasars can be used to trace the early growth of massive galaxies and may be triggered by galaxy-galaxy interactions. We present MUSE science verification data on one such interacting system consisting of the well-studied z=3.2 PKS1614+051 quasar, its AGN companion galaxy and bridge of material radiating in Lyalpha between the quasar and its companion. We find a total of four companion galaxies (at least two galaxies are new discoveries), three of which reside within the likely virial radius of the quasar host, suggesting that the system will evolve into a massive elliptical galaxy by the present day. The MUSE data are of sufficient quality to split the extended Lyalpha emission line into narrow velocity channels. In these the gas can be seen extending towards each of the three neighbouring galaxies suggesting that the emission-line gas originates in a gravitational interaction between the galaxies and the quasar host. The photoionization source of this gas is less clear but is probably dominate...

  1. Dissecting the quasar main sequence: insight from host galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jiayi

    2015-01-01

    The diverse properties of broad-line quasars appear to follow a well-defined main sequence along which the optical FeII strength increases. It has been suggested that this sequence is mainly driven by the Eddington ratio (L/L_Edd) of the black hole (BH) accretion. Shen & Ho demonstrated with quasar clustering analysis that the average BH mass decreases with increasing FeII strength when quasar luminosity is fixed, consistent with this suggestion. Here we perform an independent test by measuring the stellar velocity dispersion sigma* (hence the BH mass via the M-sigma* relation) from decomposed host spectra in low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars. We found that at fixed quasar luminosity, sigma* systematically decreases with increasing FeII strength, confirming that Eddington ratio increases with FeII strength. We also found that at fixed luminosity and FeII strength, there is little dependence of sigma* on the broad Hbeta FWHM. These new results reinforce the framework put forward by Shen & H...

  2. Probing Quasar Winds Using Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Christopher S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Roberts, Amber; Ganguly, Rajib; Misawa, Toru; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2017-01-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole. Furthermore, outflows potentially have a role in providing feedback to the galaxy, and halting star formation and infall of gas. The geometry and density of these outflows remain unknown, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. Having searched ultraviolet spectra at both high redshift (VLT/UVES; 1.4physically associated with) the quasar. We identify intrinsic NALs with a wide range of properties, including ejection velocity, coverage fraction, and ionization level. We also consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar properties (optical, radio and X-ray fluxes), and find that radio properties and quasar orientation are influential in determining if a quasar is likely to host an intrinsic system. We find that there is a continuum of properties within the intrinsic NAL sample, rather than discrete families, ranging from partially covered CIV systems with black Lya and with a separate low ionization gas phase to partially covered NV systems with partially covered Lya and without detected low ionization gas. Additionally, we construct a model describing the spatial distributions, geometries, and varied ionization structures of intrinsic NALs.

  3. A Variable PV Broad Absorption Line and Quasar Outflow Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellupo, Daniel M; Barlow, Tom A

    2014-01-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar spectra identify high velocity outflows that might exist in all quasars and could play a major role in feedback to galaxy evolution. The viability of BAL outflows as a feedback mechanism depends on their kinetic energies, as derived from the outflow velocities, column densities, and distances from the central quasar. We estimate these quantities for the quasar, Q1413+1143 (redshift $z_e = 2.56$), aided by the first detection of PV $\\lambda\\lambda$1118,1128 BAL variability in a quasar. In particular, PV absorption at velocities where the CIV trough does not reach zero intensity implies that the CIV BAL is saturated and the absorber only partially covers the background continuum source (with characteristic size 22.3 (cm^-2). Variability in the PV and saturated CIV BALs strongly disfavors changes in the ionization as the cause of the BAL variability, but supports models with high-column density BAL clouds moving across our lines of sight. The observed variability time of ...

  4. Clusters of galaxies associated with quasars. I. 3C 206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H.K.C.; Green, R.F.; Kinman, T.D. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA); Montreal Universite (Canada); Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Multislit spectroscopy and three-color CCD photometry of the galaxies in the cluster associated with the quasar 3C 206 (PKS 0837-12) at z = 0.198 are presented. This cluster is the richest environment of any low-redshift quasar observed in an Abell richness class 1 cluster. The cluster has a very flattened structure and a very concentrated core about the quasar. Most of the galaxies in this field have colors and luminosities consistent with normal galaxies at this redshift. The background-corrected blue fraction of galaxies is consistent with values for other rich clusters. The existence of several blue galaxies in the concentrated cluster core is an anomaly for a region of such high galaxy density, however, suggesting the absence of a substantial intracluster medium. This claim is supported by the Fanaroff-Riley (1974) class II morphology of the radio source. The velocity dispersion calculated from 11 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members is 500 + or - 110 km/s, which is slightly lower than the average for Abell class 1 clusters. A high frequency of interaction between the quasar host galaxy and cluster core members at low relative velocities, and a low intracluster gas pressure, may comprise a favorable environment for quasar activity. The properties of the cluster of galaxies associated with 3C 206 are consistent with this model. 59 refs.

  5. He II Proximity Effect and the Lifetime of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Khrykin, I S; McQuinn, M; Worseck, G

    2015-01-01

    The lifetime of quasars is fundamental for understanding the growth of supermassive black holes, and is an important ingredient in models of the reionization of the intergalactic medium. However, despite various attempts to determine quasar lifetimes, current estimates from a variety of methods are uncertain by orders of magnitude. This work combines cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and 1D radiative transfer to investigate the structure and evolution of the He II Ly$\\alpha$ proximity zones around quasars at $z \\simeq 3-4$. We show that the time evolution in the proximity zone can be described by a simple analytical model for the approach of the He II fraction $x_{\\rm HeII}\\left( t \\right)$ to ionization equilibrium, and use this picture to illustrate how the transmission profile depends on the quasar lifetime, quasar UV luminosity, and the ionization state of helium in the ambient IGM (i.e. the average He II fraction, or equivalently the metagalactic He II ionizing background). A significant degeneracy...

  6. Photometric Classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, D; Pichara, K; Anguita, T; Murphy, D N A; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Yee, H K C; Hsieh, B C; López, S

    2014-01-01

    We describe the construction of a quasar catalog containing 91,842 candidates derived from analysis of imaging data with a Random Forest algorithm. Using spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars from the SDSS as a training set, we blindly search the RCS-2 (~750 deg^2) imaging survey. From a source catalogue of 1,863,970 RCS-2 point sources, our algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colours. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements available for a subset 16,898 of these objects, we refine the classifier by adding NUV-optical colours to the algorithm's search. An additional subset (comprising 13% of the source catalog) features WISE coverage; we explore the effect of including W1 and W2 bands on the performance of the algorithm. Upon analysing all RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 85,085 quasar candidates, with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 90.4% and a recall (the fraction of true ...

  7. Thermal Emission from Warm Dust in the Most Distant Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, R; Wagg, J; Bertoldi, F; Walter, F; Menten, K M; Omont, A; Cox, P; Strauss, M A; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Schneider, D P

    2008-01-01

    We report new continuum observations of fourteen z~6 quasars at 250 GHz and fourteen quasars at 1.4 GHz. We summarize all recent millimeter and radio observations of the sample of the thirty-three quasars known with 5.7110^{12}L_{\\odot}), while the average L_{FIR}/L_{bol} ratio of the non-detections is consistent with that of the optically-selected PG quasars. The MAMBO detections also tend to have weaker Ly\\alpha emission than the non-detected sources. We discuss possible FIR dust heating sources, and critically assess the possibility of active star formation in the host galaxies of the z~6 quasars. The average star formation rate of the MAMBO non-detections is likely to be less than a few hundred M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, but in the strong detections, the host galaxy star formation is probably at a rate of \\gtrsim10^{3} M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, which dominates the FIR dust heating.

  8. HST/COS OBSERVATIONS OF THIRTEEN NEW He II QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, David [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zheng Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meiksin, Avery [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: David.Syphers@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The full reionization of intergalactic helium was a major event in the history of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and UV observations of the He II Gunn-Peterson trough allow us to characterize the end of this process at z {approx} 3. Due to intervening hydrogen absorption, quasars allowing such study are rare, with only 33 known in the literature, and most of those are very recent discoveries. We expand on our previous discovery work, and present 13 new He II quasars with redshifts 2.82 < z < 3.77, here selected with {approx}80% efficiency, and including several that are much brighter than the vast majority of those previously known. This is the largest sample of uniformly observed He II quasars covering such a broad redshift range, and they show evidence of IGM opacity increasing with redshift, as expected for the helium reionization epoch. No evidence of He II Ly{alpha} quasar emission is seen in individual or averaged spectra, posing a problem for standard models of the broad-line region. The current rapid advance in the study of He II quasars has been greatly facilitated by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and we discuss the instrumental and other subtleties that must be taken into account in IGM He II observations.

  9. Quasars Probing Quasars VII. The Pinnacle of the Cool Circumgalactic Medium Surrounds Massive z~2 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    We survey the incidence and absorption strength of the metal-line transitions CII 1334 and CIV from the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding z~2 quasars, which act as signposts for massive dark matter halos M_halo~10^12.5 Msun. On scales of the virial radius (Mvir~160kpc), we measure a high covering fraction fC=0.73+/-0.10 to strong CII absorption (rest equivalent width W1334>0.2A), implying a massive reservoir of cool (T~10^4K) metal enriched gas. We conservatively estimate a metal mass exceeding 10^8 Msun. We propose these metals trace enrichment of the incipient intragroup/intracluster medium that these halos eventually inhabit. This cool CGM around quasars is the pinnacle amongst galaxies observed at all epochs, as regards covering fraction and average equivalent width of HI Lya and low-ion metal absorption. We argue that the properties of this cool CGM primarily reflect the halo mass, and that other factors such as feedback, star-formation rate, and accretion from the intergalactic medium are secondar...

  10. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  11. VERITAS Observations under Bright Moonlight

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The presence of moonlight is usually a limiting factor for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes due to the high sensitivity of the camera photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In their standard configuration, the extra noise limits the sensitivity of the experiment to gamma-ray signals and the higher PMT currents also accelerates PMT aging. Since fall 2012, observations have been carried out with VERITAS under bright moonlight (Moon illumination $> 35\\%$), in two observing modes, by reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs and with UV bandpass filters, which allow observations up to $\\sim80\\%$ Moon illumination resulting in $29\\%$ more observing time over the course of the year. In this presentation, we provide details of these new observing modes and their performance relative to the standard VERITAS observations.

  12. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z>4.5

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Rocco; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É; Gurvits, Leonid I; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on observations of an additional ten z>4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50%. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z>4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis ...

  13. ULASJ1234+0907: The Reddest Type 1 Quasar at z=2.5 Revealed in the X-ray and Far Infra-red

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel and XMM-Newton observations of ULASJ1234+0907 ($z=2.503$), the reddest broad-line Type 1 quasar currently known with (i-K)>7.1. Herschel observations indicate that the quasar host is a hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HyLIRG) with a total infrared luminosity of log10(LIR/L0)=13.90+/-0.02. A greybody fit gives a dust temperature of Td=60+/-3K assuming an emissivity index of beta=1.5, considerably higher than in submillimeter bright galaxies observed at similar redshifts. The star formation rate is estimated to be >2000M0/yr even accounting for a significant contribution from an AGN component to the total infrared luminosity or requiring that only the far infra-red luminosity is powered by a starburst. XMM-Newton observations constrain the hard X-ray luminosity to be L(2-10keV)=1.3e45 erg/s putting ULASJ1234+0907 among the brightest X-ray quasars known. Through very deep optical and near infra-red imaging of the field at sub-arcsecond seeing, we demonstrate that despite its extreme luminosity,...

  14. Near-Infrared Imaging of a z=6.42 Quasar Host Galaxy With the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3

    CERN Document Server

    Mechtley, Matt; Ryan, Russell E; Schneider, Glenn; Cohen, Seth H; Jansen, Rolf A; Fan, Xiaohui; Hathi, Nimish P; Keel, William C; Koekemoer, Anton M; Röttgering, Huub; Scannapieco, Evan; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A; Yan, Haojing

    2012-01-01

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z=6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m_J>22.8, m_H>23.0 AB mag (2 sigma). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.3"-0.5" radius of mu_J > 23.5, mu_H > 23.7 AB magarc (2 sigma). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and S\\'ersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface b...

  15. Nitrogen-deficient and iron-rich associated absorbers with oversolar metallicities towards the quasar HE0141-3932

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Reimers, D; Fechner, C; Janknecht, E; López, S

    2005-01-01

    HE0141-3932 (zem=1.80) is a bright blue radio-quite quasar which reveals an emission line spectrum with an unusually weak Ly-alpha line. In addition, large redshift differences (Delta z=0.05) are observed between high ionization and low ionization emission lines. Absorption systems identified at z=1.78, 1.71, and 1.68 show mild oversolar metallicities (Z ~= 1-2Zsolar) and can be attributed to the associated gas clouds ejected from the circumnuclear region. The joint analysis of the emission and absorption lines leads to the conclusion that this quasar is seen almost pole-on. Its apparent luminosity may be Doppler boosted by ~10 times. The absorbing gas shows high abundance of Fe, Mg, and Al ([Fe, Mg, Al/C] ~= 0.15+/-0.10) along with underabundance of N ([N/C]0 and [Fe/C]<0 at Z ~ Zsolar. Full details of this work are given in Reimers et al. (2005).

  16. The unprecedented optical outburst of the quasar 3C 454.3. The WEBT campaign of 2004-2005

    CERN Document Server

    Villata, M; Balonek, T J; Aller, M F; Jorstad, S G; Kurtanidze, O M; Nicastro, F; Nilsson, K; Aller, H D; Arai, A; Arkharov, A; Bach, U; Benítez, E; Berdyugin, A; Buemi, C S; Böttcher, M; Carosati, D; Casas, R; Caulet, A; Chen, W P; Chiang, P S; Chou, Y; Ciprini, S; Coloma, J M; Di Rico, G; Díaz, C; Efimova, N V; Forsyth, C; Frasca, A; Fuhrmann, L; Gadway, B; Gupta, S; Hagen-Thorn, V A; Harvey, J; Heidt, J; Hernandez-Toledo, H; Hroch, F; Hu, C P; Hudec, R; Ibrahimov, M A; Imada, A; Kamata, M; Kato, T; Katsuura, M; Konstantinova, T; Kopatskaya, E; Kotaka, D; Kovalev, Y Y; Kovalev, Yu A; Krichbaum, T P; Kubota, K; Kurosaki, M; Lanteri, L; Larionov, V M; Larionova, L; Laurikainen, E; Lee, C U; Leto, P; Lahteenmaki, A; López-Cruz, O; Marilli, E; Marscher, A P; McHardy, I M; Mondal, S A; Mullan, B; Napoleone, N; Nikolashvili, M G; Ohlert, J M; Postnikov, S; Pursimo, T; Ragni, M; Ros, J A; Sadakane, K; Sadun, A C; Savolainen, T; Sergeeva, E A; Sigua, L A; Sillanpää, A; Sixtova, L; Sumitomo, N; Takalo, L O; Terasranta, H; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Umana, G; Volvach, A; Voss, B; Wortel, S

    2006-01-01

    The radio quasar 3C 454.3 underwent an exceptional optical outburst lasting more than 1 year and culminating in spring 2005. The maximum brightness detected was R = 12.0, which represents the most luminous quasar state thus far observed (M_B ~ -31.4). In order to follow the emission behaviour of the source in detail, a large multiwavelength campaign was organized by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT). Continuous optical, near-IR and radio monitoring was performed in several bands. ToO pointings by the Chandra and INTEGRAL satellites provided additional information at high energies in May 2005. The historical radio and optical light curves show different behaviours. Until about 2001.0 only moderate variability was present in the optical regime, while prominent and long-lasting radio outbursts were visible at the various radio frequencies, with higher-frequency variations preceding the lower-frequency ones. After that date, the optical activity increased and the radio flux is less variable. This suggests t...

  17. PG 1411 + 442 - The nearest broad absorption line quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Matthew A.; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John B.

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations reveal strong, moderately broad absorption troughs in the blue wings of the C IV and N V emission lines of the quasar PG 1411 + 442. No absorption from weakly ionized gas is detected. The emission-line strengths and overall shape of the ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared/far-infrared continuum of the new broad absorption line quasar are within the range normally measured in quasars. Its redshift is low enough to allow the morphology of the host galaxy to be studied in deep broad-band and intermediate-band CCD images. The galaxy appears to be a large spiral with a very long arm or tail. The inclination angle is 57 deg, which rules out the possibility that the line of sight to the nucleus intersects a large path length in a galactic disk.

  18. Microlensing in the double quasar SBS1520+530

    CERN Document Server

    Gaynullina, E R; Akhunov, T; Burkhonov, O M; Gottlöber, S; Mirtadjieva, K; Nuritdinov, S N; Tadjibaev, I; Wambsganss, J; Wisotzki, L

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a monitoring campaign of the double quasar SBS1520+530 at Maidanak observatory from April 2003 to August 2004. We obtained light curves in V and R filters that show small-amplitude \\Delta m~0.1 mag intrinsic variations of the quasar on time scales of about 100 days. The data set is consistent with the previously determined time delay of \\Delta t=(130+-3) days by Burud et al. (2002). We find that the time delay corrected magnitude difference between the quasar images is now larger by (0.14+-0.03) mag than during the observations by Burud et al. (2002). This confirms the presence of gravitational microlensing variations in this system.

  19. The circum-galactic medium of quasars: CIV absorption systems

    CERN Document Server

    Landoni, M; Treves, A; Scarpa, R; Farina, E P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the circumgalactic gas in the halo of quasar host galaxies from CIV absorption line systems. Optical spectroscopy of closely aligned pairs of quasars (projected distance \\leq 200 kpc) obtained at the Gran Telescopio Canarias is used to investigate the distribution of the absorbing gas for a sample of 18 quasars at z \\sim 2. We found that the detected absorption systems of EW \\geq 0.3Ang associated with the foreground QSO are revealed up to 200 kpc from the center of the host galaxy. The structure of the absorbing gas is rather patchy with a covering fraction of the gas that quickly decreases beyond 100 kpc. These results are in qualitative agreement with those found for the lower ionisation metal Mg II 2800 Ang.

  20. The Intrinsic Quasar Luminosity Function: Accounting for Accretion Disk Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, M A; Brotherton, M S; Runnoe, J C; Green, R F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic --- in part due to its disk-like structure --- but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic l...

  1. On the Size of HII Regions around High Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, A; Ferrara, A; Choudhury, T R

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of constraining the ionization state of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) close to the end of reionization (z ~ 6) by measuring the size of the HII regions in high-z quasars spectra. We perform a combination of multiphase SPH and 3D radiative transfer (RT) simulations to reliably predict the properties of typical high-z quasar HII regions, embedded in a partly neutral IGM. From the analysis of mock spectra along lines of sight through the simulated QSO environment we find that the HII region size derived from quasar spectra is on average 30 % smaller than the physical one. Additional maximum likelihood analysis shows that this offset induces an overestimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction, x_HI, by a factor ~ 3. By applying the same statistical method to a sample of observed QSOs our study favors a mostly ionized (x_HI < 0.06) universe at z=6.1.

  2. High-redshift quasar host galaxies with adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlbrodt, B; Wisotzki, L; Jahnke, K

    2005-01-01

    We present K band adaptive optics observations of three high-redshift (z ~ 2.2) high-luminosity quasars, all of which were studied for the first time. We also bserved several point spread function (PSF) calibrators, non-simultaneously because of the small field of view. The significant temporal PSF variations on timescales of minutes inhibited a straightforward scaled PSF removal from the quasar images. Characterising the degree of PSF concentration by the radii encircling 20% and 80% of the total flux, respectively, we found that even under very different observing conditions the r20 vs. r80 relation varied coherently between individual short exposure images, delineating a well-defined relation for point sources. Placing the quasar images on this relation, we see indications that all three objects were resolved. We designed a procedure to estimate the significance of this result, and to estimate host galaxy parameters, by reproducing the statistical distribution of the individual short exposure images. We fi...

  3. Optical variability of quasars: a damped random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    A damped random walk is a stochastic process, defined by an exponential covariance matrix that behaves as a random walk for short time scales and asymptotically achieves a finite variability amplitude at long time scales. Over the last few years, it has been demonstrated, mostly but not exclusively using SDSS data, that a damped random walk model provides a satisfactory statistical description of observed quasar variability in the optical wavelength range, for rest-frame timescales from 5 days to 2000 days. The best-fit characteristic timescale and asymptotic variability amplitude scale with the luminosity, black hole mass, and rest wavelength, and appear independent of redshift. In addition to providing insights into the physics of quasar variability, the best-fit model parameters can be used to efficiently separate quasars from stars in imaging surveys with adequate long-term multi-epoch data, such as expected from LSST.

  4. FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF TYPE 1 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanish, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Capak, P.; Desai, V.; Armus, L.; Brinkworth, C.; Brooke, T.; Colbert, J.; Fadda, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Huynh, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Murphy, E. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Shenoy, S., E-mail: hanish@ipac.caltech.edu [Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey, we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 {mu}m type 1 quasar template. We find that the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 {mu}m, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths, we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with significant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 {mu}m.

  5. Far-Infrared Properties of Type 1 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hanish, D J; Capak, P; Desai, V; Armus, L; Brinkworth, C; Brooke, T; Colbert, J; Fadda, D; Frayer, D; Huynh, M; Lacy, M; Murphy, E; Noriega-Crespo, A; Paladini, R; Scarlata, C; Shenoy, S

    2013-01-01

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES) to study the spectral energy distributions of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the 2-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 micron type 1 quasar template. We find the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 microns, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with signifiant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 microns.

  6. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguang Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of the tested square area was physically unchanged. The results show that when the black surround inducing brightness contrast suddenly became gray (i.e., vanished, the center gray square tended to look darker than a control gray square. Similarly, after viewing a subjective square consisting of black-line terminations, the square area tended to look darker than the control even though the afterimage of the lines could not be seen. These results indicate that induced or illusory brightness causes an aftereffect in brightness regardless of the appearance of negative afterimages of the illusion-inducing components.

  7. Environments of strong/ultrastrong, ultraviolet Fe II emitting quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowes, Roger G.; Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Campusano, Luis E.

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the strength of ultraviolet (UV) Fe II emission from quasars within the environments of large quasar groups (LQGs) in comparison with quasars elsewhere, for 1.1 ≤ zLQG ≤ 1.7, using the DR7QSO catalogue of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the Weymann et al. W2400 equivalent width, defined between the rest-frame continuum windows 2240-2255 and 2665-2695 Å, as the measure of the UV Fe II emission. We find a significant shift of the W2400 distribution to higher values for quasars within LQGs, predominantly for those LQGs with 1.1 ≤ zLQG ≤ 1.5. There is a tentative indication that the shift to higher values increases with the quasar i magnitude. We find evidence that within LQGs the ultrastrong emitters with W2400 ≥ 45 Å (more precisely, ultrastrong plus with W2400 ≥ 44 Å) have preferred nearest-neighbour separations of ˜30-50 Mpc to the adjacent quasar of any W2400 strength. No such effect is seen for the ultrastrong emitters that are not in LQGs. The possibilities for increasing the strength of the Fe II emission appear to be iron abundance, Lyα fluorescence and microturbulence, and probably all of these operate. The dense environment of the LQGs may have led to an increased rate of star formation and an enhanced abundance of iron in the nuclei of galaxies. Similarly, the dense environment may have led to more active blackholes and increased Lyα fluorescence. The preferred nearest-neighbour separation for the stronger emitters would appear to suggest a dynamical component, such as microturbulence. In one particular LQG, the Huge-LQG (the largest structure known in the early Universe), six of the seven strongest emitters very obviously form three pairings within the total of 73 members.

  8. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  9. OUTFLOW AND HOT DUST EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Xing, Feijun; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Kai [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Shaohua, E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Polar Research Institute of China, Jinqiao Road 451, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2013-10-10

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z ∼ 2 non-broad absorption line quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near-infrared slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from the accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of C IV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, C IV regions are dominated by outflows so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) can reliably reflect the general properties and velocity of outflows, respectively. In low Eddington ratio quasars, on the other hand, C IV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) become less sensitive to outflows. Therefore, the correlations for the highest Eddington ratio quasars are more likely to represent the true dependence of hot dust emission on outflows and the correlations for the entire sample are significantly diluted by the low Eddington ratio quasars. Our results show that an outflow with a large BAI or velocity can double the hot dust emission on average. We suggest that outflows either contain hot dust in themselves or interact with the dusty interstellar medium or torus.

  10. Black holes, quasars, and the universe /2nd edition/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Topics of astronomy are discussed in terms of black holes, galaxies, quasars, and models of the universe. Black holes are approached through consideration of stellar evolution, white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, the event horizon, Cygnus X-1, white holes, and worm holes. Attention is also given to radio waves from high speed electrons, the radiation emitted by quasars, active galaxies, galactic energy sources, and interpretations of the redshift. Finally, the life cycle of the universe is deliberated, along with the cosmic time scale, evidence for the Big Bang, and the future of the universe.

  11. Quasar Formation and Energy Emission in Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Formation and energy emission of quasars are investigated in accord with the black hole universe, a new cosmological model recently developed by Zhang. According to this new cosmological model, the universe originated from a star-like black hole and grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe have been fully ex- plained in Paper I and II. This study as Paper III explains how a quasar forms, ignites and releases energy as an amount of that emitted by dozens of galaxies. A main sequence star, after its fuel supply runs out, will, in terms of its mass, form a dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole. A normal galaxy, after its most stars have run out of their fuels and formed dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, will eventually shrink its size and collapse towards the center by gravity to form a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses. This collapse leads to that extremely hot stellar black holes merge each other and further into the massive black hole at the center and meantime release a huge amount of radiation energy that can be as great as that of a quasar. Therefore, when the stellar black holes of a galaxy collapse and merge into a supermassive black hole, the galaxy is activated and a quasar is born. In the black hole universe, the observed dis- tant quasars powered by supermassive black holes can be understood as donuts from the mother universe. They were actually formed in the mother universe and then swallowed into our universe. The nearby galaxies are still very young and thus quiet at the present time. They will be activated and further evolve into quasars after billions of years. At that time, they will enter the universe formed by the currently observed distant quasars as similar to the distant quasars entered our universe

  12. BAL Quasars without intrinsic X-ray absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ While observing a sample of quasars with broad absorption line (BAL) in their spectra, Prof. WANG Junxian and his colleagues Prof. WANG Tinggui and Dr. ZHOU Hongyan with the Center for Astrophysics at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) discovered that unlike most of BAL quasars, two of the observed do not show intrinsic X-ray absorption, indicating a different composition of matter in their outflows. This might help us better understand how black holes devour and project gases, according to the astronomers.

  13. Unveiling the intrinsic X-ray properties of broad absorption line quasars with a relatively unbiased sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morabito, Leah K.; Dai, Xinyu; Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Sivakoff, Gregory R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183 Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Shankar, Francesco [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 IBJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence of a higher intrinsic fraction of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) than that obtained in optical surveys, on which most previous X-ray studies of BALQSOs have focused. Here we present Chandra observations of 18 BALQSOs at z ∼ 2, selected from a near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) sample, where the BALQSO fraction is likely to be close to the intrinsic fraction. We measure photon indices using the stacked spectra of the optically faint (i – K{sub s} ≥ 2.3 mag) and optically bright (i – K{sub s} < 2.3 mag) samples to be Γ ≅ 1.5-2.1. We constrain their intrinsic column density by modeling the X-ray fractional hardness ratio, finding a mean column density of 3.5 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} assuming neutral absorption. We incorporate Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical measurements (rest frame UV) to study the broadband spectral index between the X-ray and UV bands, and compare this to a large sample of normal quasars. We estimate that the optically faint BALQSOs are X-ray weaker than the optically bright ones, and the entire sample of BALQSOs are intrinsically X-ray weak when compared to normal active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Correcting for magnification of X-ray emission via gravitational lensing by the central black hole viewed at large inclination angles makes these BALQSOs even more intrinsically X-ray weak. Finally, we estimate AGN kinetic feedback efficiencies of a few percent for an X-ray wind of 0.3c in high-ionization BALQSOs. Combined with energy carried by low-ionization BALQSOs and UV winds, the total kinetic energy in BALQSOs can be sufficient to provide AGN kinetic feedback required to explain the co-evolution between black holes and host galaxies.

  14. Discovery of 16 New z ∼ 5.5 Quasars: Filling in the Redshift Gap of Quasar Color Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Fan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Bian, Fuyan; Yang, Qian; McGreer, Ian D.; Yi, Weimin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Yue, Minghao; Wang, Shu; Li, Zefeng; Ding, Jiani; Dye, Simon; Lawrence, Andy

    2017-04-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous z ∼ 5.5 quasars. Quasars at z ∼ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for z ∼ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR, and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys—Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS), and Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer. From our pilot observations in the SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two z ∼ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct a uniform quasar sample at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7, with 17 quasars in a ∼4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J-band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected z ∼ 5.5 quasar.

  15. Surveys of Luminous Quasars in the Post-reionization Universe at z=5-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Green, Richard F.; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Ran; Yi, Weimin; UHS Team

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at z ~ 5 to 6, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium (IGM), quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. The quasar luminosity function (QLF) and its evolution at z >~ 5 is also needed to estimate the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background during and after the reionization epoch. McGreer et al. (2013) provided the first complete measurement of the z ~ 5 QLF. However, their work focused on faint quasars over a small sky area; there were only 8 quasars with M1450 4, previous studies have concluded that the number density evolution steepens at high redshift, such that luminous quasars decline as a population more steeply at higher redshift (z ~ 5.5) than from z=4 to 5. However, quasars at redshifts 5.3 Up to date, we have constructed an uniform luminous z ~ 5.5 quasar sample with 26 new quasars. Our final completed sample of quasars at z=5-6 will be used to study QLF, evolution model and IGM evolution in the post-deionization universe.

  16. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  17. Bright Star Astrometry with URAT

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) is observing the northern sky since April 2012 for an astrometric survey. Multiple overlaps per year are performed in a single bandpass (680$-$750 nm) using the "redlens" 20 cm aperture astrograph and a mosaic of large CCDs. Besides the regular, deep survey to magnitude 18.5, short exposures with an objective grating are taken to access stars as bright as 3rd magnitude. A brief overview of the program, observing and reductions is given. Positions on the 8 to 20 mas level are obtained of 66,202 Hipparcos stars at current epochs. These are compared to the Hipparcos Catalog to investigate its accuracy. About 20\\% of the observed Hipparcos stars are found to have inconsitent positions with the Hipparcos Catalog prediction on the 3 sigma level or over (about 75 mas or more discrepant position offsets). Some stars are now seen at an arcsec (or 25 sigma) off their Hipparcos Catalog predicted position.

  18. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D) space varying from bright to dark. The

  19. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies. Th

  20. The Multi-Wavelength Quasar Survey Ⅳ. Quasars in the Leo Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We aim to provide a quasar sample that is more complete than any previous surveys by using a combined selection technique to reduce the selection effects. Here we present the observational results for the X-ray candidates in the field of the Leo Cluster. We found 33 X-ray AGNs in this field of which 10 are new discoveries. The X-ray data and optical spectra of these AGNs are given. We also study the near-IR properties of the X-ray-selected AGNs by using the data from 2MASS. Most of the AGNs in our sample span the color range 0.0 < B- J < 2.5, 1.0 < J-Ks < 2.0 and 0.5 < H-Ks < 1.2.

  1. Galaxy selection and the surface brightness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, S S; Schombert, J M

    1995-01-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney (1976) suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman (1970) was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (\\ie approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity ...

  2. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF A z = 6.42 QUASAR HOST GALAXY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechtley, M.; Windhorst, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Scannapieco, E. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Ryan, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schneider, G.; Fan, X. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Keel, W. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Roettgering, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Strauss, M. A. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Yan, H. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Missouri, 701 South College Ave, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z = 6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point-spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m{sub J} > 22.8 and m{sub H} > 23.0 AB mag (2 {sigma}). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.''3 to 0.''5 radius of {mu}{sub J} > 23.5 and {mu}{sub H} > 23.7 AB mag arcsec{sup -2} (2 {sigma}). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and Sersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit ({mu}{sub J} > 23.5 AB mag arcsec{sup -2}) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m{sub J} > 22-23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log (IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope {beta} > -1.2 {+-} 0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z {approx_equal} 6 Lyman break galaxies.

  3. Chandra Observes Cosmic Traffic Pile-Up In Energetic Quasar Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    produced in gamma rays, a question that researchers are unable to resolve with current telescopes. The energy emitted from the jet in 3C273 probably comes from gas that falls toward a supermassive black hole at the center of the quasar, but is redirected by strong electromagnetic fields into a collimated jet. While the black hole itself is not observed directly, scientists can discern properties of the black hole by studying the jet. The formation of the jet from the matter that falls into the black hole is a process that remains poorly understood. The quasar 3C273 is no stranger to making astronomical news. Discovered in the 1960s, 3C273 was one of the first objects to be recognized a "quasi-stellar" object, due to its incredible optical and radio brightness, but perplexing properties. Only after careful consideration did astronomers determine that 3C273 and others of its ilk were not nearby stars, but instead incredibly powerful objects billions of light years away. The Chandra observation of 3C273 was made with both the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) and the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG), in conjunction with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). In addition to Dr. Marshall, the team of researchers includes J.J. Drake, A. Fruscione, J. Grimes, D. Harris, M. Juda, R. Kraft, S.S. Murray, D. Pease, A. Siemiginowska, S. Vrtilek, and B.J. Wargelin (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), P.M. Ogle (MIT), and S. Mathur (Ohio State University.) The HRC was built for NASA by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. The HETG and ACIS instruments were built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The LETG was built by the Space Research Organization of the Netherlands and the Max Plank Institute. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime

  4. The near-to-mid infrared spectrum of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Mateos, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We analyse a sample of 85 luminous L3um > 10^45.5 erg/s quasars with restframe ~2-11um spectroscopy from AKARI and Spitzer. Their high luminosity allows a direct determination of the near-infrared quasar spectrum free from host galaxy emission. A semi-empirical model consisting of a single template for the accretion disk and two blackbodies for the dust emission successfully reproduces the 0.1-10um spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Excess emission at 1-2um over the best-fitting model suggests that hotter dust is necessary in addition to the ~1200K blackbody and the disk to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectrum. Variation in the extinction affecting the disk and in the relative strength of the disk and dust components accounts for the diversity of individual SEDs. Quasars with higher dust-to-disk luminosity ratios show slightly redder infrared continua and less prominent silicate emission. We find no luminosity dependence in the shape of the average infrared quasar spectrum. The equivalent width of P...

  5. Locating Star-Forming Regions in Quasar Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Shemmer, O; Netzer, H; Gronwall, C; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R; Sturm, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II] $\\lambda$3727, H$\\beta$, [O III] $\\lambda$5007 and Pa$\\alpha$ images, taken with the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically aroun...

  6. Comparison of Approaches to Photometric Redshift Estimation of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yang; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Tian, Hai-Jun

    We probe many kinds of approaches used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars, including KNN (K-nearest neighbor algorithm), Lasso (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator), PLS (Partial Least Square regression), ridge regression, SGD (Stochastic Gradient Descent) and Extra-Trees.

  7. A morphological and spectral study of GPS galaxies and quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, RT; Tschager, W; Snellen, IAG; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; van Langevelde, HJ; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Hirabayashi, H; Preston, RA; Gurvits, LI

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed HALCA and global VLBI data for 2021+614, the first of eleven GPS quasars and galaxies to be observed by HALCA. We show that 2021+614 is a compact symmetric object of overall size similar to 40 pc, and confirm that the speed of separation of the two dominant lobes is approximately on

  8. Multifrequency observations of the flaring quasar 1156+295

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Bregman, J. N.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.; Pica, A. J.; Pollock, J. T.; Leacock, R. J.; Smith, A. G.; Webb, J. R.; Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1983-01-01

    A report is presented on the optically violent variable quasar 1156+295, known also as 4C 29.45 and Ton 599. A large outburst of this quasar was discovered in April 1981 in the course of a program to obtain simultaneous multifrequency spectra of variable quasars. Ultraviolet observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite were coordinated with ground-based observations at radio, infrared, and optical wavelengths. Measurements were made at four epochs starting immediately after the outburst was discovered, when the B-magnitude was 14.0, and at intervals of 4 days, 60 days and 1 year. The luminosity integrated only over observed wavelength bands was approximately 3 x 10 to the 48th ergs/sec on the first epoch of observation. Modeling of the source with a synchrotron self-Compton model suggests that the core of the source has a linear dimension of 0.01 pc, a magnetic field strength in the range 0.1-30 gauss, and a bulk relativistic motion in the quasar rest frame characterized by a Lorentz factor in the range 2-8.

  9. Investigating the Structure of the Windy Torus in Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Abado, M M; Keating, S K

    2015-01-01

    Thermal mid-infrared emission of quasars requires an obscuring structure that can be modeled as a magneto-hydrodynamic wind in which radiation pressure on dust shapes the outflow. We have taken the dusty wind models presented by Keating and collaborators that generated quasar mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and explored their properties (such as geometry, opening angle, and ionic column densities) as a function of Eddington ratio and X-ray weakness. In addition, we present new models with a range of magnetic field strengths and column densities of the dust-free shielding gas interior to the dusty wind. We find this family of models -- with input parameters tuned to accurately match the observed mid-IR power in quasar SEDs -- provides reasonable values of the Type 1 fraction of quasars and the column densities of warm absorber gas, though it does not explain a purely luminosity-dependent covering fraction for either. Furthermore, we provide predictions of the cumulative distribution of E(B-V...

  10. Outflow and hot dust emission in high redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z~2 non-BAL quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near infrared (NIR) slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of CIV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, CIV regions are dominated by outflows so BAI and FWHM(CIV) can reliably reflect the general property and velocity of outflows, respectively. While in low Eddington ratio quasars, CIV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so BAI and FWHM(C...

  11. Outflow and hot dust emission in broad absorption line quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Tinggui; Xing, Feijun; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated a sample of 2099 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with z=1.7-2.2 built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven and the Wide-field Infrared Survey. This sample is collected from two BAL quasar samples in the literature, and refined by our new algorithm. Correlations of outflow velocity and strength with hot dust indicator (beta_NIR) and other quasar physical parameters, such as Eddington ratio, luminosity and UV continuum slope, are explored in order to figure out which parameters drive outflows. Here beta_NIR is the near-infrared continuum slope, a good indicator of the amount of hot dust emission relative to accretion disk emission. We confirm previous findings that outflow properties moderately or weakly depends on Eddington ratio, UV slope and luminosity. For the first time, we report moderate and significant correlations of outflow strength and velocity with beta_NIR in BAL quasars. It is consistent with the behavior of blueshifted broad emission lines in non-BAL quasa...

  12. Line-driven radiative outflows in luminous quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Rebecca A A; Allen, James T; Ferland, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of ~19500 narrow (<200 km/s) CIV 1548.2,1550.8 absorbers in ~34000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar spectra is presented. The statistics of the number of absorbers as a function of outflow-velocity shows that in approximately two-thirds of outflows, with multiple CIV absorbers present, absorbers are line-locked at the 500 km/s velocity separation of the CIV absorber doublet; appearing as 'triplets' in the quasar spectra. Line-locking is an observational signature of radiative line driving in outflowing material, where the successive shielding of 'clouds' of material in the outflow locks the clouds together in outflow velocity. Line-locked absorbers are seen in both broad absorption line quasars (BALs) and non-BAL quasars with comparable frequencies and with velocities out to at least 20000 km/s. There are no detectable differences in the absorber properties and the dust content of single CIV doublets and line-locked CIV doublets. The gas associated with both single and line-locked CIV absorption...

  13. Insights into Quasar UV Spectra Using Unsupervised Clustering Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tammour, Aycha; Daley, Mark; Richards, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning can provide powerful tools to detect patterns in multi-dimensional parameter space. We use K-means -a simple yet powerful unsupervised clustering algorithm which picks out structure in unlabeled data- to study a sample of quasar UV spectra from the Quasar Catalog of the 10th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey of Paris et al. (2014). Detecting patterns in large datasets helps us gain insights into the physical conditions and processes giving rise to the observed properties of quasars. We use K-means to find clusters in the parameter space of the equivalent width (EW), the blue- and red-half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) of the Mg II 2800 A line, the C IV 1549 A line, and the C III] 1908 A blend in samples of Broad Absorption-Line (BAL) and non-BAL quasars at redshift 1.6-2.1. Using this method, we successfully recover correlations well-known in the UV regime such as the anti-correlation between the EW and blueshift of the C IV emission line and the shape of the ionizing Spectra Energy...

  14. Environments of Strong / Ultrastrong, Ultraviolet Fe II Emitting Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Clowes, Roger G; Soechting, Ilona K; Graham, Matthew J; Campusano, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the strength of ultraviolet Fe II emission from quasars within the dense environments of Large Quasar Groups (LQGs) in comparison with quasars elsewhere, for 1.1 = 45 Ang. (more precisely, ultrastrong-plus with W2400 >= 44 Ang.) have preferred nearest-neighbour separations of ~ 30-50 Mpc to the adjacent quasar of any W2400 strength. No such effect is seen for the ultrastrong emitters that are not in LQGs. The possibilities for increasing the strength of the Fe II emission appear to be iron abundance, Ly-alpha fluorescence, and microturbulence, and probably all of these operate. The dense environment of the LQGs may have led to an increased rate of star formation and an enhanced abundance of iron in the nuclei of galaxies. Similarly the dense environment may have led to more active blackholes and increased Ly-alpha fluorescence. The preferred nearest-neighbour separation for the stronger emitters would appear to suggest a dynamical component, such as microturbulence. In one particular LQ...

  15. Mid-infrared spectra of optically selected type 2 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Strauss, Michael A; Krolik, Julian H

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 quasars are luminous Active Galactic Nuclei whose central engines are seen through large amounts of gas and dust. We present Spitzer spectra of twelve type 2 quasars selected on the basis of their optical emission line properties. Within this sample, we find a surprising diversity of spectra, from those that are featureless to those showing strong PAH emission, deep silicate absorption at 10 micron, hydrocarbon absorption, high-ionization emission lines and H_2 rotational emission lines. About half of the objects in the sample are likely Compton-thick, including the two with the deepest Si absorption. The median star-formation luminosity of the objects in our sample measured from the strength of the PAH features is 5x10^11 L_sun, much higher than for field galaxies or for any other AGN sample, but similar to other samples of type 2 quasars. This suggests an evolutionary link between obscured quasars and peak star formation activity in the host galaxy. Despite the high level of star formation, the bolom...

  16. The discovery of timescale-dependent color variability of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu-Han; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Yang [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Ya, E-mail: sunyh92@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Quasars are variable on timescales from days to years in UV/optical and generally appear bluer while they brighten. The physics behind the variations in fluxes and colors remains unclear. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey g- and r-band photometric monitoring data for quasars in Stripe 82, we find that although the flux variation amplitude increases with timescale, the color variability exhibits the opposite behavior. The color variability of quasars is prominent at timescales as short as ∼10 days, but gradually reduces toward timescales up to years. In other words, the variable emission at shorter timescales is bluer than that at longer timescales. This timescale dependence is clearly and consistently detected at all redshifts from z = 0 to 3.5; thus, it cannot be due to contamination to broadband photometry from emission lines that do not respond to fast continuum variations. The discovery directly rules out the possibility that simply attributes the color variability to contamination from a non-variable redder component such as the host galaxy. It cannot be interpreted as changes in global accretion rate either. The thermal accretion disk fluctuation model is favored in the sense that fluctuations in the inner, hotter region of the disk are responsible for short-term variations, while longer-term and stronger variations are expected from the larger and cooler disk region. An interesting implication is that one can use quasar variations at different timescales to probe disk emission at different radii.

  17. Mean Spectral Energy Distributions and Bolometric Corrections for Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Mehta, Sajjan S; Vogeley, Michael S; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; 10.1088/0067-0049/206/1/4

    2013-01-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.0641.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope, a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis (PCA) trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extream-UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possib...

  18. Using Quasars as Standard Candles for Studying Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Watson, D.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated (Watson et al. 2011, ApJ, 740, L49) that quasars, or more generally active galactic nuclei (AGNs), can be used as standard candles for measuring distances in the universe, similar to Type Ia supernovae (SNe). Here, we present the initial findings of this new method...

  19. The buried Balmer-edge signatures from quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Boisson, Catherine; Blaes, Omer M

    2004-01-01

    In our previous paper, we have reported the detection of a Balmer edge absorption feature in the polarized flux of one quasar (Ton 202). We have now found similar Balmer edge features in the polarized flux of four more quasars (4C09.72, 3C95, B2 1208+32, 3C323.1), and possibly a few more, out of 14 newly observed with the VLT and Keck telescopes. In addition, we also re-observed Ton 202, but we did not detect such a dramatic feature, apparently due to polarization variability (the two observations are one-year apart). The polarization measurements of some quasars are affected by an interstellar polarization in our Galaxy, but the measurements have been corrected for this effect reasonably well. Since the broad emission lines are essentially unpolarized and the polarization is confined only to the continuum in the five quasars including Ton 202 in both epochs, the polarized flux is considered to originate interior to the broad emission line region. The Balmer edge feature seen in the polarized flux is most sim...

  20. Caught in the Act: Discovery of a Physical Quasar Triplet

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, E P; Decarli, R; Fumagalli, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a triplet of quasars at z~1.51. The whole system is well accommodated within 25 arcsec (i.e., 200 kpc in projected distance). The velocity differences among the three objects (as measured through the broad MgII emission line) are less than 1000 km/s, suggesting that the quasars belong to the same physical structure. Broad band NIR images of the field do not reveal evidence of galaxies or galaxy clusters that could act as a gravitational lens, ruling out the possibility that two or all the three quasars are multiple images of a single, strongly lensed source. QQQ J1519+0627 is the second triplet of quasars known up to date. We estimate that these systems are extremely rare in terms of simple accidental superposition. The lack of strong galaxy overdensity suggests that this peculiar system is harboured in the seeds of a yet-to-be-formed massive structure. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory with the New Technology Telescope (NTT) of the European Southern Obser...

  1. A fast optical outburst of the quasar CTA102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorstad, Svetlana; Larionov, Valeri; Mokrushina, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The quasar CTA102 is being in an active state at gamma-ray and optical wavelengths since 2015, with prominent gamma-ray and optical outbursts observed in the beginning of 2016 (see www.bu.edu/blazars/VLBA_GLAST/cta102.html).

  2. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below. The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans. Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide. Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  3. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  4. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  5. Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars and AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, B.

    2004-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are multiwavelength emitters. To have any hope of understanding them, or even to determine their energy output, we must observe them in multiple wavebands using many telescopes. I will review what we have learned from broad-band observations of relatively bright, low-redshift AGN over the past ˜ 15 years. AGN can be found at all wavelengths but each provides a different view of the intrinsic population, often with little overlap between samples selected in different wavebands. I look forward to the full view of the intrinsic population which we will obtain over the next few years with surveys using today's new, sensitive observatories. These surveys are already finding enough new and different AGN candidates to pose the question ``What IS an AGN?".

  6. Photometric Observations of Selected, Optically Bright Quasars for Space Interferometry Mission and Other Future Celestial Reference Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-31

    SDSS r-magnitude Figure 8. Plot of (r−R), the difference of the SDSS r magnitude and observed R magnitude, against SDSS r magnitude -0.2 0 0.2 0.4...0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 (g -r ) m ag ni tu de (V-R) magnitude Figure 9. Color–color plot of SDSS (g−r) against...with SDSS We also made a comparison of our results with a dedicated sample, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ( SDSS DR5; Adelman- McCarthy et al. 2007

  7. Superluminal non-ballistic jet swing in the quasar NRAO 150 revealed by mm-VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Agudo, I; Krichbaum, T P; Marscher, A P; Gonidakis, I; Diamond, P J; Perucho, M; Alef, W; Graham, D A; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Bremer, M; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Barrena, R

    2007-01-01

    NRAO 150 -a compact and bright radio to mm source showing core/jet structure- has been recently identified as a quasar at redshift z=1.52 through a near-IR spectral observation. To study the jet kinematics on the smallest accessible scales and to compute the first estimates of its basic physical properties, we have analysed the ultra-high-resolution images from a new monitoring program at 86 GHz and 43 GHz with the GMVA and the VLBA, respectively. An additional archival and calibration VLBA data set, covering from 1997 to 2007, has been used. Our data shows an extreme projected counter-clock-wise jet position angle swing at an angular rate of up to ~11 deg./yr within the inner ~31 pc of the jet, which is associated with a non-ballistic superluminal motion of the jet within this region. The results suggest that the magnetic field could play an important role in the dynamics of the jet in NRAO 150, which is supported by the large values of the magnetic field strength obtained from our first estimates. The extre...

  8. Milliarcsecond-Scale Structure in the Gamma-Ray Loud Quasar PKS 1622-297

    CERN Document Server

    Wajima, K; Kobayashi, H; Hirabayashi, H; Murata, Y; Edwards, P G; Tsuboi, M; Fujisawa, K; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Bignall, Hayley E.; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Murata, Yasuhiro; Edwards, Philip G.; Tsuboi, Masato; Fujisawa, Kenta

    2005-01-01

    We have made a high-resolution VLBI observation of the gamma-ray loud quasar PKS 1622-297 with the HALCA spacecraft and ground radio telescopes at 5 GHz in 1998 February, almost three years after the source exhibited a spectacular GeV gamma-ray flare. The source shows an elongated structure toward the west on the parsec scale. The visibility data are well modeled by three distinct components; a bright core and two weaker jet components. Comparison with previous observations confirms that the jet components have an apparent superluminal motion up to 12.1 h^{-1}c, with the inner jet components having lower superluminal speeds. We apply the inverse Compton catastrophe model and derive a Doppler factor, \\delta, of 2.45, which is somewhat lower than that of other gamma-ray loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), suggesting the source was in a more quiescent phase at the epoch of our observation. As an alternative probe of the sub-parsec scale structure, we also present the results from multi-epoch ATCA total flux moni...

  9. Gravitational Microlensing of a Reverberating Quasar Broad Line Region - I. Method and Qualitative Results

    CERN Document Server

    Garsden, H; Lewis, G F

    2011-01-01

    The kinematics and morphology of the broad emission line region (BELR) of quasars are the subject of significant debate. The two leading methods for constraining BELR properties are microlensing and reverberation mapping. Here we combine these two methods with a study of the microlensing behaviour of the BELR in Q2237+0305, as a change in continuum emission (a "flare") passes through it. Beginning with some generic models of the BELR - sphere, bicones, disk - we slice in velocity and time to produce brightness profiles of the BELR over the duration of the flare. These are numerically microlensed to determine whether microlensing of reverberation mapping provides new information about the properties of BELRs. We describe our method and show images of the models as they are flaring, and the unlensed and lensed spectra that are produced. Qualitative results and a discussion of the spectra are given in this paper, highlighting some effects that could be observed. Our conclusion is that the influence of microlensi...

  10. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  11. The distribution of neutral hydrogen around high-redshift galaxies and quasars in the EAGLE simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmati, Alireza; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The observed high covering fractions of neutral hydrogen (HI) with column densities above $\\sim 10^{17} \\rm{cm}^{-2}$ around Lyman-Break Galaxies (LBGs) and bright quasars at redshifts z ~ 2-3 has been identified as a challenge for simulations of galaxy formation. We use the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation, which has been shown to reproduce a wide range of galaxy properties and for which the subgrid feedback was calibrated without considering gas properties, to study the distribution of HI around high-redshift galaxies. We predict the covering fractions of strong HI absorbers ($N_{\\rm{HI}} \\gtrsim 10^{17} \\rm{cm}^{-2}$) inside haloes to increase rapidly with redshift but to depend only weakly on halo mass. For massive ($M_{200} \\gtrsim 10^{12} {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$) halos the covering fraction profiles are nearly scale-invariant and we provide fitting functions that reproduce the simulation results. While efficient feedback is required to increase the HI covering fractions to the high observed values...

  12. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  13. Space Brightness Evaluation for a Daylit Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maruyama

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems for lighting design is how to reduce an electric energy. One way to solve this problem is use of daylight, but little is known how to perceive a brightness of a room illuminated by daylight come in through a window and artificial light. Although the horizontal illuminance increases because of daylight, we would not perceive the room as bright as brightness estimated by the illuminance. The purpose of this study is to measure the space brightness for daylit room and to propose a evaluation method. The experiment was conducted with a couple of miniature office rooms, standard room and test room. Test room has several types of windows and standard room has no window. Subject was asked to evaluate the brightness of the test room relative to the standard room with method of magnitude estimation. It was found that brightness of daylit room did not increase simply with horizontal illuminance. Subject perceived a daylit room darker than a room illuminated only by the artificial light even if horizontal illuminance of these room was same. The effect of daylight on space brightness would vary with the window size and intensity of daylight or artificial light.

  14. The extended High A(V) Quasar Survey: Searching for dusty absorbers toward mid-infrared selected quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krogager, J -K; Heintz, K E; Geier, S; Ledoux, C; Møller, P; Noterdaeme, P; Venemans, B P; Vestergaard, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic survey for dusty intervening absorption systems, particularly damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs), towards reddened quasars. The candidate quasars are selected from mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer combined with optical and near-infrared photometry. Out of 1073 candidates, we secure low-resolution spectra for 108 using the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain. Based on the spectra, we are able to classify 100 of the 108 targets as quasars. A large fraction (50 %) is observed to have broad absorption lines (BALs). Moreover, we find 6 quasars with strange breaks in their spectra, which are not consistent with regular dust reddening. Using template fitting we infer the amount of reddening along each line of sight ranging from A(V)$\\approx$0.1 mag to 1.2 mag (assuming an SMC extinction curve). In four cases, the reddening is consistent with dust exhibiting the 2175{\\AA} feature caused by an intervening absorber, and for two of...

  15. A Quasar-Galaxy Mixing Diagram: Quasar Spectral Energy Distribution Shapes in the Optical to Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Heng; Kelly, Brandon C; Civano, Francesca; Bongiorno, Angela; Zamorani, Gianni; Celotti, Annalisa; Ho, Luis C; Merloni, Andrea; Jahnke, Knud; Comastri, Andrea; Trump, Jonathan R; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Salvato, Mara; Brusa, Marcella; Impey, Chris D; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Vignali, Cristian; Silverman, John D; Urry, C Megan; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We define the quasar-galaxy mixing diagram by the slopes of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of quasars from $1\\mu m$ to 3000 \\AA\\ and from $1\\mu m$ to 3 $\\mu m$ in the rest frame. The mixing diagram can easily distinguish among quasar-dominated, galaxy-dominated and reddening-dominated SED shapes. By studying the position of the 413 XMM selected Type 1 AGN in the wide-field "Cosmic Evolution Survey" (COSMOS) in the mixing diagram, we find that a combination of the Elvis et al. (1994, hereafter E94) quasar SED with various contributions from galaxy emission and some dust reddening is remarkably effective in describing the SED shape near $1\\mu m$ for large ranges of redshift, luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio of type 1 AGN. In particular, the location in the mixing diagram of the highest luminosity AGN is very close (within 1$\\sigma$) to that expected on the basis of the E94 SED. The mixing diagram can also be used to estimate the host galaxy fraction and reddening in the SED. We also show ...

  16. Structure of Quasar Continuum Emission Regions and Cosmology from Optical and X-Ray Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-02

    Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26666. This research also made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster ...obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. 3 Contents 1 Introduction 4 1.1 Quasars

  17. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Adam D; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J; Newman, Jeffrey A; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; Miller, Adam A; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SDSS-IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will perform measurements of the cosmological distance scale via application of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to samples of quasars and galaxies. Quasar surveys are particularly useful in the BAO context as they can trace extremely large volumes back to moderately high redshift. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over a 7500 sq. deg. area. First, z > 2.1 quasars will be targeted to improve BAO measurements in the Lyman-Alpha Forest. Second, a homogeneously selected "CORE" sample of quasars at 0.9 2.1 quasars. A supplemental selection based on variability of quasars in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ~3-4 per sq. deg. z > 2.1 quasars to g 500,000 new spectroscopically confirmed quasars and > 500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of SDSS-IV, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra...

  18. Exploratory Study of the X-Ray Properties of Quasars With Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, Toru; Chartas, George; Charlton, Jane C

    2008-01-01

    We have used archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of quasars hosting intrinsic narrow UV absorption lines (intrinsic NALs) to carry out an exploratory survey of their X-ray properties. Our sample consists of three intrinsic-NAL quasars and one "mini-BAL" quasar, plus four quasars without intrinsic absorption lines for comparison. These were drawn in a systematic manner from an optical/UV-selected sample. The X-ray properties of intrinsic-NAL quasars are indistinguishable from those of "normal" quasars. We do not find any excess absorption in quasars with intrinsic NALs, with upper limits of a few times 10^22 cm^-2. We compare the X-ray and UV properties of our sample quasars by plotting the equivalent width and blueshift velocity of the intrinsic NALs and the X-ray spectral index against the "optical-to-X-ray" slope, alpha-ox. When BAL quasars and other AGNs with intrinsic NALs are included, the plots suggest that intrinsic-NAL quasars form an extension of the BAL sequences and tend to bridge the gap ...

  19. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  20. Efficient Photometric Selection of Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: II. ~1,000,000 Quasars from Data Release Six

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Gray, Alexander G; Riegel, Ryan N; Nichol, Robert C; Brunner, Robert J; Szalay, Alexander S; Schneider, Donald P; Anderson, Scott F

    2008-01-01

    We present a catalog of 1,172,157 quasar candidates selected from the photometric imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The objects are all point sources to a limiting magnitude of i=21.3 from 8417 sq. deg. of imaging from SDSS Data Release 6 (DR6). This sample extends our previous catalog by using the latest SDSS public release data and probing both UV-excess and high-redshift quasars. While the addition of high-redshift candidates reduces the overall efficiency (quasars:quasar candidates) of the catalog to ~80%, it is expected to contain no fewer than 850,000 bona fide quasars -- ~8 times the number of our previous sample, and ~10 times the size of the largest spectroscopic quasar catalog. Cross-matching between our photometric catalog and spectroscopic quasar catalogs from both the SDSS and 2dF Surveys, yields 88,879 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. For judicious selection of the most robust UV-excess sources (~500,000 objects in all), the efficiency is nearly 97% -- more than sufficient...

  1. The Pan-STARRS1 distant z>5.6 quasar survey: more than 100 quasars within the first Gyr of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Mazzucchelli, C; Walter, F; Fan, X; Stern, D; Schlafly, E; Chambers, K C; Rix, H-W; Jiang, L; McGreer, I; Simcoe, R; Wang, F; Yang, J; Morganson, E; De Rosa, G; Greiner, J; Baloković, M; Burgett, W S; Cooper, T; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Jun, H D; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Miller, D; Schindler, J -T; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C; Yang, Q

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.65.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.

  2. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Pushing further back toward the first generation of objects to form in the universe, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed the three most distant known quasars and found them to be prodigious producers of X-rays. This indicates that the supermassive black holes powering them were already in place when the Universe was only about one billion years old. "Chandra's superb sensitivity has allowed the detection of X-rays from the dawn of the modern universe, when the first massive black holes and galaxies were forming," said Niel Brandt of Penn State University, leader of one the teams involved. "These results indicate that future X-ray surveys should be able to detect the first black holes to form in the Universe." The three quasars were recently discovered at optical wavelengths by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and are 13 billion light years from Earth, making them the most distant known quasars. The X-rays Chandra detected were emitted when the universe was only a billion years old, about 7 percent of the present age of the Universe. Since X-rays reveal conditions in the immediate vicinity of supermassive black holes, Brandt proposed that Chandra look at these objects in three snapshots of about two hours each to see if they were different from their older counterparts. The observations on January 29, 2002 were made public immediately and the four different teams quickly went to work on them. Brandt's team concluded that the quasars looked similar to ones that were at least twice as old, so the conditions around the central black hole had not changed much in that time, contrary to some theoretical expectations. A team led by Smita Mathur of Ohio State University reached a similar conclusion. "These young quasars do not appear to be any different from their older cousins, based upon our current understanding and assumptions," said Mathur. "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about them may be that they are so absolutely unremarkable." Jill Bechtold of the

  3. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  4. The analogy between stereo depth and brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, A; Stevens, K A

    1989-01-01

    Apparent depth in stereograms exhibits various simultaneous-contrast and induction effects analogous to those reported in the luminance domain. This behavior suggests that stereo depth, like brightness, is reconstructed, ie recovered from higher-order spatial derivatives or differences of the original signal. The extent to which depth is analogous to brightness is examined. There are similarities in terms of contrast effects but dissimilarities in terms of the lateral inhibition effects traditionally attributed to underlying spatial-differentiation operators.

  5. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN-Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  6. Parsec-scale structure of quasars: dawn of the golden age?

    CERN Document Server

    Ojha, Roopesh

    2013-01-01

    Half a century after their discovery, the study of quasars remains one of the most fascinating intellectual challenges in astronomy. Quasars are laboratories for everything from relativity to magnetohydrodynamics and are perhaps the best available probes for cosmology. A tremendous amount has been learned about quasars and yet many of the most fundamental questions about their physics remain open. Parsec-scale observations have played an indispensable role in building up our current understanding of quasars; virtually everything we know about quasars depends on such observations. However, the finest hour for parsec scale observations may be just beginning. This is partly due to the development of highly reliable VLBI networks (which is continuing) but mostly due to the unprecedented availability of multiepoch, simultaneous, broadband observations that have long been the `holy grail' for quasar researchers.

  7. Color-Redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wei Zhang; Xu Zhou

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the χ2 minimization technique, we describe a general method for estimating the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compared them with their spectroscopic redshifts. The difference is less than 0.1 for 47% of the quasars and less than 0.2for 68%. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars,galaxies and quasars both on the SDSS system and on the BATC system, we expect that we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficaciously with the latter than with the former, provided the BATC survey can detect objects with magnitudes fainter than 21.

  8. Color-redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X B; Zhou, X; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the \\chi^2 minimization technique, we demonstrated a general method to estimate the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving the theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compare them with the spectroscopic redshifts. The redshift difference is smaller than 0.1 for 47% of quasars and 0.2 for 68 % of them. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars, galaxies and quasars in both the SDSS and BATC photometric systems, we expected that with the BATC system of 15 intermediate filters we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficiently than in the SDSS, provided the BATC survey could detect objects with magnitude fainter than 21.

  9. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  10. Bayesian High-Redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Peters, Christina M; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D; Trump, Jonathan R; Riegel, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection "wedges" and to 2.23. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  11. The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of Low Redshift Radio Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; O'Dea, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum of three low redshift ($z \\sim 0.6$) radio loud quasars, 3C 95, 3C 57 and PKS 0405-123. The spectra were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) of the Hubble Space Telescope. The bolometric thermal emission, $L_{bol}$, associated with the accretion flow is a large fraction of the Eddington limit for all of these sources. We estimate the long term time averaged jet power, $\\overline{Q}$, for the three sources. $\\overline{Q}/L_{bol}$, is shown to lie along the correlation of $\\overline{Q}/L_{bol}$ and $\\alpha_{EUV}$ found in previous studies of the EUV continuum of intermediate and high redshift quasars, where the EUV continuum flux density between 1100 \\AA\\, and 700 \\AA\\, is defined by $F_{\

  12. Two to Tango? Binary Quasars, their Environments, and the Merger Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Merger/feedback scenarios linking AGN and galaxy evolution to cosmological structure formation seem wildly successful. Close quasar pairs, which are rare but show a significant excess over the extrapolated large-scale quasar correlation function, are the strongest candidates for merger triggering we have. But a competing theory posits that their excess is only due to their inhabiting locally overdense environments. To address this controversy, we propose to observe 9 close quasar pairs. Their X-ray luminosity, spectra, and broadband SEDs will be compared to hundreds of isolated SDSS quasars already imaged and analyzed. Proposed NOAO 4-meter imaging provides complementary tests for environmental overdensities.

  13. Correlation between radio and broad-line emissions in radio-loud quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, X; Cao, Xinwu

    1999-01-01

    Radio emission is a good indicator of the jet power of radio-loud quasars, while the emission in broad-line can well represent the accretion disc radiation in quasars. We compile a sample of all sources of which the broad-line fluxes are available from 1 Jy, S4 and S5 radio source catalogues. A correlation between radio and broad-line emission for this sample of radio-loud quasars is presented, which is in favour of a close link between the accretion processes and the relativistic jets. The BL Lac objects seem to follow the statistical behaviour of the quasars, but with fainter broad-line emission.

  14. A Deep Multicolor Survey; 3, Additional Spectroscopy and Implications for the Number Counts of Faint Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kennefick, D; Hall, P B; Green, R F; Kennefick, Julia D.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Green, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614, astro-ph/9512052). We have identified 9 new quasars with 0.3 3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B-R) and (V-R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3 3 over predictions based on models by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.

  15. On the selection effect of radio quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Zhou, Hongyan; Wu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We identified a large sample of radio quasars, including those with complex radio morphology, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Faint Images of Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST). Using this sample, we inspect previous radio quasar samples for selection effects resulting from complex radio morphologies and adopting positional coincidence between radio and optical sources alone. We find that 13.0% and 8.1% radio quasars do not show a radio core within 1.2 and 2 arcsecs of their optical position, and thus are missed in such samples. Radio flux is under-estimated by a factor of more than 2 for an additional 8.7% radio quasars. These missing radio extended quasars are more radio loud with a typical radio-to-optical flux ratio namely radio loudness RL >100, and radio power P >10^{25} W/Hz. They account for more than one third of all quasars with RL>100. The color of radio extended quasars tends to be bluer than the radio compact quasars. This suggests that radio extended quasars are more radio powerful ...

  16. Observational Constraints on Quasar Black Hole Mass Distributions, Eddington Ratio Distributions, and Lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan, X.

    2010-01-01

    I will present the black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad line quasars in the SDSS DR3. We employ a powerful Bayesian statistical technique that corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates. We find evidence that the most massive black hole appeared as quasars...... earlier in the universe, and that most quasars are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit. I will also present constraints on the quasar lifetime and maximum black hole mass, derived from the mass functions....

  17. Cosine directions using Rao-Blackwell Theorem and Hausdorff metric in Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Byron E

    2015-01-01

    This analysis will determine the equations of the cosine directions for all flux of the optical spectrum in quasars. Studies on Hausdorff metric will greatly enhance our understanding of quasars distances. This study will complete steps in the classification of quasars by finding the minimum variance of flux by using the RaoBlackwell Theorem. The papers of C. R. Rao and D. Blackwell will be examined to clarify more of the above theorem. Keywords: Theory of Flux, SDSS, Quasars, Redshift (z), Population Perimeters, Regression Analysis

  18. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT QUASAR AT z ∼ 6 AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yongjung; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Duho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Building 45, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Minjin; Park, Won-Kee [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Karouzos, Marios [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hoon [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Pak, Soojong, E-mail: yjkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr [School of Space Research and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies suggest that faint active galactic nuclei may be responsible for the reionization of the universe. Confirmation of this scenario requires spectroscopic identification of faint quasars (M{sub 1450} > −24 mag) at z ≳ 6, but only a very small number of such quasars have been spectroscopically identified so far. Here, we report the discovery of a faint quasar IMS J220417.92+011144.8 at z ∼ 6 in a 12.5 deg{sup 2} region of the SA22 field of the Infrared Medium-deep Survey (IMS). The spectrum of the quasar shows a sharp break at ∼8443 Å, with emission lines redshifted to z = 5.944 ± 0.002 and rest-frame ultraviolet continuum magnitude M{sub 1450} = −23.59 ± 0.10 AB mag. The discovery of IMS J220417.92+011144.8 is consistent with the expected number of quasars at z ∼ 6 estimated from quasar luminosity functions based on previous observations of spectroscopically identified low-luminosity quasars. This suggests that the number of M{sub 1450} ∼ −23 mag quasars at z ∼ 6 may not be high enough to fully account for the reionization of the universe. In addition, our study demonstrates that faint quasars in the early universe can be identified effectively with a moderately wide and deep near-infrared survey such as the IMS.

  19. Quasar Clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berk, D. E.; SDSS Collaboration

    2001-05-01

    We present initial results on quasar clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The data set consists of over 9000 quasars spanning a redshift range from near 0 to well-over 5. The two-point correlation function for the entire sample is well-fit on scales from ~ 1 to over 100h-1Mpc by a power-law with an index of -1.4 and a scale length of 6h-1Mpc -- similar to the parameterization for galaxies in the local universe. There is no evidence for evolution in either the power-law index or scale length with redshift, for an Ω m=1, Ω Λ =0 cosmology. We also examine the quasar clustering as a function of luminosity, and cosmological model. We discuss the scientific potential of the final SDSS sample of 105 quasars for large-scale structure studies. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a joint project of The University of Chicago, Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan Participation Group, The Johns Hopkins University, the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), New Mexico State University, Princeton University, the United States Naval Observatory, and the University of Washington. Apache Point Observatory, site of the SDSS telescopes, is operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC). Funding for the project has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the SDSS member institutions, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, Monbusho, and the Max Planck Society. The SDSS Web site is http://www.sdss.org/.

  20. Gemini Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Luminous z~6 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    shows no strong evolution in metallicity up to z$\\sim$6. The FeII/MgII ratio of the quasars is 4.9+/-1.4, consistent with low-redshift measurements. We estimate central BH masses of 10^9 to 10^{10} M_{\\sun} and Eddington luminosity ratios of order unity. We identify two MgII $\\lambda\\lambda$2796...