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Sample records for bright quasar survey

  1. Quasar evolution derived from the Palomar bright quasar survey and other complete quasar surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) consisting of 114 objects to an average limiting magnitude B = 16.16 over an area of 10,714 deg2. There are 92 quasars with M/sub B/<-23 in the sample. We use the BQS and complete samples from published surveys to derive models of the statistical evolution of quasars. The increase of space density with redshift depends strongly on absolute luminosity, being close to zero for low-luminosity quasars. Detailed predictions are given for the distribution of redshifts and magnitudes and for the total counts based on the evolution models

  2. X-ray observations of the bright quasar survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Einstein Observatory, X-ray observations of about 80 percent of the quasars in the Bright Quasar Survey located outside the declination range defined by 30 and 60 deg. X-ray emission has been detected above the 3-sigma level for 57 out of 66 quasars observed. This paper describes observations and data reduction and provides a summary of the more detailed analyses and discussion contained in the two accompanying papers (Schmidt and Green 1986, Avni and Tananbaum 1986). 22 references

  3. VLA observations of the Palomar bright quasar survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have optically surveyed some 10000 square degrees of the northern sky to search for bright quasars. Their final sample contains about 100 quasars. The B magnitudes of the sample range from 13.1 to 16.5, with most in the range 15.0-16.2. The redshifts range from 0.03 to over 2, considerably concentrated toward smaller values (median of 0.18). They observed 94 of these quasars with the partially complete VLA in November/December 1979, and detected radio emission from 27 of them, or 29%, to a limit of 1-2 mJy. It is concluded that bright quasars are definitely more likely to be detectable radio sources. (Auth.)

  4. VLA observations of objects in the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on the VLA observations (with 18 arcsec resolution) of all 114 objects from the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) are presented, and the relation between the radio luminosity and optical luminosity is discussed. It was found that most of the BQS quasars are radio quiet and have a radio flux density close to that of the optical flux density; however, 15-20 percent of the quasars are radio loud and are much brighter at radio than at optical wavelengths. The radio luminosity function was derived. It is shown that the radio emission from high-red-shift (z greater than 0.5) quasars is dominated by compact components; most quasars with R above 100 have small red shifts. 39 refs

  5. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). II. Discovery of 40 Bright Quasars Near the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Myungshin; Cho, Yunseok; Choi, Changsu; Ko, Jongwan; Song, Mimi

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of 40 bright quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at low Galactic latitude (b<20deg). The low Galactic latitude region has been considered a place to avoid when searching for extragalactic sources, because of the high Galactic extinction, as well as a large number of stars contaminating the sample selection. Bright quasars (R<~17) suffer more from such difficulties because they look like bright stars, which are numerous at low b, yet their surface number density is very low. In order to find quasars in this region of the sky less explored for extragalactic sources, we have started a survey of low Galactic latitude bright quasars as a part of the Seoul National University Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). Quasar candidates have been selected from radio and near-infrared (NIR) data. Out of 88 targets, we identify 29 bright quasars/AGNs around the antigalactic center, and 11 bright quasars/AGNs in the outskirts of the Galactic center, from two observing runs in 2006 at the Boh...

  6. The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS): DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Monroe, TalaWanda R; Tejos, N; Worseck, G; Hennawi, Joseph F; Schmidt, Tobias; Tumlinson, Jason; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We present the first data release (DR1) from our UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) for new $z \\sim 1$ active galactic nuclei (AGN) across the sky. Using simple GALEX UV and WISE near-IR color selection criteria, we generated a list of 1450 primary candidates with $FUV 0.5$. Including a small set of observed secondary candidates, we report the discovery of 217 AGN with $FUV < 18$ mag that had no previously reported spectroscopic redshift. These are excellent potential targets for UV spectroscopy before the end of the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} mission. The main data products are publicly released through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  7. An Exploratory Chandra Survey of a Well-Defined Sample of 35 Large Bright Quasar Survey Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, S. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Chartas, G.; Priddey, R.; Garmire, G.P.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present 4-7 ks Chandra observations of 35 Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the largest sample of sensitive, 0.5-8.0 keV X-ray observations of this class of quasars to date. The limited ranges in both redshift (z=1.42-2.90) and UV luminosity (a factor of ~12) of the sample also make it relatively uniform. Of 35 targets, 27 are detected for a detection fraction of 77%, and we confirm previous studies that find BAL quasars to be generally X-ray weak. Fi...

  8. Quasars near bright galaxies - results from the Jodrell Bank 966-MHz survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of bright galaxies around quasars from the Jodrell Bank 966-MHz survey has been investigated. No statistical evidence is found to support the hypothesis that nearby bright galaxies and quasars are physically associated. Some selection effects which lead to a correlation between pair separation and galaxy redshift are discussed. (author)

  9. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  10. Comparative statistical study of the chronometric and Friedman cosmologies based on the palomar bright quasar and other complete quasar surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palomar Bright Quasar Survey and other complete samples derived by Schmidt and Green from quasar surveys are used for comparative cosmological studies and for predictions of quasar counts. Systematic self-tests and mutual cross-tests of the chronometric and Friedman cosmologies are made. Nonparametric estimates of the normalized luminosity function are made that involve no assumption as to the homogeneity of the spatial distribution of quasars and are statistically optimal in this respect. The homogeneity question is studied independently by V/V/sub m/ tests

  11. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  12. The FIRST Bright Quasar Survey. II. 60 Nights and 1200 Spectra Later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST survey and the Automated Plate Measuring Facility (APM) catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey I (POSS-I) plates as the basis for constructing a new radio-selected sample of optically bright quasars. This is the first radio-selected sample that is competitive in size with current optically selected quasar surveys. Using only two basic criteria, radio-optical positional coincidence and optical morphology, quasars and BL Lac objects can be identified with 60% selection efficiency; the efficiency increases to 70% for objects fainter than 17 mag. We show that a more sophisticated selection scheme can predict with better than 85% reliability which candidates will turn out to be quasars. This paper presents the second installment of the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey (FBQS), with a catalog of 636 quasars distributed over 2682 deg2. The quasar sample is characterized and all spectra are displayed. The FBQS detects both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars out to redshift z>3. We find a large population of objects of intermediate radio loudness; there is no evidence in our sample for a bimodal distribution of radio characteristics. The sample includes ∼29 broad absorption line quasars, both high and low ionization, and a number of new objects with remarkable optical spectra. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society

  13. The FIRST Bright Quasar Survey. II. 60 Nights and 1200 Spectra Later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Richard L.; Becker, Robert H.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Impey, Chris D.; Petry, Catherine E.; Foltz, Craig B.; Chaffee, Frederic H.; Richards, Gordon T. (and others)

    2000-02-01

    We have used the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST survey and the Automated Plate Measuring Facility (APM) catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey I (POSS-I) plates as the basis for constructing a new radio-selected sample of optically bright quasars. This is the first radio-selected sample that is competitive in size with current optically selected quasar surveys. Using only two basic criteria, radio-optical positional coincidence and optical morphology, quasars and BL Lac objects can be identified with 60% selection efficiency; the efficiency increases to 70% for objects fainter than 17 mag. We show that a more sophisticated selection scheme can predict with better than 85% reliability which candidates will turn out to be quasars. This paper presents the second installment of the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey (FBQS), with a catalog of 636 quasars distributed over 2682 deg2. The quasar sample is characterized and all spectra are displayed. The FBQS detects both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars out to redshift z>3. We find a large population of objects of intermediate radio loudness; there is no evidence in our sample for a bimodal distribution of radio characteristics. The sample includes {approx}29 broad absorption line quasars, both high and low ionization, and a number of new objects with remarkable optical spectra. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society.

  14. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...... functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison......, and discussion of these mass functions will be made with other existing black hole mass functions, notably that based on the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog. We present the relationships used to estimate the black hole mass based on the MgII emission line; the relations are calibrated to the Hbeta and CIV relations...

  15. An X-ray survey of variable radio bright quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sample consisting primarily of radio bright quasars was observed in X-rays with the Einstein Observatory for times ranging from 1500 to 5000 seconds. Detected sources had luminosities ranging from 0.2 to 41.0 x 10 to the 45th power ergs/sec in the 0.5 to 4.5 keV band. Three of the fourteen objects which were reobserved showed flux increases greater than a factor of two on a time scale greater than six months. No variability was detected during the individual observations. The optical and X-ray luminosities are correlated, which suggests a common origin. However, the relationship (L sub x is approximately L sub op to the (.89 + or - .15)) found for historic radio variables may be significantly different than that reported for other radio bright sources. Some of the observed X-ray fluxes were substantially below the predicted self-Compton flux, assuming incoherent synchrotron emission and using VLBI results to constrain the size of the emission region, which suggests relativistic expansion in these sources. Normal CIV emission in two of the sources with an overpredicted Compton component suggests that although they, like BL Lac objects, have highly relativistic material apparently moving at small angle to the line of sight, they have a smaller fraction of the continuum component in the beam

  16. A new magnetic white dwarf discovered during the Large Bright Quasar Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previously unknown magnetic white dwarf has been discovered as part of the Large, Bright Quasar Survey (Foltz et al., 1988). The absorption features are identified with transitions of hydrogen and are analyzed in the context of high-field Zeeman models to derive a polar dipole field strength of 24 x 10 to the 6th G at the stellar surface. 11 refs

  17. The SDSS View of the Palomar-Green Bright Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jester, S; Richards, G T; Green, R F; Schmidt, M; Hall, P B; Strauss, M A; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Stoughton, C; Gunn, J E; Brinkmann, J; Kent, S M; Smith, J A; Tucker, D L; Yanny, B; Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Yanny, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, we define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). We find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects w...

  18. MASS FUNCTIONS OF THE ACTIVE BLACK HOLES IN DISTANT QUASARS FROM THE LARGE BRIGHT QUASAR SURVEY, THE BRIGHT QUASAR SURVEY, AND THE COLOR-SELECTED SAMPLE OF THE SDSS FALL EQUATORIAL STRIPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS), the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS), and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts from the local universe to z = 5 and were subject to different selection criteria and flux density limits. This makes these samples complementary and can help us gain additional insight on the true underlying black hole mass distribution free from selection effects and mass estimation errors through future studies. By comparing these quasar samples, we see evidence that the active black hole population at redshift four is somewhat different than that at lower redshifts, including that in the nearby universe. In particular, there is a sharp increase in the space density of the detected active black holes (M BH ∼>108 M sun) between redshifts ∼4 and ∼2.5. Also, the mass function of the SDSS quasars at 3.6 ≤ z ≤ 5 has a somewhat flatter high-mass-end slope of β = -1.75 ± 0.56, compared to the mass functions based on quasars below z of 3 (BQS and LBQS quasars), which display typical slopes of β ∼ -3.3; the latter are consistent with the mass functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison, and discussion of these mass functions will be made with other existing black hole mass functions, notably that based on the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog. We present the relationships used to estimate the black hole mass based on the Mg II emission line; the relations are calibrated to the Hβ and C IV relations by means of several thousand high-quality SDSS spectra. Mass estimates of the individual black holes of these

  19. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE II. the bright end of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 5

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ~ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 5. Combined our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range 4.7 <= z < 5.4 and -29 < M1450 <= -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/Va method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as alpha = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope beta = -3.58+/-0.24 and a fainter break magnitude M*1450 = -26.98+/-0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a lum...

  20. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    CERN Document Server

    Ballo, L; Della Ceca, R; Caccianiga, A; Vignali, C; Carrera, F J; Corral, A; Mateos, S

    2014-01-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH>4x10^21 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L(2-10 keV)>10^44 ergs/s; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, lambda_Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, ...

  1. DETERMINING QUASAR BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTIONS FROM THEIR BROAD EMISSION LINES: APPLICATION TO THE BRIGHT QUASAR SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating quasar black hole mass functions (BHMF) using the broad emission lines to estimate black hole mass. We show how using the broad-line mass estimates in combination with statistical techniques developed for luminosity function estimation (e.g., the 1/Va correction) leads to statistically biased results. We derive the likelihood function for the BHMF based on the broad-line mass estimates, and derive the posterior distribution for the BHMF, given the observed data. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the BHMF is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the BHMF parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the BHMF. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the BHMF, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. Our method has the advantage that it is able to constrain the BHMF even beyond the survey detection limits at the adopted confidence level, accounts for measurement errors and the intrinsic uncertainty in broad-line mass estimates, and provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the BHMF. We conclude by using our method to estimate the local active BHMF using the z BH ∼> 108 M sun. Our analysis implies that at a given M BH, z < 0.5 broad-line quasars have a typical Eddington ratio of ∼0.4 and a dispersion in Eddington ratio of ∼<0.5 dex.

  2. Through BAL Quasars Brightly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, George

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observation of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1115+080 performed with the XMM-Newton observatory. Spectral analysis reveals the second case of a relativistic X-ray-absorbing outflow in a BAL quasar. The first case was revealed in a recent observation of APM 08279+5255 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. As in the case of APM 08279+5255, the observed flux of PG 1115+080 is greatly magnified by gravitational lensing. The relatively high redshift (z=1.72) of the quasar places the redshifted energies of resonant absorption features in a sensitive portion of the XMM- Newton spectral response. The spectrum indicates the presence of complex low-energy absorption in the 0.2-0.6 keV observed energy band and high-energy absorption in the 2-5 keV observed energy band. The high-energy absorption is best modeled by two Gaussian absorption lines with rest-frame energies of 7.4 and 9.5 keV. Assuming that these two lines axe produced by resonant absorption due to Fe XXV, we infer that the X-ray absorbers are outflowing with velocities of approx. 0.10c and approx. 0.34c respectively. We have detected significant variability of the energies and widths of the X-ray BALs in PG 1115+080 and APM 08279+5255 over timescales of 19 and 1.8 weeks (proper time), respectively. The BAL variability observed from APM 08279+5255 supports our earlier conclusion that these absorbers are most likely launched at relatively small radii of less than 10(exp 16)(Mbh/M8)(sup 1/2) cm. A comparison of the ionization properties and column densities of the low-energy and high-energy absorbers indicates that these absorbers are likely distinct; however, higher spectral resolution is needed to confirm this result. Finally, we comment on prospects for constraining the kinematic and ionization properties of these X-ray BALs with the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  3. Discovery program for bright quasars: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program has been undertaken to obtain a complete sample of bright quasars on the basis of ultraviolet color excess. Spectroscopic examination of candidates selected from two-color Schmidt telescope films has yielded four new quasars brighter than B = 16/sup m/5, with the candidate list containing two more previously identified. Magnitudes, color indices, and redshifts are presented for the new discoveries, along with positions and finding charts. Although the sample is not yet complete, these first results suggest that bright quasars have a low surface density

  4. PROBING THE IGM/GALAXY CONNECTION. IV. THE LCO/WFCCD GALAXY SURVEY OF 20 FIELDS SURROUNDING UV-BRIGHT QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We publish the survey for galaxies in 20 fields containing ultraviolet bright quasars (with zem ∼ 0.1-0.5) that can be used to study the association between galaxies and absorption systems from the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM). The survey is magnitude limited (R ∼ 19.5 mag) and highly complete out to 10' from the quasar in each field. It was designed to detect dwarf galaxies (L ∼ 0.1L*) at an impact parameter ρ ∼ 1 Mpc (z = 0.1) from a quasar. The complete sample (all 20 fields) includes R-band photometry for 84,718 sources and confirmed redshifts for 2800 sources. This includes 1198 galaxies with 0.005 em - 0.01) at a median redshift of 0.18, which may associated with IGM absorption lines. All of the imaging was acquired with cameras on the Swope 40'' telescope and the spectra were obtained via slit mask observations using the WFCCD spectrograph on the Dupont 100'' telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. This paper describes the data reduction, imaging analysis, photometry, and spectral analysis of the survey. We tabulate the principal measurements for all sources in each field and provide the spectroscopic data set online.

  5. TEN MORE NEW SIGHTLINES FOR THE STUDY OF INTERGALACTIC HELIUM, AND HUNDREDS OF FAR-ULTRAVIOLET-BRIGHT QUASARS, FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY, GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER, AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption along quasar sightlines remains among the most sensitive direct measures of He II reionization in much of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Until recently, fewer than a half-dozen unobscured quasar sightlines suitable for the He II Gunn-Peterson test were known; although these handful demonstrated great promise, the small sample size limited confidence in cosmological inferences. We have recently added nine more such clean He II quasars, exploiting Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar samples, broadband ultraviolet (UV) imaging from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), and high-yield UV spectroscopic confirmations from Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Here we markedly expand this approach by cross-correlating SDSS DR7 and GALEX GR4+5 to catalog 428 SDSS and 165 other quasars with z > 2.78 having likely (∼70%) GALEX detections, suggesting they are bright into the far-UV. Reconnaissance HST Cycle 16 Supplemental prism data for 29 of these new quasar-GALEX matches spectroscopically confirm 17 as indeed far-UV bright. At least 10 of these confirmations have clean sightlines all the way down to He II Lyα, substantially expanding the number of known clean He II quasars, and reaffirming the order of magnitude enhanced efficiency of our selection technique. Combined confirmations from this and our past programs yield more than 20 He II quasars, quintupling the sample. These provide substantial progress toward a sample of He II quasar sightlines large enough, and spanning a sufficient redshift range, to enable statistical IGM studies that may avoid individual object peculiarity and sightline variance. Our expanded catalog of hundreds of high-likelihood far-UV-bright QSOs additionally will be useful for understanding the extreme-UV properties of the quasars themselves.

  6. The Bright Quasar 3C 273

    OpenAIRE

    Courvoisier, Thierry J. -L.

    1998-01-01

    We review the observed properties of the bright quasar 3C~273 and discuss the implications of these observations for the emission processes and in view of gaining a more global understanding of the object. Continuum and line emission are discussed. The emission from the radio domain to gamma rays are reviewed. Emphasis is given to variability studies across the spectrum as a means to gain some understanding on the relationships between the emission components. 3C~273 has a small scale jet and...

  7. Concentration of bright quasars in the Sculptor Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent objective prism searches for quasars confirm the grouping of bright quasars in the direction of the Sculptor Group of galaxies. The density of such quasars with V -2. The concentration in the NGC 55, NGC 300 and NGC 253 areas is 0.65 deg-2. Around NGC 253 the density is over 20 times the average and has a chance of -4 of being accidental. (author)

  8. New Quasars Detected via Variability in the QUEST1 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rengstorf, A W; Abad, C; Adams, B; Andrews, P; Bailyn, C D; Baltay, C; Bongiovanni, A; Briceño, C; Bruzual, G; Coppi, P S; Prugna, F D; Emmet, W; Ferrin, I; Fuenmayor, F; Gebhard, M; Hernández, J; Honeycutt, R K; Magris, G; Musser, J; Naranjo, O; Oemler, A; Rosenzweig, P; Sabbey, C N; Sánchez, G; Schenner, H; Sinnott, J; Snyder, J A; Sofia, S; Stock, J; Van Altena, W; Vivas, A K; Sanchez, Ge.; Sanchez, Gu.

    2004-01-01

    By observing the high galactic latitude equatorial sky in drift scan mode with the QUEST (QUasar Equatorial Survey Team) Phase 1 camera, multi-bandpass photometry on a large strip of sky, resolved over a large range of time scales (from hourly to biennially) has been collected. A robust method of ensemble photometry revealed those objects within the scan region that fluctuate in brightness at a statistically significant level. Subsequent spectroscopic observations of a subset of those varying objects easily discriminated the quasars from stars. For a 13-month time scale, 38% of the previously known quasars within the scan region were seen to vary in brightness and subsequent spectroscopic observation revealed that approximately 7% of all variable objects in the scan region are quasars. Increasing the time baseline to 26 months increased the percentage of previously known quasars which vary to 61% and confirmed via spectroscopy that 7% of the variable objects in the region are quasars. This reinforces previous...

  9. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg2 utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-zB ) and (zB -zR ) colors, where zB and zR are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to zR < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M 1450 = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M 1450 = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s–1, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6

  10. Properties of Radio-Selected Broad Absorption-Line Quasars from the FIRST Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, R. H.; White, R L; Gregg, M. D.; Brotherton, M. S.; Laurent-Meuleisen, S. A.; Arav, N.

    2000-01-01

    In a spectroscopic follow-up to the VLA FIRST survey, the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey (FBQS) has found 29 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. This sample provides the first opportunity to study the properties of radio-selected BAL quasars. Contrary to most previous studies, we establish that a significant population of radio-loud BAL quasars exists. Radio-selected BAL quasars display compact radio morphologies and possess both steep and flat radio spectra. Quasars with low-ioni...

  11. Optical variability of the medium-bright quasar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variability study of the 32-member Medium-Bright Quasar Sample is reported. It is found that the star US 1953 has undergone a noticeable variation in the course of 26 hr. Apparent variations in the extragalactic object US 3498 may be illusory, owing to its partially resolved appearance. No other evidence for variability was detected. 34 refs

  12. A very bright (i = 16.44) quasar in the 'redshift desert' discovered by the Guoshoujing Telescope (LAMOST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redshift range from 2.2 to 3 is known as the 'redshift desert' of quasars because quasars with redshifts in this range have similar optical colors as normal stars and are thus difficult to find in optical sky surveys. A quasar candidate, SDSS J085543.40-001517.7, which was selected by a recently proposed criterion involving near-IR Y - K and optical g - z colors, was identified spectroscopically as a new quasar with a redshift of 2.427 by the Guoshoujing Telescope (LAMOST) commissioning observation in 2009 December and confirmed by the observation made with the NAOC/Xinglong 2.16 m telescope in 2010 March. This quasar was not identified in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. Comparing with other SDSS quasars, we found that this new quasar, with an i magnitude of 16.44, is apparently the brightest one in the redshift range from 2.3 to 2.7. From its spectral properties, we derived its central black hole mass to be (1.4 ∼ 3.9) x 1010 Mo-dot and its bolometric luminosity to be 3.7 x 1048 erg s-1, which indicates that this new quasar is intrinsically very bright and belongs to the class of the most luminous quasars in the universe. Our identification supports the notion that quasars in the redshift desert can be found by the quasar selection criterion involving the near-IR colors. More missing quasars are expected to be uncovered by future LAMOST spectroscopic surveys, which is important to the study of the cosmological evolution of quasars at redshifts higher than 2.2. (research papers)

  13. New lensed quasars from the MUSCLES survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Neal; Ofek, Eran O; Shin, Min-Su

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational lens systems containing lensed quasars are important as cosmological probes, as diagnostics of structural properties of the lensing galaxies and as tools to study the quasars themselves. The largest lensed quasar sample is the SDSS Quasar Lens Search, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We are attempting to extend this survey using observations of lens candidates selected from a combination of the quasar sample from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). This adds somewhat higher image quality together with a wider range of wavelength for the selection process. In previous pilot surveys we observed 5 objects, finding 2 lenses; here we present further observations of 20 objects in which we find 4 lenses, of which 2 are independently discovered in SQLS (in preparation). Following earlier work on the combination of these two surveys, we have refined our method and find that use of a colour-separation diagnostic, where we select for separations between components which...

  14. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  15. DISCOVERING BRIGHT QUASARS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS BASED ON OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED COLORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of quasars at intermediate redshifts (2.2 < z < 3.5) has been inefficient in most previous quasar surveys since the optical colors of quasars are similar to those of stars. The near-IR K-band excess technique has been suggested to overcome this difficulty. Our recent study also proposed to use optical/near-IR colors for selecting z < 4 quasars. To verify the effectiveness of this method, we selected a list of 105 unidentified bright targets with i ≤ 18.5 from the quasar candidates of SDSS DR6 with both SDSS ugriz optical and UKIDSS YJHK near-IR photometric data, which satisfy our proposed Y – K/g – z criterion and have photometric redshifts between 2.2 and 3.5 estimated from the nine-band SDSS-UKIDSS data. We observed 43 targets with the BFOSC instrument on the 2.16 m optical telescope at Xinglong station of the National Astronomical Observatory of China in the spring of 2012. We spectroscopically identified 36 targets as quasars with redshifts between 2.1 and 3.4. The high success rate of discovering these quasars in the SDSS spectroscopic surveyed area further demonstrates the robustness of both the Y – K/g – z selection criterion and the photometric redshift estimation technique. We also used the above criterion to investigate the possible stellar contamination rate among the quasar candidates of SDSS DR6, and found that the rate is much higher when selecting 3 < z < 3.5 quasar candidates than when selecting lower redshift candidates (z < 2.2). The significant improvement in the photometric redshift estimation when using the nine-band SDSS-UKIDSS data over the five-band SDSS data is demonstrated and a catalog of 7727 unidentified quasar candidates in SDSS DR6 selected with optical/near-IR colors and having photometric redshifts between 2.2 and 3.5 is provided. We also tested the Y – K/g – z selection criterion with the recently released SDSS-III/DR9 quasar catalog and found that 96.2% of 17,999 DR9 quasars with UKIDSS Y- and K

  16. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  17. Molecular hydrogen emission from the bright quasar 3C273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of broad emission lines in polarized light from the type 2 Seyfert galaxy NGCl068 led to postulation of the existence of a type 1 Seyfert nucleus shrouded from our direct view by a torus of molecular gas. Theoretical development of this idea included the suggestion that low-angular-momentum clouds in the torus are captured by the central source, fuelling the observed activity. The difficulty in applying this model to all active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is the lack of convincing evidence for molecular gas in 'bare' nucleus objects such as the quasar 3C273, which exhibits a simple power-law continuum and no excess of thermal dust emission. Here we present observations, made during the course of a survey for rotation and vibration lines of H2 emission from type 1 Seyferts and quasars, of molecular hydrogen emission from 3C273. This is the first time such emission has been seen from a radio-loud quasar. (author)

  18. Molecular hydrogen emission from the bright quasar 3C273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawara, Kimiaki (National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)); Nishida, Minoru (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Gregory, Brooke (Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile) Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK))

    1989-09-21

    The discovery of broad emission lines in polarized light from the type 2 Seyfert galaxy NGCl068 led to postulation of the existence of a type 1 Seyfert nucleus shrouded from our direct view by a torus of molecular gas. Theoretical development of this idea included the suggestion that low-angular-momentum clouds in the torus are captured by the central source, fuelling the observed activity. The difficulty in applying this model to all active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is the lack of convincing evidence for molecular gas in 'bare' nucleus objects such as the quasar 3C273, which exhibits a simple power-law continuum and no excess of thermal dust emission. Here we present observations, made during the course of a survey for rotation and vibration lines of H{sub 2} emission from type 1 Seyferts and quasars, of molecular hydrogen emission from 3C273. This is the first time such emission has been seen from a radio-loud quasar. (author).

  19. The SDSS Quasar Survey: Quasar Luminosity Function from Data Release Three

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, G T; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R J; Fukugita, M; Gray, J; Gunn, J E; Hall, P B; Harvanek, M; Ivezic, Z; Jester, S; Kent, S M; Kirkland, M E; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D C; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Meiksin, A; Nash, T; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Pope, A; Schlegel, D J; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Xiaohui F; Yanny, B; York, Do G; Anderson, Scott F.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Brunner, Robert J.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jester, Sebastian; Kirkland, Margaret E.; Loveday, Jon; Meiksin, Avery; Pope, Adrian; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    We determine the number counts and z=0-5 luminosity function for a well-defined, homogeneous sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We conservatively define the most uniform statistical sample possible, consisting of 15,343 quasars within an effective area of 1622 deg^2 that was derived from a parent sample of 46,420 spectroscopically confirmed broad-line quasars in the 5282 deg^2 of imaging data from SDSS Data Release Three. The sample extends from i=15 to i=19.1 at z3. The number counts and luminosity function agree well with the results of the 2dF QSO Survey, but the SDSS data probe to much higher redshifts than does the 2dF sample. The number density of luminous quasars peaks between redshifts 2 and 3, although uncertainties in the selection function in this range do not allow us to determine the peak redshift more precisely. Our best fit model has a flatter bright end slope at high redshift than at low redshift. For z5-sigma level, must be accounted for in models of the evolution of ...

  20. On the completeness of a sample of bright quasars selected by colour excess in the direction of the North Galactic Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Medium Bright Quasar survey (MBQS) shows evidence for a dearth of bright quasars in a Palomar Schmidt field centred on Selected Area (SA) 57 near the North Galactic Pole, compared to similar fields centred on SA 28, 29, 55, and 94. The SA 57 field has been searched again for bright quasar candidates with the held of a second survey plate exposed according to a slightly modified Haro-Luyten three-colour (Tonantzintla) prescription. Candidates so selected have both a blue and ultraviolet excess (B-UVX). The main result of the paper is that there appear to be no B-UVX quasars in the SA 57 field that are brighter than B=17.25 mag. The significance of this apparent anomaly is briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Discovery of the optically bright, wide separation double quasar SDSS J1442+4055

    CERN Document Server

    Sergeyev, Alexey V; Shalyapin, Vyacheslav N; Goicoechea, Luis J

    2015-01-01

    Optically bright, wide separation double (gravitationally lensed) quasars can be easily monitored, leading to light curves of great importance in determining the Hubble constant and other cosmological parameters, as well as the structure of active nuclei and halos of galaxies. Searching for new double quasars in the SDSS-III database, we discovered SDSS J1442+4055. This consists of two bright images (18-19 magnitudes in the r band) of the same distant quasar at redshift z = 2.575. The two quasar images are separated by about 2.1 arcsec, show significant parallel flux variations and can be monitored from late 2015. We also found other two double quasar candidates, SDSS J1617+3827 (z = 2.079) and SDSS J1642+3200 (z = 2.264), displaying evidence for the presence of a lensing object and parallel flux variations, but requiring further spectroscopic observations to be confirmed as lensed quasars.

  2. Subaru high-$z$ exploration of low-luminosity quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-$z$ Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multi-band imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg$^2$ of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes ($z_{\\rm AB} < 23.5$ mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-$z$ quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-br...

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Quasar composite made from bright QSOs (Selsing+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsing, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Christensen, L.; Krogager, J.-K.

    2015-10-01

    Quasar composite made from bright QSOs, as described in the paper. The composite consists of wavelength with corresponding arbitrarily normalized flux and error. The source code and composite is also made available at https://github.com/jselsing/QuasarComposite (1 data file).

  4. Radio-Selected Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.

    2009-12-01

    We have conducted a pilot survey for z > 3.5 quasars by combining the FIRST radio survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). While SDSS already targets FIRST sources for spectroscopy as quasar candidates, our survey includes fainter quasars and greatly improves the discovery rate by using strict astrometric criteria for matching the radio and optical positions. Our method allows for selection of high-redshift quasars with less color bias than with optical selection, as using radio selection essentially eliminates stellar contamination. We report the results of spectroscopy for 45 candidates, including 29 quasars in the range 0.37 3.5. We compare quasars selected using radio and optical criteria, and find that radio-selected quasars have a much higher fraction of moderately reddened objects. We derive a radio-loud quasar luminosity function at 3.5 4.0, and find that it is in good agreement with expectations from prior SDSS results.

  5. Four quasars above redshift 6 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Willott, Chris J.; Delorme, Philippe; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reyle, Celine; Hill, Gary J.; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Simard, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshift greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z=6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust propertie...

  6. False periodicities in quasar time-domain surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; Markowitz, A. G.; Huppenkothen, D.; Middleton, M. J.; Alston, W.N.; Scargle, J. D.; Farr, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    There have recently been several reports of apparently periodic variations in the light curves of quasars, e.g. PG 1302-102 by Graham et al. (2015a). Any quasar showing periodic oscillations in brightness would be a strong candidate to be a close binary supermassive black hole and, in turn, a candidate for gravitational wave studies. However, normal quasars -- powered by accretion onto a single, supermassive black hole -- usually show stochastic variability over a wide range of timescales. It...

  7. The Subaru high-z quasar survey: discovery of faint z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Willott, Chris J; Onoue, Masafusa; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Niino, Yuu; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z~6 quasars in 6.5 deg^2 utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z_B) and (z_B-z_R) colors, where z_B and z_R are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842A and 9841A, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z~6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z_R<24.0, which is 3.5 mag. deeper than SDSS. We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z=6.156 with M_1450=-23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z=6.041 with a faint continuum of M_1450=-22.58 and a narrow Lyman-alpha emission with HWHM=427 km/s, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman-alpha emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z~6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number...

  8. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. III. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF 758 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magellanic Quasars Survey (MQS) has now increased the number of quasars known behind the Magellanic Clouds by almost an order of magnitude. All survey fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 70% of those in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) have been observed. The targets were selected from the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) based on their optical variability, mid-IR, and/or X-ray properties. We spectroscopically confirmed 758 quasars (565 in the LMC and 193 in the SMC) behind the clouds, of which 94% (527 in the LMC and 186 in the SMC) are newly identified. The MQS quasars have long-term (12 yr and growing for OGLE), high-cadence light curves, enabling unprecedented variability studies of quasars. The MQS quasars also provide a dense reference grid for measuring both the internal and bulk proper motions of the clouds, and 50 quasars are bright enough (I ∼< 18 mag) for absorption studies of the interstellar/intergalactic medium of the clouds

  9. Completeness of the Medium Sensitivity Survey quasar sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS) quasar sample is being used more and more to study quasar properties in general and to analyze the relationship between X-ray-selected and optically selected quasars in particular. These studies have recently shown that current knowledge of the properties of optically selected quasars (luminosity function, evolution, X-ray to optical luminosity ratio) leads to the prediction that many more X-ray-selected quasars should have been detected than are actually observed. Prompted by this fact, a detailed examination of possible causes of incompleteness of the MSS quasar sample has been undertaken, paying particular attention to the problem of photoelectric absorption due to the interstellar medium within the Galaxy. It is found that there is no evidence of a loss of sources due to the effects considered, and that the MSS quasar sample is statistically complete. 14 references

  10. Spectroscopy of quasar candidates from the case low-dispersion survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-slit CCD spectra of 19 stellar objects selected from the Case Low-Dispersion Northern Sky Survey are presented. Thirteen of them are quasars, ranging in redshift from 0.0786 to 2.67, with a median redshift of 2. CSO 203 is a broad absorption-line quasar, and CSO 38 may have substantial associated absorption in the cores of emission lines. Several other objects show some intervening absorption, and all of them are bright enough to make the follow-up studies practical. CSO 251 is a bright (about 15 magnitudes), previously uncataloged quasar. The remaining objects are Galactic stars, five subdwarfs, and one hot white dwarf (CSO 160). 11 refs

  11. A very bright i=16.44 quasar in the `redshift desert' discovered by LAMOST

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zuo, Wenwen; Zhao, Yongheng; Luo, Ali; Bai, Zhongrui; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Haotong; Yan, Hongliang; Ren, Juanjuan; Sun, Shiwei; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yeping; Lu, Qishuai; Wang, You; Ni, Jijun; Wang, Hai; Kong, Xu; Shen, Shiyin

    2010-01-01

    The redshift range from 2.2 to 3, is known as the 'redshift desert' of quasars because quasars with redshift in this range have similar optical colors as normal stars and are thus difficult to be found in optical sky surveys. A quasar candidate, SDSS J085543.40-001517.7, which was selected by a recently proposed criterion involving near-IR $Y-K$ and optical $g-z$ colors, was identified spectroscopically as a new quasar with redshift of 2.427 by the LAMOST commissioning observation in December 2009 and confirmed by the observation made with the NAOC/Xinglong 2.16m telescope in March 2010. This quasar was not targeted in the SDSS spectroscopic survey because it locates in the stellar locus of the optical color-color diagrams, while it is clearly separated from stars in the $Y-K$ vs. $g-z$ diagram. Comparing with other SDSS quasars we found this new quasar with $i$ magnitude of 16.44 is apparently the brightest one in the redshift range from 2.3 to 2.7. From the spectral properties we derived its central black h...

  12. The X-Ray Properties of the Optically Brightest Mini-BAL Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jianfeng; Comins, M L; Gibson, Robert R; Shemmer, Ohad; Garmire, Gordon P; Schneider, Donald P

    2010-01-01

    We have compiled a sample of 14 of the optically brightest radio-quiet quasars ($m_{i}$~$\\le$~17.5 and $z$~$\\ge$~1.9) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog that have C IV mini-BALs present in their spectra. X-ray data for 12 of the objects were obtained via a Chandra snapshot survey using ACIS-S, while data for the other two quasars were obtained from archival XMM-Newton observations. Joint X-ray spectral analysis shows the mini-BAL quasars have a similar average power-law photon index ($\\Gamma\\approx1.9$) and level of intrinsic absorption ($N_H \\lesssim 8\\times 10^{21} \\ {\\rm cm}^{-2}$) as non-BMB (neither BAL nor mini-BAL) quasars. Mini-BAL quasars are more similar to non-BMB quasars than to BAL quasars in their distribution of relative X-ray brightness (assessed with $\\Delta\\alpha_{\\rm ox}$). Relative colors indicate mild dust reddening in the optical spectra of mini-BAL quasars. Significant correlations between $\\Delta\\alpha_{\\rm ox}$ and UV absorption properties are confirmed for ...

  13. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: tenth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Éric; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Borde, Arnaud; Brinkmann, Jon; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Cook, Benjamin A; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Ho, Shirley; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marchante, Moses; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew; Riffel, Rogério; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G

    2013-01-01

    We present the Data Release 10 Quasar (DR10Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the first 2.5 years of the survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra. The catalog also includes known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 166,583 quasars (74,454 are new discoveries since SDSS-DR9) detected over 6,373 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (117,668) is $\\sim$5 times greater than the number of $z>2.15$ quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII, MgII). The catalog identifies 16,461 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-...

  14. False periodicities in quasar time-domain surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, S; Markowitz, A G; Huppenkothen, D; Middleton, M J; Alston, W N; Scargle, J D; Farr, W M

    2016-01-01

    There have recently been several reports of apparently periodic variations in the light curves of quasars, e.g. PG 1302-102 by Graham et al. (2015a). Any quasar showing periodic oscillations in brightness would be a strong candidate to be a close binary supermassive black hole and, in turn, a candidate for gravitational wave studies. However, normal quasars -- powered by accretion onto a single, supermassive black hole -- usually show stochastic variability over a wide range of timescales. It is therefore important to carefully assess the methods for identifying periodic candidates from among a population dominated by stochastic variability. Using a Bayesian analysis of the light curve of PG 1302-102, we find that a simple stochastic process is preferred over a sinusoidal variations. We then discuss some of the problems one encounters when searching for rare, strictly periodic signals among a large number of irregularly sampled, stochastic time series, and use simulations of quasar light curves to illustrate ...

  15. GALEX FAR-ULTRAVIOLET COLOR SELECTION OF UV-BRIGHT HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the small population of high-redshift (zem>2.7) quasars detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer(GALEX), whose far-UV emission is not extinguished by intervening H I Lyman limit systems. These quasars are of particular importance to detect intergalactic He II absorption along their sight lines. We correlate almost all verified zem>2.7 quasars to the GALEX GR4 source catalog covering ∼ 25,000 deg2, yielding 304 sources detected at signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >3. However, ∼50% of these are only detected in the GALEX NUV band, signaling the truncation of the FUV flux by low-redshift optically thick Lyman limit systems. We exploit the GALEX UV color mFUV - mNUV to cull the most promising targets for follow-up studies, with blue (red) GALEX colors indicating transparent (opaque) sight lines. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations indicate an He II detection rate of ∼60% for quasars with mFUV - mNUV ∼em ∼3 to be most promising for Hubble Space Telescope follow-up, with an additional 114 quasars if we consider S/N >2 detections in the FUV. Combining the statistical properties of H I absorbers with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar luminosity function, we predict a large all-sky population of ∼200 quasars with zem>2.7 and i ∼304 em ∼em ∼em ∼< 3.5 quasars have likely underestimated their space density by selecting intergalactic medium sight lines with an excess of strong H I absorbers.

  16. THE X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE OPTICALLY BRIGHTEST MINI-BAL QUASARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have compiled a sample of 14 of the optically brightest radio-quiet quasars (mi ≤ 17.5 and z ≥ 1.9) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog that have C IV mini-broad absorption lines (mini-BALs) present in their spectra. X-ray data for 12 of the objects were obtained via a Chandra snapshot survey using ACIS-S, while data for the other two quasars were obtained from archival XMM-Newton observations. Joint X-ray spectral analysis shows that the mini-BAL quasars have a similar average power-law photon index (Γ ∼ 1.9) and level of intrinsic absorption (NH ∼21 cm-2) as non-BMB (neither BAL nor mini-BAL) quasars. Mini-BAL quasars are more similar to non-BMB quasars than to BAL quasars in their distribution of relative X-ray brightness (assessed with Δαox). Relative colors indicate mild dust reddening in the optical spectra of mini-BAL quasars. Significant correlations between Δαox and UV absorption properties are confirmed for a sample of 56 sources combining mini-BAL and BAL quasars with high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame UV spectra, which generally supports models in which X-ray absorption is important in enabling driving of the UV absorption-line wind. We also propose alternative parameterizations of the UV absorption properties of mini-BAL and BAL quasars, which may better describe the broad absorption troughs in some respects.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

  18. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: twelfth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A; Albareti, Franco D; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, W Niel; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A C; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B; Jian, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properti...

  20. Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Osmer, Patrick S.

    1999-01-01

    I review recent results for quasars and discuss how they are related to activity in galaxies. Topics included are studies of quasar host galaxies with HST; searches for quasars in the Hubble Deep Field; evolution of the quasar luminosity function; news highlights from astro-ph; and current observational problems and their relation to theoretical work.

  1. A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis

    2005-12-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

  2. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability selection and quasar luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Magneville, Ch.; Yèche, Ch.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Burtin, E.; Dawson, K.; McGreer, I.; Myers, A. D.; Rossi, G.; Schlegel, D.; Schneider, D.; Streblyanska, A.; Tinker, J.

    2016-03-01

    The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, which are unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when z = 2.7-3.5 quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at z 2.2. Both models are constrained to be continuous at z = 2.2. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at high redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3% (resp., 1.1%) to g< 22.5 (resp., g< 23). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.

  3. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Y L; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y -X; Yuan, H -L; Song, Y -H; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M; Wu, H; Shen, S -Y; Shi, J -R; He, B -L; Lei, Y -J; Li, Y -B; Luo, A -L; Zhao, Y -H; Zhang, Hao-Tong

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in Large Sky Area Multi- Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes pilot survey and the first year regular survey. There are 3921 quasars identified with reliability, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the H{\\alpha}, H{\\beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photo- metric data with model fitting as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, and flags indicating the selec- tion methods, broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are available online. 28% of the 3921 quasars are selected with optical- infrared colours independently, indicating that the method is quite promising in completeness of quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the on-g...

  4. The LAMOST Survey of Background Quasars in the Vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies -- II. Results from the Commissioning Observations and the Pilot Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Yan, Lin; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Du, Bing; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Lei, Ya-Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guang-Wei; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Jian; Li, Xin-Nan; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Gen-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Qi-Shuai; Luo, A-Li; Luo, Yu; Men, Li; Ni, Ji-Jun; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Jian-Rong; Shi, Huo-Ming; Sun, Shi-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tian, Yuan; Tu, Liang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Wang, Feng-Fei; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Yue; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, En-Peng; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the LAMOST during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available SDSS, KPNO 4 m telescope, XSTPS optical, and WISE near infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ~135 sq. deg from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey datasets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ~100 sq. deg that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning datasets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62 and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively, of which 5, 20 and 75 are newly-discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable c...

  5. Reverberation in the UV-Optical Continuum Brightness Fluctuations of MACHO Quasar 13.5962.237

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E; Protopapas, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    We examine the nature of brightness fluctuations in the UV-Optical spectral region of an ordinary quasar with 881 optical brightness measurements made during the epoch 1993 - 1999. We find evidence for systematic trends having the character of a pattern of reverberations following an initial disturbance. The initial pulses have brightness increases of order 20% and pulse widths of 50 days, and the reverberations have typical amplitudes of 12% with longer mean pulse widths of order 80 days and pulse separations of order 90 days. The repeat pattern occurs over the same time scales whether the initial disturbance is a brightening or fading. The lags of the pulse trains are comparable to the lags seen previously in reverberation of the broad blue-shifted emission lines following brightness disturbances in Seyfert galaxies, when allowance is made for the mass of the central object. In addition to the burst pulse trains, we find evidence for a semi-periodicity with a time scale of 2 years. These strong patterns of ...

  6. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z ∼ 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z ∼ 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02-0.23+0.21×1013 h-1 Msun for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of ∼10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5σ level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z ∼ 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N 2/A ∼ 5 × 106 deg–2 (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg2) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys

  7. DIFFERENCE IMAGING OF LENSED QUASAR CANDIDATES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SUPERNOVA SURVEY REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few nonlensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on the fields of lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and one serendipitously discovered lensed quasar. Starting from 20,536 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars, 32 candidate lenses/lensed images, and one known lensed quasar, we find that 174 sources including 35 SDSS quasars, 16 candidate lenses/lensed images, and the known lensed quasar are nonperiodic variable sources. We can measure the spatial structure of the variable flux for 119 of these variable sources and identify only eight as candidate extended variables, including the known lensed quasar. Only the known lensed quasar appears as a close pair of sources on the difference images. Inspection of the remaining seven suggests they are false positives, and only two were spectroscopically identified quasars. One of the lens candidates from the SQLS survives our cuts, but only as a single image instead of a pair. This indicates a false positive rate of order ∼1/4000 for the method, or given our effective survey area of order 0.82 deg.2, ∼5 per deg.2 in the SDSS Supernova Survey. The fraction of quasars not found to be variable and the false positive rate would both fall if we had analyzed the full, later data releases for the SDSS fields. While application of the method to the SDSS is limited by the resolution, depth, and sampling of the survey, several future surveys such as Pan-STARRS, LSST, and SNAP will significantly improve on these limitations.

  8. Difference Imaging of Lensed Quasar Candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Survey Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune

    2009-06-01

    Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few nonlensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on the fields of lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and one serendipitously discovered lensed quasar. Starting from 20,536 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars, 32 candidate lenses/lensed images, and one known lensed quasar, we find that 174 sources including 35 SDSS quasars, 16 candidate lenses/lensed images, and the known lensed quasar are nonperiodic variable sources. We can measure the spatial structure of the variable flux for 119 of these variable sources and identify only eight as candidate extended variables, including the known lensed quasar. Only the known lensed quasar appears as a close pair of sources on the difference images. Inspection of the remaining seven suggests they are false positives, and only two were spectroscopically identified quasars. One of the lens candidates from the SQLS survives our cuts, but only as a single image instead of a pair. This indicates a false positive rate of order ~1/4000 for the method, or given our effective survey area of order 0.82 deg2, ~5 per deg2 in the SDSS Supernova Survey. The fraction of quasars not found to be variable and the false positive rate would both fall if we had analyzed the full, later data releases for the SDSS fields. While application of the method to the SDSS is limited by the resolution, depth, and sampling of the survey, several future surveys such as Pan-STARRS, LSST, and SNAP will significantly improve on these limitations.

  9. Spectral Variability of Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I: Wavelength Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhite, B C; Kron, R G; Schneider, D P; Pereyra, N; Brunner, R J; Richards, G T; Brinkmann, J; Wilhite, Brian C.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Kron, Richard G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Pereyra, Nicholas; Brunner, Robert J.; Richards, Gordon T.; Brinkmann, Jonathan V.

    2005-01-01

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeat spectroscopic observations have resulted in multiple-epoch spectroscopy for roughly 2500 quasars observed more than 50 days apart. From this sample, we identify 315 quasars that have varied significantly between observations. We create an ensemble difference spectrum (bright phase minus faint phase) covering rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 to 6000 Angstroms. This average difference spectrum is bluer than the average single-epoch quasar spectrum; a power-law fit to the difference spectrum yields a spectral index alpha_lambda = -2.00, compared to an index of alpha_lambda = -1.35 for the single-epoch spectrum. The strongest emission lines vary only 30% as much as the continuum. Due to the lack of variability of the lines, measured photometric color is not always bluer in brighter phases, but depends on redshift and the filters used. Lastly, the difference spectrum is bluer than the ensemble quasar spectrum only for lambda_rest < 2500 Angstroms, indicating that the varia...

  10. Long-term Optical Variability of Radio-Selected Quasars from the FIRST Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Helfand, D J; Willman, B; White, R L; Becker, R H; Price, T; Gregg, M D; McMahon, R G; Helfand, David J.; Stone, Remington P.S.; Willman, Beth; White, Richard L.; Becker, Robert H.; Price, Trevor; Gregg, Michael D.; Mahon, Richard G. Mc

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained single-epoch optical photometry for 201 quasars, taken from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey, which span a wide range in radio loudness. Comparison with the magnitudes of these objects on the POSS-I plates provides by far the largest sample of long-term variability amplitudes for radio-selected quasars yet produced. We find the quasars to be more variable in the blue than in the red band, consistent with work on optically selected samples. The previously noted trend of decreasing variability with increasing optical luminosity applies only to radio-quiet objects. Furthermore, we do not confirm a rise in variability amplitude with redshift, nor do we see any dependence on radio flux or luminosity. The variability over a radio-optical flux ratio range spanning a factor of 60,000 from radio-quiet to extreme radio-loud objects is largely constant, although there is a suggestion of greater variability in the extreme radio-loud objects. We demonstrate the importance of Malmquist bias in variability st...

  11. False periodicities in quasar time-domain surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, S.; Uttley, P.; Markowitz, A. G.; Huppenkothen, D.; Middleton, M. J.; Alston, W. N.; Scargle, J. D.; Farr, W. M.

    2016-09-01

    There have recently been several reports of apparently periodic variations in the light curves of quasars, e.g. PG 1302-102 by Graham et al. Any quasar showing periodic oscillations in brightness would be a strong candidate to be a close binary supermassive black hole and, in turn, a candidate for gravitational wave studies. However, normal quasars - powered by accretion on to a single, supermassive black hole - usually show stochastic variability over a wide range of time-scales. It is therefore important to carefully assess the methods for identifying periodic candidates from among a population dominated by stochastic variability. Using a Bayesian analysis of the light curve of PG 1302-102, we find that a simple stochastic process is preferred over a sinusoidal variation. We then discuss some of the problems one encounters when searching for rare, strictly periodic signals among a large number of irregularly sampled, stochastic time series, and use simulations of quasar light curves to illustrate these points. From a few thousand simulations of steep spectrum (`red noise') stochastic processes, we find many simulations that display few-cycle periodicity like that seen in PG 1302-102. We emphasize the importance of calibrating the false positive rate when the number of targets in a search is very large.

  12. Rapid infrared and optical variability in the bright quasar 3C273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed variations by a factor of two in the infrared flux from the bright quasar 3C273 on a timescale as short as one day. In February 1988, the behaviour of the source changed from having a stable infrared flux and slow optical variations to a state characterized by recurrent infrared and optical flaring. The optical variations were of several per cent per day, changing from increase to decrease approximately every week. The amplitude of the repeated optical flares was 30-40%. The data are consistent with re-injection/acceleration of electrons followed by rapid cooling. The inferred magnetic field is 0.7 gauss and the data are marginally consistent with no relativistic beaming. (author)

  13. Rapid infrared and optical variability in the bright quasar 3C273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, T.J.-L.; Robson, E.I.; Hughes, D.H.; Blecha, A.; Bouchet, P.; Schwarz, H.E.; Krisciunas, K.

    1988-09-22

    We have observed variations by a factor of two in the infrared flux from the bright quasar 3C273 on a timescale as short as one day. In February 1988, the behaviour of the source changed from having a stable infrared flux and slow optical variations to a state characterized by recurrent infrared and optical flaring. The optical variations were of several per cent per day, changing from increase to decrease approximately every week. The amplitude of the repeated optical flares was 30-40%. The data are consistent with re-injection/acceleration of electrons followed by rapid cooling. The inferred magnetic field is 0.7 gauss and the data are marginally consistent with no relativistic beaming.

  14. The very first Pop III stars and their relation to bright z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first PopIII stars formed at redshift z > 40 and the rare, massive, halos that are generally considered to host bright z~6 quasars. We show that within the typical volume occupied by one bright high-z QSO the remnants of the first several thousands PopIII stars formed do not end up in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The black hole seeds planted by these very first PopIII stars can easily grow to M > 10^{9.5} Msun by z=6 assuming Eddington accretion with radiative efficiency epsilon~0.1. Therefore quenching of the accretion is crucial to avoid an overabundance of supermassive black holes. We implement a simple feedback model for the growth of the seeds planted by PopIII stars and obtain a z~6 BH mass function consistent with the observed QSO luminosity function.

  15. Distribution of the Very First Population III Stars and Their Relation to Bright z~6 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, M.; Stiavelli, M.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first Population III stars and the rare, massive halos that are generally considered to host bright quasars at high redshift (z~6). The main question that we intend to answer is whether the supermassive black holes powering these QSOs grew out from the seeds planted by the first intermediate-mass black holes created in the universe. This question involves a dynamical range of 1013 in mass, and we address it by combining N-body simulations of structure formation to identify the most massive halos at z~6 with a Monte Carlo method based on linear theory to obtain the location and formation times of the first-light halos within the whole simulation box. We show that the descendants of the first ~106 Msolar virialized halos do not, on average, end in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The oldest Population III progenitors of the most massive halos at z~6 form instead from density peaks that are on average 1.5 σ more common than the first Population III star formed in the volume occupied by one bright high-z QSO. The intermediate-mass black hole seeds planted by the very first Population III stars at z>~40 can easily grow to masses mBH>109.5 Msolar by z=6 assuming Eddington accretion with radiative efficiency ɛ<~0.1. Quenching of the black hole accretion is therefore crucial to avoid an overabundance of supermassive black holes at lower redshift. This can be obtained if the mass accretion is limited to a fraction η~6×10-3 of the total baryon mass of the halo hosting the black hole. The resulting high-end slope of the black hole mass function at z=6 is α~-3.7, a value within the 1 σ error bar for the bright-end slope of the observed quasar luminosity function at z=6.

  16. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7 < z < 4.0 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Fifth Data Release. These nitrogen-rich (N-rich) objects comprise ~1.1% of the SDSS quasars. The comparison between the N-rich quasars and other quasars shows that the two quasar subsets share many common properties. We also confirm previous results that N-rich quasars have much stronger Lya and NV la...

  17. The LAMOST survey of background quasars in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies. II. Results from the commissioning observations and the pilot surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, also named the Guoshoujing Telescope, during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 m telescope, Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey optical, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer near-infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ∼135 deg2 from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey data sets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ∼100 deg2 that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning data sets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62, and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5, and 18.0, respectively, of which 5, 20, and 75 are newly discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable collection with which to probe the kinematics and chemistry of the interstellar/intergalactic medium in the Local Group of galaxies. A total of 93 quasars are now known with locations within 2.°5 of M31, of which 73 are newly discovered. Tens of quasars are now known to be located behind the Giant Stellar Stream, and hundreds are behind the extended halo and its associated substructures of M31. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 can potentially be utilized to construct a perfect astrometric reference frame to measure the minute proper motions (PMs) of M31 and M33, along with the PMs of substructures associated with the Local Group of galaxies. Those PMs are some of the most fundamental properties of the Local Group.

  18. Spectroscopic Target Selection in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: The Quasar Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Gordon T.; Fan, Xiaohui; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Strauss, Michael A.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Schneider, Donald P.; Yanny, Brian; Boucher, Adam; Burles, Scott; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gunn, James E.; Hall, Patrick B; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen; Loveday, Jon

    2002-01-01

    We describe the algorithm for selecting quasar candidates for optical spectroscopy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar candidates are selected via their non-stellar colors in "ugriz" broad-band photometry, and by matching unresolved sources to the FIRST radio catalogs. The automated algorithm is sensitive to quasars at all redshifts lower than z=5.8. Extended sources are also targeted as low-redshift quasar candidates in order to investigate the evolution of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) a...

  19. A Survey of UV Bright Sources Behind the Halo of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Fittingoff, Andrew; Kalirai, Jasonjot S; Strader, Jay; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaplan, Kyle F

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a wide-area ultraviolet (UV) imaging survey using the GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) to search for bright, point-like UV sources behind M31's extended halo. Our survey consisted of 46 pointings covering an effective area of ~50 deg^2, in both the far-UV and near-UV channels. We combined these data with optical R-band observations acquired with the WIYN Mosaic-1 imager on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 0.9m WIYN telescope. An analysis of the brightness and colors of sources matched between our photometric catalogs yielded ~100 UV-bright quasar candidates. We have obtained discovery spectra for 76 of these targets with the Kast spectrometer on the Lick 3m telescope and confirm 30 active galactic nuclei and quasars, 29 galaxies at z > 0.02 including several early-type systems, 16 Galactic stars (hot main-sequence stars), and one featureless source previously identified as a BL Lac object. Future UV spectroscopy of the brightest targets with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble S...

  20. THE 2dF REDSHIFT SURVEY. I. PHYSICAL ASSOCIATION AND PERIODICITY IN QUASAR FAMILIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested for physical association of candidate companion quasars with putative parent galaxies by virtue of Karlsson periodicity in quasar redshifts. We examined galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and quasars from the 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey (2QZ) in the two declination strips (at declinations 0° and –30°) covered by the 2QZ, first filtering out galaxies and quasars using the respective survey masks and observation qualities as described, and using only quasars with z ≥ 0.5 to avoid the redshift region of mixed galaxies and quasars. Around each galaxy, quasars are detected as physically associated with a putative parent galaxy if their respective redshifts conform to empirically derived constraints based on an ejection hypothesis. We ran Monte Carlo control trials against the pure physical associations by replacing the actual redshifts of the candidate companion quasars with quasar redshifts drawn randomly from each respective right ascension hour. The constraints are grouping of quasar redshifts and Karlsson periodicity of quasar redshifts.

  1. Optical selection effects that bias quasar evolution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a study of systematic biases that are redshift-dependent and could influence not only the optical discovery of quasars but also the evolution laws derived from counts of quasars in ''complete'' surveys. A numerical model of the optical biases suggests that the excess of quasars found at z roughly-equal 2.5 when compared to the local density is largely a result of photometric errors and the unrecognized contribution of strong UV emission lines to the blue magnitude of high-redshift quasars. An observational reexamination of the quasars brighter than M/sub B/ = -24 in the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) shows that for the brightest quasars in the survey, the data are consistent with no evolution. A comparison of BQS quasars with the brightest quasars from the CTIO Schmidt Telescope Survey (Osmer and Smith 1980) shows that the brightest CTIO survey quasars have much stronger C IV lambda1548 lines than the brightest BQS quasars. If q0 is taken to be near zero, the density of bright quasars in comoving Friedmann cosmology coordinates is about 15 times higher for the CTIO survey quasars (mean z roughly-equal 2.8) than for the BQS quasars (mean z roughly-equal 1.8). In this case, spectral evolution is required, since the high-redshift CTIO quasars have greater C IV lambda1548 equivalent widths than the lower redshift BQS quasars of similar luminosity. Alternatively, if q3] is taken to be near unity, the brightest CTIO survey quasars would all be fainter than the brightest BQS objects. The strong emission lines seen in the CTIO survey quasars could be understood as a consequence of the general correlation between absolute quasar luminosity and C IV lambda1548 equivalent width

  2. IDENTIFYING BREAKS AND CURVATURE IN THE FERMI SPECTRA OF BRIGHT FLAT SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing the site of γ-ray emission in active galactic nucleus jets will do much for our understanding of the physics of the source. In particular, if the emission region is close to the black hole then absorption of γ-rays with photons from the broad-line region could become significant. Such absorption is predicted to produce two specific spectral breaks in the γ-ray spectra of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs). We test this hypothesis using three years of Fermi observations of nine bright FSRQs. A simple power-law fit to the spectrum of each source can be significantly improved by introducing a break, but the break energies are inconsistent with those predicted by the double-absorber model. In some cases the fit can be further improved by a log-parabola. In addition, by dividing the data from each source into two equal epochs we find that the best description of an object's spectrum often varies between a log-parabola and a broken power law.

  3. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, H; Paladino, R; Hull, C L H; Cortes, P; Moellenbrock, G; Fomalont, E; Asada, K; Hada, K

    2016-01-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C~286 made with the ALMA at 1.3~mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17\\%, this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or EVPA) in the core is $\\sim$\\,$39^{\\circ}$, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report ...

  4. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Hull, C. L. H.; Cortes, P.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Asada, K.; Hada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C 286 made with the Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at 1.3 mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south–west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17%; this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or electric vector position angle (EVPA)) in the core is ˜39◦, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report a serendipitous detection of a sub-mJy source in the field of view, which is likely to be a submillimeter galaxy.

  5. A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L. D; Jiang, Linhua; Kim, J. Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J. C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; ukugita, Masataka F; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S. J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Eric H. N eilsen, Jr; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Voges, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two...... have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a...... gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do not...

  6. Interferometer observations of quasars from the Jodrell Bank 966-MHz survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio observations are reported of the 68 quasars with blue magnitudes < or =19.0 identified in the Jodrell Bank 966-MHz survey. The observations were made with the Green Bank interferometer at 2695 MHz with baselines ranging from 300 m to 35 km. Model brightness distributions are presented consisting of one to four elliptical Gaussian components. A limiting resolution of 0.1 arcsec was obtained in the best cases. For radio sources with steep spectra, angular sizes ranged from <0.2 to 85 arcsec. Only two of the sources with steep radio spectra were unresolved. The median angular size for the entire sample is 8 arcsec. For quasars larger than 10 arcsec, the structures can almost always be described in triple. Twenty-nine of the 30 such sources have outer lobes on either side of the optical source and 24 of the 30 have detectable central components. The ratio of the flux densities of the outer lobes varies over a wide range but has a median value of 1.8. The ratio of the flux density of the central component to the total flux density at 2695 MHz ranges from 1% to 95%, with a median value near 10%. The existence of triple structure in the vast majority of quasars, along the with failure to detect central components in blank field sources, suggests a close connection between the nuclear activity in the radio and optical regions of the spectrum. It is also consistent with a picture in which the difference between blank fields and quasars is just transient activity in the nucleus of a distant parent galaxy

  7. The Pan-STARRS1 z>6 quasar survey: More than 100 quasars within the first Gyr of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Banados, Eduardo; Venemans, Bram; Decarli, Roberto; Farina, Emanuele; Mazzucchelli, Chiara; Fan, Xiaohui; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient sources in the Universe. As such, they are ideal probes of the redshift range z=6-7, a critical phase in cosmic history, when the Universe is emerging from the dark ages. Over the last three years we have exploited the Pan-STARRS1 survey, more than doubling the number of known z>5.5 quasars (tripling the number of z>6 quasars in the southern sky, and discovering 4 of the 9 quasars known at z>6.5). This seach significantly extended the sampled parameter space in terms of quasar luminosities and redshift coverage. Pioneering studies already demostrate the intrumental role of QSOs in probing the very early phases of galaxy formation and black hole growth within 1 Gyr from the Big Bang: a) billion solar masses black holes are already in place, b) they are surrounded by massive reservoirs of cold gas, and c) the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium rapidly drops after z~6, thus marking the end of the epoch of reionization. Our significantly enlarged sample marks the transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-z quasar population. We present some of the comprehensive multiwavelength characterization of the high-z quasar population and their environment (our on-going efforts include deep NIR spectroscopy, ALMA, NOEMA, HST, Spitzer, and JVLA observations).

  8. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Linhua; Vestergaard, M

    2008-01-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7 < z < 4.0 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Fifth Data Release. These nitrogen-rich (N-rich) objects comprise ~1.1% of the SDSS quasars. The comparison between the N-rich quasars and other quasars shows that the two quasar subsets share many common properties. We also confirm previous results that N-rich quasars have much stronger Lya and NV lambda 1240 emission lines. Strong nitrogen emission in all ionization states indicates high overall nitrogen abundances in these objects. We find evidence that the nitrogen abundance is closely related to quasar radio properties. The radio-loud fraction in the NIII]-rich quasars is 26% and in the NIV]-rich quasars is 69%, significantly higher than ~8% measured in other quasars with similar redshift and luminosity. Therefore, the high nitrogen abundance in N-rich quasars could be an indicator of a special quasar evolu...

  9. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, M.

    2008-06-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong N IV] λ1486 or N III] λ1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width >3 Å) at 1.7 4.0 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Fifth Data Release. These nitrogen-rich (N-rich) objects comprise ~1.1% of the SDSS quasars. The comparison between the N-rich quasars and other quasars shows that the two quasar subsets share many common properties. We also confirm previous results that N-rich quasars have much stronger Lyα and N V λ1240 emission lines. Strong nitrogen emission in all ionization states indicates high overall nitrogen abundances in these objects. We find evidence that the nitrogen abundance is closely related to quasar radio properties. The radio-loud fraction in the N III]-rich quasars is 26% and in the N IV]-rich quasars is 69%, significantly higher than ~8% measured in other quasars with similar redshift and luminosity. Therefore, the high nitrogen abundance in N-rich quasars could be an indicator of a special quasar evolution stage, in which the radio activity is also strong.

  10. RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: A Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kardashev, N. S.; Kellermann, K. I.; Lobanov, A. P.; Johnson, M. D.; Gurvits, L. I.; Voitsik, P. A.; Zensus, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.; Bach, U.; Jauncey, D. L.; Ghigo, F.; Ghosh, T.; Kraus, A.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Petrov, L. Yu.; Romney, J. D.; Salter, C. J.; Sokolovsky, K. V.

    2016-03-01

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of 1011.5 K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of 1013 K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C 273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 μas (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of 1013 K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require a much higher Doppler factor than what is determined from jet apparent kinematics.

  11. RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: a Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Y Y; Kellermann, K I; Lobanov, A P; Johnson, M D; Gurvits, L I; Voitsik, P A; Zensus, J A; Anderson, J M; Bach, U; Jauncey, D L; Ghigo, F; Ghosh, T; Kraus, A; Kovalev, Yu A; Lisakov, M M; Petrov, L Yu; Romney, J D; Salter, C J; Sokolovsky, K V

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of $10^{11.5}$ K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of $10^{13}$ K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 $\\mu$as (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of $10^{13}$ K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require much higher jet speeds than are observed.

  12. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Adam D; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J; Newman, Jeffrey A; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; Miller, Adam A; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SDSS-IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will perform measurements of the cosmological distance scale via application of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to samples of quasars and galaxies. Quasar surveys are particularly useful in the BAO context as they can trace extremely large volumes back to moderately high redshift. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over a 7500 sq. deg. area. First, z > 2.1 quasars will be targeted to improve BAO measurements in the Lyman-Alpha Forest. Second, a homogeneously selected "CORE" sample of quasars at 0.9 2.1 quasars. A supplemental selection based on variability of quasars in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ~3-4 per sq. deg. z > 2.1 quasars to g 500,000 new spectroscopically confirmed quasars and > 500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of SDSS-IV, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra...

  13. GALEX far-UV color selection of UV-bright high-redshift quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Worseck, Gábor; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2010-01-01

    We study the small population of z>2.7 quasars detected by GALEX, whose far-UV emission is not extinguished by intervening HI Lyman limit systems. These quasars are of particular importance to detect intergalactic HeII absorption along their sightlines. We correlate verified z>2.7 quasars to the GALEX GR4 source catalog, yielding 304 S/N>3 sources. However, ~50% of these are only detected in the GALEX NUV band, signaling the truncation of the FUV flux by low-redshift Lyman limit systems. We e...

  14. SDSS J2222+2745: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED SEXTUPLE QUASAR WITH A MAXIMUM IMAGE SEPARATION OF 15.''1 DISCOVERED IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSS J2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a zs = 2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at zl = 0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.''1. Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity are in themselves rare among known lensed quasars, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present data sets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow-up and verification with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from 2011 September to 2012 September reveals significant variability at the ∼10%-30% level in some of the quasar images, indicating that measurements of the relative time delay between quasar images will be feasible. In this lens system, we also identify a bright (g = 21.5) giant arc corresponding to a strongly lensed background galaxy at zs = 2.30. We fit parametric models of the lens system, constrained by the redshift and positions of the quasar images and the redshift and position of the giant arc. The predicted time delays between different pairs of quasar images range from ∼100 days to ∼6 yr

  15. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; Miller, Adam A.; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P.; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will improve measurements of the cosmological distance scale by applying the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to quasar samples. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over 7500 deg2. First, a “CORE” quasar sample will combine the optical selection in ugriz using a likelihood-based routine called XDQSOz, with a mid-IR-optical color cut. eBOSS CORE selection (to g 2.1 quasars. Second, a selection based on variability in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ˜3-4 deg-2z > 2.1 quasars to g sample should thus be sufficiently dense and homogeneous over 0.9 2.1 will be used to improve BAO measurements in the Lyα Forest. Beyond its key cosmological goals, eBOSS should be the next-generation quasar survey, comprising >500,000 new quasars and >500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of eBOSS, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra for more than 800,000 quasars.

  16. WFPC2 Imaging of Quasar Environments: A Comparison of LBQS and HST Archive Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, R. A.; Impey, C. D.; Hooper, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data on the large-scale environments of 16 0.39 < z < 0.51 quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS). The LBQS quasars are representative of the radio-quiet population, and this is the first look at their large-scale environments. We compare the LBQS environments with the environments of 27 0.15 < z < 0.55 quasars selected from the HST Archive. The majority of the Archive quasars are from the PG and PKS sur...

  17. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data

    OpenAIRE

    SDSS Collaboration; Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 15 high-redshift quasars (z > 3.6) discovered from ~140 deg^2 of five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. The quasars are selected by their distinctive colors in SDSS multicolor space. Four of the quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.63, 4.75, 4.90 and 5.00, the latter being the highest redshift quasar yet known). In addition, two previously known z > 4 obje...

  18. Color-redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X B; Zhou, X; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the \\chi^2 minimization technique, we demonstrated a general method to estimate the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving the theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compare them with the spectroscopic redshifts. The redshift difference is smaller than 0.1 for 47% of quasars and 0.2 for 68 % of them. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars, galaxies and quasars in both the SDSS and BATC photometric systems, we expected that with the BATC system of 15 intermediate filters we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficiently than in the SDSS, provided the BATC survey could detect objects with magnitude fainter than 21.

  19. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. V. FINAL CATALOG FROM THE SEVENTH DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the final statistical sample of lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The well-defined statistical lens sample consists of 26 lensed quasars brighter than i = 19.1 and in the redshift range of 0.6 < z < 2.2 selected from 50,826 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), where we restrict the image separation range to 1'' < θ < 20'' and the i-band magnitude differences in two images to be smaller than 1.25 mag. The SDSS DR7 quasar catalog also contains 36 additional lenses identified with various techniques. In addition to these lensed quasars, we have identified 81 pairs of quasars from follow-up spectroscopy, 26 of which are physically associated binary quasars. The statistical lens sample covers a wide range of image separations, redshifts, and magnitudes, and therefore is suitable for systematic studies of cosmological parameters and surveys of the structure and evolution of galaxies and quasars.

  20. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, X

    1999-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 15 high-redshift quasars (z > 3.6) discovered from ~140 deg^2 of five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. The quasars are selected by their distinctive colors in SDSS multicolor space. Four of the quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.63, 4.75, 4.90 and 5.00, the latter being the highest redshift quasar yet known). In addition, two previously known z > 4 objects were recovered from the data. The quasars all have i* < 20 and have luminosities comparable to that of 3C273. The spectra of the quasars have similar features (strong, broad emission lines and substantial absorption blueward of the Ly alpha emission line) seen in previously known high-redshift quasars. Although the photometric accuracy and image quality fail to meet the final survey requirements, our success rate for identifying high-redshift quasars (17 quasars from 27 candidates) is much higher than that of previ...

  1. The Discovery of Three New z>5 Quasars in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, R J; Brown, M J I; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P R M; Eisenstein, D J; Elston, R J; Fan, X; González, A H; Green, R F; Jannuzi, B T; Kochanek, C S; McKenzie, E H; Rieke, G H; Rieke, M; Soifer, B T; Spinrad, H; Stern, D; Brand, Kate; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cool, Richard J.; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elston, Richard J.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Green, Richard F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kenzie, Eric H. Mc; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rieke, George H.; Rieke, Marcia; Soifer, Baruch T.; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of three z>5 quasars in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) spectroscopic observations of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) Bootes Field. These quasars were selected as part of a larger Spitzer mid-infrared quasar sample with no selection based on optical colors. The highest redshift object, NDWFS J142516.3+325409, z=5.85, is the lowest-luminosity z>5.8 quasar currently known. We compare mid-infrared techniques for identifying z>5 quasars to more traditional optical techniques and show that mid-infrared colors allow for selection of high-redshift quasars even at redshifts where quasars lie near the optical stellar locus and at z>7 where optical selection is impossible. Using the superb multi-wavelength coverage available in the NDWFS Bootes field, we construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high-redshift quasars from observed Bw-band to 24 microns (rest-frame 600 Angstroms - 3.7 microns). We show that the three high-redshift quasars have quite similar SEDs, a...

  2. THE FIFTH DATA RELEASE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY/XMM-NEWTON QUASAR SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of 792 Fifth Data Release Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars with optical spectra that have been observed serendipitously in the X-rays with the XMM-Newton. These quasars cover a redshift range of z = 0.11-5.41 and a magnitude range of i = 15.3-20.7. Substantial numbers of radio-loud (70) and broad absorption line (51) quasars exist within this sample. Significant X-ray detections at ≥2σ account for 87% of the sample (685 quasars), and 473 quasars are detected at ≥6σ, sufficient to allow X-ray spectral fits. For detected sources, ∼60% have X-ray fluxes between F 2-10keV = (1-10) x10-14 erg cm-2 s-1. We fit a single power law, a fixed power law with intrinsic absorption left free to vary, and an absorbed power-law model to all quasars with X-ray signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 6, resulting in a weighted mean photon index Γ = 1.91 ± 0.08, with an intrinsic dispersion σΓ = 0.38. For the 55 sources (11.6%) that prefer intrinsic absorption, we find a weighted mean NH = 1.5 ± 0.3 x 1021 cm-2. We find that Γ correlates significantly with optical color, Δ(g - i), the optical-to-X-ray spectral index (αox), and the X-ray luminosity. While the first two correlations can be explained as artifacts of undetected intrinsic absorption, the correlation between Γ and X-ray luminosity appears to be a real physical correlation, indicating a pivot in the X-ray slope.

  3. First discoveries of z~6 quasars with the Kilo Degree Survey and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy survey

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Mwebaze, J; Valentijn, E A; Bañados, E; Decarli, R; de Jong, J T A; Findlay, J R; Kuijken, K H; La Barbera, F; McFarland, J P; McMahon, R G; Napolitano, N; Sikkema, G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our first year of quasar search in the on-going ESO public Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) surveys. These surveys go up to 2 magnitudes fainter than other wide-field imaging surveys that uncovered predominantly very luminous quasars at z~6. This allows us to probe a more common, fainter population of z~6 quasars. From this first set of combined survey catalogues covering ~250 deg^2 we selected point sources down to Z_AB=22 that had a very red i-Z (i-Z>2.2) colour. After follow-up imaging and spectroscopy, we discovered four new quasars in the redshift range 5.8quasars fainter than M^*, which at z=6 has been estimated to be between M^*=-25.1 and M^*=-27.6. The discovery of 4 quasars in 250 deg^2 of survey data is consistent with predictions based on the z~6 quasar luminosity function. We discuss variou...

  4. The extended High A(V) Quasar Survey: Searching for dusty absorbers toward mid-infrared selected quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krogager, J -K; Heintz, K E; Geier, S; Ledoux, C; Møller, P; Noterdaeme, P; Venemans, B P; Vestergaard, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic survey for dusty intervening absorption systems, particularly damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs), towards reddened quasars. The candidate quasars are selected from mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer combined with optical and near-infrared photometry. Out of 1073 candidates, we secure low-resolution spectra for 108 using the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain. Based on the spectra, we are able to classify 100 of the 108 targets as quasars. A large fraction (50 %) is observed to have broad absorption lines (BALs). Moreover, we find 6 quasars with strange breaks in their spectra, which are not consistent with regular dust reddening. Using template fitting we infer the amount of reddening along each line of sight ranging from A(V)$\\approx$0.1 mag to 1.2 mag (assuming an SMC extinction curve). In four cases, the reddening is consistent with dust exhibiting the 2175{\\AA} feature caused by an intervening absorber, and for two of...

  5. UBVRI photometry of bright GB/GB2 radio galaxies and quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectric UBVRI observations of 25 radio galaxies brighter than V ∼ 17 mag, and 14 quasars and other stellar objects brighter than V ∼ 18 mag are presented and discussed. These objects coincide with the GB/GB2 radio sources, extensively observed with the VLA at 1465 MHz. Galaxy broad-band colours confirm that most of these galaxies are giant ellipticals. (author)

  6. The Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Variability Selection and Quasar Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Yèche, Ch; Pâris, I; Petitjean, P; Burtin, E; Dawson, K; McGreer, I; Myers, A D; Rossi, G; Schlegel, D; Schneider, D; Streblyanska, A; Tinker, J

    2015-01-01

    The SDSS-IV/eBOSS has an extensive quasar program that combines several selection methods. Among these, the photometric variability technique provides highly uniform samples, unaffected by the redshift bias of traditional optical-color selections, when $z= 2.7 - 3.5$ quasars cross the stellar locus or when host galaxy light affects quasar colors at $z 2.2$. Both models are constrained to be continuous at $z=2.2$. They present a flattening of the bright-end slope at large redshift. The LEDE model indicates a reduction of the break density with increasing redshift, but the evolution of the break magnitude depends on the parameterization. The models are in excellent accord, predicting quasar counts that agree within 0.3\\% (resp., 1.1\\%) to $g<22.5$ (resp., $g<23$). The models are also in good agreement over the entire redshift range with models from previous studies.

  7. Red and Reddened Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinstein, Michael A.; Reichard, Timothy A.; York, Donald G.; Knapp, G. R.; Fan, Xiaohui; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brinkmann, J.; Budavari, Tamas; Csabai, Istvan; Nichol, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the continuum and emission line properties of 4576 SDSS quasars as a function of their optical/UV SEDs. The optical/UV color distribution of our sample is roughly Gaussian, but with a red tail; we distinguish between 1) intrinsically blue (optically flat) quasars, 2) intrinsically red (optically steep) quasars, and 3) the 273 (6%) of our quasars whose continua are inconsistent with a single power-law and appear redder due to SMC-like dust reddening rather than synchrotron emiss...

  8. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe,; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will improve measurements of the cosmological distance scale by applying the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to quasar samples. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over 7500 sq. deg. First, a "CORE" quasar sample will combine optical selection in ugriz using a likelihood-based routine called XDQSOz, with a mid-IR-optical color-cut. eBOSS CORE selection (to g < 22 OR r...

  9. The Pittsburgh Sloan Digital Sky Survey Mg II Quasar Absorption-line Survey Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quider, Anna M.; Nestor, Daniel B.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.; Monier, Eric M.; Weyant, Anja N.; Busche, Joseph R.

    2011-04-01

    We present a catalog of intervening Mg II quasar absorption-line systems in the redshift interval 0.36 <= z <= 2.28. The catalog was built from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Four (SDSS DR4) quasar spectra. Currently, the catalog contains ~17, 000 measured Mg II doublets. We also present data on the ~44, 600 quasar spectra which were searched to construct the catalog, including redshift and magnitude information, continuum-normalized spectra, and corresponding arrays of redshift-dependent minimum rest equivalent widths detectable at our confidence threshold. The catalog is available online. A careful second search of 500 random spectra indicated that, for every 100 spectra searched, approximately one significant Mg II system was accidentally rejected. Current plans to expand the catalog beyond DR4 quasars are discussed. Many Mg II absorbers are known to be associated with galaxies. Therefore, the combination of large size and well understood statistics makes this catalog ideal for precision studies of the low-ionization and neutral gas regions associated with galaxies at low to moderate redshift. An analysis of the statistics of Mg II absorbers using this catalog will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  10. A Spectroscopic Survey of WISE-selected Obscured Quasars with the Southern African Large Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Hainline, Kevin N; Carroll, Christopher M; Myers, Adam D; DiPompeo, Michael A; Trouille, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic survey of a sample of 40 candidate obscured quasars identified on the basis of their mid-infrared emission detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Optical spectra for this survey were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). Our sample was selected with WISE colors characteristic of AGNs, as well as red optical to mid-IR colors indicating that the optical/UV AGN continuum is obscured by dust. We obtain secure redshifts for the majority of the objects that comprise our sample (35/40), and find that sources that are bright in the WISE W4 (22$\\mu$m) band are typically at moderate redshift ( = 0.35$) while sources fainter in W4 are at higher redshifts ( = 0.73$). The majority of the sources have narrow emission lines, with optical colors and emission line ratios of our WISE-selected sources that are consistent with the locus of AGN on the rest-frame $g-z$ color vs. [NeIII]$\\lambda$3869...

  11. The radio structure of a sample of 101 quasars from the Parkes +- 40 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-baseline interferometers at Jodrell Bank have been used to investigate the radio structure of 101 quasar candidates from the Parkes 2700-MHz survey of the +- 40 declination zone. These observations show that quasars with flat or inverted radio spectra have radio structures which are smaller than 0.1 arcsec. The steep-spectrum quasars from the Parkes sample are more extended, and have a distribution of angular sizes similar to that of quasars of the same spectral type identified from the lower-frequency 4C catalogue. All 10 of the quasars with concave spectra have radio emission from the vicinity of the optical nucleus, usually from regions smaller than 0.1 arcsec. (author)

  12. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of Δznorm (i.e., (zspec – zphot)/(1 + zspec)), to an average of Δznorm = 0.004, a standard deviation of σ = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., zspec ≤ 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2σ from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to σ = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application

  13. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Angstroem break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P.; A Mirhosseini; Pertermann, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered a few unusual quasars with a characteristic break in the continuum around 3000 A that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for a systematical search for quasars with such properties in the SDSS spectra archive. We constructed a sample of 23 quasars classified as 3000 A break quasars and two comparison samp...

  14. BINARY QUASARS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: EVIDENCE FOR EXCESS CLUSTERING ON SMALL SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, J F; Strauss, M A; Oguri, M; Inada, N; Richards, G T; Pindor, B; Schneider, D P; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Fan, X; Burles, S; Schlegel, D J; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R; Bahcall, N A; Brunner, R J; Brinkman, J

    2005-11-10

    We present a sample of 218 new quasar pairs with proper transverse separations R{sub prop} < 1 h{sup -1} Mpc over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 3.0, discovered from an extensive follow up campaign to find companions around the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey quasars. This sample includes 26 new binary quasars with separations R{sub prop} < 50 h{sup -1} kpc ({theta} < 10''), more than doubling the number of such systems known. We define a statistical sample of binaries selected with homogeneous criteria and compute its selection function, taking into account sources of incompleteness. The first measurement of the quasar correlation function on scales 10 h{sup -1} kpc < R{sub prop} < 400 h{sup -1} kpc is presented. For R{sub prop} {approx}< 40 h{sup -1} kpc, we detect an order of magnitude excess clustering over the expectation from the large scale (R{sub prop} {approx}> 3 h{sup -1} Mpc) quasar correlation function, extrapolated down as a power law to the separations probed by our binaries. The excess grows to {approx}30 at R{sub prop} {approx} 10 h{sup -1} kpc, and provides compelling evidence that the quasar autocorrelation function gets progressively steeper on sub-Mpc scales. This small scale excess can likely be attributed to dissipative interaction events which trigger quasar activity in rich environments. Recent small scale measurements of galaxy clustering and quasar-galaxy clustering are reviewed and discussed in relation to our measurement of small scale quasar clustering.

  15. Photometric Redshifts for Quasars in Multi-band Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Longo, G.; Mercurio, A.

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of Δz norm (i.e., (z spec - z phot)/(1 + z spec)), to an average of Δz norm = 0.004, a standard deviation of σ = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z spec objects with photo-z deviating more than 2σ from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to σ = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  16. Chandra Survey of Radio-quiet, High-redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bechtold, J; Shields, J; Czerny, B; Janiuk, A; Hamann, F; Aldcroft, T L; Elvis, M; Dobrzycki, A; Bechtold, Jill; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Shields, Joseph; Czerny, Bozena; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Hamann, Fred; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Elvis, Martin; Dobrzycki, Adam

    2003-01-01

    We observed 17 optically-selected, radio-quiet high-redshift quasars with the Chandra Observatory ACIS, and detected 16 of them. The quasars have redshift between 3.70 and 6.28 and include the highest redshift quasars known. When compared to low-redshift quasars observed with ROSAT, these high redshift quasars are significantly more X-ray quiet. We also find that the X-ray spectral index of the high redshift objects is flatter than the average at lower redshift. These trends confirm the predictions of models where the accretion flow is described by a cold, optically-thick accretion disk surrounded by a hot, optically thin corona, provided the viscosity parameter alpha >= 0.02. The high redshift quasars have supermassive black holes with masses ~10^{10} M_{sun}, and are accreting material at ~0.1 the Eddington limit. We detect 10 X-ray photons from the z=6.28 quasar SDS 1030+0524, which may have a Gunn-Peterson trough and be near the redshift of reionization of the intergalactic medium. The X-ray data place an...

  17. Dust and gas obscuration in ELAIS Deep X-ray Survey reddened quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Willott, C J; Almaini, O; Johnson, O; Lawrence, A; Dunlop, J S; Roche, N D; Mann, R G; Manners, J C; González-Solares, E A; Pérez-Fournon, I; Ivison, R J; Serjeant, S; Oliver, S J; McMahon, R G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Willott, Chris J.; Simpson, Chris; Almaini, Omar; Johnson, Olivia; Lawrence, Andrew; Dunlop, James S.; Roche, Nathan D.; Mann, Robert G.; Manners, James C.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Ivison, Rob J.; Serjeant, Stephen; Oliver, Seb J.; Mahon, Richard G. Mc; Rowan-Robinson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray surveys have uncovered a large population of heavily obscured AGN. They also reveal a population of quasars with moderate obscuration at both visible and X-ray wavelengths. We use Chandra selected samples of quasars from the ELAIS Deep X-ray Survey (EDXS) and CDF-N to investigate the obscuration towards the nuclei of moderately obscured AGN. We find an inverse correlation between the optical to X-ray flux ratio and the X-ray hardness ratio which can be interpreted as due to obscuration at visible and X-ray wavelengths. We present detailed optical and near-infrared data for a sample of optically-faint (R>23) quasars from the EDXS. These are used to constrain the amount of rest-frame UV/optical reddening towards these quasars. It is found that optically-faint quasars are mostly faint due to obscuration, not because they are intrinsically weak. After correcting for reddening, the optical magnitudes of most of these quasars are similar to the brighter quasars at these X-ray fluxes. Combining with gas c...

  18. An Empirical Calibration of the Completeness of the SDSS Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Richards, G T; Hall, P B; Strauss, M A; Brunner, R J; Fan, X; Baldry, I K; York, D G; Gunn, J E; Nichol, R C; Meiksin, A; Brinkmann, J; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Brunner, Robert; Fan, Xiaohui; Baldry, Ivan K.; York, Donald G.; Gunn, James E.; Nichol, Robert C.; Meiksin, Avery; Brinkmann, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Spectra of nearly 20000 point-like objects to a Galactic reddening corrected magnitude of i=19.1 have been obtained to test the completeness of the SDSS quasar survey. The spatially-unresolved objects were selected from all regions of color space, sparsely sampled from within a 278 sq. deg. area of sky covered by this study. Only ten quasars were identified that were not targeted as candidates by the SDSS quasar survey (including both color and radio source selection). The inferred density of unresolved quasars on the sky that are missed by the SDSS algorithm is 0.44 per sq. deg, compared to 8.28 per sq. deg. for the selected quasar density, giving a completeness of 94.9(+2.6,-3.8) to the limiting magnitude. Omitting radio selection reduces the color-only selection completeness by about 1%. Of the ten newly identified quasars, three have detected broad absorption line systems, six are significantly redder than other quasars at the same redshift, and four have redshifts between 2.7 and 3.0 (the redshift range ...

  19. On the selection effect of radio quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yu; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan; Wu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We identified a large sample of radio quasars, including those with complex radio morphology, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Faint Images of Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST). Using this sample, we inspect previous radio quasar samples for selection effects resulting from complex radio morphologies and adopting positional coincidence between radio and optical sources alone. We find that 13.0% and 8.1% radio quasars do not show a radio core within 1.2 and 2 arcsecs of their opti...

  20. Nitrogen Enriched Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Bentz, M C; Osmer, P S; Bentz, Misty C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2004-01-01

    The quasar Q0353-383 has long been known to have extremely strong nitrogen intercombination lines at 1486 and 1750 Angstroms, implying an anomalously high nitrogen abundance of ~15 times solar. A search for similar nitrogen-rich quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release catalog has yielded 20 candidates, including four with nitrogen emission as strong or stronger than that seen in Q0353-383. Our results indicate that only about 1 in 1700 of quasars have nitrogen abundances similar to Q0353-383, while up to 1 in 140 may be in the process of extreme nitrogen enrichment.

  1. Nitrogen Enriched Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Bentz, Misty C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2004-01-01

    The quasar Q0353-383 has long been known to have extremely strong nitrogen intercombination lines at 1486 and 1750 Angstroms, implying an anomalously high nitrogen abundance of ~15 times solar. A search for similar nitrogen-rich quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release catalog has yielded 20 candidates, including four with nitrogen emission as strong or stronger than that seen in Q0353-383. Our results indicate that only about 1 in 1700 of quasars have nitrogen abundances si...

  2. An X-Shooter composite of bright 1 < z < 2 quasars from UV to infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsing, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Christensen, L.; Krogager, J.-K.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectral templates are important both to QSO physics and for investigations that use QSOs as probes of intervening gas and dust. However, combinations of various QSO samples obtained at different times and with different instruments so as to expand a composite and to cover a wider rest frame wavelength region may create systematic effects, and the contribution from QSO hosts may contaminate the composite. We have constructed a composite spectrum from luminous blue QSOs at 1 github.com/jselsing/QuasarComposite

  3. CIV Broad Absorption Line Acceleration in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Grier, C. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; J. R. Trump; Ak, N. Filiz; Anderson, S. F.; Green, Paul J.; Schneider, D. P.; Sun, M.; Vivek, M.; Beatty, T. G.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the largest systematic investigation of broad absorption line (BAL) acceleration to date. We use spectra of 140 quasars from three Sloan Digital Sky Survey programs to search for global velocity offsets in BALs over timescales of ~2.5-5.5 years in the quasar rest frame. We carefully select acceleration candidates by requiring monolithic velocity shifts over the entire BAL trough, avoiding BALs with velocity shifts that might be caused by profile variability. The CIV BA...

  4. The Pan-STARRS1 distant z>5.6 quasar survey: more than 100 quasars within the first Gyr of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Mazzucchelli, C; Walter, F; Fan, X; Stern, D; Schlafly, E; Chambers, K C; Rix, H-W; Jiang, L; McGreer, I; Simcoe, R; Wang, F; Yang, J; Morganson, E; De Rosa, G; Greiner, J; Baloković, M; Burgett, W S; Cooper, T; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Jun, H D; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Miller, D; Schindler, J -T; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C; Yang, Q

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.65.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.

  5. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data VI. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectrograph Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, S F; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Strauss, M A; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Gunn, J E; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Gunn, James E.

    2001-01-01

    We present results on over 100 high-redshift quasars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using automated selection algorithms applied to SDSS imaging data and with spectroscopic confirmation obtained during routine spectroscopic operations of the Sloan 2.5-m telescope. The SDSS spectra cover the wavelength range 3900--9200 Angstroms at a spectral resolution of 1800, and have been obtained for 116 quasars with redshifts greater than 3.94; 92 of these objects were previously uncataloged, significantly increasing the current tally of published z>4 quasars. The paper also reports observations of five additional new z>4.6 quasars; all were found from the SDSS imaging survey and spectroscopically confirmed with data from the Apache Point Observatory's 3.5-m telescope. The i' magnitudes of the quasars range from 18.03 to 20.56. Of the 97 new objects in this paper, 13 are Broad Absorption Line quasars. Five quasars, including one object at a redshift of 5.11, have 20 cm peak flux densities greater than 1 mJ...

  6. A search for distant radio-loud quasars in the CLASS survey: three new radio-selected quasars at z>4

    OpenAIRE

    Snellen, Ignas; McMahon, Richard; Dennett-Thorpe, Jane; Jackson, Neal; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Xanthopoulos, Emily

    2001-01-01

    We report on the search for distant radio-loud quasars in the Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey (CLASS) of flat spectrum radio sources with S_5GHz>30 mJy. Unresolved optical counterparts were selected from APM scans of POSS-I plates, with e2.0 colours, in an effective area of ~6400 deg^2. Four sources were found to be quasars with z>4, of which one was previously known. This sample bridges the gap between the strong radio surveys with S_5GHz>200 mJy and the samples of radio-weak quasars that can be ...

  7. Multiwavelength polarization observations of the γ-ray bright quasar PKS 0420-014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitskiy I.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze total and polarized intensity images of the quasar PKS 0420-014 obtained monthly with the VLBA at 43 GHz during 2008–2012 along with γ-ray data provided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and multi-color photometric and polarimetric measurements collected by different optical telescopes. During this period the quasar underwent a number of optical flares, which were accompanied by rapid rotation of polarization angle, an increase of activity in γ-rays, and the appearance of new superluminal knots in the parsec-scale jet. We investigate the fine structure of the flares at different wavelengths and in polarized light, and determine kinematic parameters of the knots. We compare the rapid evolution of the optical polarization with the polarization of the VLBI core and knots. We interpret the multi-wavelength behavior within a model that places the blazar “dissipation zone” at the millimeter-wave core of the parsec-scale jet.

  8. The 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey: The z<2.1 Quasar Luminosity Function from 5645 Quasars to g=21.85

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, G T; Anderson, S F; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Boyle, B J; De Propris, R; Drinkwater, M J; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Ivezic, Z; Jester, S; Loveday, J; Meiksin, A; Miller, L; Myers, A; Nichol, R C; Outram, P J; Pimbblet, K A; Roseboom, I G; Ross, N; Schneider, D P; Shanks, T; Sharp, R G; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Szalay, A S; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; York, D G

    2005-01-01

    We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged

  9. SDSS J0246-0825: A New Gravitationally Lensed Quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, N; Burles, S; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; Schechter, P L; Eisenstein, D J; Oguri, M; Castander, F J; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Pindor, B; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; White, R L; Brinkmann, J; Szalay, A; York, D G

    2005-11-10

    We report the discovery of a new two-image gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J024634.11-082536.2 (SDSS J0246-0825). This object was selected as a lensed quasar candidate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by the same algorithm that was used to discover other SDSS lensed quasars (e.g., SDSS J0924+0219). Multicolor imaging with the Magellan Consortium's Walter Baade 6.5-m telescope and the spectroscopic observations using the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope confirm that SDSS J0246-0825 consists of two lensed images ({Delta}{theta} = 1''.04) of a source quasar at z = 1.68. Imaging observations with the Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope reveal an extended object between the two quasar components, which is likely to be a lensing galaxy of this system. From the absorption lines in the spectra of quasar components and the apparent magnitude of the galaxy, combined with the expected absolute magnitude from the Faber-Jackson relation, we estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be z = 0.724. A highly distorted ring is visible in the Hubble Space Telescope images, which is likely to be the lensed host galaxy of the source quasar. Simple mass modeling predicts the possibility that there is a small (faint) lensing object near the primary lensing galaxy.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Velocity Shifts of Quasar Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; Denney, Kelly D; Greene, Jenny E; Grier, C J; Ho, Luis C; Peterson, Bradley M; Petitjean, Patrick; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Quasar emission lines are often shifted from the systemic velocity due to various dynamical and radiative processes in the line-emitting region. The level of these velocity shifts depends both on the line species and on quasar properties. We study velocity shifts for the line peaks of various narrow and broad quasar emission lines relative to systemic using a sample of 849 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. The coadded (from 32 epochs) spectra of individual quasars have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to measure stellar absorption lines to provide reliable systemic velocity estimates, as well as weak narrow emission lines. The sample also covers a large dynamic range in quasar luminosity (~2 dex), allowing us to explore potential luminosity dependence of the velocity shifts. We derive average line peak velocity shifts as a function of quasar luminosity for different lines, and quantify their intrinsic scatter. We further quantify how well the peak velocit...

  11. Space distribution of quasars based on optically selected samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scale search for bright quasars was started in 1972. This survey for ultraviolet-excess stellar objects covers some 10,700 sq. deg. and is aimed to be complete, on the average, to B = 16.2. The authors undertook spectroscopic observations of all objects and produced a sample of over 100 quasars with redshifts and magnitudes that constitute the Palomar Bright Quasar Survey. They have used the results of this Survey, together with the Braccesi sample, two objective-prism quasar surveys discussed by Osmer and Smith (1980) and Osmer (1980), and a small, deep sample in SA 57 (Kron and Chiu 1981) to study the space distribution and optical luminosity function of quasars. Some of the main results are summarised. (Auth.)

  12. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); McGreer, Ian D. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Aubourg, Eric [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana, E-mail: npross@lbl.gov [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); and others

    2013-08-10

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i {approx}< 21.8 quasars are selected over an area of 2236 deg{sup 2}, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 < z < 3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. The completeness of the survey is derived through simulated quasar photometry, and this completeness estimate is checked using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar K-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M{sub i} (z = 2.2) Almost-Equal-To -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log {Phi}* - M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of {approx}2.6 while {Phi}* declines by a factor of {approx}8. At z {approx}< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.

  13. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data V. Hobby-Eberly Telescope Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Donald P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Gunn, James E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hill, Gary J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of 27 quasars with redshifts between 3.58 and 4.49. The objects were identified as high-redshift candidates based on their colors in Sloan Digital Sky Survey commissioning data. The redshifts were confirmed with low resolution spectra obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The quasars' $i^*$ magnitudes range from 18.55 to 20.97. Nearly 60% of the quasar candidates observed are confirmed spectroscopically as quasars. Two of the objects are Broad Absorption Line quasars...

  14. Difference Imaging of Lensed Quasar Candidates inthe SDSS Supernova Survey Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune

    2008-02-04

    Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few non-lensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and their surrounding fields. Starting from 20768 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars and 36 candidate lenses/lensed images, we find that 21 sources including 15 SDSS QSOs and 7 candidate lenses/lensed images are non-periodic variable sources. We can measure the spatial structure of the variable flux for 18 of these sources and identify only one as a non-point source. This source does not display the compelling spatial structure of the variable flux of known lensed quasars, so we reject it as a lens candidate. None of the lens candidates from the SQLS survive our cuts. Given our effective survey area of order 0.71 square degrees, this indicates a false positive rate of order one per square degree for the method. The fraction of quasars not found to be variable and the false positive rate should both fall if we analyze the full, later data releases for the SDSS fields. While application of the method to the SDSS is limited by the resolution, depth, and sampling of the survey, several future surveys such as Pan-STARRS, LSST, and SNAP will avoid these limitations.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Donald P; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Boroson, Todd A; Ross, Nicholas P; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Inada, Naohisa; Jester, Sebastian; Knapp, G R; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Thakar, Anirudda R; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, Daniel; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; Hibon, Pascale; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kron, Richard G; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lupton, Robert H; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, K; Pier, Jeffrey R; Price, Ted N; Saxe, David H; Schlegel, David J; Simmons, Audry; Snedden, Stephanie A; SubbaRao, Mark U; Szalay, Alexander S; Weinberg, David H

    2010-01-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" r...

  16. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  17. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i AB = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW0 ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y AB = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i 775 – Y 105 color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  18. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Haiman, Zoltàn [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiang, Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i {sub AB} = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW{sub 0} ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y {sub AB} = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i {sub 775} – Y {sub 105} color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  19. Growing the first bright quasars in cosmological simulations of structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2009-11-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the growth of massive black holes (BHs) at high redshifts subject to BH merger recoils from gravitational wave emission. As a promising host system of a powerful high-redshift quasar, we select the most massive dark matter halo at z = 6 from the Millennium simulation, and resimulate its formation at much higher resolution including gas physics and a model for BH seeding, growth and feedback. Assuming that the initial BH seeds are relatively massive, of the order of 105Msolar, and that seeding occurs around z ~ 15 in dark matter haloes of mass ~109-1010Msolar, we find that it is possible to build up supermassive BHs (SMBHs) by z = 6 that assemble most of their mass during extended Eddington-limited accretion periods. The properties of the simulated SMBHs are consistent with observations of z = 6 quasars in terms of the estimated BH masses and bolometric luminosities, the amount of star formation occurring within the host halo, and the presence of highly enriched gas in the innermost regions of the host galaxy. After a peak in the BH accretion rate at z = 6, the most massive BH has become sufficiently massive for the growth to enter into a much slower phase of feedback-regulated accretion. We extend our basic BH model by incorporating prescriptions for the BH recoils caused by gravitational wave emission during BH merger events, taking into account the newest numerical relativity simulations of merging BH binaries. In order to explore the full range of expected recoils and radiative efficiencies, we also consider models with spinning BHs. In the most `pessimistic' case where BH spins are initially high, we find that the growth of the SMBHs can be potentially hampered if they grow mostly in isolation and experience only a small number of mergers. On the other hand, whereas BH kicks can expel a substantial fraction of low-mass BHs, they do not significantly affect the build-up of the SMBHs. On the contrary, a

  20. Efficient Photometric Selection of Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: 100,000 z<3 Quasars from Data Release One

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, G T; Gray, A G; Brunner, R J; Lupton, R H; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Chong, S S; Weinstein, M A; Schneider, D P; Anderson, S F; Munn, J A; Harris, H C; Strauss, M A; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Ivezic, Z; York, D G; Brinkmann, J; Richards, Gordon T.; Nichol, Robert C.; Gray, Alexander G.; Brunner, Robert J.; Lupton, Robert H.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Chong, Shang Shan; Weinstein, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Anderson, Scott F.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Strauss, Michael A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Ivezic, Zeljko; York, Donald G.

    2004-01-01

    We present a catalog of 100,563 unresolved, UV-excess (UVX) quasar candidates to g=21 from 2099 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release One (DR1) imaging data. Existing spectra of 22,737 sources reveals that 22,191 (97.6%) are quasars; accounting for the magnitude dependence of this efficiency, we estimate that 95,502 (95.0%) of the objects in the catalog are quasars. Such a high efficiency is unprecedented in broad-band surveys of quasars. This ``proof-of-concept'' sample is designed to be maximally efficient, but still has 94.7% completeness to unresolved, g<~19.5, UVX quasars from the DR1 quasar catalog. This efficient and complete selection is the result of our application of a probability density type analysis to training sets that describe the 4-D color distribution of stars and spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS. Specifically, we use a non-parametric Bayesian classification, based on kernel density estimation, to parameterize the color distribution of astronomical sour...

  1. A spectroscopic survey of WISE-selected obscured quasars with the southern african large telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic survey of a sample of 40 candidate obscured quasars identified on the basis of their mid-infrared emission detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Optical spectra for this survey were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. Our sample was selected with WISE colors characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), as well as red optical to mid-IR colors indicating that the optical/UV AGN continuum is obscured by dust. We obtain secure redshifts for the majority of the objects that comprise our sample (35/40), and find that sources that are bright in the WISE W4 (22 μm) band are typically at moderate redshift ((z) = 0.35) while sources fainter in W4 are at higher redshifts ((z) = 0.73). The majority of the sources have narrow emission lines with optical colors and emission line ratios of our WISE-selected sources that are consistent with the locus of AGN on the rest-frame g – z color versus [Ne III] λ3869/[O II] λλ3726+3729 line ratio diagnostic diagram. We also use empirical AGN and galaxy templates to model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the objects in our sample, and find that while there is significant variation in the observed SEDs for these objects, the majority require a strong AGN component. Finally, we use the results from our analysis of the optical spectra and the SEDs to compare our selection criteria to alternate criteria presented in the literature. These results verify the efficacy of selecting luminous obscured AGNs based on their WISE colors.

  2. A spectroscopic survey of WISE-selected obscured quasars with the southern african large telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Carroll, Christopher M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Myers, Adam D.; DiPompeo, Michael A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Trouille, Laura [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, The Adler Planetarium, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic survey of a sample of 40 candidate obscured quasars identified on the basis of their mid-infrared emission detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Optical spectra for this survey were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. Our sample was selected with WISE colors characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), as well as red optical to mid-IR colors indicating that the optical/UV AGN continuum is obscured by dust. We obtain secure redshifts for the majority of the objects that comprise our sample (35/40), and find that sources that are bright in the WISE W4 (22 μm) band are typically at moderate redshift ((z) = 0.35) while sources fainter in W4 are at higher redshifts ((z) = 0.73). The majority of the sources have narrow emission lines with optical colors and emission line ratios of our WISE-selected sources that are consistent with the locus of AGN on the rest-frame g – z color versus [Ne III] λ3869/[O II] λλ3726+3729 line ratio diagnostic diagram. We also use empirical AGN and galaxy templates to model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the objects in our sample, and find that while there is significant variation in the observed SEDs for these objects, the majority require a strong AGN component. Finally, we use the results from our analysis of the optical spectra and the SEDs to compare our selection criteria to alternate criteria presented in the literature. These results verify the efficacy of selecting luminous obscured AGNs based on their WISE colors.

  3. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. II. CONFIRMATION OF 144 NEW ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE SOUTHERN EDGE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We quadruple the number of quasars known behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from 56 (42 in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-III LMC fields) to 200 by spectroscopically confirming 169 (144 new) quasars from a sample of 845 observed candidates in four ∼3 deg2 Anglo-Australian Telescope/AAOmega fields south of the LMC center. The candidates were selected based on their Spitzer mid-infrared colors, X-ray emission, and/or optical variability properties in the database of the OGLE microlensing survey. The contaminating sources can be divided into 115 young stellar objects (YSOs), 17 planetary nebulae (PNe), 39 Be and 24 blue stars, 68 red stars, and 12 objects classed as either YSO/PN or blue star/YSO. There are also 402 targets with either featureless spectra or too low signal-to-noise ratios for source classification. Our quasar sample is 50% (30%) complete at I = 18.6 mag (19.3 mag). The newly discovered active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide many additional reference points for proper motion studies of the LMC, and the sample includes 10 bright AGNs (I < 18 mag) that are potentially suitable for absorption line studies. Their primary use, however, is for detailed studies of quasar variability, as they all have long-term, high cadence, continuously growing light curves from the microlensing surveys of the LMC. Completing the existing Magellanic Quasars Survey fields in the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud should yield a sample of ∼700 well-monitored AGNs, and expanding it to the larger regions covered by the OGLE-IV survey should yield a sample of ∼3600 AGNs.

  4. Growing the first bright quasars in cosmological simulations of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sijacki, Debora; Haehnelt, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the growth of massive black holes (BHs) at high redshifts subject to BH merger recoils from gravitational wave emission. We select the most massive dark matter halo at z=6 from the Millennium simulation, and resimulate its formation at much higher resolution including gas physics and a model for BH seeding, growth and feedback. Assuming that the initial BH seeds are relatively massive, of the order of 10^5 Msun, and that seeding occurs around z~15 in dark matter haloes of mass 10^9-10^10 Msun, we find that it is possible to build up supermassive BHs (SMBHs) by z=6 that assemble most of their mass during extended Eddington-limited accretion periods. The properties of the simulated SMBHs are consistent with observations of z=6 quasars in terms of the estimated BH masses and bolometric luminosities, the amount of star formation occurring within the host halo, and the presence of highly enriched gas in the innermost regions of the host galaxy. After a pea...

  5. The X-Ray Properties of the Optically Brightest Mini-BAL Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Comins, M. L.; Gibson, Robert R.; Shemmer, Ohad; Garmire, Gordon P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    We have compiled a sample of 14 of the optically brightest radio-quiet quasars ($m_{i}$~$\\le$~17.5 and $z$~$\\ge$~1.9) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog that have C IV mini-BALs present in their spectra. X-ray data for 12 of the objects were obtained via a Chandra snapshot survey using ACIS-S, while data for the other two quasars were obtained from archival XMM-Newton observations. Joint X-ray spectral analysis shows the mini-BAL quasars have a similar average power...

  6. Dust and gas obscuration in ELAIS Deep X-ray Survey reddened quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Willott, Chris J.; Simpson, Chris; Almaini, Omar; Johnson, Olivia; Lawrence, Andrew; Dunlop, James S.; Roche, Nathan D.; Mann, Robert G.; Manners, James C.; González-Solares, Eduardo; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Ivison, Rob J; Serjeant, Stephen; Oliver, Seb J.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray surveys have uncovered a large population of heavily obscured AGN. They also reveal a population of quasars with moderate obscuration at both visible and X-ray wavelengths. We use Chandra selected samples of quasars from the ELAIS Deep X-ray Survey (EDXS) and CDF-N to investigate the obscuration towards the nuclei of moderately obscured AGN. We find an inverse correlation between the optical to X-ray flux ratio and the X-ray hardness ratio which can be interpreted as due to obscura...

  7. The Magellanic Quasars Survey. III. Spectroscopic Confirmation of 758 Active Galactic Nuclei behind the Magellanic Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Kozłowski, Szymon; Onken, Christopher A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Meixner, M.; Bonanos, A. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The Magellanic Quasars Survey (MQS) has now increased the number of quasars known behind the Magellanic Clouds by almost an order of magnitude. All survey fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 70% of those in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) have been observed. The targets were selected from the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) based on their optical variability, mid-IR and/or X-ray properties. We spectroscopically confirmed 758 (565 LMC and 193 ...

  8. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, A.; Treu, T.; Ostrovski, F.; Schechter, P. L.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Auger, M. W.; Courbin, F.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Frieman, J.; Kuropatkin, N.; Marshall, P. J.; McMahon, R. G.; Meylan, G.; More, A.; Suyu, S. H.; Rusu, C. E.; Finley, D.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new gravitationally lensed quasars, discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) based on their multiband photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show a red galaxy with two blue point sources at either side, which are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64 as obtained by our long-slit spectroscopic data. The Einstein radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51 arcsec. DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fibre spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption by Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. Our long-slit spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein radius is 0.68 arcsec, corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M⊙. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES data set.

  9. The discovery of the first luminous z~6 quasar in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Warren, S J; González-Solares, E A; Hewett, P C; Mortlock, D J; Dye, S; Sharp, R G

    2006-01-01

    We present the initial results from our search for high redshift, z > 6, quasars using near infrared data from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS). Our analysis of the first 106 deg^2 of sky has resulted in the discovery of ULAS J020332.38+001229.2, a luminous (J_AB=20.0, J_Vega=19.1, M_1450=-26.2) quasar at z=5.86. Following candidate selection from the combined IR and optical catalogue data and stacking of multiple epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, we have obtained optical spectroscopy for two candidates. The VLT FORS2 spectrum of ULAS J020332.38+001229.2 shows broad Ly alpha + NV1240 emission at ~8350 A and an abrupt continuum break due to absorption by the Ly alpha forest. The quasar is not present in the SDSS DR5 catalogue and the continuum spectral index of alpha=-1.4 (F_nu~nu^alpha) is redder than a composite of SDSS quasars at similar redshifts (alpha=-0.5). The discovery of one z~6 quasar in ~100 deg^2 down to Y_AB=20.4 (7 sigma) is consistent with existing S...

  10. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: QUASAR TARGET SELECTION FOR DATA RELEASE NINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg2, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the distribution of Lyα absorption from the spectra of a sample of ∼150,000 z > 2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z ≈ 2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars in the redshift range 2.2 –2 in this redshift range, with a goal of 20 out of 40 targets deg–2 allocated to the quasar survey. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g ≤ 22.0 or r ≤ 21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the distribution of Lyα absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection algorithm, many other astrophysical studies do. We have therefore defined a uniformly selected subsample of 20 targets deg–2, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50% (∼10 z > 2.20 quasars deg–2). This 'CORE' subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. For the remaining 20 targets deg–2, we will continue to develop improved selection techniques, including the use of additional data sets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. In this paper, we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS QTS algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations (through 2011 July), in support of the science investigations based on these data, and we analyze the spectra obtained during the first year. During this year, 11,263 new z > 2.20 quasars were spectroscopically confirmed by BOSS, roughly double the number of previously known quasars with z > 2.20. Our current algorithms select an average of 15 z > 2.20 quasars deg–2 from 40

  11. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Mouyuan; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the MgII and Hbeta broad emission lines and UV/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over $6$ months, containing 357 quasars with MgII and 41 quasars with Hbeta . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional $2854$ quasars with MgII and 572 quasars with Hbeta. The MgII emission line is significantly variable ($\\Delta f/f$ 10% on 100-day timescales), indicating that it is feasible to use the broad MgII line for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of $\\gtrsim 5$ days. We compare the emission-line and...

  12. A Catalog of Broad Absorption Line Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Trump, J R; Brinkman, J; Fan, X; Hall, P B; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Nitta, A; Reichard, T A; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, Scott F.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Reichard, Timothy A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a total of 4784 unique broad absorption line quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. An automated algorithm was used to match a continuum to each quasar and to identify regions of flux at least 10% below the continuum over a velocity range of at least 1000 km/s in the CIV and MgII absorption regions. The model continuum was selected as the best-fit match from a set of template quasar spectra binned in luminosity, emission line width, and redshift, with the power-law spectral index and amount of dust reddening as additional free parameters. We characterize our sample through the traditional ``balnicity'' index and a revised absorption index, as well as through parameters such as the width, outflow velocity, fractional depth and number of troughs. From a sample of 16883 quasars at 1.7 \\le z \\le 4.38, we identify 4386 (26.0%) quasars with broad CIV absorption, of which 1756 (10.4%) satisfy traditional selection criteria. From a sample of 34973 quasars at 0.5 \\le z \\le 2.15, we id...

  13. Distribution of the very first PopIII stars and their relation to bright z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first PopIII stars and the rare, massive, halos that are generally considered to host bright quasars at high redshift z~6. The main question that we intend to answer is whether the super-massive black holes powering these QSOs grew out from the seeds planted by the first intermediate massive black holes created in the universe. This question involves a dynamical range of 10^13 in mass and we address it by combining N-body simulations of structure formation to identify the most massive halos at z~6 with a Monte Carlo method based on linear theory to obtain the location and formation times of the first light halos within the whole simulation box. We show that the descendants of the first ~10^6 Msun virialized halos do not, on average, end up in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The oldest PopIII progenitors of the most massive halos at z~6, form instead from density peaks that are on average one and a half...

  14. BBN, ADTree and MLP Comparison in Separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2006-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection. Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective to classify point sources, moreover they all may be applied for large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  15. A Comparison of BBN, ADTree and MLP in separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Zhang; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perception (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection.Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy found, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective for classifying point sources. They may all be applied to large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  16. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Å break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P.; Mirhosseini, A.; Pertermann, F.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In past decades, huge surveys have confirmed the existence of populations of exotic and hitherto unknown quasar types. The discovery and investigation of these rare peculiar objects is important because they may represent links to special evolutionary stages and hold clues to the evolution of quasars and galaxies. Aims: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered the unusual quasars J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8 and a small number of similar objects. Their spectra are characterised by a break in the continuum around 3000 Å that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. The main aim of the present paper was twofold. First, a new target-oriented search was performed in the spectra database of the SDSS to construct a sizable sample of such 3000 Å break quasars. Second, their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) was compared with SEDs of BAL quasars. Methods: We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for data mining in the SDSS spectra archive to search for more quasars with properties comparable to the prototypes J010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. We constructed a sample of 3000 Å break quasars and comparison samples of quasars with similar properties, to some extent, but also showing indications for typical BAL features. Particular attention was payed to a possible contamination by rare stellar spectral types, in particular DQ white dwarfs. We construct ensemble-averaged broad-band SEDs based on archival data from SDSS, GALEX, 2MASS, UKIDSS, WISE, and other surveys. The SEDs were corrected for dust absorption at the systemic redshifts of the quasars by the comparison with the average SED of normal quasars. Results: We compiled a list of 23 quasars classified as 3000 Å break quasars with properties similar to 010540.75-003313.9 and J220445.27+003141.8. Their de-reddened arithmetic median composite SED is indistinguishable

  17. A Snapshot Survey for Gravitational Lenses among z>=4.0 Quasars. II. Constraints on the 4.0Quasar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Haiman, Zoltán; Pindor, Bartosz; Strauss, Michael A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Eisenstein, Daniel; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    We report on i-band snapshot observations of 157 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at 4.0-3.8 (3 σ), assuming a break in the quasar luminosity function at M*1450~-24.5. This constraint is considerably stronger than the limit of β>-4.63 obtained from the absence of lensing in four z>5.7 quasars. Such constraints are important to our understanding of the true space density of high-redshift quasars and the ionization state of the early universe. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9472.

  18. The quest for Type 2 quasars: Chandra observations of luminous obscured quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Comastri, A

    2006-01-01

    We report on new Chandra exploratory observations of six candidate Type 2 quasars at z=0.49-0.73 selected among the most [OIII] luminous emitters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Under the assumption that [OIII] is a proxy for the intrinsic luminosity of the central source, their predicted rest-frame X-ray luminosities are L(2-10keV)~10^45 erg/s. For two of the targets, the photon statistics are good enough to allow for basic X-ray spectral analyses, which indicate the presence of intrinsic absorption (~10^{22-23} cm^-2) and luminous X-ray emission (L_X>10^44 erg/s). Of the remaining four targets, two are detected with only a few (3-6) X-ray counts, and two are undetected by Chandra. If these four sources have the large intrinsic X-ray luminosities predicted by the [OIII] emission, then their nuclei must be heavily obscured (N_H>few 10^23 cm^-2) and some might be Compton thick (N_H>1.5 10^24 cm^-2). We also present the results for two Type 2 quasar candidates serendipitously lying in the fields of th...

  19. On the Absorption of X-ray Bright Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Giustini, Margherita; Vignali, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    Most X-ray studies of BALQSOs found significant (N_H~10^{22-24} cm^{-2}) intrinsic column densities of gas absorbing an underlying typical power-law continuum emission, in agreement with expectations from radiatively driven accretion disk wind models. However, direct spectral analysis was performed only on a limited number of bright sources. We investigate the X-ray emission of a large BALQSO sample at medium to high redshift (0.8 ~ 5 x 10^{22} cm^{-2}) even including the faintest sources analyzed through hardness ratio analysis. The mean photon index is Gamma~1.9, with no significant evolution with redshift. The alpha_ox are typical of radio-quiet broad line AGN, in contrast with the known (from previous X-ray studies) ``soft X-ray weakness'' of BALQSOs and in agreement with the lack of X-ray absorption. We found the low-Absorption Index (AI) subsample to host the lowest X-ray absorbing column densities of the entire sample. X-ray selected BALQSOs show lower X-ray absorption than purely optically selec ted o...

  20. The ultraviolet spectrum and continuum energy distribution of the bright quasar H1821 + 643

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first UV observations of the bright QSO H1821 + 643 are reported. With V = 14.2 mag and z = 0.297, H1821 + 643 is the second brightest object in the sky at z above 0.1. The IUE data are combined with new optical spectroscopy, and existing IR and X-ray data, to reveal a strong optical/UV 'big bump', which continues past the Lyman limit in the rest frame of the QSO. A possible turnover at the high-frequency side of the UV continuum constrains fits of a thin accretion disk model to a large black hole mass and high accretion rate, but a small disk size. The shape of the UV continuum was found to be variable, with a hardening of the spectrum when the source was brighter. Because of its location, only 3 deg from the ecliptic pole, H1821 + 643 will be an important object for simultaneous UV and soft X-ray monitoring to test for a common origin of the UV bump and soft X-ray excess. 44 refs

  1. The ultraviolet spectrum and continuum energy distribution of the bright quasar H1821 + 643

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, Michiel; Halpern, Jules P.; Shrader, Chris R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1991-01-01

    The first UV observations of the bright QSO H1821 + 643 are reported. With V = 14.2 mag and z = 0.297, H1821 + 643 is the second brightest object in the sky at z above 0.1. The IUE data are combined with new optical spectroscopy, and existing IR and X-ray data, to reveal a strong optical/UV 'big bump', which continues past the Lyman limit in the rest frame of the QSO. A possible turnover at the high-frequency side of the UV continuum constrains fits of a thin accretion disk model to a large black hole mass and high accretion rate, but a small disk size. The shape of the UV continuum was found to be variable, with a hardening of the spectrum when the source was brighter. Because of its location, only 3 deg from the ecliptic pole, H1821 + 643 will be an important object for simultaneous UV and soft X-ray monitoring to test for a common origin of the UV bump and soft X-ray excess.

  2. Massive star-forming host galaxies of quasars on Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stellar properties of about 800 galaxies hosting optically luminous, unobscured quasars at z < 0.6 are analyzed. Deep co-added Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images of the quasars on Stripe 82 are decomposed into nucleus and host galaxy using point spread function and Sérsic models. The systematic errors in the measured galaxy absolute magnitudes and colors are estimated to be less than 0.5 mag and 0.1 mag, respectively, with simulated quasar images. The effect of quasar light scattered by the interstellar medium is also carefully addressed. The measured quasar-to-galaxy ratio in total flux decreases toward longer wavelengths, from ∼8 in the u band to ∼1 in the i and z bands. We find that the SDSS quasars are hosted exclusively by massive galaxies (stellar mass M star > 1010 M ☉), which is consistent with previous results for less luminous narrow-line (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The quasar hosts are very blue and almost absent on the red sequence, showing stark contrast to the color-magnitude distribution of normal galaxies. The fact that more powerful AGNs reside in galaxies with higher star-formation efficiency may indicate that negative AGN feedback, if it exists, is not concurrent with the most luminous phase of AGNs. We also find positive correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs; M BH) and host stellar mass, but the M BH-M star relation is offset toward large M BH or small M star compared to the local relation. While this could indicate that SMBHs grow earlier than do their host galaxies, such an argument is not conclusive, as the effect may be dominated by observational biases.

  3. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data II: The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    OpenAIRE

    SDSS Collaboration; Fan, Xiaohui

    1999-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from ~250 deg^2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of sky. Our success rate of identifying high-redshift quasars is ...

  4. Spectroscopy of quasar candidates from the University of Michigan low-dispersion survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of long-slit CCD spectroscopy on 39 objects and four close companions from the University of Michgan objective-prism survey lists. Twelve of them are quasars with redshifts ranging from 0.326 to 2.852, and an additional 12 objects (including companions) are Seyferts or active galaxies ranging in redshift from 0.0365 to 0.227. UM 443 may be a broad absorption-line quasar. UM 565 is a star with a puzzling spectrum. Spectra are presented for a total of 25 objects. 17 refs

  5. A Search for Nitrogen Enriched Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2003-01-01

    A search for nitrogen-rich quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS EDR) catalog has yielded 16 candidates, including five with very prominent emission, but no cases with nitrogen emission as strong as in Q0353-383. The quasar Q0353-383 has long been known to have extremely strong nitrogen intercombination lines at lambda 1486 and lambda 1750 Angstroms, implying an anomalously high nitrogen abundance of about 15 times solar. It is still the only one of its kind known. ...

  6. First lensed quasar system(s) from the VST-ATLAS survey: one quad and three nearly identical pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Schechter, Paul L; Chehade, B; Metcalfe, N; Shanks, T; McDonald, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed images from the VST ATLAS survey to identify candidate gravitationally lensed quasar systems in a sample of WISE sources with W1 - W2 > 0.7. Results from followup spectroscopy with the Baade 6.5 m telescope are presented for seven systems. One of these is a quadruply lensed quasar. Two are projected superpositions of two quasars at different redshifts. In one system two quasars, though at the same redshift, have very different emission line profiles, and constitute a physical binary. In three systems the component spectra are consistent with the lensing hypothesis, after allowing for micro-lensing. But as no lensing galaxy is detected in these three, we classify them as nearly identical quasar pairs. More extensive observations are needed to establish whether they are lensed quasars or physical binaries.

  7. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: QUASAR TARGET SELECTION FOR DATA RELEASE NINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Carithers, William C.; Ho, Shirley [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton, NY 11375 (United States); Yeche, Christophe; Aubourg, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Strauss, Michael A.; Lee, Khee-Gan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bovy, Jo; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Croft, Rupert A. C. [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Da Silva, Robert [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dawson, Kyle [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F., E-mail: npross@lbl.gov [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-03-01

    The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg{sup 2}, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption from the spectra of a sample of {approx}150,000 z > 2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z Almost-Equal-To 2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3.5, where their colors tend to overlap those of the far more numerous stars. During the first year of the BOSS survey, quasar target selection (QTS) methods were developed and tested to meet the requirement of delivering at least 15 quasars deg{sup -2} in this redshift range, with a goal of 20 out of 40 targets deg{sup -2} allocated to the quasar survey. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g {<=} 22.0 or r {<=} 21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection algorithm, many other astrophysical studies do. We have therefore defined a uniformly selected subsample of 20 targets deg{sup -2}, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50% ({approx}10 z > 2.20 quasars deg{sup -2}). This 'CORE' subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. For the remaining 20 targets deg{sup -2}, we will continue to develop improved selection techniques, including the use of additional data sets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. In this paper, we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS QTS algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations (through 2011 July), in support of the science investigations

  8. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    McGreer, Ian D; Strauss, Michael A; Haiman, Zoltan; Richards, Gordon T; Jiang, Linhua; Bian, Fuyan; Schneider, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z=4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyman alpha emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i_AB = 23.6) located 2arcsec (11 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyman alpha emission (EW_0 ~ 100Ang) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z=6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z~6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ~4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y_AB=25) at a separation of 0.9 arcsec. The red i_775-Y_105 color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (7 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an associati...

  9. Difference Imaging of Lensed Quasar Candidates in the SDSS Supernova Survey Region

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C; Stanek, Krzysztof Z; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune

    2008-01-01

    Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few non-lensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and their surrounding fields. Starting from 20768 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars and 36 candidate lenses/lensed images, we find that 21 sources including 15 SDSS QSOs and 7 candidate lenses/lensed images are non-periodic variable sources. We can measure the spatial structure of the variable flux for 18 of these sources and identify only one as a non-point source. This source does not display the compelling spatial structure of the variable flux of known lensed quasars, so we reject it as a lens candidate. None of the lens candidates from the SQLS survive our cuts. Given our effective survey area of order 0.71 square degrees, this indicates a false positive rate of order one per square degree for themethod. T...

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 4. Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester,; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona

    2007-04-01

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 5740 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2-minutes rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

  11. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U.; Richards, Gordon T.; /Drexel U.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Boroson, Todd A.; /Kitt Peak Observ.; Ross, Nicholas P.; /Penn State U.; Shen, Yue; /Princeton U. Observ.; Brandt, W.N.; /Penn State U.; Fan, Xiaohui; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  12. An X-ray IMAGING SURVEY OF QUASAR JETS: TESTING THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of α rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky, so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with a high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence expected from the IC-CMB model. For a subset of our sample with known superluminal motion based on VLBI observations, we estimate the angle of the kiloparsec-scale jet to the line of sight by considering the additional information in the bends observed between parsec- and kiloparsec-scale jets. These angles are sometimes much smaller than estimates based on the IC-CMB model with a Lorentz factor of 15, indicating that these jets may decelerate significantly from parsec scales to kiloparsec scales.

  13. Bright [CII] and dust emission in three z>6.6 quasar host galaxies observed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Zschaechner, L; Decarli, R; De Rosa, G; Findlay, J R; McMahon, R G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA detections of the [CII] 158 micron emission line and the underlying far-infrared continuum of three quasars at 6.6~6 quasar hosts correlate with the quasar's bolometric luminosity. In one quasar, the [CII] line is significantly redshifted by ~1700 km/s with respect to the MgII broad emission line. Comparing to values in the literature, we find that, on average, the MgII is blueshifted by 480 km/s (with a standard deviation of 630 km/s) with respect to the host galaxy redshift, i.e. one of our quasars is an extreme outlier. Through modeling we can rule out a flat rotation curve for our brightest [CII] emitter. Finally, we find that the ratio of black hole mass to host galaxy (dynamical) mass is higher by a factor 3-4 (with significant scatter) than local relations.

  14. DES J0454$-$4448: Discovery of the First Luminous z $\\ge$ 6 Quasar from the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, S L; Banerji, M; Becker, G D; Gonzalez-Solares, E; Martini, P; Ostrovski, F; Rauch, M; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D; Rosell, A Carnero; da Costa, L N; ĎAndrea, C; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Finley, D A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J; Merritt, K; Miquel, R; Mohr, J; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A; Romer, K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A; Wechsler, R H

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results of a survey for high redshift, z $\\ge$ 6, quasars using izY multi-colour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Here we report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the $\\rm z_{AB}, Y_{AB}$ = 20.2, 20.2 (M$_{1450}$ = $-$26.5) quasar DES J0454$-$4448 with an emission line redshift of z = 6.10$\\pm$0.03 and a HI near zone size of 4.6 $\\pm$ 1.7 Mpc.The quasar was selected as an i-band drop out with i$-$z = 2.46 and z$_{AB} $ 50-100 new quasars with z $>$ 6 including 3-10 with z $>$ 7 dramatically increasing the numbers of quasars currently known that are suitable for detailed studies including determination of the neutral HI fraction of the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of Hydrogen reionization.

  15. An X-shooter composite of bright 1 < z < 2 quasars from UV to infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Selsing, Jonatan; Christensen, Lise; Krogager, Jens-Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-stellar object (QSO) spectral templates are important both to QSO physics and for investigations that use QSOs as probes of intervening gas and dust. However, combinations of various QSO samples obtained at different times and with different instruments so as to expand a composite and to cover a wider rest frame wavelength region may create systematic effects, and the contribution from QSO hosts may contaminate the composite. We have constructed a composite spectrum from luminous blue QSOs at 1 < z < 2.1 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The observations with X-shooter simultaneously cover ultraviolet (UV) to near- infrared (NIR) light, which ensures that the composite spectrum covers the full rest-frame range from Ly$\\beta$ to 11350 $\\AA$ without any significant host contamination. Assuming a power-law continuum for the composite we find a spectral slope of $\\alpha_\\lambda$ = 1.70+/-0.01, which is steeper than previously found in the literature. We attribute the differences to ou...

  16. The BTC40 Survey for Quasars at 4.8 < z < 6

    CERN Document Server

    Monier, E M; Hall, P B; Osmer, P S; Smith, M G; Dalton, G B; Green, R F

    2002-01-01

    The BTC40 Survey for high-redshift quasars is a multicolor search using images obtained with the Big Throughput Camera (BTC) on the CTIO 4-m telescope in V, I, and z filters to search for quasars at redshifts of 4.8 < z < 6. The survey covers 40 sq. deg. in B, V, & I and 36 sq. deg. in z. Limiting magnitudes (3 sigma) reach to V = 24.6, I = 22.9 and z = 22.9. We used the (V-I) vs. (I-z) two-color diagram to select high-redshift quasar candidates from the objects classified as point sources in the imaging data. Follow-up spectroscopy with the AAT and CTIO 4-m telescopes of candidates having I < 21.5 has yielded two quasars with redshifts of z = 4.6 and z = 4.8 as well as four emission line galaxies with z = 0.6. Fainter candidates have been identified down to I = 22 for future spectroscopy on 8-m class telescopes.

  17. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Ostrovski, Fernanda; Schechter, Paul L; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J; Lin, Huan; Auger, Matthew W; Courbin, Frederic; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Frieman, Josh; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Marshall, Philip J; McMahon, Richard G; Meylan, Georges; More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H; Rusu, Cristian E; Finley, David; Abbott, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe B; Allam, Sahar; Annis, James; Banerji, Manda; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Burke, David L; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; Cunha, Carlos E; D'Andrea, Chris B; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg P; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Estrada, Juan; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gerdes, David W; Gruen, Daniel; Gutierrez, Gaston; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Lahav, Ofer; Lima, Marco; Maia, Marcio A G; March, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Miller, Christopher J; Miquel, Ramon; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres A; Reil, Kevin; Romer, A Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Sako, Masao; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basilio; Scarpine, Vic; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, R Chris; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Thaler, Jon; Tucker, Douglas; Walker, Alistair R; Wechsler, Risa H; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an e...

  18. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Jiang Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); DeGraf, Colin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Ge Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina, E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  19. Broad-band spectral energy distribution of 3000 Angstroem break quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H; Mirhosseini, A; Pertermann, F

    2016-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) discovered a few unusual quasars with a characteristic break in the continuum around 3000 A that neither shows the typical structure of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs nor is explained by typical intrinsic dust reddening. We used the method of Kohonen self-organising maps for a systematical search for quasars with such properties in the SDSS spectra archive. We constructed a sample of 23 quasars classified as 3000 A break quasars and two comparison samples of quasars with similar properties, to some extent, but also showing typical BAL features. We computed ensemble-averaged broad-band SEDs based on archival data from SDSS, GALEX, 2MASS, UKIDSS, and WISE. The SEDs were corrected for intrinsic dust absorption by the comparison with the average SED of normal quasars. The de-reddened arithmetic median composite SED of the 3000 A break quasars is found to be indistinguishable from that of the unusual BAL quasars. We conclude that 3000 A break quasars are most likely extreme...

  20. An I-Band-Selected Sample of Radio-Emitting Quasars: Evidence for a Large Population of Red Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    White, Richard L.; Helfand, David J.; Becker, Robert H.; Gregg, Michael D.; Postman, Marc; Lauer, Tod R.; Oegerle, William

    2003-01-01

    We present a new sample of 35 quasars selected from the FIRST radio survey and the Deeprange I-band survey (Postman et al. 1998, 2002). A comparison with the FIRST Bright Quasar survey samples reveals that this I-band selected sample is redder by 0.25-0.5 mag in B-R, and that the color difference is not explained by the higher mean redshift of this sample but must be intrinsic. Our small sample contains five quasars with unusually red colors, including three that appear very heavily reddened....

  1. Discovery of three z > 6.5 quasars in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy (VIKING) survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying quasars at the highest redshifts can constrain models of galaxy and black hole formation, and it also probes the intergalactic medium in the early universe. Optical surveys have to date discovered more than 60 quasars up to z ≅ 6.4, a limit set by the use of the z-band and CCD detectors. Only one z ≳ 6.4 quasar has been discovered, namely the z = 7.08 quasar ULAS J1120+0641, using near-infrared imaging. Here we report the discovery of three new z ≳ 6.4 quasars in 332 deg2 of the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) survey, thus extending the number from 1 to 4. The newly discovered quasars have redshifts of z = 6.60, 6.75, and 6.89. The absolute magnitudes are between –26.0 and –25.5, 0.6-1.1 mag fainter than ULAS J1120+0641. Near-infrared spectroscopy revealed the Mg II emission line in all three objects. The quasars are powered by black holes with masses of ∼(1-2) × 109 M ☉. In our probed redshift range of 6.44 < z < 7.44 we can set a lower limit on the space density of supermassive black holes of ρ(M BH > 109 M ☉) > 1.1 × 10–9 Mpc–3. The discovery of three quasars in our survey area is consistent with the z = 6 quasar luminosity function when extrapolated to z ∼ 7. We do not find evidence for a steeper decline in the space density of quasars with increasing redshift from z = 6 to z = 7.

  2. Using the 2dF galaxy redshift survey to detect gravitationally-lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, D J; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Webster, Rachel L.

    2001-01-01

    Galaxy redshift surveys can be used to detect gravitationally-lensed quasars if the spectra obtained are searched for the quasars' emission lines. Previous investigations of this possibility have used simple models to show that the 2 degree Field (2dF) redshift survey could yield several tens of new lenses, and that the larger Sloan Digital Sky Survey should contain an order of magnitude more. However the particular selection effects of the samples were not included in these calculations, limiting the robustness of the predictions; thus a more detailed simulation of the 2dF survey was undertaken here. The use of an isophotal magnitude limit reduces both the depth of the sample and the expected number of lenses, but more important is the Automatic Plate Measuring survey's star-galaxy separation algorithm, used to generate the 2dF input catalogue. It is found that most quasar lenses are classed as merged stars, with only the few lenses with low-redshift deflectors likely to be classified as galaxies. Explicit i...

  3. A Spectroscopic Survey of Faint Quasars in the SDSS Deep Stripe: I. Preliminary Results from the Co-added Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, L; Cool, R J; Eisenstein, D J; Fan, X; Johnston, D; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Scranton, R; Strauss, M A; Zehavi, I

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the first results of a deep spectroscopic survey of faint quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Southern Survey, a deep survey carried out by repeatedly imaging a 270 deg^2 area. Quasar candidates were selected from the deep data with good completeness over 02.0) at the faint end, indicating a break in the QLF slope. Using a luminosity-dependent density evolution model, we find that the quasar density at M_{g}<-22.5 peaks at z~2, which is later in cosmic time than the peak of z~2.5 found from surveys of more luminous objects. The SFQS QLF is consistent with the results of the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, the SDSS, and the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey, but probes fainter quasars. We plan to obtain more quasars from future observations and establish a complete faint quasar sample with more than 1000 objects over 10 deg^2.

  4. Measuring large-scale structure with quasars in narrow-band filter surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, L. Raul; Strauss, Michael A.; Lima, Marcos; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Lazkoz, Ruth; Moles, Mariano; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Sendra, Irene; Sodré, Laerte; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2012-07-01

    We show that a large-area imaging survey using narrow-band filters could detect quasars in sufficiently high number densities, and with more than sufficient accuracy in their photometric redshifts, to turn them into suitable tracers of large-scale structure. If a narrow-band optical survey can detect objects as faint as i= 23, it could reach volumetric number densities as high as 10-4 h3 Mpc-3 (comoving) at z˜ 1.5. Such a catalogue would lead to precision measurements of the power spectrum up to z˜ 3-4. We also show that it is possible to employ quasars to measure baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshifts, where the uncertainties from redshift distortions and non-linearities are much smaller than at z≲ 1. As a concrete example we study the future impact of the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS), which is a narrow-band imaging survey in the optical over 1/5 of the unobscured sky with 42 filters of ˜100-Å full width at half-maximum. We show that J-PAS will be able to take advantage of the broad emission lines of quasars to deliver excellent photometric redshifts, σz≃ 0.002 (1 +z), for millions of objects.

  5. FR-II Broad Absorption Line Quasars and the Life Cycle of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; de Vries, W

    2006-01-05

    By combining the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey Third Data Release quasar list with the VLA FIRST survey, we have identified five objects having both broad absorption lines in their optical spectra and FR-II radio morphologies. We identify an additional example of this class from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey, J1408+3054. Including the original FR-II-BAL object, J1016+5209, brings the number of such objects to eight. These quasars are relatively rare; finding this small handful has required the 45,000-large quasar sample of SDSS. The FR-II-BAL quasars exhibit a significant anti-correlation between radio-loudness and the strength of the BAL features. This is easily accounted for by the evolutionary picture in which quasars emerge from cocoons of BAL-producing material which stifle the development of radio jets and lobes. There is no such simple explanation for the observed properties of FR-II-BALs in the unification-by-orientation model of quasars. The rarity of the FR-II-BAL class implies that the two phases do not coexist for very long in a single quasar, perhaps less than 10{sup 5} years, with the combined FR-II, high ionization broad absorption phase being even shorter by another factor of 10 or more.

  6. A Systematic Meta-Survey of High Redshift Quasars Probing their Environments and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeille, Doug B. P.

    We have constructed a meta-survey of 298 quasars in the window from 7 to 17.5 hours in right ascension and 0 to 65 degrees in declination. These quasars span three decades of total power and redshifts from 0.158 to 5.284. All sources had a flux density of greater than 70 mJy at 1.4 GHz. At redshifts z > 2.5 our sample is complete. It is also complete for z 1027.55 W/Hz. Our quasar sample is built from archival Very Large Array (VLA) observations, as well as three observations in 2007 and 2008. This sample represents one of the most complete meta-surveys to date of the high redshift universe. In the 1980's, two competing groups (Ne, Gower and Hutchings, and Barthel, Miley, and Lonsdale) investigated the high redshift universe, seeking to investigate the dependence of largest linear size (LLS) and bending angles on redshift, core power, and extended power. Using our sample we test the differing results of these groups and build our own model of source evolution with redshift and power. We also seek a relationship between bending angles and core dominance, modeling this dependence on the thoughts of Orr & Browne showing that projected bending angles grow as the angle to the line of sight approaches the intrinsic bending angle of the quasar. We will also present an additional component of our high redshift quasar observations seeking arcsecond scale jets to be observed with the space based Chandra x-ray telescope. These observations will be used to investigate the nature of x-ray emission from the knots of kiloparsec jets in the high redshift universe.

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss,; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Myers, Adam D.; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; Hirata, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; O'Connell, Ross; Huff, Eric; Schlegel, David; Slosar, Anže; Weinberg, David; Strauss, Michael; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has surveyed 14,555 square degrees of the sky, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present the large-scale clustering of 1.6 million quasars between z=0.5 and z=2.5 that have been classified from this imaging, representing the highest density of quasars ever studied for clustering measurements. This data set spans 0~ 11,00 square degrees and probes a volume of 80 h-3 Gpc3. In principle, such a large volume and medium density of tracers should facilitate high-precision cosmological constraints. We measure the angular clustering of photometrically classified quasars using an optimal quadratic estimator in four redshift slices with an accuracy of ~ 25% over a bin width of δl ~ 10-15 on scales corresponding to matter-radiation equality and larger (0l ~ 2-3). Observational systematics can strongly bias clustering measurements on large scales, which can mimic cosmologically relevant signals such as deviations from Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial perturbations. We account for systematics by employing a new method recently proposed by Agarwal et al. (2014) to the clustering of photometrically classified quasars. We carefully apply our methodology to mitigate known observational systematics and further remove angular bins that are contaminated by unknown systematics. Combining quasar data with the photometric luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample of Ross et al. (2011) and Ho et al. (2012), and marginalizing over all bias and shot noise-like parameters, we obtain a constraint on local primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL = -113+154-154 (1σ error). We next assume that the bias of quasar and galaxy distributions can be obtained independently from quasar/galaxy-CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements (such as those in Sherwin et al. (2013)). This can be facilitated by spectroscopic observations of the sources, enabling the redshift distribution to be completely determined, and allowing precise estimates of the bias

  9. C IV Broad Absorption Line Acceleration in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, C. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Trump, J. R.; Filiz Ak, N.; Anderson, S. F.; Green, Paul J.; Schneider, D. P.; Sun, M.; Vivek, M.; Beatty, T. G.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the largest systematic investigation of broad absorption line (BAL) acceleration to date. We use spectra of 140 quasars from three Sloan Digital Sky Survey programs to search for global velocity offsets in BALs over timescales of ≈2.5–5.5 years in the quasar rest frame. We carefully select acceleration candidates by requiring monolithic velocity shifts over the entire BAL trough, avoiding BALs with velocity shifts that might be caused by profile variability. The C iv BALs of two quasars show velocity shifts consistent with the expected signatures of BAL acceleration, and the BAL of one quasar shows a velocity-shift signature of deceleration. In our two acceleration candidates, we see evidence that the magnitude of the acceleration is not constant over time; the magnitudes of the change in acceleration for both acceleration candidates are difficult to produce with a standard disk-wind model or via geometric projection effects. We measure upper limits to acceleration and deceleration for 76 additional BAL troughs and find that the majority of BALs are stable to within about 3% of their mean velocities. The lack of widespread acceleration/deceleration could indicate that the gas producing most BALs is located at large radii from the central black hole and/or is not currently strongly interacting with ambient material within the host galaxy along our line of sight.

  10. CIV Broad Absorption Line Acceleration in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, C J; Hall, P B; Trump, J R; Ak, N Filiz; Anderson, S F; Green, Paul J; Schneider, D P; Sun, M; Vivek, M; Beatty, T G; Brownstein, Joel R; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the largest systematic investigation of broad absorption line (BAL) acceleration to date. We use spectra of 140 quasars from three Sloan Digital Sky Survey programs to search for global velocity offsets in BALs over timescales of ~2.5-5.5 years in the quasar rest frame. We carefully select acceleration candidates by requiring monolithic velocity shifts over the entire BAL trough, avoiding BALs with velocity shifts that might be caused by profile variability. The CIV BALs of two quasars show velocity shifts consistent with the expected signatures of BAL acceleration, and the BAL of one quasar shows a velocity-shift signature of deceleration. In our two acceleration candidates, we see evidence that the magnitude of the acceleration is not constant over time; the magnitudes of the change in acceleration for both acceleration candidates are difficult to produce with a standard disk-wind model or via geometric projection effects. We measure upper limits to acceleration and deceleration for ...

  11. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Donald P; Richards, Gordon T; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Anderson, Scott F; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Jester, Sebastian; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; SubbaRao, Mark U; Thakar, Anirudda R; Stoughton, Chris; Szalay, Alexander S; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Castander, Francisco J; Csabai, Istvan; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Daniel C; Lupton, Robert H; Nitta, Atsuko; Pier, Jeffrey R; Saxe, David H; Shen, Yue; Snedden, Stephanie A; Weinberg, David H; Wu, Jian

    2007-01-01

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry...

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Jester, S; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Brandt, W; Gunn, J E; Yanny, B; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Boroski, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R; Csabai, I; Doi, M; Eisenstein, D J; Frieman, J A; Fukugita, M; Gray, J; Harvanek, M; Heckman, T M; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Kleinman, S; Knapp, G R; Kron, R G; Krzesínski, J; Long, D C; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Margon, B; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Newman, P R; Nichol, R; Nitta, A; Pier, J R; Rockosi, C M; Saxe, D H; Schlegel, D J; Snedden, S A; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Uomoto, A; York, D G

    2005-01-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties o...

  13. A photometric catalogue of quasars and other point sources in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sheelu; Philip, Ninan Sajeeth; Kembhavi, Ajit; Wadadekar, Yogesh G.; Sinha, Rita

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalogue of about six million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release, classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars. We use a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects from 14th to 22nd magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our catalogue consists of 2 430 625 quasars, 3 544 036 stars and 63 586 unresolved galaxies from 14th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS i band. Our algorithm recovers 99.96 per cent of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and 99.51 per cent of stars to i ˜ 21.3 in the colour window that we study. The level of contamination due to data artefacts for objects beyond i = 21.3 is highly uncertain and all mention of completeness and contamination in the paper are valid only for objects brighter than this magnitude. However, a comparison of the predicted number of quasars with the theoretical number counts shows reasonable agreement.

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Post-Starburst Signatures in Quasar Host Galaxies at z < 1

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Shen, Yue; Brandt, William N; Greene, Jenny E; Ho, Luis C; Schneider, Donald P; Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their cores. We present a study of 191 unobscured quasars and their host galaxies at z < 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass (M*), and velocity dispersion (sigma*) of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass (Mbh), for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with M* ~ 10^{11} Msun characterized by stellar ages around a billion years, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low S...

  15. Partially obscured quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Xiao-Bo; Hong-yan ZHOU; Wang, Ting-Gui; Wang, Jun-Xian; Li, Cheng; Zhou, You-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled a sample of 21 low redshift (z 7) using the galaxy and QSO catalogs of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release. Using this sample we attempt to determine the fraction of quasars with large internal absorption. We find that these AGN have Strong [O III] and broad Halpha emission, and that starlight dominates the spectra in the blue band, suggesting that these objects are heavily ...

  16. Clustering of High Redshift (z>2.9) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E.Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-30

    We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,428 optically selected luminous quasars with redshift 2.9 {le} z {le} 5.4 selected over 4041 deg{sup 2} from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We fit a power-law to the projected correlation function w{sub p}(r{sub p}) to marginalize over redshift space distortions and redshift errors. For a real-space correlation function of the form {zeta}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}}, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are r{sub 0} = 15.2 {+-} 2.7 h{sup -1} Mpc and {gamma} = 2.0 {+-} 0.3, over a scale range 4 {le} r{sub p} {le} 150 h{sup -1} Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their z {approx} 1.5 counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length r{sub 0} {approx} 6.5 h{sup -1} Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and z {ge} 3.5, and assuming a power-law index {gamma} = 2.0, we find a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 16.9 {+-} 1.7 h{sup -1} Mpc for the former, and r{sub 0} = 24.3 {+-} 2.4 h{sup -1} Mpc for the latter. Strong clustering at high redshift indicates that quasars are found in very massive, and therefore highly biased, halos. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range 4 {approx} 50 Myr for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5; and 30 {approx} 600 Myr for quasars with z {ge} 3.5. The corresponding duty cycles are 0.004 {approx} 0.05 for the lower redshift bin and 0.03 {approx} 0.6 for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is 2-3 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and 4-6 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with z {ge} 3.5; the effective bias factor b{sub eff} increases with redshift, e.g., b

  17. Measuring large-scale structure with quasars in narrow-band filter surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Abramo, L Raul; Lima, Marcos; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Lazkoz, Ruth; Moles, Mariano; de Oliveira, Cláudia M; Sendra, Irene; Sodré, Laerte

    2011-01-01

    We show that a large-area imaging survey using narrow-band filters could detect quasars in sufficiently high number densities, and with more than sufficient accuracy in their photometric redshifts, to turn them into suitable tracers of large-scale structure. If a narrow-band optical survey can detect objects as faint as i=23, it could reach volumetric number densities as high as 10^{-4} h^3 Mpc^{-3} (comoving) at z~1.5 . Such a catalog would lead to precision measurements of the power spectrum up to z~3-4. We also show that it is possible to employ quasars to measure baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshifts, where the uncertainties from redshift distortions and nonlinearities are much smaller than at z<1. As a concrete example we study the future impact of J-PAS, which is a narrow-band imaging survey in the optical over 1/5 of the unobscured sky with 42 filters of ~100 A full-width at half-maximum. We show that J-PAS will be able to take advantage of the broad emission lines of quasars to deliver exc...

  18. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data. II. The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u' g' r' i' z') imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from ∼250 deg2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Our success rate in identifying high-redshift quasars is 68%. Five of the newly discovered quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.62, 4.69, 4.70, 4.92, and 5.03). All the quasars have i* B 0 =0.5). Several of the quasars show unusual emission and absorption features in their spectra, including an object at z=4.62 without detectable emission lines, and a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar at z=4.92. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society

  19. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ˜ 0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high-velocity-ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (˜5000 Å) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we combine host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [O III] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to host galaxies' high star formation rates and bright merger signatures, we suggest that this low-redshift outbreak of luminous quasar activity is triggered by recent minor mergers. Combining these novel observations, we present new quasar unification tests, which are in agreement with expectations of the orientation-based unification model for quasars.

  20. VLBI observations of the nuclei of a mixed sample of bright galaxies and quasars at 327 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first VLBI observations using the Ooty telescope are presented. An array consisting of telescopes at Ooty (India), Crimea (USSR), Torun (Poland), Westerbork (Netherlands) and Jodrell Bank (United Kingdom) was operated in 1983 December at a frequency of 327 MHz. Nearby galaxies, compact quasars and SS433 were observed in this pilot experiment. Most of the galaxies were found to be well resolved. The structure of SS433 (visible only on the shortest baseline) is consistent with that obtained in previous high-frequency VLBI work. The visibilities of the compact quasars indicate that large-scale scattering may be taking place in the interplanetary medium. (author)

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog II. First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, D P; Hall, P B; Jester, S; Richards, G T; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Brandt, W N; Gunn, J E; Gray, J; Trump, J R; Voges, W; Yanny, B; Schneider, Donald P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Jester, Sebastian; Richards, Gordon T.; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; Rao, Mark Subba; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Gunn, James E.; Gray, Jim; Trump, Jonathan R.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2003-01-01

    We present the second edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of 16713 objects in the SDSS First Data Release (DR1) that have luminosities larger than M_i=-22 (H_0=70 km/s, Omega_M=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered is ~1360 deg^2 and the redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.43. Each object has positions accurate to better than 0.2" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method, in addition to radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large area surveys. Calibrated digital spectra covering 3800-9200 Angstroms at a spectral resolution 1800-2100, are available. This publication supersedes the first SDSS Quasar Catalog, which was based on material from the SDSS Early Data Release. A summa...

  2. Signals from the Noise: Image Stacking for Quasars in the FIRST Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R L; Helfand, D J; Becker, R H; Glikman, E; deVries, W

    2006-05-05

    We present a technique to explore the radio sky into the nanoJansky regime by employing image stacking using the FIRST radio sky survey. We begin with a discussion of the non-intuitive relationship between the mean and median values of a non-Gaussian distribution in which measurements of the members of the distribution are dominated by noise. Following a detailed examination of the systematic effects present in the 20 cm VLA snapshot images that comprise FIRST, we demonstrate that image stacking allows us to recover the average properties of source populations with flux densities a factor of 30 or more below the rms noise level. With the calibration described herein, mean estimates of radio flux density, luminosity, radio loudness, etc. are derivable for any undetected source class having arcsecond positional accuracy. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by exploring the radio properties of quasars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compute the mean luminosities and radio-loudness parameters for 41,295 quasars in the SDSS DR3 catalog. There is a tight correlation between optical and radio luminosity, with the radio luminosity increasing as the 0.72 power of optical luminosity. This implies declining radio-loudness with optical luminosity, with the most luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -30) having on average ten times lower radio-to-optical ratios than the least luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -21). There is also a striking correlation between optical color and radio loudness: quasars that are either redder or bluer than the norm are brighter radio sources. Quasars having g-r {approx} 0.8 magnitudes redder than the SDSS composite spectrum are found to have radio-loudness ratios that are higher by a factor of 8. We examine the radio properties of the subsample of quasars with broad absorption lines, finding, surprisingly, that BAL quasars have higher mean radio flux densities at all redshifts, with the greatest disparity arising in the rare low

  3. New Challenges in Cosmology Posed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Adrija; Kumar Pal, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    For SDSS quasar data (2005) we have truncated data structure whereas for the survey of 2007 the data is no longer truncated. This calls for development or use of completely different statistical methodology to study the data for the evolution of the same objects like quasars. These different methodologies suggest different interpretation for a particular phenomenon in nature. This leads to the issue of validation of the data. More intriguing and challenging issue crops up as, given all of the data, what can be said about the laws of physics that have been operating over the universe? Over here we have used the concept of Neural Network to model the relationship between redshift and apparent magnitude.

  4. Broad Absorption Line Variability in Repeat Quasar Observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, B F; Brunner, R J; Hall, P B; Schneider, D P; York, D G; Vanden Berk, D E; Brinkmann, J; Lundgren, Britt F.; Wilhite, Brian C.; Brunner, Robert J.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We present a time-variability analysis of 29 broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) observed in two epochs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These spectra are selected from a larger sample of BALQSOs with multiple observations by virtue of exhibiting a broad CIV $\\lambda$1549 absorption trough separated from the rest frame of the associated emission peak by more than 3600 km s$^{-1}$. Detached troughs facilitate higher precision variability measurements, since the measurement of the absorption in these objects is not complicated by variation in the emission line flux. We have undertaken a statistical analysis of these detached-trough BALQSO spectra to explore the relationships between BAL features that are seen to vary and the dynamics of emission from the quasar central engine. We have measured variability within our sample, which includes three strongly variable BALs. We have also verified that the statistical behavior of the overall sample agrees with current model predictions and previous studies o...

  5. Exploiting the full potential of photometric quasar surveys: Optimal power spectra through blind mitigation of systematics

    CERN Document Server

    Leistedt, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We present optimal measurements of the angular power spectrum of the XDQSOz catalogue of photometric quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These measurements rely on a quadratic maximum likelihood estimator that simultaneously measures the auto- and cross-power spectra of four redshift samples, and provides minimum-variance, unbiased estimates even at the largest angular scales. Since photometric quasars are known to be strongly affected by systematics such as spatially-varying depth and stellar contamination, we introduce a new framework of extended mode projection to robustly mitigate the impact of systematics on the power spectrum measurements. This technique involves constructing template maps of potential systematics, decorrelating them on the sky, and projecting out modes which are significantly correlated with the data. Our method is able to simultaneously process several thousands of nonlinearly-correlated systematics, and mode projection is performed in a blind fashion. Using our final power spe...

  6. A multi-wavelength survey of AGN in the XMM-LSS field: I. Quasar selection via the KX technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nakos, Th; Andreon, S; Surdej, J; Riaud, P; Hatziminaoglou, E; Garcet, O; Alloin, D; Baes, M; Galaz, G; Pierre, M; Quintana, H; Page, M J; Tedds, J A; Ceballos, M T; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We present a sample of candidate quasars selected using the KX-technique. The data cover 0.68 deg^2 of the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM) Large-Scale Structure (LSS) survey area where overlapping multi-wavelength imaging data permits an investigation of the physical nature of selected sources. METHODS: The KX method identifies quasars on the basis of their optical (R and z') to near-infrared (Ks) photometry and point-like morphology. We combine these data with optical (u*,g'r',i',z') and mid-infrared (3.6-24 micron) wavebands to reconstruct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of candidate quasars. RESULTS: Of 93 sources selected as candidate quasars by the KX method, 25 are classified as quasars by the subsequent SED analysis. Spectroscopic observations are available for 12/25 of these sources and confirm the quasar hypothesis in each case. Even more, 90% of the SED-classified quasars show X-ray emission, a property not shared by any of the false candidates in the KX-selected sample. Applying a photometr...

  7. Nature and statistical properties of quasar associated absorption systems in the XQ-100 Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Perrotta, Serena; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cristiani, Stefano; Cupani, Guido; Ellison, Sara; Lòpez, Sebastian; Becker, George D; Berg, Trystyn A M; Christensen, Lise; Denney, Kelly D; Hamann, Frederick; Pâris, Isabelle; Vestergaard, Marianne; Worseck, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyze the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < z$\\rm_{em}$ < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/VLT in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect a $\\sim$ 8 $\\sigma$ excess in the number density of absorbers within 10,000 km/s of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km/s cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10,000 km/s when also weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 \\AA) are considered. We infer NV is the ion that better traces the effects of the qua...

  8. Simulations of BAO reconstruction with a quasar Lyman-alpha survey

    CERN Document Server

    Goff, J -M Le; Rollinde, E; Peirani, S; Petitjean, P; Pichon, C; Rich, J; Yeche, C; Aubourg, E; Busca, N; Charlassier, R; Delubac, T; Hamilton, J C; Delabrouille, N Palanque; Paris, I; Vargas, M

    2011-01-01

    The imprint of Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) on the matter power spectrum can be constrained using the neutral hydrogen density in the intergalactic medium as a tracer of the matter density. One of the goals of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) is to derive the Hubble expansion rate and the angular scale from the BAO signal in the IGM. To this aim, the Lyman-alpha forest of 10^5 quasars will be observed in the redshift range 2.2survey to estimate the statistical accuracy on the BAO scale determination provided by such a large scale survey. In particular, we discuss the effect of the poorly constrained estimate of the unabsorbed intrinsic quasar spectrum. The volume of current N-body simulations being too small for such studies, we resorted to Gaussian random field (GRF) simulations. We validated the use of GRFs by comparing the output of GRF simulations with that of the Horizon N-bo...

  9. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE. I. target selection and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Yi, Weimin; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Wang, Shu; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at $z\\gtrsim4.5$. We have developed a new method to select $4.7\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.4$ quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous $z\\sim5$ quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with $z$-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and 64 (64.6\\%) of them are quasars with redshifts of $4.4\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.5$ and absolute magnitudes of $-29\\lesssim M_{1450} \\lesssim -26.4$. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same crite...

  10. Polar Outflows in Six Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Junxian; Yuan, Weimin; Lu, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Using the radio observations by FIRST and NVSS, we build a sample of 151 radio variable quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3 (SDSS DR3). Six (probably another two) among them are classified as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, with radio flux variations of a few 10 percent within 1.5-5 years. Such large amplitudes of the variations imply brightness temperatures much higher than the inverse Compton limits (10$^{12}$ K) in all the BAL quasars, suggesting the pres...

  11. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zhi-fu, Chen; Luwenjia, Zhou; Yanmei, Chen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we extend our works of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey \\CIVab\\ narrow absorption lines (NALs) with \\zabs$\\ll$\\zem\\ on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), to collect \\CIV\\ NALs with \\zabs$\\approx$\\zem\\ from blue to red wings of \\CIVwave\\ emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41,479 \\CIV\\ NALs with $1.4544\\le$\\zabs$\\le4.9224$ in surveyed spectral region redward of \\lya\\ until red wing of \\CIVwave\\ emission line. We find that the stronger \\CIV\\ NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (\\zabs$\\approx$\\zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (\\zabs$\\ll$\\zem). The redshift density evolution behavior of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity ($\\beta$) distribution of \\MgII\\ absorbers, the $\\beta$ distribution of \\C...

  12. The Environments of Obscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen M.; Lacy, Mark; Nielsen, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) feedback is prescribed for driving the high-end shape of the galaxy luminosity function, clearing the circumnuclear environment during the end stages of mergers, and eventually turning off its own accretion. Yet the dominant processes and characteristics of active galactic nuclei are indistinct. Chief among this confusion is how significant the role of dust is in each galaxy. Orientation of the dusty torus is attributed to causing the differences between Sy1 and Sy2, but whether obscured quasars are found in particularly dusty host galaxies, if they exist at a different stage in the merger process (early on, before the dust is blown out), or if they are merely oriented differently than optical quasars is not yet so well distinguished. With obscured quasars now observed to make up 50% or greater of the population of quasars, the question of what causes obscuration becomes vital to address. With this in mind, I study matched samples of obscured and unobscured quasars to characterize their environments, with the intent of addressing what contribution environment has to obscuration levels. I investigate the megaparsec-scale environments of SIRTF Wide-field Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) quasars at z ˜ 1-3 by cross-correlating the sample with 3.8 million galaxies from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). Optically obscured quasars are compared to a control sample of optically-bright quasars via selection in the mid-infrared. Environments were observed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm to a depth of ≈ 2 μJy (AB = 23.1). Recent work has found diverse results in such studies, with dependence of environmental richness on both redshift and level of obscuration. I find that, within reasonable error, on average there is no distinct difference between the level of clustering for obscured and normal quasars, and that there is no dependence on redshift of this result within the range of 1.3 < z < 2.5. I compare our results

  13. Space distribution of faint quasars from the CFHT survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic data are presented for 163 QSOs brighter than B = 20.5 selected from 1000 A/mm CFHT blue grens observations. The data are used to investigate the form of the evolution of QSOs in order to obtain their luminosity functions, and to predict their magnitude and density distributions to allow comparison with the results of other surveys. Less than 5 percent of the QSOs have z greater than 2.5 despite the ease of detecting them up to z = 3.4, so high-redshift QSOs are rare. The surface density of QSOs brighter than m = 20.5 is 30/sq deg. While the luminosity-dependent density evolution models of Schmidt and Green (1983) are found to fit the data well, a smooth cutoff to the evolution at high redshifts is proposed which implies a density maximum at z of roughly 1.7. The clustering properties of the sample QSOs are discussed and it is shown, in agreement with previous studies, that while clustering is not a general phenomenon among QSOs, significant density enhancements apparently do exist. 26 references

  14. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M1450 2, then extend to lower luminosities (M1450 2 of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 1450*∼-27). The bright-end slope is steep (β ∼1450 < –26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate ∼30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  15. Quasars and their host galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This review attempts to describe developments in the fields of quasar and quasar host galaxies in the past five. In this time period, the Sloan and 2dF quasar surveys have added several tens of thousands of quasars, with Sloan quasars being found to z>6. Obscured, or partially obscured quasars have begun to be found in significant numbers. Black hole mass estimates for quasars, and our confidence in them, have improved significantly, allowing a start on relating quasar properties such as radi...

  16. A CHANDRA SURVEY OF THE X-RAY PROPERTIES OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results of a Chandra study of 21 broad absorption line (BAL) radio-loud quasars (RLQs). We conducted a Chandra snapshot survey of 12 bright BAL RLQs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data/Faint Images of the Radio Sky data and possessing a wide range of radio and C IV absorption properties. Optical spectra were obtained nearly contemporaneously with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope; no strong flux or BAL variability was seen between epochs. In addition to the snapshot targets, we include in our sample nine additional BAL RLQs possessing archival Chandra coverage. We compare the properties of (predominantly high-ionization) BAL RLQs to those of non-BAL RLQs as well as to BAL radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and non-BAL RQQs for context. All 12 snapshots and 8/9 archival BAL RLQs are detected, with observed X-ray luminosities less than those of non-BAL RLQs having comparable optical/UV luminosities by typical factors of 4.1-8.5. (BAL RLQs are also X-ray weak by typical factors of 2.0-4.5 relative to non-BAL RLQs having both comparable optical/UV and radio luminosities.) However, BAL RLQs are not as X-ray weak relative to non-BAL RLQs as are BAL RQQs relative to non-BAL RQQs. While some BAL RLQs have harder X-ray spectra than typical non-BAL RLQs, some have hardness ratios consistent with those of non-BAL RLQs, and there does not appear to be a correlation between X-ray weakness and spectral hardness, in contrast to the situation for BAL RQQs. RLQs are expected to have X-ray continuum contributions from both accretion-disk corona and small-scale jet emission. While the entire X-ray continuum in BAL RLQs cannot be obscured to the same degree as in BAL RQQs, we calculate that the jet is likely partially covered in many BAL RLQs. We comment briefly on implications for geometries and source ages in BAL RLQs.

  17. On the peculiar X-ray properties of the bright nearby radio-quiet quasar PDS456

    OpenAIRE

    Vignali, C; Comastri, A.; F. Nicastro; Matt, G.; Fiore, F.; Palumbo, G. G. C.

    2000-01-01

    BeppoSAX and ASCA observations of the nearby (z=0.184), high-luminosity, radio-quiet quasar PDS456 are presented. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a prominent ionized edge at 8-9 keV (originally discovered by RXTE, Reeves et al. 2000) and by a soft excess below 1.5 keV. The lack of any significant iron K alpha emission line suggests for the edge an origin from line-of-sight material rather than from reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc. The hard X-ray continuum is indeed well...

  18. INFRARED SPECTRA AND PHOTOMETRY OF COMPLETE SAMPLES OF PALOMAR-GREEN AND TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a step toward a comprehensive overview of the infrared (IR) diagnostics of the central engines and host galaxies of quasars at low redshift, we present Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic (5-40 μm) and photometric (24, 70, and 160 μm) measurements of all Palomar-Green (PG) quasars at z < 0.5 and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z < 0.3. We supplement these data with Herschel measurements at 160 μm. The sample is composed of 87 optically selected PG quasars and 52 near-IR-selected 2MASS quasars. Here we present the data, measure the prominent spectral features, and separate emission due to star formation from that emitted by the dusty circumnuclear torus. We find that the mid-IR (5-30 μm) spectral shape for the torus is largely independent of quasar IR luminosity with scatter in the spectral energy distribution (SED) shape of ≲0.2 dex. Except for the silicate features, no large difference is observed between PG (unobscured—silicate emission) and 2MASS (obscured—silicate absorption) quasars. Only mild silicate features are observed in both cases. When in emission, the peak wavelength of the silicate feature tends to be longer than 9.7 μm, possibly indicating effects on grain properties near the active galactic nucleus. The IR color is shown to correlate with the equivalent width of the aromatic features, indicating that the slope of the quasar mid- to far-IR SED is to first order driven by the fraction of radiation from star formation in the IR bands

  19. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i ∼2, with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 i (z = 2.2) ≈ –24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log Φ* – M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ∼2.6 while Φ* declines by a factor of ∼8. At z ∼< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities

  20. Hyper-luminous Reddened Broad-Line Quasars at z~2 from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey and WISE All Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Koposov, Sergey E

    2012-01-01

    We present the first sample of spectroscopically confirmed heavily reddened broad-line quasars selected using the new near infra-red VISTA Hemisphere Survey and WISE All-Sky Survey. Observations of four candidates with (J-K)>2.5 and K 22. We also present WISE photometry at 3--22um, for our full sample of spectroscopically confirmed reddened quasars including those selected from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (Banerji et al. 2012a). We demonstrate that the rest-frame infrared SEDs of these redde...

  1. Binary Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Evidence for Excess Clustering on Small Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Hennawi, J F; Oguri, M; Inada, N; Richards, G T; Pindor, B; Schneider, D P; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Fan, X; Burles, S; Schlegel, D J; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R; Bahcall, Neta A; Brunner, R J; Brinkmann, J; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Richards, Gordon T.; Pindor, Bartosz; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Johnston, David E.; Fan, Xiaohui; Burles, Scott; Schlegel, David J.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brunner, Robert J.; Brinkman, Jon

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of 218 new quasar pairs with proper transverse separations R_prop 3 Mpc/h quasar correlation function, extrapolated down as a power law to the separations probed by our binaries. The excess grows to ~ 30 at R_prop ~ 10 kpc/h, and provides compelling evidence that the quasar autocorrelation function gets progressively steeper on sub-Mpc scales. This small scale excess can likely be attributed to dissipative interaction events which trigger quasar activity in rich environments. Recent small scale measurements of galaxy clustering and quasar-galaxy clustering are reviewed and discussed in relation to our measurement of small scale quasar clustering.

  2. Bright [CII] 158$\\mu$m emission in a quasar host galaxy at $z=6.54$

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Walter, F; Venemans, B P; Farina, E P; Fan, X

    2015-01-01

    The [CII] 158$\\mu$m fine-structure line is known to trace regions of active star formation and is the main coolant of the cold, neutral atomic medium. In this \\textit{Letter}, we report a strong detection of the [CII] line in the host galaxy of the brightest quasar known at $z>6.5$, the Pan-STARRS1 selected quasar PSO J036.5078+03.0498 (hereafter P036+03), using the IRAM NOEMA millimeter interferometer. Its [CII] and total far-infrared luminosities are $(5.8 \\pm 0.7) \\times 10^9 \\,L_\\odot$ and $(7.6\\pm1.5) \\times 10^{12}\\,L_\\odot$, respectively. This results in a $L_{[CII]} /L_{TIR}$ ratio of $\\sim 0.8\\times 10^{-3}$, which is at the high end for those found for active galaxies, though it is lower than the average found in typical main sequence galaxies at $z\\sim 0$. We also report a tentative additional line which we identify as a blended emission from the $3_{22} - 3_{13}$ and $5_{23} - 4_{32}$ H$_2$O transitions. If confirmed, this would be the most distant detection of water emission to date. P036+03 riva...

  3. Multi-Epoch VLBA Observations of EGRET-Detected Quasars and BL Lac Objects Superluminal Motion of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Jorstad, S G; Mattox, J R; Wehrle, A E; Bloom, S D; Yurchenko, A V; Jorstad, Svetlana G; Marscher, Alan P; Mattox, John R; Wehrle, Ann E; Bloom, Steven D; Yurchenko, Alexei V

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a program to monitor the structure of the radio emission in 42 $\\gamma$-ray bright blazars (31 quasars and 11 BL Lac objects) with the VLBA at 43, 22, and occasionally 15 and 8.4 GHz, over the period from November 1993 to July 1997. We determine proper motions in 33 sources and find that the apparent superluminal motions in $\\gamma$-ray sources are much faster than for the general population of bright compact radio sources. This follows the strong dependence of the $\\gamma$-ray flux on the level of relativistic beaming for both external-radiation Compton and synchrotron self-Compton emission. There is a positive correlation (correlation coefficient $r$=0.45) between the flux density of the VLBI core and the $\\gamma$-ray flux and a moderate correlation (partial correlation coefficient $r$=0.31) between $\\gamma$-ray apparent luminosity and superluminal velocities of jet components, as expected if the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates in a very compact region of the relativistic jet and ...

  4. Implications for the Number Density of Quasars at z > 4.8 Using VIZJ Imaging from the BTC40 Multicolor Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursick, Shelly; Kennefick, J. D.; Smith, M.; Monier, E.; Hall, P.; Osmer, P.; Dalton, G.; Green, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of optical spectroscopy of four faint high redshift quasar candidates taken with the GMOS -S instrument on Gemini South during the spring 08’ and fall 06’ semesters. These candidates were selected as part of the VIZ and J multicolor BTC40 survey for z > 4.8 quasars. We will discuss implications for the number density of quasars at these redshifts.

  5. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, N Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based observations as well as (2) techniques to quickly estimate the distances of quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Learning methods considered include genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimisation, artificial neural networks, and radial basis function networks. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates that GAs and PSOs can both be efficiently used to model functions that are highly non-linear in several dimensions. It is subsequently demonstrated in the second part that ANNs and RBFNs can be used as ef...

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Oguri, Masamune; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shin, Min-Su; /Michigan U. /Princeton U. Observ.; Kayo, Issha; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; /UC, Berkeley /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Morokuma, Tomoki; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan; Becker, Robert H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; White, Richard L.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; /Ohio State U.; Gregg, Michael D.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Exeter U.

    2010-05-01

    We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i < 19.1 in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1 < {theta} < 20 and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.84{sub -0.08}{sup +0.06}(stat.){sub -0.07}{sup + 0.09}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1 to 16.6, which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.

  7. The Pittsburgh Sloan Digital Sky Survey MgII Quasar Absorption-Line Survey Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Quider, Anna M; Turnshek, David A; Rao, Sandhya M; Monier, Eric M; Weyant, Anja N; Busche, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalog of intervening MgII quasar absorption-line systems in the redshift interval 0.36 17,000 measured MgII doublets. We also present data on the ~44,600 quasar spectra which were searched to construct the catalog, including redshift and magnitude information, continuum-normalized spectra, and corresponding arrays of redshift-dependent minimum rest equivalent widths detectable at our confidence threshold. The catalog is available on the web. A careful second search of 500 random spectra indicated that, for every 100 spectra searched, approximately one significant MgII system was accidentally rejected. Current plans to expand the catalog beyond DR4 quasars are discussed. Many MgII absorbers are known to be associated with galaxies. Therefore, the combination of large size and well understood statistics makes this catalog ideal for precision studies of the low-ionization and neutral gas regions associated with galaxies at low to moderate redshift. An analysis of the statistics of MgII absorbers ...

  8. Hyper-luminous Reddened Broad-Line Quasars at z~2 from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey and WISE All Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul C; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Koposov, Sergey E

    2012-01-01

    We present the first sample of spectroscopically confirmed heavily reddened broad-line quasars selected using the new near infra-red VISTA Hemisphere Survey and \\textit{WISE} All-Sky Survey. Observations of four candidates with $(J-K)>2.5$ and $K\\le16.5$ over $\\sim$180 deg$^2$, leads to confirmation that two are highly dust-reddened broad-line Type 1 quasars at z$\\sim$2. The typical dust extinctions are A$_V\\sim$2--2.5 mags. We measure black-hole masses of $\\sim10^{9}$M$_\\odot$ and extinction corrected bolometric luminosities of $\\sim10^{47}$ erg/s, making these among the brightest Type 1 quasars currently known. Despite this, these quasars lie well below the detection limits of wide-field optical surveys like the SDSS with $i_{AB}>22$. We also present \\textit{WISE} photometry at 3--22$\\mu$m, for our full sample of spectroscopically confirmed reddened quasars including those selected from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (Banerji et al. 2012a). We demonstrate that the rest-frame infrared SEDs of these reddened qu...

  9. Finding the Most Distant Quasars Using Bayesian Selection Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Quasars, the brightly glowing disks of material that can form around the super-massive black holes at the centres of large galaxies, are amongst the most luminous astronomical objects known and so can be seen at great distances. The most distant known quasars are seen as they were when the Universe was less than a billion years old (i.e., $\\sim\\!7%$ of its current age). Such distant quasars are, however, very rare, and so are difficult to distinguish from the billions of other comparably-bright sources in the night sky. In searching for the most distant quasars in a recent astronomical sky survey (the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, UKIDSS), there were $\\sim\\!10^3$ apparently plausible candidates for each expected quasar, far too many to reobserve with other telescopes. The solution to this problem was to apply Bayesian model comparison, making models of the quasar population and the dominant contaminating population (Galactic stars) to utilise the information content in the survey measurements. The result wa...

  10. On the peculiar X-ray properties of the bright nearby radio-quiet quasar PDS456

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Nicastro, F; Matt, G; Fiore, F; Palumbo, G G C

    2000-01-01

    BeppoSAX and ASCA observations of the nearby (z=0.184), high-luminosity, radio-quiet quasar PDS456 are presented. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a prominent ionized edge at 8-9 keV (originally discovered by RXTE, Reeves et al. 2000) and by a soft excess below 1.5 keV. The lack of any significant iron K alpha emission line suggests for the edge an origin from line-of-sight material rather than from reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc. The hard X-ray continuum is indeed well modelled by transmission through a highly-ionized medium with a large column density (N_H warm = 4.5 x 10^24 cm^-2) plus an additional cold absorber with a lower column density (N_H cold = 2.7 x 10^22 cm^-2).

  11. A Snapshot Survey for Gravitational Lenses Among z>=4.0 Quasars: I. The z>5.7 Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, G T; Pindor, B; Haiman, Z; Fan, X; Eisenstein, D J; Schneider, D P; Bahcall, Neta A; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R J; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pindor, Bartosz; Haiman, Zoltan; Fan, Xiaohui; Eisenstein, Daniel; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brunner, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has discovered several hundred quasars with redshift between 4.0 and 6.4. Including the effects of magnification bias, one expects a priori that an appreciable fraction of these objects are gravitationally lensed. We have used the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope to carry out a snapshot imaging survey of high-redshift SDSS quasars to search for gravitationally split lenses. This paper, the first in a series reporting the results of the survey, describes snapshot observations of four quasars at z = 5.74, 5.82, 5.99 and 6.30, respectively. We find that none of these objects has a lensed companion within 5 magnitudes with a separation larger than 0.3 arcseconds; within 2.5 magnitudes, we can rule out companions within 0.1 arcseconds. Based on the non-detection of strong lensing in these four systems, we constrain the z~6 luminosity function to a slope of beta>-4.63 (3 sigma), assuming a break in the quasar luminosity function a...

  12. A Constraint on Quasar Clustering at z = 5 from a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ˜135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5 the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r0)-2, this discovery implies a correlation length of r0 ≳ 20h-1 Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  13. Color Effects Associated with the 1999 Microlensing Brightness Peaks in Gravitationally Lensed Quasar Q2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulik, V G; Dudinov, V N; Minakov, A A; Nuritdinov, S N; Tsvetkova, V S; Zheleznyak, A P; Konichek, V V; Sinelnikov, I Y; Burkhonov, O M; Artamonov, B P; Bruevich, V V

    2003-01-01

    Photometry of the Q2237+0305gravitational lens in VRI spectral bands with the 1.5-m telescope of the high-altitude Maidanak observatory in 1995-2000 is presented. Monitoring of Q2237+0305 in July-October 2000, made at nearly daily basis, did not reveal rapid (night-to-night and intranight) variations of brightness of the components during this time period. Rather slow changes of magnitudes of the components were observed, such as 0.08 mag fading of B and C components and 0.05 mag brightening of D in R band during July 23 - October 7, 2000. By good luck three nights in 1999 were almost at the time of the strong brightness peak of image C, and approximately in the middle of the ascending slope of the image A brightness peak. The C component was the most blue one in the system in 1998 and 1999, having changed its (V-I) color from 0.56 mag to 0.12 mag since August 1997, while its brightness increased almost 1.2 mag during this time period. The A component behaved similarly between August 1998 and August 2000, hav...

  14. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salviander, S.; Shields, G. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bonning, E. W., E-mail: triples@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: erin.bonning@emory.edu [Department of Physics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M {sub BH}, and the host galaxy luminosity, L {sub gal}, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship by examining the redshift dependence of Δ log M {sub BH}, the offset in M {sub BH} from the local M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship. There is little systematic trend in Δ log M {sub BH} out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, σ{sub *}, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for σ{sub *} in statistical studies.

  15. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M BH, and the host galaxy luminosity, L gal, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M BH-L gal relationship by examining the redshift dependence of Δ log M BH, the offset in M BH from the local M BH-L gal relationship. There is little systematic trend in Δ log M BH out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, σ*, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for σ* in statistical studies

  16. VPMS J1342+2840 - an unusual quasar from the variability and proper motion survey

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H; Haas, M; Irwin, M; Laget, M; Scholz, R D

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of the highly peculiar, radio-loud quasar VPMS J1342+2840 (z ~ 1.3) from the variability and proper motion survey. We present spectroscopic, imaging and photometric observations. The unusual spectrum shows a strong depression of the continuum over a wide wavelength range in the blue part without the typical structures of broad absorption line (BAL) troughs. The image of the quasar is unresolved and there is no evidence for a foreground object on the line of sight. The broad-band spectral energy distribution is not consistent with obvious dust reddening with the standard SMC extinction curve. The downturn of the continuum flux of VPMS J1342+2840 at short wavelengths can be caused by dust reddening only if the reddening curve is steeper then the SMC curve in the ultraviolet and is very flat at longer wavelengths. Alternatively, the dominant spectral features can be explained by low-ionization BALs forming unusually wide, overlapping absorption troughs.

  17. The Discovery of a Luminous z = 5.80 Quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, X; Davis, M; Becker, R H; Strauss, M A; Schneider, D P; Gregg, M D; Gunn, J E; Knapp, G R; Lupton, R H

    2000-01-01

    We present observations of SDSSp J104433.04--012502.2, a luminous quasar at z=5.80 discovered from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multicolor imaging data. This object was selected as an i'-band dropout object, with i*=21.8 +/- 0.2, z*=19.2 +/- 0.1. It has an absolute magnitude M1450 = -27.2 (H_0 =50 km/s/Mpc, q0 = 0.5). The spectrum shows a strong and broad Ly alpha emission line, strong Ly alpha forest absorption lines with a mean continuum decrement D_A = 0.91, and a Lyman Limit System at z=5.72. The spectrum also shows strong OI and SiIV emission lines similar to those of quasars at z<= 5, suggesting that these metals were produced at redshift beyond six. The lack of a Gunn-Peterson trough in the spectrum indicates that the universe is already highly ionized at z ~ 5.8. Using a high-resolution spectrum in the Ly alpha forest region, we place a conservative upper limit of the optical depth due to the Gunn-Peterson effect of tau < 0.5 in regions of minimum absorption. The Ly alpha forest absorption in...

  18. Selection constraints on high redshift quasar searches in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy survey

    CERN Document Server

    Findlay, J R; Venemans, B P; Reyle, C; Robin, A C; Bonfield, D G; Bruce, V A; Jarvis, M J

    2011-01-01

    The European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is a 4-m class survey telescope for wide-field near-infrared imaging. VISTA is currently running a suite of six public surveys, which will shortly deliver their first Europe wide public data releases to ESO. The VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) forms a natural intermediate between current wide shallow, and deeper more concentrated surveys, by targeting two patches totalling 1500 sq.deg in the northern and southern hemispheres with measured 5-sigma limiting depths of Z ~ 22.4, Y ~ 21.4, J ~ 20.9, H ~ 19.9 and Ks ~19.3 (Vega). This architecture forms an ideal working parameter space for the discovery of a significant sample of 6.5 <= z <= 7.5 quasars. In the first data release priority has been placed on small areas encompassing a number of fields well sampled at many wavelengths, thereby optimising science gains and synergy whilst ensuring a timely release of the first products. For rare...

  19. A Periodically Varying Luminous Quasar at z=2 from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey: A Candidate Supermassive Black Hole Binary in the Gravitational Wave-Driven Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tingting; Heinis, Sebastien; Magnier, Eugene A; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth; Flewelling, Heather; Huber, Mark; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) should be an inevitable consequence of the hierarchical growth of massive galaxies through mergers, and the strongest sirens of gravitational waves (GWs) in the cosmos. And yet, their direct detection has remained elusive due to the compact (sub-parsec) orbital separations of gravitationally bound SMBHBs. Here we exploit a theoretically predicted signature of a SMBHB in the time domain: periodic variability caused by a mass accretion rate that is modulated by the binary's orbital motion. We report our first significant periodically varying quasar detection from the systematic search in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey. Our SMBHB candidate, PSO J334.2028+01.4075, is a luminous radio-loud quasar at $z=2.060$, with extended baseline photometry from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, as well as archival spectroscopy from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey. The observed period ($542 \\pm 15$ days) and estimated black hole mass ($\\log (M_{\\rm BH}/M_\\odot) = 9.97 \\p...

  20. A search for nontoroidal topological lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Flat space models with multiply connected topology, which have compact dimensions, are tested against the distribution of high-redshift ($z \\geq 4$) quasars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). When the compact dimensions are smaller in size than the observed universe, topological lensing occurs, in which multiple images of single objects (ghost images) are observed. We improve on the recently introduced method to identify ghost images by means of four-point statistics. Our method is valid for any of the 17 multiply connected flat models, including nontoroial ones that are compactified by screw motions or glide reflection. Applying the method to the data revealed one possible case of topological lensing caused by sixth-turn screw motion, however, it is consistent with the simply connected model by this test alone. Moreover, simulations suggest that we cannot exclude the other space models despite the absence of their signatures. This uncertainty mainly originates from the patchy coverage of SDSS in the Sou...

  1. THE TWO-POINT CORRELATION OF 2QZ QUASARS AND 2SLAQ LRGS: FROM A QUASAR FUELING PERSPECTIVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public data from the 2dF quasar survey and 2dF/Sloan Digital Sky Survey LRG and QSO, with their vast reservoirs of spectroscopically located and identified sources, afford us the chance to more accurately study their real-space correlations in the hopes of identifying the physical processes that trigger quasar activity. We have used these two public databases to measure the projected cross-correlation, ω p, between quasars and luminous red galaxies. We find the projected two-point correlation to have a fitted clustering radius of r 0 = 5.3 ± 0.6 and a slope γ = 1.83 ± 0.42 on scales from 0.7 to 27 h -1 Mpc. We attempt to understand this strong correlation by separating the LRG sample into two populations of blue and red galaxies. We measure at the cross-correlation with each population. We find that these quasars have a stronger correlation amplitude with the bluer, more recently star-forming population in our sample than the redder passively evolving population, which has a correlation that is much more noisy and seems to flatten on scales -1 Mpc. We compare this result to published work on hierarchical models. The stronger correlation of bright quasars with LRGs that have undergone a recent burst of star formation suggests that the physical mechanisms that produce both activities are related and that minor mergers or tidal effects may be important triggers of bright quasar activity and/or that bright quasars are less highly biased than faint quasars.

  2. Data Mining for Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine learning techniques and demonstrate that a two step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step we use catalog-level information ($griz$+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to preselect targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (Gradient-Boosted Trees), to form a final set of cand...

  3. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  4. Estimating Photometric Redshifts of Quasars via K-nearest Neighbor Approach Based on Large Survey Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Yanxia, Zhang; Nanbo, Peng; Yongheng, Zhao; Xue-bing, Wu

    2013-01-01

    We apply one of lazy learning methods named k-nearest neighbor algorithm (kNN) to estimate the photometric redshifts of quasars, based on various datasets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) (the SDSS sample, the SDSS-UKIDSS sample, the SDSS-WISE sample and the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample). The influence of the k value and different input patterns on the performance of kNN is discussed. kNN arrives at the best performance when k is different with a special input pattern for a special dataset. The best result belongs to the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample. The experimental results show that generally the more information from more bands, the better performance of photometric redshift estimation with kNN. The results also demonstrate that kNN using multiband data can effectively solve the catastrophic failure of photometric redshift estimation, which is met by many machine learning methods. By comparing the performance of various m...

  5. The Quasar 2175 Å Dust Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Twelve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinan; Ge, Jian; Ma, Jingzhe; Hu, Teng; Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Peng; Prochaska, Jason X.; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Brandt, W. Niel

    2016-01-01

    We report detection of quasar 2175 Å dust absorber (2DA) candidates in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release Twelve (DR12). These dust absorbers are searched from 39,242 Mg II absorbers with the absorption redshift 0.7≦ z(abs)≦ 2.67. The redshift range is chosen to allow 2DAs to be covered within SDSS spectrograph operation wavelength range (~3650-10,400 Å). We optimized our previously developed searching and identification procedures. The parameterized extinction curve is applied to fit the observation spectra with DR12 composite spectra (blue, average and red) in the rest-frame of Mg II absorbers. The best fitted spectra are used to extract bump parameters (width, depth and location). Only absorbers with bump strength above the 3σ level are chosen as 2DA candidates and used for statistical study. A total of over 400 2DA candidates have been identified as the first complete sample of 2DAs. In this sample, the bump strengths of most candidates are similar to the absorption bump observed in the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC) and significantly weaker than those in the Milky Way (MW). The UV bump strength decreases with redshift. The UV bump strength is projected to evolve to the MW value at the present time. A subsample of these absorbers were observed with the MMT and Keck. All of them show strong dust depletion and high metallicity. Our results support a steadily increasing chemical enrichment of the ISM in quasar 2175 absorbers, unlike DLAs which show very weak redshift evolution.

  6. Radio and X-ray observations of the gamma-ray bright quasar PKS 0528+134

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun Fei; Marscher, Alan P.; Aller, Hugh D.; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Valtaoja, Esko

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of the z = 2.07 quasar PKS 0528+134, which has been detected as an extraordinarily luminous gamma-ray source. Its radio properties are highly variable in both total and polarized flux density. Milliarcsecond-scale maps from global very long base interferometry (VLBI) experiments, an X-ray spectrum from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations, and light curves in total flux density and polarization are used to investigate the geometry, radiation mechanism, and physical environment of the emission region in the source. The VLBI images reveal a bent jet extending toward the northeast on parsec scales, with less intense knots of emission appearing on the opposite side of the brightest spot. The position of the core usually found in such sources is unclear. The polarization angle is stable despite strong variability in polarized flux density and indicates that the magnetic field is aligned with the jet axis as defined by our 8.4 GHz image. The ROSAT X-ray flux density of PKS 0528+134 in 1991 March is measured to be 1.6 micro Jy at 1 keV, with a very steep spectral (`energy') index sigma(sub x) approximately equal to 2.2. The X-ray observations reveal the presence of cold gas along the line of sight significantly in excess of that present in the Galaxy. A strong radio flare began within two months of the first observation of a high flux of gamma-rays from PKS 0528+134 by Hunter et al. Using the geometry and spectral chacateristics determined by our VLBI observations, a synchrotron self-Compton calculation indicates that relativistic bulk motion is required in PKS 0528+134, with an estimated Doppler beaming factor delta approximately greater than 4.3, similar to the value delta approximately greater than 7 required to explain the low optical depth of the gamma-rays to photon-photon pair production. We suggest that the core activity of PKS 0528+134 is sporadic in nature, with the nonthermal outburst starting in 1991 representing

  7. The LEGUE High Latitude Bright Survey Design for the LAMOST Pilot Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yueyang; Yang, Fan; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Zhang, Haotong; Lepine, Sebastien; Xu, Yan; Gao, Shuang; Christlieb, Norbert; Han, Zhanwen; Hou, Jinliang; Lee, Hsutai; Liu, Xiaowei; Pan, Kaike; Wang, Hongchi

    2012-01-01

    We describe the footprint and input catalog for bright nights in the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which began in October 2011. Targets are selected from two stripes in the north and south Galactic Cap regions, centered at $\\alpha$= 29$^\\circ$, with 10$^\\circ$ width in declination, covering right ascension of 135$^\\circ-290^\\circ$ and -30$^\\circ$ to 30$^\\circ$ respectively. We selected spectroscopic targets from a combination of the SDSS and 2MASS point source catalogs. The catalog of stars defining the field centers (as required by the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the center of the LAMOST field) consists of all V < 8m stars from the Hipparcos catalog. We employ a statistical selection algorithm that assigns priorities to targets based on their positions in multidimensional color/magnitude space. This scheme overemphasizes rare objects and de-emphasizes more populated regions of magnitude and color phase space, while ensuring a smooth, well-understood selection function. A demonstration of plate design is pre...

  8. Co-evolution of Extreme Star Formation and Quasar: hints from Herschel and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Yan, Haojing

    2016-01-01

    Using the public data from the Herschel wide field surveys, we study the far-infrared properties of optical-selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Within the common area of ˜172 deg2 we have identified the far-infrared counterparts for 354 quasars, among which 134 are highly secure detections in the Herschel 250μm band (signal-to-noise ratios ≥5). This sample is the largest far-infrared quasar sample of its kind, and spans a wide redshift range of 0.14≤z≤4.7. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions, which are due to the cold dust components within the host galaxies, are consistent with being heated by active star formation. In most cases (>˜80%), their total infrared luminosities as inferred from only their far-infrared emissions (LIR(cd)) already exceed 1012 Lsun, and thus these objects qualify as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. There is no correlation between LIR(cd) and the absolute magnitudes, the black hole masses or the X-ray luminosities of the quasars, which further support that their far-infrared emissions are not due to their active galactic nuclei. A large fraction of these objects (>˜50-60%) have star formation rates >˜300Msun/yr. Such extreme starbursts among optical quasars, however, is only a few per cent. This fraction varies with redshift, and peaks at around z~2. Among the entire sample, 136 objects have secure estimates of their cold-dust temperatures (T), and we find that there is a dramatic increasing trend of T with increasing LIR(cd). We interpret this trend as the envelope of the general distribution of infrared galaxies on the (T, LIR(cd)) plane.

  9. The LBT Bootes Field Survey: I. The Rest-frame UV and Luminosity Functions and Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dave, Romeel

    2013-01-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U-band imaging survey (9 deg2) covering the NOAO Bootes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z~3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by >3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of $z\\sim3$ quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z~3 LBGs based on the R-band and IRAC [4.5 micro m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z~7 and z~3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR),which fo...

  10. The Magellanic Quasars Survey. II. Confirmation of 145 New AGN Behind the Southern Edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Jacyszyn, A M; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Poleski, R; Kubiak, M; Soszynski, I; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P

    2011-01-01

    We quadruple the number of quasars known behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from 55 (42 in the OGLE-III LMC fields) to 200 by spectroscopically confirming 169 (145 new) quasars from a sample of 845 observed candidates in four ~3 deg^2 AAT/AAOmega fields south of the LMC center. The candidates were selected based on their Spitzer mid-infrared colors, X-ray emission, and/or optical variability properties in the database of the OGLE microlensing survey. The contaminating sources can be divided into 112 young stellar objects (YSOs), 17 planetary nebulae (PNe), 39 Be and 24 blue stars, and 66 red stars. There are also 401 targets with either featureless spectra or too low signal-to-noise ratio for source classification. While our quasar sample is relatively complete for I<19.2 mag, it is incomplete for fainter quasars. We would expect to find an additional ~200 AGNs if the sample was complete to our target depth of I<21 mag. The newly discovered AGNs provide many additional reference points for proper m...

  11. Large Scale Clustering of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars: Impact of the Baryon Density and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Yahata, K; Kayo, I; Matsubara, T; Connolly, A; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Sheth, R; Szapudi, I; Anderson, S F; Bahcall, Neta A; Brinkmann, J; Csabai, I; Fan, X; Loveday, J; York, A S; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Suto, Yasushi; Kayo, Issha; Matsubara, Takahiko; Connolly, Andrew; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Sheth, Ravi; Szapudi, Istvan; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, Jon; Csabai, Istvan; Fan, Xiaohui; Loveday, Jon; York, Alexander S. Szalay and Donald

    2004-01-01

    We report the first result of the clustering analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars. We compute the two-point correlation function (2PCF) of SDSS quasars in redshift space at $10h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc} < s < 1h^{-1}{\\rm Gpc}$, with particular attention to its baryonic signature. Our sample consists of 20303 quasars extracted from the SDSS Data Release 3 (DR3). The redshift range of the sample is $0.16 \\le z \\le 2.24$ and the reddening-corrected $i$-band apparent magnitude range is $15.0 \\le m_{i,{\\rm rc}} \\le 19.1$. Due to the relatively low number density of the quasar sample, the bump in the power spectrum due to the baryon density, $\\Omega_{\\rm b}$, is not clearly visible. The effect of the baryon density is, however, to shift the zero-crossing scale $s_{\\rm zero}$ of the 2PCF. The sensitivity of the zero crossing to the baryon density makes it an interesting alternate measure of the baryonic signature. Assuming a scale-independent linear bias and the spatially flat universe, i.e., $\\Omega_{\\rm ...

  12. Clustering of High Redshift ($z\\ge 2.9$) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Y; Oguri, M; Hennawi, J F; Fan, X; Richards, G T; Hall, P B; Gunn, J E; Schneider, D P; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Vanden Berk, D E; Anderson, S F; Bahcall, N A; Connolly, A J; Knapp, G R; Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gunn, James E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Knapp, Gillian R.

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,426 luminous optical quasars with redshift $2.9 \\le z\\le 5.4$ selected over 4041 deg$^2$ from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For a real-space correlation function of the form $\\xi(r)=(r/r_0)^{-\\gamma}$, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are $r_0 = 15.2 \\pm 2.7 h^{-1}$ Mpc and $\\gamma = 2.0 \\pm 0.3$, over a scale range $4\\le r_p\\le 150 h^{-1}$ Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their $z \\approx 1.5$ counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length $r_0 \\approx 6.5 h^{-1}$ Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: $2.9\\le z\\le 3.5$ and $z\\ge 3.5$, and assuming a power-law index $\\gamma=2.0$, we find a correlation length of $r_0 = 16.9 \\pm 1.7 h^{-1}$ Mpc for the former, and $r_0 = 24.3 \\pm 2.4 h^{-1}$ Mpc for the latter. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifet...

  13. The Low-Resolution Spectrograph of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. II. Observations of Quasar Candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes spectra of quasar candidates acquired during the commissioning phase of the Low-Resolution Spectrograph of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The objects were identified as possible quasars from multicolor image data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The 10 sources had typical r' magnitudes of 19-20, except for one extremely red object with r' ≅23. The data, obtained with exposure times between 10 and 25 minutes, reveal that the spectra of four candidates are essentially featureless and are not quasars, five are quasars with redshifts between 2.92 and 4.15 (including one broad absorption line quasar), and the red source is a very late M star or early L dwarf. (c) (c) 2000. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific

  14. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7......We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7...

  15. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF BRIGHT γ-RAY OUTBURSTS FROM THE PECULIAR QUASAR 4C +21.35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the two-year-long Fermi-Large Area Telescope observation of the peculiar blazar 4C +21.35 (PKS 1222+216). This source was in a quiescent state from the start of the science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 August until 2009 September, and then became more active, with gradually increasing flux and some moderately bright flares. In 2010 April and June, 4C +21.35 underwent a very strong GeV outburst composed of several major flares characterized by rise and decay timescales of the order of a day. During the outburst, the GeV spectra of 4C +21.35 displayed a broken power-law form with spectral breaks observed near 1-3 GeV photon energies. We demonstrate that, at least during the major flares, the jet in 4C +21.35 carried a total kinetic luminosity comparable to the total accretion power available to feed the outflow. We also discuss the origin of the break observed in the flaring spectra of 4C +21.35. We show that, in principle, a model involving annihilation of the GeV photons on the He II Lyman recombination continuum and line emission of 'broad-line region' clouds may account for such. However, we also discuss the additional constraint provided by the detection of 4C +21.35 at 0.07-0.4 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope, which coincided with one of the GeV flares of the source. We argue that there are reasons to believe that the ∼17 cm from the nucleus), but instead originates further away from the active center, namely, around the characteristic scale of the hot dusty torus surrounding the 4C +21.35 nucleus (∼1019 cm).

  16. Observed Quasar Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-05-01

    With the introduction of microlensing (nano-lensing) and reverberation analysis, understanding of the luminous structure surrounding quasars has gone from theoretical speculation to an observer's sport. Micro-lensing with day timescale has demonstrated that quasars have structure on scales of 1 R_G which we attribute to the inner edge of the accretion disc, at central distance 70 R_G in lo-hard state (radio loud) Q0957 quasar, indicated by reverberation. Reverberation of the dominant optical continuum has been detected in all 55 hi-soft quasars with brightness data, originating in the dusty torus observed in UV-optical and IR reverberation. Microlensing simulation compared to brightness monitoring shows that 2/3 of the UV-optical continuum originates in the outer torus. The observed color effects observed in the microlensing support the existence of inner and outer luminous structure.

  17. A 5-GHz survey of bright southern elliptical and SO galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Parkes 64-m telescope has been used in a 5.0 GHz survey of 181 Southern E and SO galaxies from the Reference catalogue of bright galaxies. Of the 39 detections above the nominal limit of 12 mJy, 15 are new, several have radio spectra indicating membership in the active class, and two have shown intensity variations at centimetre wavelengths. The results of this survey combined with results from earlier surveys of lower sensitivity suggest that only about 40 per cent of the E/SO galaxies in the Reference catalogue have Ssub(5GHz)>1 mJy. (author)

  18. Gravitational lensing of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenbrod, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The universe, in all its richness, diversity and complexity, is populated by a myriad of intriguing celestial objects. Among the most exotic of them are gravitationally lensed quasars. A quasar is an extremely bright nucleus of a galaxy, and when such an object is gravitationally lensed, multiple images of the quasar are produced – this phenomenon of cosmic mirage can provide invaluable insights on burning questions, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. After presenting the basics of modern cosmology, the book describes active galactic nuclei, the theory of gravitational lensing, and presents a particular numerical technique to improve the resolution of astronomical data. The book then enters the heart of the subject with the description of important applications of gravitational lensing of quasars, such as the measurement of the famous Hubble constant, the determination of the dark matter distribution in galaxies, and the observation of the mysterious inner parts of quasars with much higher r...

  19. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION RELATIONSHIP FOR QUASARS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assess evolution in the M BH-σ* relationship for quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 for the redshift range 0.1 BH, using the 'photoionization method', with the broad Hβ or Mg II emission line and the quasar continuum luminosity. For the stellar velocity dispersion, we use the narrow [O III] or [O II] emission line as a surrogate. This study is a follow-up to an earlier study in which we investigated evolution in the M BH-σ* relationship in quasars from Data Release 3. The greatly increased number of quasars in our new sample has allowed us to break our lower-redshift subsample into black hole mass bins and probe the M BH-σ* relationship for constant black hole mass. The M BH-σ* relationship for the highest-mass (M BH > 109.0 M ☉) and lowest-mass (M BH 7.5 M ☉) black holes appears to evolve significantly; however, most or all of this apparent evolution can be accounted for by various observational biases due to intrinsic scatter in the relationship and to uncertainties in observed quantities. The M BH-σ* relationship for black holes in the middle mass range (107.5 BH 9.0 M ☉) shows minimal change with redshift. The overall results suggest a limit of ±0.2 dex on any evolution in the M BH-σ* relationship for quasars out to z ≈ 1 compared with the relationship observed in the local universe. Intrinsic scatter may also provide a plausible way to reconcile the wide range of results of several different studies of the black hole-galaxy relationships.

  20. Predicting the Quasar Photometric Reshift with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Filter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubacher, Emily M.; York, Donald G.

    1999-10-01

    Photometric data were obtained for a set of known quasars (QSOs) in five bands with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) filter system for the purpose of testing the ability of the SDSS system to accurately predict the photometric redshift of QSOs. The initial plot of the SDSS photometric redshift versus the measured redshift shows a good relationship, but a lot of scatter. A literature search was conducted on a selected sampling of 49 QSOs, 26 with redshift z advertised redshifts. This search revealed 10 rejected QSOs which were not QSOs but rather Seyfert galaxies or Narrow Line Objects. Additionally, 11 QSOs were either Broad Absorption Line Systems or had spectra that were in some way incomplete, and therefore, their QSO identification could not be confirmed. The revised plot, with the rejected and unconfirmed QSOs removed, gives an excellent straight line with very little scatter. Although these results are preliminary and for only a small sampling of QSOs, they show that further study of the relationship is warranted and that eventually the SDSS method may be used to accurately predict the photometric redshift of QSOs.

  1. A Catalog of Broad Absorption Line Quasars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Robert R; Brandt, W N; Hall, Patrick B; Shen, Yue; Wu, Jianfeng; Anderson, Scott F; Schneider, Donald P; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Gallagher, S C; Fan, Xiaohui; York, Donald G

    2008-01-01

    We present a catalog of 5039 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars (QSOs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) QSO catalog that have absorption troughs covering a continuous velocity range >= 2000 km/s. We have fit ultraviolet (UV) continua and line emission in each case, enabling us to report common diagnostics of BAL strengths and velocities in the range -25,000 to 0 km/s for SiIV $\\lambda$1400, CIV $\\lambda$1549, AlIII $\\lambda$1857, and MgII $\\lambda$2799. We calculate these diagnostics using the spectrum listed in the DR5 QSO catalog, and also for spectra from additional SDSS observing epochs when available. In cases where BAL QSOs have been observed with Chandra or XMM-Newton, we report the X-ray monochromatic luminosities of these sources. We confirm and extend previous findings that BAL QSOs are more strongly reddened in the rest-frame UV than non-BAL QSOs and that BAL QSOs are relatively X-ray weak compared to non-BAL QSOs. The observed BAL fraction is dependent on the spectral s...

  2. Spectral Variability of Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. II: The C IV Line

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhite, B C; Brunner, R J; Brinkmann, J

    2006-01-01

    We examine the variability of the high-ionizaton C IV line in a sample of 105 quasars observed at multiple epochs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find a strong correlation between the change in the C IV line flux and the change in the line width, but no correlations between the change in flux and changes in line center and skewness. The relation between line flux change and line width change is consistent with a model in which a broad line base varies with greater amplitude than the line core. The objects studied here are more luminous and at higher redshift than those normally studied for variability, ranging in redshift from 1.65 to 4.00 and in absolute r-band magnitude from roughly -24 to -28. Using moment analysis line-fitting techniques, we measure line fluxes, centers, widths and skewnesses for the C IV line at two epochs for each object. The well-known Baldwin Effect is seen for these objects, with a slope beta = -0.22. The sample has a median intrinsic Baldwin Effect slope of beta = -0.85; the C I...

  3. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, R; Arav, N; Heap, S R; Wisotzki, L; Aldcroft, T L; Alloin, D; Behar, E; Canalizo, G; Crenshaw, D M; De Kool, M; Chambers, K; Cecil, G; Chatzichristou, E T; Everett, J; Gabel, J; Gaskell, C M; Galliano, E; Green, R F; Hall, P B; Hines, D C; Junkkarinen, V T; Kaastra, J S; Kaiser, M E; Kazanas, D; Konigl, A; Korista, K T; Kriss, G A; Laor, A; Leighly, K M; Mathur, S; Ogle, P; Proga, D; Sabra, B; Sivron, R; Snedden, S A; Telfer, R; Vestergaard, M; Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum; Heap, Sara R.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Alloin, Danielle; Behar, Ehud; Canalizo, Gabriela; Kool, Martijn de; Chambers, Kenneth; Cecil, Gerald; Chatzichristou, Eleni; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Galliano, Emmanuel; Green, Richard F.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hines, Dean C.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Konigl, Arieh; Korista, Kirk T.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Laor, Ari; Leighly, Karen M.; Mathur, Smita; Ogle, Patrick; Proga, Daniel; Sabra, Bassem; Sivron, Ran; Snedden, Stephanie; Telfer, Randal; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar, HE0441-2826, contains extremely weak emission lines and our spectrum is consistent with a simple power-law continuum. The quasar is radio-loud, but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated morphology, which argues against it being a blazar. The unusual spectrum of this quasar resembles the spectra of the quasars PG1407+265, SDSSJ1136+0242, and PKS1004+13 for which several possible explanations have been entertained.

  4. Discovery of eight z ∼ 6 quasars from Pan-STARRS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-redshift quasars are currently the only probes of the growth of supermassive black holes and potential tracers of structure evolution at early cosmic time. Here we present our candidate selection criteria from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 and follow-up strategy to discover quasars in the redshift range 5.7 ≲ z ≲ 6.2. With this strategy we discovered eight new 5.7 ≤ z ≤ 6.0 quasars, increasing the number of known quasars at z > 5.7 by more than 10%. We additionally recovered 18 previously known quasars. The eight quasars presented here span a large range of luminosities (–27.3 ≤ M 1450 ≤ –25.4; 19.6 ≤ z P1 ≤ 21.2) and are remarkably heterogeneous in their spectral features: half of them show bright emission lines whereas the other half show a weak or no Lyα emission line (25% with rest-frame equivalent width of the Lyα +N V line lower than 15 Å). We find a larger fraction of weak-line emission quasars than in lower redshift studies. This may imply that the weak-line quasar population at the highest redshifts could be more abundant than previously thought. However, larger samples of quasars are needed to increase the statistical significance of this finding.

  5. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r < 19) candidates with long-slit spectroscopy at DuPont telescope (LCO) yields 14 confirmed quasars. The results signal encouraging progress in the classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Biases in z>1.46 Redshifts due to Quasar Diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Denney, K D; Brandt, W N; Grier, C J; Ho, Luis C; Peterson, B M; Trump, J R; Ge, J

    2016-01-01

    We use the coadded spectra of 32 epochs of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Reverberation Mapping Project observations of 482 quasars with z>1.46 to highlight systematic biases in the SDSS- and BOSS-pipeline redshifts due to the natural diversity of quasar properties. We investigate the characteristics of this bias by comparing the BOSS-pipeline redshifts to an estimate from the centroid of HeII 1640. HeII has a low equivalent width but is often well-defined in high-S/N spectra, does not suffer from self-absorption, and has a narrow component that, when present (the case for about half of our sources), produces a redshift estimate that, on average, is consistent with that determined from [OII] to within 1-sigma of the quadrature sum of the HeII and [OII] centroid measurement uncertainties. The large redshift differences of ~1000 km/s, on average, between the BOSS-pipeline and HeII-centroid redshifts suggest there are significant biases in a portion of BOSS quasar redshift measurements. Adopting the HeII-based ...

  8. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars with image separations of 3 arcseconds from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Richards, Gordon T.; Johnston, David E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Pindor, Bartosz; Strauss, Michael A.; Brunner, Robert; Becker, Robert H.; Castander, Francisco J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; York, Donald G.

    2004-11-01

    We report the discovery of two doubly-imaged quasars, SDSS J100128.61+502756.9 and SDSS J120629.65+433217.6, at redshifts of 1.838 and 1.789 and with image separations of 2.86'' and 2.90'', respectively. The objects were selected as lens candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on the identical nature of the spectra of the two quasars in each pair and the identification of the lens galaxies, we conclude that the objects are gravitational lenses. The lenses are complicated; in both systems there are several galaxies in the fields very close to the quasars, in addition to the lens galaxies themselves. The lens modeling implies that these nearby galaxies contribute significantly to the lens potentials. On larger scales, we have detected an enhancement in the galaxy density near SDSS J100128.61+502756.9. The number of lenses with image separation of {approx} 3'' in the SDSS already exceeds the prediction of simple theoretical models based on the standard Lambda-dominated cosmology and observed velocity function of galaxies.

  9. Heavily Reddened Quasars at z~2 in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey: A Transitional Phase in AGN Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul C; Alaghband-Zadeh, Susannah; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Venemans, Bram P

    2012-01-01

    We present a new sample of K_Vega<16.5 extremely red quasar candidates at z~2 from ~900 deg^2 of data in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey Data Release 4. Five of these are spectroscopically confirmed to be heavily reddened Type 1 AGN with broad emission lines. These combined with the 7 reddened quasars with K_Vega<17 from 100 deg^2 of data overlapping the SDSS Stripe82 (Hawthorn et al., 2012) brings our total sample of optically obscured AGN to 12 at z=1.5--2.7. At these redshifts, Halpha (6563A) is in the K-band. However, the mean Halpha equivalent width of the reddened quasars is only 1.1x that of the optically selected population and cannot explain the extreme colours. Instead, dust extinction of the order of A_V~2-6 is required to reproduce the continuum colours of our sources. This is comparable to the dust extinctions seen in submillimeter galaxies at similar redshifts. We argue that our sample are likely being observed in a relatively short-lived phase when they are transitioning from massive starbur...

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum; Heap, Sara R.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Alloin, Danielle; Behar, Ehud; Canalizo, Gabriela; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Kool, Martijn de; Chambers, Kenneth; Cecil, Gerald; Chatzichristou, Eleni; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Gaskell, C. Martin; Galliano, Emmanuel; Green, Richard F.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hines, Dean C.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Konigl, Arieh; Korista, Kirk T.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Laor, Ari; Leighly, Karen M.; Mathur, Smita; Ogle, Patrick; Proga, Daniel; Sabra, Bassem; Sivron, Ran; Snedden, Stephanie; Telfer, Randal; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z zz 1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasa...

  11. A serendipitous all sky survey for bright objects in the outer solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use seven year's worth of observations from the Catalina Sky Survey and the Siding Spring Survey covering most of the northern and southern hemisphere at galactic latitudes higher than 20° to search for serendipitously imaged moving objects in the outer solar system. These slowly moving objects would appear as stationary transients in these fast cadence asteroids surveys, so we develop methods to discover objects in the outer solar system using individual observations spaced by months, rather than spaced by hours, as is typically done. While we independently discover eight known bright objects in the outer solar system, the faintest having V=19.8±0.1, no new objects are discovered. We find that the survey is nearly 100% efficient at detecting objects beyond 25 AU for V≲19.1 (V≲18.6 in the southern hemisphere) and that the probability that there is one or more remaining outer solar system object of this brightness left to be discovered in the unsurveyed regions of the galactic plane is approximately 32%.

  12. A serendipitous all sky survey for bright objects in the outer solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. E.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bannister, M. T. [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Schmidt, B. P.; McNaught, R. [The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. [The University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We use seven year's worth of observations from the Catalina Sky Survey and the Siding Spring Survey covering most of the northern and southern hemisphere at galactic latitudes higher than 20° to search for serendipitously imaged moving objects in the outer solar system. These slowly moving objects would appear as stationary transients in these fast cadence asteroids surveys, so we develop methods to discover objects in the outer solar system using individual observations spaced by months, rather than spaced by hours, as is typically done. While we independently discover eight known bright objects in the outer solar system, the faintest having V=19.8±0.1, no new objects are discovered. We find that the survey is nearly 100% efficient at detecting objects beyond 25 AU for V≲19.1 (V≲18.6 in the southern hemisphere) and that the probability that there is one or more remaining outer solar system object of this brightness left to be discovered in the unsurveyed regions of the galactic plane is approximately 32%.

  13. Radio-Quiet Quasars in the VIDEO Survey: Evidence for AGN-powered radio emission below 1 mJy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah; Jarvis, Matt; Haeussler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the interaction between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation is responsible for the co-evolution of black hole mass with galaxy bulge mass. Therefore studying this interplay is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The new generation of radio surveys are able to play a key role in this area, as both processes produce radio emission.We use a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry to select a sample of 72 quasars from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey, over 1 deg2. The depth of VIDEO allows us to study very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes. 26% of the candidate quasar sample has been spectroscopically confirmed using the Southern African Large Telescope and the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. We then use a radio-stacking technique to sample below the nominal flux-density threshold of existing Very Large Array data at 1.4 GHz. In agreement with other work, we show that a power-law fit to the radio number counts is inadequate, with an upturn in the counts being observed at these faint luminosities. Previous authors attribute this to an emergent star-forming population. However, by comparing radio emission from our quasars with that from a control sample of galaxies, we suggest that this emission is predominantly caused by accretion activity. Further support for an AGN origin is provided by a comparison of two independent estimates of star formation rate. These findings have important implications for modelling radio populations below 1 mJy, which is necessary for the development of the Square Kilometre Array.

  14. Cross-Correlation of SDSS DR7 Quasars and DR10 BOSS Galaxies: The Weak Luminosity Dependence of Quasar Clustering at z~0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; White, Martin; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam D; Guo, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Parejko, John K; Ross, Nicholas P; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; Swanson, Molly E C; Zehavi, Idit; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    We present the measurement of the two-point cross-correlation function (CCF) of 8,198 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) quasars and 349,608 DR10 CMASS galaxies from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at redshift ~0.5 (0.3=0.53 from the CCF measurements. This linear bias corresponds to a characteristic host halo mass of ~4x10^12 M_sun/h, compared to ~10^13 M_sun/h characteristic host halo mass for CMASS galaxies. We divide the quasar sample in luminosity and constrain the luminosity dependence of quasar bias to be db_Q/dlogL=0.20+-0.34 or 0.11+-0.32 (depending on different luminosity divisions) for quasar luminosities -23.5>M_i(z=2)>-25.5, implying a weak luminosity dependence of quasar clustering for the bright end of the quasar population at ~0.5. We compare our measurements with theoretical predictions, Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models and mock catalogs. These comparisons suggest quasars reside in a broad range of host halos, and the host halo mass distributions...

  15. ESTIMATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF QUASARS VIA THE k-NEAREST NEIGHBOR APPROACH BASED ON LARGE SURVEY DATABASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply one of the lazy learning methods, the k-nearest neighbor (kNN) algorithm, to estimate the photometric redshifts of quasars based on various data sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; the SDSS sample, the SDSS-UKIDSS sample, the SDSS-WISE sample, and the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample). The influence of the k value and different input patterns on the performance of kNN is discussed. kNN performs best when k is different with a special input pattern for a special data set. The best result belongs to the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample. The experimental results generally show that the more information from more bands, the better performance of photometric redshift estimation with kNN. The results also demonstrate that kNN using multiband data can effectively solve the catastrophic failure of photometric redshift estimation, which is met by many machine learning methods. Compared with the performance of various other methods of estimating the photometric redshifts of quasars, kNN based on KD-Tree shows superiority, exhibiting the best accuracy.

  16. The Low-Redshift Quasar-Quasar Correlation Function from an Extragalactic Halpha Emission-Line Survey to z = 0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbey, C N; Coppi, P S; Baltay, C; Bongiovanni, A; Bruzual, A G; García, C; Musser, J; Rengstorf, A W; Snyder, J A

    2001-01-01

    We study the large-scale spatial distribution of low-redshift quasars and luminous Seyfert~1 galaxies using a sample of 108 AGN (0.2 1. We infer that quasars and luminous Seyfert~1 at $z \\lesssim 0.3$ are useful tracers of the large-scale structure, with a bias comparable to groups of galaxies. We find a decrease in the quasar clustering amplitude by a factor of $4.6\\pm1.9$ between z = 0.26 and $z \\approx 1.5$.

  17. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ~ 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high velocity ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (~5000 Angstroms) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we combine host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [OIII] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to < 30% of elliptical galaxies that are highly st...

  18. Spectral Classification of Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Eigenspectra; Redshift and Luminosity Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Yip, C W; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Ma, Z; Frieman, J A; Subba-Rao, M; Szalay, A S; Richards, G T; Hall, P B; Schneider, D P; Hopkins, A M; Trump, J; Brinkmann, J

    2004-01-01

    We study 16,707 quasar spectra from the SDSS using the Karhunen-Lo\\`eve (KL) transform (or Principal Component Analysis, PCA). The quasar eigenspectra of the full catalog reveal the following: 1st order - the mean spectrum; 2nd order - a host-galaxy component; 3rd order - the UV-optical continuum slope; 4th order - the correlations of Balmer emission lines. We find that the spectral classification of quasars is redshift and luminosity dependent, as such there does not exist a compact set ( 95%) of the entire catalog. We therefore construct several sets of eigenspectra in different redshift and luminosity bins. From these eigenspectra we find that quasar spectra can be classified (by the first two eigenspectra) into a sequence that is defined by a simple progression in the steepness of the slope of the continuum. We also find a dependence on redshift and luminosity in the eigencoefficients. The dominant redshift effect is a result of the evolution of the blended FeII emission (optical) and the Balmer continuum...

  19. Clustering of Low-Redshift (z <= 2.2) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Nicholas P; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Connolly, Andrew J; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Weinberg, David H; Hall, Patrick B; Bahcall, Neta A; Brunner, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the quasar two-point correlation function, \\xi_{Q}, over the redshift range z=0.3-2.2 based upon data from the SDSS. Using a homogeneous sample of 30,239 quasars with spectroscopic redshifts from the DR5 Quasar Catalogue, our study represents the largest sample used for this type of investigation to date. With this redshift range and an areal coverage of approx 4,000 deg^2, we sample over 25 h^-3 Gpc^3 (comoving) assuming the current LCDM cosmology. Over this redshift range, we find that the redshift-space correlation function, xi(s), is adequately fit by a single power-law, with s_{0}=5.95+/-0.45 h^-1 Mpc and \\gamma_{s}=1.16+0.11-0.16 when fit over s=1-25 h^-1 Mpc. Using the projected correlation function we calculate the real-space correlation length, r_{0}=5.45+0.35-0.45 h^-1 Mpc and \\gamma=1.90+0.04-0.03, over scales of rp=1-130 h^-1 Mpc. Dividing the sample into redshift slices, we find very little, if any, evidence for the evolution of quasar clustering, with the redshift-spac...

  20. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. V. A New Selection Strategy for Quasars at z > 5 based on Medium-Band Observation with SQUEAN

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Yiseul; Pak, Soojong; Hyun, Minhee; Kim, Sanghyuk; Kim, Yongjung; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple color selection techniques have been successful in identifying quasars from wide-field broad-band imaging survey data. Among the quasars that have been discovered so far, however, there is a redshift gap at $5 \\lesssim {\\rm z} \\lesssim 5.7$ due to the limitations of filter sets in previous studies. In this work, we present a new selection technique of high redshift quasars using a sequence of medium-band filters: nine filters with central wavelengths from 625 to 1025 nm and bandwidths of 50 nm. Photometry with these medium-bands traces the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a source, similar to spectroscopy with resolution R $\\sim$ 15. By conducting medium-band observations of high redshift quasars at 4.7 $\\leq$ z $\\leq$ 6.0 and brown dwarfs (the main contaminants in high redshift quasar selection) using the SED camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (SQUEAN) on the 2.1-m telescope at the McDonald Observatory, we show that these medium-band filters are superior to multi-color broad-band color sectio...

  1. Bright microwave pulses from PSR B0531+21 observed with a prototype transient survey receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dea, J. Andrew; Cheng, Tsan-Huei; Buu, Chau M.; Asmar, Sami W.; Armstrong, J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jenet, F. A.; Beroiz, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Recent discoveries of transient radio events have renewed interest in time-variable astrophysical phenomena. Many radio transient events are rare, requiring long observing times for reliable statistical study. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Network (DSN) tracks spacecraft nearly continuously with 13 large-aperture, low system temperature radio antennas. During normal spacecraft operations, the DSN processes only a small fraction of the pre-detection bandwidth available from these antennas; any information in the remaining bandwidth, e.g., from an astronomical source in the same antenna beam as the spacecraft, is currently ignored. As a firmware modification to the standard DSN tracking receiver, we built a prototype receiver that could be used for astronomical transient surveys. Here, we demonstrate the receiver's utility through observations of bright pulses from the Crab pulsar and describe attributes of potential transient survey observations piggybacking on operational DSN tracks.

  2. Bright microwave pulses from PSR B0531+21 observed with a prototype transient survey receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent discoveries of transient radio events have renewed interest in time-variable astrophysical phenomena. Many radio transient events are rare, requiring long observing times for reliable statistical study. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Network (DSN) tracks spacecraft nearly continuously with 13 large-aperture, low system temperature radio antennas. During normal spacecraft operations, the DSN processes only a small fraction of the pre-detection bandwidth available from these antennas; any information in the remaining bandwidth, e.g., from an astronomical source in the same antenna beam as the spacecraft, is currently ignored. As a firmware modification to the standard DSN tracking receiver, we built a prototype receiver that could be used for astronomical transient surveys. Here, we demonstrate the receiver's utility through observations of bright pulses from the Crab pulsar and describe attributes of potential transient survey observations piggybacking on operational DSN tracks.

  3. DES J0454-4448: discovery of the first luminous z ≥ 6 quasar from the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Becker, G. D.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Martini, P.; Ostrovski, F.; Rauch, M.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; da Costa, L. N.; D' Andrea, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J.; Merritt, K.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A.; Romer, K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2015-10-28

    We present the first results of a survey for high-redshift, z ≥ 6, quasars using izY multicolour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Here we report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the zAB, YAB = 20.2, 20.2 (M1450 = -26.5) quasar DES J0454-4448 with a redshift of z = 6.09±0.02 based on the onset of the Ly α forest and an H I near zone size of 4.1+1.1-1.2 proper Mpc. The quasar was selected as an i-band drop out with i-z = 2.46 and zAB < 21.5 from an area of ~300 deg2. It is the brightest of our 43 candidates and was identified for spectroscopic follow-up solely based on the DES i-z and z-Y colours. The quasar is detected by WISE and has W1AB = 19.68. The discovery of one spectroscopically confirmed quasar with 5.7 < z < 6.5 and zAB ≤ 20.2 is consistent with recent determinations of the luminosity function at z ~ 6. DES when completed will have imaged ~5000 deg2 to YAB = 23.0 (5σ point source) and we expect to discover 50–100 new quasars with z > 6 including 3–10 with z > 7 dramatically increasing the numbers of quasars currently known that are suitable for detailed studies.

  4. SDSSJ2222+2745 A Gravitationally Lensed Sextuple Quasar with Maximum Image Separation of 15.1" Discovered in the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dahle, H; Sharon, K; Bayliss, M B; Wuyts, E; Abramson, L E; Koester, B P; Groeneboom, N; Brinckmann, T E; Kristensen, M T; Lindholmer, M O; Nielsen, A; Krogager, J -K; Fynbo, J P U

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSSJ2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a z_s=2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z_l=0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.1". Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity of the lensed quasar are in themselves exceptionally rare, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present datasets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow up and verification with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from September 2011 to September 2012 r...

  5. The statistics of radio emission from quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radio properties of quasars have traditionally been discussed in terms of the radio-to-optical flux-density ratio R, implying a correlation between emission in these wavebands. It is here shown that, for bright quasars, this apparent correlation is largely due to an abrupt change in the radio properties of the quasar population near absolute magnitude Msub(B)=-24. It is suggested that this change in due to the existence of two classes of quasar with differing host galaxies: a proportion of quasars brighter than Msub(B)approx.=-24 lie in elliptical galaxies and thus generate powerful radio sources, while elliptical galaxies with weaker nuclear quasar components are classified as N-galaxies rather than quasars; quasars fainter than Msub(B)approx.=-24 lie in spiral galaxies and thus are high-luminosity analogues of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. (author)

  6. Spitzer 24 um Excesses for Bright Galactic Stars in Bootes and First Look Survey Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hovhannisyan, L R; Weedman, D W; Le Floc'h, E; Houck, J R; Soifer, B T; Brand, K; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T

    2009-01-01

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 square degrees for the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 square degrees for the First Look Survey (FLS). 128 stars are identified in Bootes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K-[24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the 2MASS survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 um luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 um excesses with (K-[24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least 8 of the FGK stars with excesses are main sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 u...

  7. A VLBI survey of compact broad absorption line quasars with balnicity index BI>0

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Katarzynski, K; Roskowinski, C

    2015-01-01

    We performed high resolution radio observations of a new sample of ten BAL quasars using both the VLBA and EVN at 5 GHz. All the selected sources have balnicity indices (BI) more than 0 and radio flux densities less than 80 mJy at 1.4 GHz. They are very compact with linear sizes of the order of a few tens of parsecs and radio luminosities at 1.4 GHz above the FRI-FRII luminosity threshold. Most of the observed objects have been resolved at 5 GHz showing one-sided, probably core-jet structures, typical for quasars. We discuss in detail their age and orientation based on the radio observations. We then used the largest available sample of BAL quasars to study the relationships between the radio and optical properties in these objects. We found that (1) the strongest absorption (high values of the balnicity index BI) is connected with the lower values of the radio-loudness parameter, logR_I<1.5, and thus probably with large viewing angles; (2) the large span of the BI values in each bin of the radio-loudness ...

  8. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Oguri, Masamune; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 28 gravitationally lensed quasars and candidates (23 doubles, 1 quad, 1 possible triple, and 3 candidates) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in five systems, without a priori knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low-resolution data, and we show that in our sample of lensing galaxies the observed light profile is more elliptical than the mass, for ellipticity ≳0.25. We also identify eight doubles for which the sources of external and internal shear are more reliably separated, and should therefore be prioritized in monitoring campaigns aimed at measuring time delays in order to infer the Hubble constant.

  9. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  10. Mock Quasar-Lyman-{\\alpha} Forest Data-sets for the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bautista, Julian E; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Pieri, Matthew M; Busca, Nicolás G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Rich, James; Dawson, Kyle; Feng, Yu; Ge, Jian; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Ho, Shirley; Goff, Jean Marc Le; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Pâris, Isabelle; Rossi, Graziano; Schlegel, David

    2014-01-01

    We describe mock data-sets generated to simulate the high-redshift quasar sample in Data Release 11 (DR11) of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The mock spectra contain Ly{\\alpha} forest correlations useful for studying the 3D correlation function including Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). They also include astrophysical effects such as quasar continuum diversity and high-density absorbers, instrumental effects such as noise and spectral resolution, as well as imperfections introduced by the SDSS pipeline treatment of the raw data. The Ly{\\alpha} forest BAO analysis of the BOSS collaboration, described in Delubac et al. 2014, has used these mock data-sets to develop and cross-check analysis procedures prior to performing the BAO analysis on real data, and for continued systematic cross checks. Tests presented here show that the simulations reproduce sufficiently well important characteristics of real spectra. These mock data-sets will be made available together with the data at t...

  11. Finding Quasars with SNAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondel, B. J.; Mufson, S. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Supernova / Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a planned satellite observatory that will investigate the dark energy by producing imaging data over a large (several square-degree) field of sky that will rival or exceed the Hubble Ultra Deep Field in photometric quality and depth. As such, SNAP is ideally suited for deep surveys as auxiliary science. We discuss application of quasar science techniques to SNAP photometry. Based on a simple photometric quasar / Lyman forest model, we simulate the population of quasars that SNAP will observe and compare the resulting photometry with a population of model stellar photometry. We examine the effectiveness of identifying quasars based only on photometric data by a variety of techniques, most of which were first developed for use with Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Exclusion of the stellar locus in the style of Newberg & Yanni, statistical mapping, and machine learning with neural networks are among the techniques we explore. A photometric redshift calculus is also presented.

  12. BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCE LIST FROM THE FIRST THREE MONTHS OF THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ALL-SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first three months of sky-survey operation with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveal 132 bright sources at |b|>10 deg. with test statistic greater than 100 (corresponding to about 10σ). Two methods, based on the CGRaBS, CRATES, and BZCat catalogs, indicate high-confidence associations of 106 of these sources with known active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This sample is referred to as the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). It contains two radio galaxies, namely, Centaurus A and NGC 1275, and 104 blazars consisting of 58 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 42 BL Lac objects, and 4 blazars with unknown classification. Four new blazars were discovered on the basis of the LAT detections. Remarkably, the LBAS includes 10 high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), sources which were previously difficult to detect in the GeV range. Another 10 lower-confidence associations are found. Only 33 of the sources, plus two at |b| < 10 deg., were previously detected with Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope(EGRET), probably due to variability. The analysis of the γ-ray properties of the LBAS sources reveals that the average GeV spectra of BL Lac objects are significantly harder than the spectra of FSRQs. No significant correlation between radio and peak γ-ray fluxes is observed. Blazar log N-log S distributions and luminosity functions are constructed to investigate the evolution of the different blazar classes, with positive evolution indicated for FSRQs but none for BL Lacs. The contribution of LAT blazars to the total extragalactic γ-ray intensity is estimated.

  13. The IAC Stripe 82 Legacy Project: a wide-area survey for faint surface brightness astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Fliri, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Stripe 82 covers 275 square degrees within -50 ~ 25.5 mag/arcsec^2. For point sources, we reach 50% completeness limits (3 sigma level) of (24.2,25.2,24.7,24.3,23.0) mag in (u,g,r,i,z). This is between 1.7 and 2.0 mag deeper than the single epoch SDSS releases. The co-adds show point spread functions with median FWHM values ranging between 1 arcsec in i and z to 1.3 arcsec in the u band. The imaging data are made publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82. The release includes deep co-adds and representations of the PSF for each field. Additionally, we provide object catalogues with stars and galaxies confidently separated until g~23 mag. The IAC Stripe 82 coadds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness universe, exemplified by the discovery of stellar streams around NGC0426 and NGC09...

  14. The IAC Stripe 82 Legacy Project: a wide-area survey for faint surface brightness astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliri, Jürgen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Stripe 82 covers 275 ° ^2 within -50° ≤ RA ≤ +60° and -1.25° ≤ Dec. ≤ +1.25°. We discuss the steps of our reduction which puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy. Our reduction reaches a limit of ˜28.5 mag arcsec-2 (3σ, 10 × 10 arcsec2) in the r band. The effective surface brightness limit (50 per cent completeness for exponential light distribution) lies at ˜ 25.5 mag arcsec-2. For point sources, we reach 50 per cent completeness limits (3σ level) of (24.2, 25.2, 24.7, 24.3, 23.0) mag in (u, g, r, i, z). This is between 1.7 and 2.0 mag deeper than the single-epoch SDSS releases. The co-adds show point spread functions (PSFs) with median full width at half-maximum values ranging from 1 arcsec in i and z to 1.3 arcsec in the u band. The imaging data are made publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82. The release includes deep co-adds and representations of the PSF for each field. Additionally, we provide object catalogues with stars and galaxies confidently separated until g ˜ 23 mag. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe, exemplified by the discovery of stellar streams around NGC 0426 and NGC 0936. We also discuss further science cases like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness galaxies, the intracluster light in galaxy clusters and the diffuse emission of Galactic dust known as Galactic Cirrus.

  15. The XXL Survey IV. Mass-temperature relation of the bright cluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, Maggie; Giles, Paul A; Ziparo, Felicia; Maughan, Ben J; Démoclès, Jessica; Pacaud, Florian; Pierre, Marguerite; Adami, Christophe; Bahé, Yannick M; Clerc, Nicolas; Chiappetti, Lucio; Eckert, Dominique; Ettori, Stefano; Lavoie, Sébastien; Fevre, Jean-Paul Le; McCarthy, Ian G; Kilbinger, Martin; Ponman, Trevor J; Sadibekova, Tatyana; Willis, Jon P

    2015-01-01

    The XXL survey is the largest survey carried out by XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50deg$^2$, the survey contains $\\sim450$ galaxy clusters out to a redshift $\\sim$2 and to an X-ray flux limit of $\\sim5\\times10^{-15}erg\\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}$. This paper is part of the first release of XXL results focussed on the bright cluster sample. We investigate the scaling relation between weak-lensing mass and X-ray temperature for the brightest clusters in XXL. The scaling relation is used to estimate the mass of all 100 clusters in XXL-100-GC. Based on a subsample of 38 objects that lie within the intersection of the northern XXL field and the publicly available CFHTLenS catalog, we derive the $M_{WL}$ of each system with careful considerations of the systematics. The clusters lie at $0.1

  16. Exploring the X-ray Sky with the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ceca, R D; Caccianiga, A; Severgnini, P; Braito, V; Barcons, X; Carrera, F J; Watson, M G; Tedds, J A; Brunner, H; Lehmann, I; Page, M J; Lamer, G; Schwope, A

    2004-01-01

    ABRIDGED. We present "The XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey", two flux-limited samples with flux limit fx ~7E-14 cgs in the 0.5-4.5 keV (BSS) and 4.5-7.5 keV (HBSS) energy band, respectively. After discussing the survey strategy, we present the basic data on a complete sample of 400 X-ray sources derived from the analysis of 237 XMM-Newton fields. The survey covers an area of 28.10 (25.17 for the HBSS) sq. deg. Up to now ~71% (~90%) of the sources have been spectroscopically identified making the BSS (HBSS) the sample with the highest number of identified XMM-Newton sources published so far. We find that: a) the optical counterpart in the majority (~90%) of cases has a magnitude brighter than the POSS II limit; b) the majority of the objects identified so far are broad line AGN. No obvious trend of the source spectra (as deduced from the Hardness Ratios analysis) as a function of the count rate is seen and the average spectra of the "extragalactic" population corresponds to an X-ray energy spectral index...

  17. The XXL Survey . IV. Mass-temperature relation of the bright cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, M.; Smith, G. P.; Giles, P. A.; Ziparo, F.; Maughan, B. J.; Démoclès, J.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C.; Bahé, Y. M.; Clerc, N.; Chiappetti, L.; Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Lavoie, S.; Le Fevre, J. P.; McCarthy, I. G.; Kilbinger, M.; Ponman, T. J.; Sadibekova, T.; Willis, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg2, the survey contains ~450 galaxy clusters out to a redshift ~2 and to an X-ray flux limit of ~ 5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2. This paper is part of the first release of XXL results focussed on the bright cluster sample. Aims: We investigate the scaling relation between weak-lensing mass and X-ray temperature for the brightest clusters in XXL. The scaling relation discussed in this article is used to estimate the mass of all 100 clusters in XXL-100-GC. Methods: Based on a subsample of 38 objects that lie within the intersection of the northern XXL field and the publicly available CFHTLenS shear catalog, we derive the weak-lensing mass of each system with careful considerations of the systematics. The clusters lie at 0.1 http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A2

  18. Bright z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies in deep wide field surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fuyan

    In my thesis I investigate the luminous z ˜ 3 Lyman break galaxies in deep wide field surveys. In the first part of the thesis, I use the LBT/LUCIFER to observe a lensed high-redshift star-forming galaxy (J0900+2234) at z = 2.03. With the high S/N near-IR spectroscopic observations, I reveal the detailed physical properties of this high-redshift galaxy, including SFR, metallicity, dust extinction, dynamical mass, and electron number density. In the second part of the thesis, I select a large sample of LBGs at z ˜ 3 from our new LBT Bootes field survey, and study the bright end luminosity function (LF), stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering properties of bright LBGs (1L* < L < 2.5L*). Together with other LF and SMF measurements, the evolution of LF and SMF can be well described by continuously rising star formation history model. Using the clustering measurements in this work and other works, a tight relation between the average host galaxy halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate is found, which can be interpreted as arising from cold flow accretion. The relation also suggests that the cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% of the total cold flow mass. This cosmic star formation efficiency does not evolve with redshift (from z ˜ 5 to z ˜ 3), hosting dark matter halo mass (1011 -- 1013 M⊙ ), or galaxy luminosity (from 0.3L* to 3L* ). In the third and fourth parts, with the spectroscopic follow-up observations of the bright LBGs, I establish a sample of spectroscopically-confirmed ultraluminous LBGs (ULBGs) in NOAO Boo¨tes field. With this new ULBG sample, the rest-frame UV LF of LBG at M1700A = -23.0 was measured for the first time. I find that the ULBGs have larger outflow velocity, broader Lyalpha emission and ISM absorption line profiles, and more prominent C IV P-Cygni profile. This profile may imply a top-heavy IMF in these ULBGs. The ULBGs have larger stellar mass and SFR, but smaller dust extinction than the typical L* LBGs at z ˜ 2

  19. Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: a dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain

    CERN Document Server

    Zamorano, Jaime; Ocaña, Francisco; Pila-Diez, Berenice; Castaño, José Gómez; Pascual, Sergio; Tapia, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Fernandez, Alberto; Nievas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the center of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are neccessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population, and ii) that the orograph...

  20. An Archival Chandra and XMM-Newton Survey of Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew Francis; Heckman, Timothy; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate obscuration in high-luminosity type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyzed Chandra and XMM-Newton archival observations for 71 type 2 quasars detected at 0.05 100 eV in the rest frame) and we detect this line in the other sources through a joint fit (spectral stacking). The correlation between the Fe K alpha and [O III] fluxes and the inverse correlation of the equivalent width of the Fe Ka line with the ratio of hard X-ray and [O III] fluxes is consistent with previous results for lower luminosity Seyfert 2 galaxies. We conclude that obscuration is the cause of the weak hard X-ray emission rather than intrinsically low X-ray luminosities. We find that about half of the population of optically selected type 2 quasars are likely to be Compton thick. We also find no evidence that the amount of X-ray obscuration depends on the AGN luminosity (over a range of more than three orders of magnitude in luminosity).

  1. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  2. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Pacaud, F; Giles, P A; Adami, C; Sadibekova, T; Pierre, M; Maughan, B J; Lieu, M; Fèvre, J -P Le; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Ardila, F; Baldry, I; Benoist, C; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Démoclès, J; Eckert, D; Evrard, A E; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Guennou, L; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Brun, V Le; Lidman, C; Liske, J; Maurogordato, S; Menanteau, F; Owers, M; Poggianti, B; Pomarède, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T J; Rapetti, D; Reiprich, T H; Smith, G P; Tuffs, R; Valageas, P; Valtchanov, I; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\\times 10^{-14}\\,\\mathrm{erg \\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On th...

  3. THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z ∼ 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) is one of the basic cosmological measures providing insight into structure formation and mass assembly in the universe. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey to find faint quasars (-26.0 1450 2. Thirty candidates have R ≤ 23 mag. We conducted spectroscopic follow-up for 28 of our candidates and found 23 QSOs, 21 of which are reported here for the first time, in the 3.74 β) gives a faint-end slope β = -1.6 ± 0.2. If we consider our larger, but highly incomplete sample going 1 mag fainter, we measure a steeper faint-end slope -2 < β < -2.5. In all cases, we consistently find faint-end slopes that are steeper than expected based on measurements at z ∼ 3. We combine our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to derive parameters for a double-power-law LF. Our best fit finds a bright-end slope, α = -2.4 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = -2.3 ± 0.2, without a well-constrained break luminosity. This is effectively a single power law, with β = -2.7 ± 0.1. We use these results to place limits on the amount of ultraviolet radiation produced by quasars and find that quasars are able to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts.

  4. The XXL Survey. III. Luminosity-temperature relation of the bright cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Pacaud, F.; Lieu, M.; Clerc, N.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclés, J.; Ettori, S.; Le Févre, J. P.; Ponman, T.; Sadibekova, T.; Smith, G. P.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg2, the survey contains several hundred galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 above an X-ray flux limit of ~5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. This paper belongs to the first series of XXL papers focusing on the bright cluster sample. Aims: We investigate the luminosity-temperature (LT) relation for the brightest clusters detected in the XXL Survey, taking fully into account the selection biases. We investigate the form of the LT relation, placing constraints on its evolution. Methods: We have classified the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey based on their measured X-ray flux. These 100 clusters have been analysed to determine their luminosity and temperature to evaluate the LT relation. We used three methods to fit the form of the LT relation, with two of these methods providing a prescription to fully take into account the selection effects of the survey. We measure the evolution of the LT relation internally using the broad redshift range of the sample. Results: Taking fully into account selection effects, we find a slope of the bolometric LT relation of BLT = 3.08 ± 0.15, steeper than the self-similar expectation (BLT = 2). Our best-fit result for the evolution factor is E(z)1.64 ± 0.77, fully consistent with "strong self-similar" evolution where clusters scale self-similarly with both mass and redshift. However, this result is marginally stronger than "weak self-similar" evolution, where clusters scale with redshift alone. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the assumptions made in our fitting model, finding that using an external LT relation as a low-z baseline can have a profound effect on the measured evolution. However, more clusters are needed in order to break the degeneracy between the choice of likelihood model and mass-temperature relation on the derived evolution. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science

  5. Cosmic evolution of Quasar radio structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the results of a survey of Quasar radio structures over redshifts from 0.6 to 3.7. There are clear evolutionary trends in size and luminosity, which suggest that the duty cycle of individual Quasars has increased over cosmic time. This affects source count statistics and gives clues on the evolution of Quasar environments.

  6. AN X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY OF HIGHLY RADIO-LOUD QUASARS AT z > 4: JET-LINKED EMISSION IN THE BRIGHTEST RADIO BEACONS OF THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Miller, Brendan P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vignali, Cristian, E-mail: jfwu@astro.psu.edu [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We present a systematic study of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of a sample of 17 highly radio-loud quasars (HRLQs) at z > 4 with sensitive X-ray coverage from new Chandra and archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations. Eight of the new and archival observations are reported in this work for the first time. New Chandra observations of two moderately radio-loud and highly optically luminous quasars at z {approx}> 4 are also reported. Our HRLQ sample represents the top {approx}5% of radio-loud quasars (RLQs) in terms of radio loudness. We found that our HRLQs have an X-ray emission enhancement over HRLQs at lower redshifts (by a typical factor of Almost-Equal-To 3), and this effect, after controlling for several factors which may introduce biases, has been solidly estimated to be significant at the 3{sigma}-4{sigma} level. HRLQs at z = 3-4 are also found to have a similar X-ray emission enhancement over z < 3 HRLQs, which further supports the robustness of our results. We discuss models for the X-ray enhancement's origin including a fractional contribution from inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. No strong correlations are found between the relative X-ray brightness and optical/UV emission-line rest-frame equivalent widths (REWs) for RLQs. However, the line REWs are positively correlated with radio loudness, which suggests that relativistic jets make a negligible contribution to the optical/UV continua of these HRLQs (contrary to the case where the emission lines are diluted by the relativistically boosted continuum). Our HRLQs are generally consistent with the known anti-correlation between radio loudness and X-ray power-law photon index. We also found that the two moderately radio-loud quasars appear to have the hardest X-ray spectra among our objects, suggesting that intrinsic X-ray absorption (N {sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) may be present. Our z > 4 HRLQs generally have higher X-ray luminosities

  7. AN ARCHIVAL Chandra AND XMM-Newton SURVEY OF TYPE 2 QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate obscuration in high-luminosity type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyzed Chandra and XMM-Newton archival observations for 71 type 2 quasars detected at 0.05 41 to 5.3 × 1044 erg s–1, with a median of 1.1 × 1043 erg s–1. We find that the means of the column density and photon index of our sample are log NH = 22.9 cm–2 and Γ = 1.87, respectively. From simulations using a more physically realistic model, we find that the absorbing column density estimates based on simple power-law models significantly underestimate the actual absorption in approximately half of the sources. Eleven sources show a prominent Fe Kα emission line (EW>100 eV in the rest frame) and we detect this line in the other sources through a joint fit (spectral stacking). The correlation between the Fe Kα and [O III] fluxes and the inverse correlation of the equivalent width of the Fe Kα line with the ratio of hard X-ray and [O III] fluxes is consistent with previous results for lower luminosity Seyfert 2 galaxies. We conclude that obscuration is the cause of the weak hard X-ray emission rather than intrinsically low X-ray luminosities. We find that about half of the population of optically selected type 2 quasars are likely to be Compton thick. We also find no evidence that the amount of X-ray obscuration depends on the AGN luminosity (over a range of more than three orders of magnitude in luminosity)

  8. Searches for Quasars at z > 5

    OpenAIRE

    Osmer, Patrick S.

    2000-01-01

    Quasars continue to be the most luminous objects known in the universe but are now rivaled by galaxies for having the largest redshifts. I review current techniques for finding quasars at z > 5 and the status of current optical surveys. I compare the spectra of known quasars with z \\approx 5 with the spectra of some recently discovered galaxies with z > 5 to see what we may expect in the future from surveys for high redshift quasars and galaxies. The prominent emission lines of quasars should...

  9. Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a search for radio emission from bright, optically selected quasars at 5 GHz are reported. The work was initiated to examine the distribution of radio - to -optical luminosity ratios and also, by optical and IR photometry, to seek correlations between IR - optical properties and radio emission. It is shown that quasars of bright apparent magnitude exhibit a significantly higher incidence of radio emission than would be expected on the basis of a scaling of detection thresholds. (UK)

  10. A new bright eclipsing hot subdwarf binary from the ASAS and SuperWASP surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffenroth, V; Drechsel, H; Heber, U; Wils, P; Oestensen, R H; Maxted, P F L; di Scala, G

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a bright (V=11.6 mag) eclipsing hot subdwarf binary of spectral type B with a late main sequence companion from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS 102322-3737.0). Such systems are called HW Vir stars after the prototype. The lightcurve shows a grazing eclipse and a strong reflection effect. An orbital period of P=0.13927 d, an inclination of i=65.86{\\deg}, a mass ratio q=0.34, a radial velocity semiamplitude K_1=81.0 kms^-1, and other parameters are derived from a combined spectroscopic and photometric analysis. The short period can only be explained by a common envelope origin of the system. The atmospheric parameters (T_eff=28400 K, log g=5.60) are consistent with a core helium-burning star located on the extreme horizontal branch. In agreement with that we derived the most likely sdB mass to be M_sdB=0.46M_sun, close to the canonical mass of such objects. The companion is a late M-dwarf with a mass of M_comp=0.16 M_sun. ASAS 102322-3737.0 is the third brightest of only 12 known H...

  11. The XXL Survey . IV. Mass-temperature relation of the bright cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, M.; Smith, G. P.; Giles, P. A.; Ziparo, F.; Maughan, B. J.; Démoclès, J.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C.; Bahé, Y. M.; Clerc, N.; Chiappetti, L.; Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Lavoie, S.; Le Fevre, J. P.; McCarthy, I. G.; Kilbinger, M.; Ponman, T. J.; Sadibekova, T.; Willis, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg2, the survey contains ~450 galaxy clusters out to a redshift ~2 and to an X-ray flux limit of ~ 5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2. This paper is part of the first release of XXL results focussed on the bright cluster sample. Aims: We investigate the scaling relation between weak-lensing mass and X-ray temperature for the brightest clusters in XXL. The scaling relation discussed in this article is used to estimate the mass of all 100 clusters in XXL-100-GC. Methods: Based on a subsample of 38 objects that lie within the intersection of the northern XXL field and the publicly available CFHTLenS shear catalog, we derive the weak-lensing mass of each system with careful considerations of the systematics. The clusters lie at 0.1 relation. Results: The mass-temperature relation fit (M ∝ Tb) to the XXL clusters returns a slope and intrinsic scatter σlnM|T≃ 0.53; the scatter is dominated by disturbed clusters. The fit to the combined sample of 96 clusters is in tension with self-similarity, b = 1.67 ± 0.12 and σlnM|T ≃ 0.41. Conclusions: Overall our results demonstrate the feasibility of ground-based weak-lensing scaling relation studies down to cool systems of ~1 keV temperature and highlight that the current data and samples are a limit to our statistical precision. As such we are unable to determine whether the validity of hydrostatic equilibrium is a function of halo mass. An enlarged sample of cool systems, deeper weak-lensing data, and robust modelling of the selection function will help to explore these issues further. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA sci- ence mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme 089.A-0666 and LP191.A-0268.The Master catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  12. VARIABILITY OF THE Hβ LINE PROFILES AS AN INDICATOR OF ORBITING BRIGHT SPOTS IN ACCRETION DISKS OF QUASARS: A CASE STUDY OF 3C 390.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we show that in the case when double-peaked emission lines originate from outer parts of the accretion disk, their variability could be caused by perturbations in the disk emissivity. In order to test this hypothesis, we introduced a model of the disk perturbing region in the form of a single bright spot (or flare) by a modification of the power-law disk emissivity in an appropriate way. The disk emission was then analyzed using numerical simulations based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric and the corresponding simulated line profiles were obtained. We applied this model to the observed Hβ line profiles of 3C 390.3 (observed in the period 1995-1999) and estimated the parameters of both the accretion disk and the perturbing region. Our results show that two large amplitude outbursts of the Hβ line observed in 3C 390.3 could be explained by successive occurrences of two bright spots on the approaching side of the disk. These bright spots are either moving, originating in the inner regions of the disk and spiralling outward by crossing small distances during the period of several years, or stationary. In both cases, their widths increase with time, indicating that they most likely decay.

  13. The Extremes of Quasar Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Variability is one of the key observational properties of quasars, and it can be used as a probe of their fueling, physics, and evolution. A new generation of synoptic sky surveys, in combination with the novel data analytics tools, offers unprecedented data sets for the studies of quasars in the time domain. I will illustrate this with examples from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), which has an open and growing archive of 500 million light curves, including 350,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, with the time baselines ranging from 10 minutes to 10 years. I will discuss a new approach to discover quasars using a combination of variability and mid-IR colors from WISE, which results in a catalog of over a million quasar candidates. I will then discuss quasars with extreme, anomolous light curves, including quasars that have gone through extreme brightening events over the past decade with concordant large changes in their spectroscopic properties. I will also discuss a small subset of quasars with periodic light curves which we interpret as a signature of close (milliparsec scale) supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries.

  14. Discovery of eight z ~ 6 quasars from Pan-STARRS1

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Morganson, E; Decarli, R; Walter, F; Chambers, K C; Rix, H-W; Farina, E P; Fan, X; Jiang, L; McGreer, I; De Rosa, G; Simcoe, R; Weiß, A; Price, P A; Morgan, J S; Burgett, W S; Greiner, J; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Stubbs, C W; Sweeney, W; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2014-01-01

    High-redshift quasars are currently the only probes of the growth of supermassive black holes and potential tracers of structure evolution at early cosmic time. Here we present our candidate selection criteria from the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1 and follow-up strategy to discover quasars in the redshift range 5.75.7 by more than 10%. We additionally recovered 18 previously known quasars. The eight quasars presented here span a large range of luminosities (-27.3 < M_{1450} < -25.4; 19.6 < z_ps1 < 21.2) and are remarkably heterogeneous in their spectral features: half of them show bright emission lines whereas the other half show a weak or no Ly$\\alpha$ emission line (25% with rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly$\\alpha$ + Nv line lower than 15{\\AA}). We find a larger fraction of weak-line emission quasars than in lower redshift studies. This may imply that the weak-line quasar population at the highest redshifts could be more abundant than previously thought. However,...

  15. Low-z MgII Broad Absorption-Line Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Ting-Gui; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Xiao-Bo~Dong; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2010-01-01

    We present a sample of 68 low-z MgII low-ionization broad absorption-line (loBAL) quasars. The sample is uniformly selected from the SDSS5 according to the following criteria: (1) 0.4 1600 \\kms. The last criterion is a trade-off between the completeness and consistency with respect to the canonical definition of BAL quasars that have the `balnicity index' BI>0 in CIV BAL. We adopted such a criterion to ensure that ~90% of our sample are classical BAL quasars and the completeness is ~80%, base...

  16. Chitah: Strong-gravitational-lens hunter in imaging surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, James H H; Chiueh, Tzihong; More, Anupreeta; Marshall, Philip J; Coupon, Jean; Oguri, Masamune; Price, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Strong gravitationally lensed quasars provide powerful means to study galaxy evolution and cosmology. Current and upcoming imaging surveys will contain thousands of new lensed quasars, augmenting the existing sample by at least two orders of magnitudes. To find such lens systems, we built a robot, Chitah, that hunts for lensed quasars by modeling the configuration of the multiple quasar images. Specifically, given an image of an object that might be a lensed quasar, Chitah first disentangles the light from the supposed lens galaxy and the light from the multiple quasar images based on color information. A simple rule is designed to categorize the given object into a potential four-image (quad) or two-image (double) lensed quasar system. The configuration of the identified quasar images is subsequently modeled to classify whether the object is a lensed quasar system. We test the performance of Chitah using simulated lens systems based on the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Legacy Survey. For bright quads with l...

  17. The Small-Scale Environment of Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Serber, Will; Bahcall, Neta; Menard, Brice; Richards, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Where do quasars reside? Are quasars located in environments similar to those of typical L* galaxies, and, if not, how do they differ? An answer to this question will help shed light on the triggering process of quasar activity. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to study the environment of quasars and compare it directly with the environment of galaxies. We find that quasars (M_i < -22, z < 0.4) are located in higher local overdensity regions than are typical L* galaxies. The enhanced envir...

  18. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years Period in the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. K. Manchanda

    2002-09-01

    We report the observation of nearest quasar 3C273 made with LASE instrument on November 20th, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20–200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20–200 keV with power law spectral index = 226 ± 0.07. This is in complete contrast to the reported data from OSSE and BeppoSAX which suggest the value of 1.3 to 1.6 for the power law index in the X-ray energy band, but is quite consistent with the value derived for the high energy gamma ray data. A single power law fit in the X-ray and gamma ray energy bands points to a common origin of these photons and the absence of spectral break around 1 MeV as suggested in literature. We have reanalyzed the available data to study the temporal variability of the spectrum in the hard X-ray band. Our analysis reveals that 50 keV flux from the source, shows a strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years. The analysis of the optical light curve of the source also supports the 5000 day period.We discuss the emission mechanism and the possible sites for X-ray photons along with the implications of the long term periodicity with respect to source geometry.

  19. THE CLOWES-CAMPUSANO LARGE QUASAR GROUP SURVEY. I. GALEX SELECTED SAMPLE OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of galaxy structures on large scales is a key observational prediction for current models of galaxy formation. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the 2dF galaxy survey have revealed a number of structures on 40-150 h-1 Mpc scales at low redshifts, and some even larger ones. To constrain galaxy number densities, luminosities, and stellar populations in large structures at higher redshift, we have investigated two sheet-like structures of galaxies at z = 0.8 and 1.3 spanning 150 h-1 comoving Mpc embedded in large quasar groups (LQGs) extending over at least 200 h-1 Mpc. We present first results of an analysis of these sheet-like structures using two contiguous 1 deg Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) fields (FUV and NUV) cross-correlated with optical data from the SDSS. We derive a sample of 462 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates coincident with the sheets. Using the GALEX and SDSS data, we show that the overall average spectral energy distribution of a LBG galaxy at z ∼ 1 is flat (in fλ) in the rest-frame wavelength range from 1500 A to 4000 A, implying evolved populations of stars in the LBGs. From the luminosity functions we get indications for overdensities in the two LQGs compared to their foreground regions. Similar conclusions come from the calculation of the 2-point correlation function, showing a 2σ overdensity for the LBGs in the z ∼ 0.8 LQG on scales of 1.6 to 4.8 Mpc, indicating similar correlation scales for our LBG sample as their z ∼ 3 counterparts.

  20. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Weedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A population of quasars at z ~ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities vLv(7.8 um) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio vLv(0.25 um)/vLv(7.8 um) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust which produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest frame 7.8 um are determined for quasars in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 um sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest frame 7.8 um, but the ratio Lv(100 um)/Lv(7.8 um) is about three times high...

  1. The cosmological significance of Low Surface Brightness galaxies found in a deep blind neutral-hydrogen survey

    CERN Document Server

    Minchin, R F; Parker, Q A; Boyce, P J; De Blok, W J G; Banks, G D; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; García, D A; Gibson, B K; Grossi, M; Haynes, R F; Knezek, P M; Lang, R H; Malin, D F; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Stewart, I M; Wright, A E

    2004-01-01

    We have placed limits on the cosmological significance of gas-rich low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies as a proportion of the total population of gas-rich galaxies by carrying out a very deep survey (HIDEEP) for neutral hydrogen (HI) with the Parkes multibeam system. Such a survey avoids the surface-brightness selection effects that limit the usefulness of optical surveys for finding LSB galaxies. To complement the HIDEEP survey we have digitally stacked eight 1-hour R-band Tech Pan films from the UK Schmidt Telescope covering 36 square degrees of the survey area to reach a very deep isophotal limit of 26.5 R mag/sq. arcsec. At this level, we find that all of the 129 HI sources within this area have optical counterparts and that 107 of them can be identified with individual galaxies. We have used the properties of the galaxies identified as the optical counterparts of the HI sources to estimate the significance of LSB galaxies (defined to be those at least 1.5 magnitudes dimmer in effective surface-brightne...

  2. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index –2.2 ± 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least ∼175 kpc (∼2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  3. Astrometric Redshifts for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarczik, Michael C; Mehta, Sajjan S; Schlegel, David J

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes differential chromatic refraction (DCR), whereby objects imaged at different optical/UV wavelengths are observed at slightly different positions in the plane of the detector. Strong spectral features induce changes in the effective wavelengths of broad-band filters that are capable of producing significant positional offsets with respect to standard DCR corrections. We examine such offsets for broad-emission-line (type 1) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spanning 0quasar spectrum with the SDSS bandpasses as a function of redshift and airmass. This astrometric information can be used to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts of quasars (or other emission-line sources) and, for extreme cases, may be suitable for determining "astrometric redshifts". On the SDSS's southern equatorial stripe, where it is pos...

  4. Dusty Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Hewett, Paul C; Ross, Nicholas P; Hall, P B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ~35,000 uniformly-selected quasars with 00.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)>0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index (${\\alpha}_{\\lambda}$) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger ionizing spectral lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former indicating either smaller BH mass or more face-on orientation.

  5. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Lyα emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Lyα scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1σ surface-brightness limits of SBLyα≅3 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2) for diffuse Lyα emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale ∼100 kpc Lyα emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R ∼Lyα > 50 Å) Lyα-emitter with luminosity LLyα = 2.1 ± 0.32 × 1041 erg s–1 at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence, than simply be a star-forming galaxy clustered around the quasar. Our observations imply that much deeper integrations with upcoming integral-field spectrometers such as MUSE and KCWI will be able to routinely detect a diffuse Lyα glow around bright quasars on scales R ∼ 100 kpc and thus directly image the CGM.

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Stellar Velocity Dispersions of Quasar Hosts and the M-sigma Relation to z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; Ho, Luis C; Brandt, W N; Denney, Kelly D; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Kochanek, Christopher S; McGreer, Ian D; Merloni, Andrea; Peterson, Bradley M; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P; Schulze, Andreas; Strauss, Michael A; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We present host stellar velocity dispersion measurements for a sample of 88 broad-line quasars at 0.10.6) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. High signal-to-noise ratio coadded spectra (average S/N~30 per 69 km/s pixel) from SDSS-RM allowed decomposition of the host and quasar spectra, and measurement of the host stellar velocity dispersions and black hole (BH) masses using the single-epoch (SE) virial method. The large sample size and dynamic range in luminosity (L5100=10^(43.2-44.7) erg/s) lead to the first clear detection of a correlation between SE virial BH mass and host stellar velocity dispersion far beyond the local universe. However, the observed correlation is significantly flatter than the local relation, suggesting that there are selection biases in high-z luminosity-threshold quasar samples for such studies. Our uniform sample and analysis enable an investigation of the redshift evolution of the M-sigma relation free of caveats by comparing different samples...

  7. Radio-Quiet Quasars in the VIDEO Survey: Evidence for AGN-powered radio emission at S_1.4GHz < 1 mJy

    CERN Document Server

    White, Sarah V; Häußler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between black-hole accretion and star formation, and how to disentangle the two, is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. To investigate, we use a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry to select a sample of 74 quasars from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) Survey, over 1 deg^2. The depth of VIDEO allows us to study very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes, and 26 per cent of the candidate quasar sample has been spectroscopically confirmed. We use a radio-stacking technique to sample below the nominal flux-density threshold using data from the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz and find, in agreement with other work, that a power-law fit to the quasar-related radio source counts is inadequate at low flux density. By comparing with a control sample of galaxies (where we match in terms of stellar mass), and by estimating the star formation rate, we suggest that this radio emission is predominantly caused by accretion activ...

  8. Radio-quiet quasars in the VIDEO survey: evidence for AGN-powered radio emission at S_{1.4 GHz < 1} mJy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah V.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Häußler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interplay between black-hole accretion and star formation, and how to disentangle the two, is crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. To investigate, we use a combination of optical and near-infrared photometry to select a sample of 74 quasars from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey, over 1 deg2. The depth of VIDEO allows us to study very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes, and 26 per cent of the candidate quasar sample has been spectroscopically confirmed. We use a radio-stacking technique to sample below the nominal flux-density threshold using data from the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz and find, in agreement with other work, that a power-law fit to the quasar-related radio source counts is inadequate at low flux density. By comparing with a control sample of galaxies (where we match in terms of stellar mass), and by estimating the star formation rate, we suggest that this radio emission is predominantly caused by accretion activity rather than star-formation activity.

  9. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, N. Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based o...

  10. Broad absorption line quasars have the same cool dust emission as quasars without BALs

    OpenAIRE

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Grimes, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a sub-millimeter survey of SDSS broad CIV absorption line quasars is discussed. It is found that the sub-millimeter flux distribution of BAL quasars is similar to that of non-BAL quasars. This is consistent with the idea that all quasars contain broad absorption line regions, but only a fraction of them are visible along our line-of-sight. The observations are inconsistent with BAL quasars being observed at a special evolutionary epoch co-inciding with a high star-formation rat...

  11. The large area KX quasar catalogue: I. Analysis of the photometric redshift selection and the complete quasar catalogue

    OpenAIRE

    Maddox, Natasha; Hewett, Paul C.; Peroux, Celine; Nestor, Daniel B.; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    The results of a large area, ~600 deg^2, K-band flux-limited spectroscopic survey for luminous quasars are presented. The survey utilises the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in regions of sky within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. The K-band excess (KX) of all quasars with respect to Galactic stars is exploited in combination with a photometric redshift/classification scheme to identify quasar candidates for spectroscopic follow-up observations. ...

  12. Spitzer/IRAC Imaging of Exceptionally Bright Cluster-Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Rawle, Timothy; Clement, Benjamin; Walth, Gregory; Pereira, Maria; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, discoveries of exceptionally bright (e.g., observed S_peak > 100 mJy in the Herschel/SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have generated great excitement. This is because these gravitationally lensed SMGs are so bright that they enable us to perform a variety of follow-up observations using a suite of observing facilities in the submillimeter, millimeter, and radio now available on the ground. Using Herschel, our team has been conducting a survey of such bright lensed galaxies in the fields of massive galaxy clusters: ``The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)'' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). This large Herschel program targets a total of 581 X-ray/SZ-selected massive clusters, and is currently 80% complete. Cluster lenses are often more powerful than galaxy lenses, producing larger magnifications. For example, typical magnification factors for galaxy-lensed Herschel sources are x10 or less while cluster-lensed systems can often produce magnification factors of x20-30 and even above x100. Cluster lenses will therefore allow us to detect and study intrinsically less-luminous and/or more distant sources with the ability to provide a view of finer-scale (i.e., sub-kpc) structures. Here, we propose to conduct Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 56 bright lensed SMG candidates we have identified in the ~470 HLS cluster fields observed so far. The main scientific goal is twofold: (1) to locate the underlying stellar component, and (2) to study its properties (e.g., stellar mass, specific star-formation rate) by constraining the rest-frame near-infrared SED and comparing with the Herschel and other submillimeter/millimeter data (e.g., SMA, PdB, ALMA, etc.). These rare bright lensed SMGs will allow us to probe the population of heavily dust-obscured vigorously star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z>1), which is thought to play an important role in the cosmic star-formation history of the Universe and yet has been difficult to study due to the

  13. The pattern of extreme star formation events in SDSS quasar hosts in Herschel fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Lura Katherine; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Feltre, Anna; Clarke, Charlotte; Farrah, Duncan; Harris, Kathryn Amy; Hurley, Peter; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of ~500 quasars up to redshifts of ~4 detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instrument of Herschel, we describe the behavior of intense starbursts in luminous quasars and how it correlates with the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). We select our objects in the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS) and in the largest fields of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), including the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS).The far-infrared (FIR) emission of our objects is quantified using a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique. As our sources are individually detected in the SPIRE bands, they are bright in the FIR, exhibiting typical star formation rates (SFRs) of order of 1000 M⊙yr-1. We find the SFR to increase by a factor of nearly ten from z~0.5 to z~3, in line with the increasing comoving SFR density over a similar redshift range. The SFR, however, is shown to remain constant with increasing quasar luminosity for quasars with IR luminosities above 1012L⊙, indicating a self-regulating star formation process rather than a suppression effect due to the presence of powerful AGN. We find no further proof of a causal relation between star formation and accretion onto the central black hole, as the SFR and the Eddington ratio, λEdd, are found to be uncorrelated.We then compare the broad absorption line (BAL) quasars to the rest of the quasar population, as they are candidates for outflows in action from which shorter-term feedback effects could be sought. We find the accretion luminosities and λEdd values of BAL quasars to be drawn from the same population as those of the non-BAL quasars; further, the host SFRs are statistically similar among the two populations, all of which argue against feedback effects. These similarities also oppose an evolutionary scenario, as a different evolutionary stage would imply differences in either the accretion state

  14. X-ray quasars and the X-ray background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Einstein X-ray observations of a sample of 202 radio-and optically-selected quasars due to Ku, Helfand and Lucy and to Zamorani et al. are analysed. Correlations between X-ray, optical and radio luminosities are examined. The contribution of radio-loud quasars to the 2-keV X-ray background is estimated using high-frequency radio-source counts, and the contribution due to radio-quiet, optically bright quasars using optical counts. It is shown that radio-loud quasars and radio-quiet optically bright quasars together contribute approximately 15 per cent of the observed 2-keV X-ray background. The contribution of optically faint radio-quiet quasars is uncertain, but may be limited to a maximum of approximately 30 per cent if recent indications of a flattening in optical counts at faint magnitudes are correct. (author)

  15. The Stacked Lyman-Alpha Emission Profile from the Circum-Galactic Medium of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Battaia, Fabrizio Arrigoni; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the FLASHLIGHT survey, we obtained deep narrow band images of 15 $z\\sim2$ quasars with GMOS on Gemini-South in an effort to measure Ly$\\alpha$ emission from circum- and inter-galactic gas on scales of hundreds of kpc from the central quasar. We do not detect bright giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebulae (SB~10$^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ at distances >50 kpc) around any of our sources, although we routinely ($\\simeq47$%) detect smaller scale <50 kpc Ly$\\alpha$ emission at this SB level emerging from either the extended narrow emission line regions powered by the quasars or by star-formation in their host galaxies. We stack our 15 deep images to study the average extended Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile around $z\\sim2$ quasars, carefully PSF-subtracting the unresolved emission component and paying close attention to sources of systematic error. Our analysis, which achieves an unprecedented depth, reveals a surface brightness of SB$_{\\rm Ly\\alpha}\\sim10^{-19}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}...

  16. FAR-INFRARED AND MOLECULAR CO EMISSION FROM THE HOST GALAXIES OF FAINT QUASARS AT z ∼ 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new millimeter and radio observations of nine z ∼ 6 quasars discovered in deep optical and near-infrared surveys. We observed the 250 GHz continuum in eight of the nine objects and detected three of them. New 1.4 GHz radio continuum data have been obtained for four sources, and one has been detected. We searched for molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three 250 GHz detections and detected two of them. Combined with previous millimeter and radio observations, we study the far-infrared (FIR) and radio emission and quasar-host galaxy evolution with a sample of 18 z ∼ 6 quasars that are faint at UV and optical wavelengths (rest-frame 1450 A magnitudes of m1450 ≥ 20.2). The average FIR-to-active galactic nucleus (AGN) UV luminosity ratio of this faint quasar sample is about two times higher than that of the bright quasars at z ∼ 6 (m1450 FIR ∼ Lbol0.62. Five of the 18 faint z ∼ 6 quasars have been detected at 250 GHz. These 250 GHz detections, as well as most of the millimeter-detected optically bright z ∼ 6 quasars, follow a shallower trend of LFIR ∼ Lbol0.45 defined by the starburst-AGN systems in local and high-z universe. The millimeter continuum detections in the five objects and molecular CO detections in three of them reveal a few x 108 Msun of FIR-emitting warm dust and 1010 Msun of molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. All these results argue for massive star formation in the quasar host galaxies, with estimated star formation rates of a few hundred Msun yr-1. Additionally, the higher FIR-to-AGN luminosity ratio found in these 250 GHz detected faint quasars also suggests a higher ratio between star formation rate and supermassive black hole accretion rate than the UV/optically most luminous quasars at z ∼ 6.

  17. The Spectral Slope and Escape Fraction of Bright Quasars at $z \\sim 3.8$: the Contribution to the Cosmic UV Background

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, Stefano; Fontanot, Fabio; Koothrappali, Rajesh R; Vanzella, Eros; Monaco, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    We use a sample of 1669 QSOs ($r<20.15$, $3.6survey to study the intrinsic shape of the continuum and the Lyman continuum photon escape fraction (f$_{\\rm esc,q}$), estimated as the ratio between the observed flux and the expected intrinsic flux (corrected for the intergalactic medium absorption). Modelling the intrinsic QSO continuum shape with a power-law, $F_{\\lambda}\\propto\\lambda^{-\\gamma}$, we find a median $\\gamma=1.36$ (with a dispersion of $0.36$, no dependence on the redshift and a mild intrinsic luminosity dependence) and a mean f$_{\\rm esc,q}=0.71$ (independent of the QSO luminosity and/or redshift). The f$_{\\rm esc,q}$ distribution shows a peak around zero and a long tail of higher values, with a resulting dispersion of $0.67$. If we assume for the QSO continuum a double power-law shape (also compatible with the data) with a break located at $\\lambda_{\\rm br}=1000$ \\AA \\ and a softening $\\Delta\\gamma=0.72 $ at wavelengths shorter than $\\lambda_{\\rm br}$, the mean f$...

  18. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  19. The Race Between Stars and Quasars in Reionizing Cosmic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    The cosmological background of ionizing radiation has been dominated by quasars once the Universe aged by ~2 billion years. At earlier times (redshifts z>3), the observed abundance of bright quasars declined sharply, implying that cosmic hydrogen was reionized by stars instead. Here, we explain the physical origin of the transition between the dominance of stars and quasars as a generic feature of structure formation in the concordance LCDM cosmology. At early times, the fraction of baryons i...

  20. The Infrared Environment of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, G.

    1996-12-01

    The IRAS survey has shown that the spectral energy distribution of quasars exhibits a relative maximum in the mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The infrared bump is present at about the same level in both radio quiet and radio loud quasars. The generally accepted explanation is that the infrared emission is dominated by thermal emission from dust grains within a few parsecs of a central non thermal source. The results of an observational test of this explanation in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths will be described. In the near-infrared, the emission from quasars is sometimes significantly contaminated by galaxy light from the host galaxies surrounding the quasar. Infrared observations which emphasize these hosts will also be shown and the possible relationship between AGNs and the ultraluminous galaxies will be discussed.

  1. Data mining for gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target-selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine-learning techniques and demonstrate that a two-step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step, we use catalogue-level information (griz+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to pre-select targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (gradient-boosted trees), to form a final set of candidates. The results from this procedure can be used to further refine the simpler SQLS algorithms, with a twofold (or threefold) gain in purity and the same (or 80 per cent) completeness at target-selection stage, or a purity of 70 per cent and a completeness of 60 per cent after the candidate-selection step. Simpler photometric searches in griz+WISE based on colour cuts would provide samples with 7 per cent purity or less. Our technique is extremely fast, as a list of candidates can be obtained from a Stage III experiment (e.g. DES catalogue/data base) in a few CPU hours. The techniques are easily extendable to Stage IV experiments like LSST with the addition of time domain information.

  2. SPITZER- AND HERSCHEL-BASED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF 24 μm BRIGHT z ∼ 0.3-3.0 STARBURSTS AND OBSCURED QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    composite sources are most similar to the local archetypal warm ULIRG, Mrk231, which supports the interpretation of their consisting of both AGN and starburst components. In summary, our results show that there is strong evolution in the SEDs between local and z ∼ 2 IR-luminous galaxies, as well as that there is a wide range of SEDs among high redshift IR-luminous sources. The publicly available SED templates we derive from our sample will be particularly useful for infrared population synthesis models, as well as in the interpretation of other mid-IR high-z galaxies, in particular those detected by the recent all sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.

  3. A Simple Method To Find All Lensed Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Kochanek, C. S.; Mochejska, B.; Morgan, N. D.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that gravitationally lensed quasars are easily recognized using image subtraction methods as time variable sources that are spatially extended. For Galactic latitudes |b|>20 deg, lensed quasars dominate the population of spatially extended variable sources, although there is some contamination from variable star pairs, variable star-quasar pairs and binary quasars that can be easily controlled using other information in the survey such as the object light curves and colors. Thi...

  4. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING WEAK Mg II QUASAR ABSORBERS AND A CURIOUS DEPENDENCE ON QUASAR LUMINOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have identified 469 Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet systems having Wr ≥ 0.02 Å in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 r 6-109 Mpc–3 for spherical geometries and 102-105 Mpc–3 for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (Wr ≥ 1.0 Å) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ∼25% higher than toward faint quasars (10σ at low redshift, 0.4 ≤ z ≤ 1.4, and 4σ at high redshift, 1.4 < z ≤ 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ∼20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10σ at low redshift and 4σ at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  5. The Evolution of Quasars at High Redshift and Their Connection with Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Osmer, Patrick S.

    1998-01-01

    I review recent observations on the evolution of quasars, describe new surveys for quasars at z > 5 and for quasars at z > 3.3 down to luminosities corresponding to L* galaxies, and note the possible connection between the evolution of the star formation rate in young galaxies and the evolution of quasars.

  6. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. I. DOUBLING THE NUMBER OF KNOWN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of 29 new, 12 plausible, and three previously known quasars behind the central ∼1.5 deg2 region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These were identified in a single 2DF/AAOMEGA observation on the Anglo-Australian Telescope of 268 candidates selected primarily based on their mid-IR colors, along with a smaller number of optically variable sources in OGLE-II close to known X-ray sources. The low detection efficiency was partly expected from the high surface density of SMC as compared with the Large Magellanic Cloud targets and the faintness of many of them (149 with I>20 mag). The expected number of I < 20 mag quasars in the field is ≅38, and we found 15 (40%). We did not attempt to determine the nature of the remaining sources, although several appear to be new planetary nebulae. The newly discovered active galactic nuclei can be used as reference points for future proper-motion studies, to study absorption in the SMC interstellar medium, and to study the physics of quasar variability with the existing long-term, highly cadenced OGLE light curves.

  7. OBSERVATIONAL UPPER BOUND ON THE COSMIC ABUNDANCES OF NEGATIVE-MASS COMPACT OBJECTS AND ELLIS WORMHOLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Asada, Hideki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    The latest result in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) has set the first cosmological constraints on negative-mass compact objects and Ellis wormholes. There are no multiple images lensed by the above two exotic objects for {approx}50, 000 distant quasars in the SQLS data. Therefore, an upper bound is put on the cosmic abundances of these lenses. The number density of negative-mass compact objects is n < 10{sup -8}(10{sup -4}) h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at the mass scale |M| > 10{sup 15}(10{sup 12}) M{sub Sun }, which corresponds to the cosmological density parameter |{Omega}| < 10{sup -4} at the galaxy and cluster mass range |M| = 10{sup 12-15} M{sub Sun }. The number density of the Ellis wormhole is n < 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} for a range of the throat radius a = 10-10{sup 4} pc, which is much smaller than the Einstein ring radius.

  8. A Synoptic, Multiwavelength Analysis of a Large Quasar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Rengstorf, A W; Wilhite, B C; Brunner, Robert J.; Rengstorf, Adam W.; Wilhite, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    We present variability and multi-wavelength photometric information for the 933 known quasars in the QUEST Variability Survey. These quasars are grouped into variable and non-variable populations based on measured variability confidence levels. In a time-limited synoptic survey, we detect an anti-correlation between redshift and the likelihood of variability. Our comparison of variability likelihood to radio, IR, and X-ray data is consistent with earlier quasar studies. Using already-known quasars as a template, we introduce a light curve morphology algorithm that provides an efficient method for discriminating variable quasars from periodic variable objects in the absence of spectroscopic information. The establishment of statistically robust trends and efficient, non-spectroscopic selection algorithms will aid in quasar identification and categorization in upcoming massive synoptic surveys. Finally, we report on three interesting variable quasars, including variability confirmation of the BL Lac candidate P...

  9. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  10. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV & magnitude limited surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 3 or 4 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, making them SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. These SNe are also brighter than found in the local Universe, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than found in nearby galaxies. We discuss this sample in the context of understanding Type II SNe as a class and their suggested use as standard candles.

  11. On radio-bright Active Galactic Nuclei in a complete Spectroscopic Redshift Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Reviglio, P; Reviglio, Pietro; Helfand, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of the frequency and physical properties of galaxies with star-formation and AGN activity in different environments in the local universe is a cornerstone for understanding structure formation and galaxy evolution. We have built a new multiwavelength catalog for galaxies in a complete redshift survey (the 15R Survey), gathering information on their H-alpha, R-band, radio, far-infrared, and X-ray emission, as well as their radio and optical morphologies, and have developed a classification scheme to compare different selection methods and to select accurately samples of radio emitting galaxies with AGN and star-forming activity. While alternative classification schemes do not lead to major differences for star-forming galaxies, we show that spectroscopic and photometric classifications of AGN lead to incomplete samples. In particular, a large population of AGN-containing galaxies with absorption-line spectra, and in many cases extended radio structures (jets, lobes), is missed in the standard Baldwin-...

  12. X-ray lighthouses of the high-redshift Universe. Probing the most luminous z>4 Palomar Digital Sky Survey Quasars with Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Vignali, C.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Garmire, G.P.; Kaspi, S.

    2002-01-01

    We present the results from exploratory Chandra observations of nine high-z (z=4.1-4.5) optically selected quasars. These quasars, taken from the DPOSS, are among the optically most luminous z>4 quasars known (M_B=-28.4 to -30.2). All have been detected by Chandra in exposure times of 5-6 ks, tripling the number of highly luminous quasars with X-ray detections at z>4. These quasars' average broad-band SEDs are characterized by steeper aox values (=-1.81+/-0.03) than those of lower-luminosity,...

  13. Infrared observations of the X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared observations of the recently discovered X-ray quasars 0241+622 and MR2251-178 are reported. Broadband photometry of both quasars was conducted in the 1.25 to 20 micron range and spectrophotometry of 0241+622 was carried out from 1.5 to 2.5 microns. The IR energy distributions of 0241+622, MR2251-178 and the X-ray quasar 3C273 are presented, noting that for wavelengths less than 10 microns, the energy distributions of all three quasars are similar and cannot be distinguished from those of other low redshift quasars. The observed IR, visual and X-ray luminosities of the three quasars are compared and are found not to be strongly correlated. It is remarked, however, that the three X-ray quasars are the brightest known quasars at IR and visual wavelengths, which supports the suggestion that all quasars are bright X-ray emitters.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Near Infrared Snapshot Survey of 3CR radio source counterparts III: Radio galaxies and quasars in context

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, David J E; Baum, Stefi; Capetti, Alessandro; Chiaberge, Marco; Madrid, Juan; O'Dea, Christopher P; Perlman, Eric; Sparks, William

    2010-01-01

    We compare the near-infrared (NIR) H band photometric and morphological properties of low-redshift (z1E11 M_sun host galaxies (and ~1E9 M_sun black holes), whereas radio galaxies and RQQs can exist in galaxies down to 3E10 M_sun. This may be due to biases in the measured quasar host galaxy luminosities or populations studied, or due to a genuine difference in host galaxy. If due to a genuine difference, it would support the idea that radio and optical active galactic nucleii are two separate populations with a significant overlap.

  15. THE MAGELLANIC QUASARS SURVEY. I. DOUBLING THE NUMBER OF KNOWN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    OpenAIRE

    Kozłowski, Szymon; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Udalski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of 29 new, 12 plausible, and 3 previously known quasars behind the central ~1.5 deg^2 region of the Small Magellanic Cloud. These were identified in a single 2df/AAOmega observation on the Anglo-Australian Telescope of 268 candidates selected primarily based on their mid-IR colors, along with a smaller number of optically variable sources in OGLE-II close to known X-ray sources. The low detection efficiency was partly expected from the high surface den...

  16. Narrow UV Absorption Line Outflows from Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; Hidalgo, Paola Rodriguez; Capellupo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow absorption line (NAL) outflows are an important yet poorly understood part of the quasar outflow phenomenon. We discuss one particular NAL outflow that has high speeds, time variability, and moderate ionizations like typical BAL flows, at an estimated location just ~5 pc from the quasar. It also has a total column density and line widths (internal velocity dispersions) ~100 times smaller than BALs, with no substantial X-ray absorption. We argue that radiative shielding (in the form of an X-ray/warm absorber) is not critical for the outflow acceleration and that the moderate ionizations occur in dense substructures that have an overall small volume filling factor in the flow. We also present new estimates of the overall incidence of quasar outflow lines; e.g., ~43% of bright quasars have a C IV NAL outflow while ~68% have a C IV outflow line of any variety (NAL, BAL, or mini-BAL).

  17. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  18. Bright Galaxies at Hubble's Detection Frontier: The redshift z~9-10 BoRG pure-parallel survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele

    2014-10-01

    Hubble/WFC3 observations transformed our view of early galaxy formation by building reliable samples of galaxies out to redshift z 8, 700 Myr after the Big Bang and hinting at a dramatic evolution in properties at yet earlier times. From z 8 to z 10 { 200Myr} the luminosity density seems to decrease by a factor ten, but bright galaxies may remain relatively common, based on the four z>9 objects detected so far with m_ABsuccessful Cycle 17 & 19 Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies {BoRG} Survey, which found the largest sample of L>L* galaxies at z 8. BoRG[z8] demonstrated, by adding constraints from the Ultra Deep Field {UDF}, that the luminosity function follows a Schechter form, as at lower z, but with a steeper faint-end slope, leading to a photon production sufficient to complete reionization. BoRG[z9-10] will similarly complement the UDF and Frontier Fields datasets by imaging 550 arcmin^2 over 120 sightlines in five WFC3 bands {F350LP, F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W}. Besides twenty new catches at z>9, we will double {from 60 to 120} the number of bright z 8 galaxies within reach of spectroscopy, to tighten constraints on Ly-alpha emission and reionization obtained by our BoRG@Keck follow-up. This new public dataset will reveal the connection between massive dark matter halos and formation of first galaxies, and create a legacy of rare targets for JWST

  19. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmardi, B.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Henkel, C.; Crawford, K.; Teuwen, K.; Gabany, R. J.; Hanson, M.; Chonis, T. S.; Neyer, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M 104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M 101), and NGC 7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims to use the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images, fields of the target spiral galaxies are explored for extended LSB objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of nine already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates have effective surface brightnesses in the range 25.3 ≲ μe ≲ 28.8 mag arcsec-2 and are fit with Sersic profiles with indices n ≲ 1. Assuming that they are in the vicinity of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their r-band absolute magnitudes, their effective radii, and their luminosities are in the ranges -15.6 ≲ Mr ≲ -7.8, 160 pc ≲ Re ≲ 4.1 kpc, and 0.1 × 106 ≲ (L/L⊙)r ≲ 127 × 106, respectively. To determine whether these LSB galaxies are indeed satellites of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their distances need to be determined via further observations. Conclusions: Using small telescopes, we are readily able to detect LSB galaxies with similar properties to the known dwarf galaxies of the Local Group.

  20. The Giant Gemini GMOS survey of z>4.4 quasars - I. Measuring the mean free path across cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Worseck, Gábor; O'Meara, John M; Becker, George D; Ellison, Sara; Lopez, Sebastian; Meiksin, Avery; Ménard, Brice; Murphy, Michael T; Fumagalli, Michele

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of 163 quasars at $z_\\mathrm{em}>4.4$ with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrometers on the Gemini North and South telescopes, the largest publicly available sample of high-quality, low-resolution spectra at these redshifts. From this homogeneous data set, we generated stacked quasar spectra in three redshift intervals at $z\\sim 5$. We have modelled the flux below the rest-frame Lyman limit ($\\lambda_\\mathrm{r}<912$\\AA) to assess the mean free path $\\lambda_\\mathrm{mfp}^{912}$ of the intergalactic medium to HI-ionizing radiation. At mean redshifts $z_\\mathrm{q}=4.56$, 4.86 and 5.16, we measure $\\lambda_\\mathrm{mfp}^{912}=(22.2\\pm 2.3, 15.1\\pm 1.8, 10.3\\pm 1.6)h_{70}^{-1}$ proper Mpc with uncertainties dominated by sample variance. Combining our results with $\\lambda_\\mathrm{mfp}^{912}$ measurements from lower redshifts, the data are well modelled by a simple power-law $\\lambda_\\mathrm{mfp}^{912}=A[(1+z)/5]^\\eta$ with $A=(37\\pm 2)h_{70}^{-1}$ Mpc and $\\eta = -5.4\\pm 0.4$ between $z=2.3$...

  1. Testing Models of Quasar Hosts With Strong Gravitational Lensing by Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2016-01-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of strong gravitational lensing by quasar hosts of background galaxies, in the two competing models of dark matter halos of quasars, HOD and CS models. Utilizing the BolshoiP Simulation we demonstrate that strong gravitational lensing provides a potentially very powerful test of models of quasar hosting halos. For quasars at $z=0.5$, the lensing probability by quasars of background galaxies in the HOD model is higher than that of the CS model by two orders of magnitude or more for lensing image separations in the range of $\\theta\\sim 1.2-12~$arcsec. To observationally test this, we show that, as an example, at the depth of the CANDELS wide field survey and with a quasar sample of $1000$ at $z=0.5$, the two models can be differentiated at $3-4\\sigma$ confidence level.

  2. QUART: Quasar hosts Unveiled by high Angular Resolution Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley; Murray, Norman W.; Armus, Lee; Larkin, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the new QUART survey that aims to resolve high-redshift (z = 1.5 - 2.5) radio-quiet and radio-loud quasi stellar object (QSO) host galaxies using the integral field spectrograph (IFS) OSIRIS, and the Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) system. The combination of AO and IFS provides the necessary contrast to disentangle the bright-unresolved QSO from the underlying faint host galaxy with unprecedented sensitivity. We study the ionized gas in these systems to sub-kiloparsec scales, yielding essential constraints on the resolved host galaxies dynamics, morphologies, star formation rates, metallicities, and nebular emission diagnostics. We combine OSIRIS and AO observations with multi-wavelength data sets from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Very Large Array to better understand the multiple phases of the ISM and stellar population properties of the hosts. Radio-quiet QSOs have shown little-to-no star formation and no evidence of extended QSO narrow line emission. In contrast, our latest OSIRIS results of radio-loud z~1.5-2 quasars have revealed evidence for both concurrent star formation and extended quasar narrow line emission with strong outflows. These outflows are co-spatial with structure observed in the radio data, typically with the path of the quasar jet and/or lobe structure. These winds are highly extended (8-12 kpc) and show broad emission line profiles (extending up to 2,500 km/s), indicating strong evidence of quasar “feedback” in their host galaxies.

  3. The XXL Survey. XIII. Baryon content of the bright cluster sample

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, D; Coupon, J; Gastaldello, F; Pierre, M; Melin, J -B; Brun, A M C Le; McCarthy, I G; Adami, C; Chiappetti, L; Faccioli, L; Giles, P; Lavoie, S; Lefevre, J P; Lieu, M; Mantz, A; Maughan, B; McGee, S; Pacaud, F; Paltani, S; Sadibekova, T; Smith, G P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass--temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads $f_{\\rm gas,500}=0.055_{-0.006}^{+0.007}\\left(M_{\\rm 500}/10^{14}M_\\odot\\right)^{0.21_{-0.10}^{+0.11}}$. The baryon budget of galaxy c...

  4. EC 19314 - 5915 - A bright, eclipsing cataclysmic variable from the Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Kilkenny, D.; Stobie, R. S.; Remillard, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    A deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable, with an orbital period of 4.75 hr, has been discovered in the southern Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey. The star, EC 19314 - 5915, lies close to the positional constraints of a previously unidentified HEAO-1 hard X-ray source, 1H1930 - 5989. Its optical spectrum is unusual in that it shows, apart from the emission lines characteristic of a novalike, or dwarf nova cataclysmic variable (Balmer, He I and He II), metallic absorption lines typical of a late-G star. The individual time-resolved spectra, with the tertiary absorption lines removed, show absorption reversals in the Balmer emission lines, increasing in strength for the higher series. The Balmer emission radial velocities are therefore severely distorted in comparison to the He II 4686-A emission and He I 4471-A absorption radial velocity curves. An independent distance estimate of about 600 pc is derived for EC19314 - 5915, from the spectroscopic parallax of the third star.

  5. A concentration of quasars around the jet galaxy NGC1097

    OpenAIRE

    Arp, H.; Carosati, D.

    2007-01-01

    A quasar search in the region of the active galaxy NGC 1097 yielded 31 quasars in 1984. After completion of the 2dF survey in 2004 the number of catalogued quasars just within 1 degree of the galaxy increased to 142. About 38 $\\pm$ 10 of these are in excess of average background values. The evidence in 1984 is confirmed here by an increasing density of quasars as one approaches NGC 1097. Quasars within 1 degree differ from the background by being significantly brighter. There also appear two ...

  6. Jets in Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Sikora, M.

    2001-01-01

    In my review of jet phenomena in quasars, I focus on the following questions: How powerful are jets in radio-loud quasars? What is their composition? How are they launched? And why, in most quasars, are they so weak? I demonstrate the exceptional role that blazar studies can play in exploring the physics and structure of the innermost parts of quasar jets.

  7. Accretion Disc Structure and Orientation in the Lensed and Microlensed Q0957+561 Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, R E

    2005-01-01

    Because quasars are unresolved in optical imaging, their structures must presently be inferred. Gravitational microlensing offers the possibility to produce information about the luminous structure provided the Einstein ring diameter of the microlensing particle is comparable to or smaller than the radiating quasar components. The long brightness history measured for the Q0957 quasar has been analyzed previously for information about the microlensing particles, and evidence for the existence of a cosmologically significant population of planetary mass particles has been reported. The microlensing results have also directly determined the sizes of the ultraviolet light emitting surfaces in the quasar Autocorrelation analysis of the same brightness record has produced evidence for complex structure in the quasar; if the quasar suddenly brightens today, it is probable that it will brighten again after 129, 190, 540, and 620 days. We interpret these lags as the result of luminous structure around the quasar, and ...

  8. A Synoptic, Multiwavelength Analysis of a Large Quasar Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Rengstorf, Adam W.; Brunner, Robert J.; Wilhite, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    We present variability and multi-wavelength photometric information for the 933 known quasars in the QUEST Variability Survey. These quasars are grouped into variable and non-variable populations based on measured variability confidence levels. In a time-limited synoptic survey, we detect an anti-correlation between redshift and the likelihood of variability. Our comparison of variability likelihood to radio, IR, and X-ray data is consistent with earlier quasar studies. Using already-known qu...

  9. XQ-100: A legacy survey of one hundred 3.5 z < 4.5 quasars observed with VLT/XSHOOTER

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, S; Ellison, S L; Becker, G D; Christensen, L; Cupani, G; Denney, K D; Paris, I; Worseck, G; Berg, T A M; Cristiani, S; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M; Haehnelt, M; Hamann, F; Hennawi, J; Irsic, V; Kim, T -S; Lopez, P; Saust, R Lund; Menard, B; Perrotta, S; Prochaska, J X; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Vestergaard, M; Viel, M; Wisotzki, L

    2016-01-01

    We describe the execution and data reduction of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "Quasars and their absorption lines: a legacy survey of the high-redshift universe with VLT/XSHOOTER" (hereafter `XQ-100'). XQ-100 has produced and made publicly available an homogeneous and high-quality sample of echelle spectra of 100 QSOs at redshifts z~3.5-4.5 observed with full spectral coverage from 315 to 2500 nm at a resolving power ranging from R~4000 to 7000, depending on wavelength. The median signal-to-noise ratios are 33, 25 and 43, as measured at rest-frame wavelengths 1700, 3000 and 3600 Angstrom, respectively. This paper provides future users of XQ-100 data with the basic statistics of the survey, along with details of target selection, data acquisition and data reduction. The paper accompanies the public release of all data products, including 100 reduced spectra. XQ-100 is the largest spectroscopic survey to date of high-redshift QSOs with simultaneous rest-frame UV/optical coverage, and as such...

  10. The XXL Survey. XIII. Baryon content of the bright cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Coupon, J.; Gastaldello, F.; Pierre, M.; Melin, J.-B.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; McCarthy, I. G.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Faccioli, L.; Giles, P.; Lavoie, S.; Lefèvre, J. P.; Lieu, M.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B.; McGee, S.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Sadibekova, T.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction Ωb/ Ωm. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. Since it spans a wide range of mass (1013-1015 M⊙) and redshift (0.05-1.1) and benefits from a large set of multiwavelength data, the XXL-100-GC sample is ideal for measuring the global baryon budget of massive halos. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass-temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads fgas,500 = 0.055-0.006+0.007(M500/1014 M⊙)0.21-0.10+0.11. The baryon budget of galaxy clusters therefore falls short of the Universal baryon fraction by about a factor of two at r500,MT. Our measurements require a hydrostatic bias 1-b = MX/MWL = 0.72-0.07+0.08 to match the gas fraction obtained using lensing and hydrostatic equilibrium, which holds independently of the instrument considered. Comparing our gas fraction measurements with the expectations from numerical simulations, we find that our results favour an extreme feedback scheme in which a significant fraction of the baryons are expelled from the cores of halos. This model is, however, in contrast with the thermodynamical properties of observed halos, which might suggest that weak-lensing masses are overestimated. In light of these results, we note that a mass bias 1-b = 0.58 as required to reconcile Planck

  11. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  12. Mass Models and Environment of the New Quadruply Lensed Quasar SDSS J1330+1810

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-09

    We present the discovery of a new quadruply lensed quasar. The lens system, SDSS J1330+1810 at z{sub s} = 1.393, was identified as a lens candidate from the spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Optical and near-infrared images clearly show four quasar images with a maximum image separation of 1.76 inch, as well as a bright lensing galaxy. We measure a redshift of the lensing galaxy of z{sub 1} = 0.373 from absorption features in the spectrum. We find a foreground group of galaxies at z = 0.31 centred {approx} 120 inch southwest of the lens system. Simple mass models fit the data quite well, including the flux ratios between images, although the lens galaxy appears to be {approx} 1 mag brighter than expected by the Faber-Jackson relation. Our mass modeling suggests that shear from nearby structure is affecting the lens potential.

  13. The Giant Gemini GMOS survey of zem > 4.4 quasars - I. Measuring the mean free path across cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worseck, Gábor; Prochaska, J. Xavier; O'Meara, John M.; Becker, George D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Lopez, Sebastian; Meiksin, Avery; Ménard, Brice; Murphy, Michael T.; Fumagalli, Michele

    2014-12-01

    We have obtained spectra of 163 quasars at zem > 4.4 with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrometers, the largest publicly available sample of high-quality, low-resolution spectra at these redshifts. From this data set, we generated stacked quasar spectra in three redshift intervals at z ˜ 5 to model the average rest-frame Lyman continuum flux and to assess the mean free path λ _mfp^{912} of the intergalactic medium to H I-ionizing radiation. At mean redshifts zq = (4.56, 4.86, 5.16), we measure λ _mfp^{912}=(22.2 ± 2.3, 15.1 ± 1.8, 10.3 ± 1.6)h_{70}^{-1} proper Mpc with uncertainties dominated by sample variance. Combining our results with measurements from lower redshifts, the data are well modelled by a power law λ _mfp^{912}=A[(1+zright)/5]^η with A=(37 ± 2)h_{70}^{-1} Mpc and η = -5.4 ± 0.4 at 2.3 < z < 5.5. This rapid evolution requires a physical mechanism - beyond cosmological expansion - which reduces the effective Lyman limit opacity. We speculate that the majority of H I Lyman limit opacity manifests in gas outside galactic dark matter haloes, tracing large-scale structures (e.g. filaments) whose average density and neutral fraction decreases with cosmic time. Our measurements of the mean free path shortly after H I reionization serve as a valuable boundary condition for numerical models thereof. Our measured λ _mfp^{912}≈ 10 Mpc at z = 5.2 confirms that the intergalactic medium is highly ionized without evidence for a break that would indicate a recent end to H I reionization.

  14. Chandra Observations of 12 Luminous Red Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrutia, T; Lacy, M; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H

    2005-03-11

    The authors present results of a study of 12 dust-reddened quasars with 0.4 < z < 2.65 and reddenings in the range 0.15 < E(B-V) < 1.7. They obtained ACIS-S X-ray spectra of these quasars, estimated the column densities towards them, and hence obtained the gas:dust ratios in the material obscuring the quasar. They detect all but one of the red quasars in the X-rays. Even though there is no obvious correlation between the X-ray determined column densities of the sources and their optical color or reddening, all of the sources show absorbed X-ray spectra. When they correct the luminosity for absorption, they can be placed among luminous quasars; therefore their objects belong to the group of high luminosity analogues of the sources contributing to the X-ray background seen in deep X-ray observations. Such sources are also found in serendipitous shallow X-ray surveys. There is a hint that the mean spectral slope of the red quasar is higher than that of normal, unobscured quasars, which could be an indication for higher accretion rates and/or an evolutionary effect. They investigate the number density of these sources compared to type 2 AGN based on the X-ray background and estimate how many moderate luminosity red quasars may be found in deep X-ray fields.

  15. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrims, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two large quasar groups at redshift $\\sim 1.3$. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range $1.0-1.8$. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least $20$ members. This result independent...

  16. Catalog of candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 selected among X-Ray sources from the 3XMM-DR4 survey of the XMM-Newton observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorunzhev, G. A.; Burenin, R. A.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalog of 903 candidates for type 1 quasars at redshifts 3 20° in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) fields with a total area of about 300 deg2. Photometric SDSS data as well infrared 2MASS and WISE data were used to select the objects. We selected the point sources from the photometric SDSS catalog with a magnitude error δ mz' library that we compiled for these purposes using the EAZY software. Based on these data, we have rejected the objects whose spectral energy distributions are better described by the templates of stars at z = 0 and obtained a sample of quasars with photometric redshift estimates 2.75 3 in the investigated fields is shown to be about 80%. The normalized median absolute deviation (Δ z = | z spec - z phot|) is σ Δ z /(1+ z spec) = 0.07, while the outlier fraction is η = 9% when Δ z/(1 + z cпek.) > 0.2. The number of objects per unit area in our sample exceeds the number of quasars in the spectroscopic SDSS sample at the same redshifts approximately by a factor of 1.5. The subsequent spectroscopic testing of the redshifts of our selected candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 will allow the purity of this sample to be estimated more accurately.

  17. Halo Occupation Distribution of Infrared Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kaustav

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars that are observed in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope with counter-parts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release (DR)-8 quasar catalog at a median redshift of $z\\sim 1.04 (\\pm 0.58)$. Using a four parameter HOD model we derive the host mass scales of WISE selected quasars. Our results show that the median halo masses of central and satellite quasars lie in the range $M_{\\mathrm{cen}} = (5 \\pm 1.0) \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\mathrm{sat}} = 8 (^{+7.8} _{-4.8}) \\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}$, respectively. The derived satellite fraction is $f_{\\mathrm{sat}}= 5.5 (^{+35} _{-5.0})\\times 10^{-3}$. Previously Richardson et al.\\ used the SDSS DR7 quasar clustering data to obtain the halo mass distributions of $z\\sim 1.4$ quasars. Our results on the HOD of central quasars are in excellent agreement with Richardson et al.\\ but the host mass scale of satellite ...

  18. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  19. MERLIN and VLA observations of the quasar 1150 + 497

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new high-resolution MERLIN and VLA maps of the quasar 1150+497 which has a bright jet with compact knots and sharp bends, but no prominent hotspot. The source shows very little variation of Faraday rotation or depolarization. We discuss whether this is a disrupting jet which is intrinsically bright or whether it simply appears bright due to Doppler beaming. (author)

  20. ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1997-01-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched in November 1995, allows us to measure the far-infrared (far-IR) emission of quasars in greater detail and over a wider energy range than previously possible. In this paper, preliminary results in a study of the 5--200 $\\mu m$ continuum of quasars and active galaxies are presented. Comparison of the spectral energy distributions show that, if the far-IR emission from quasars is thermal emission from galaxian dust, the host galaxies of quasars mus...

  1. Hidden blazars and emission line variability of high redshift quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a survey to search for hidden blazars in a sample of z 2 radio{loud quasars. The idea is based on our prediction that we should be able to see large C IV line variability not associated with observed continuum variations or most other emission lines in every radio{loud quasar. Here we report the initial results including the discovery of large C IV line variations in two quasars.

  2. The race between stars and quasars in reionizing cosmic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmological background of ionizing radiation has been dominated by quasars once the Universe aged by ∼ 2 billion years. At earlier times (redshifts z ∼> 3), the observed abundance of bright quasars declines sharply, implying that cosmic hydrogen was reionized by stars instead. Here, we explain the physical origin of the transition between the dominance of stars and quasars as a generic feature of structure formation in the concordance ΛCDM cosmology. At early times, the fraction of baryons in galaxies grows faster than the maximum (Eddington-limited) growth rate possible for quasars. As a result, quasars were not able to catch up with the rapid early growth of stellar mass in their host galaxies

  3. Quasar microlensing and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Hogan, Craig J.

    1988-01-01

    The amplification of quasar brightness due to gravitational lensing by foreground objects is discussed. It is shown that a recently published sample of X-ray-selected quasars behind foreground galaxies shows a statistically significant brightening compared to a control sample. Correlations with galaxy redshift and impact parameter predicted by microlensing are also demonstrated. A technique is described to measure the mean density of the lenses from a small number of identified cases of microlensing. It is shown that, in this sample, amplification bias is important in determining the mean intensity enhancement and must be included in the density estimate. Assuming that at least two of the four intrinsically brightest quasars behind galaxies are indeed microlensed, the present data yield a formal lower limit on the mean density parameter of lenses Omega(l) greater than 0.25 at 95 percent confidence. These data also imply that a considerable quantity of dark matter exists in macroscopic objects outside the visible parts of galaxies but is still highly correlated with them.

  4. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF SDSS QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an estimate of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) over the full range of one- and two-halo scales, 0.02 h–1 Mpc p –1 Mpc. This was achieved by combining data from SDSS DR7 on large scales and Hennawi et al. (with appropriate statistical corrections) on small scales. Our combined clustering sample is the largest spectroscopic quasar clustering sample to date, containing ∼48, 000 quasars in the redshift range 0.4 ∼sat = (7.4 ± 1.4) × 10–4, be satellites in dark matter halos. At z ∼ 1.4, the median masses of the host halos of central and satellite quasars are constrained to be Mcen = 4.1+0.3–0.4 × 1012 h–1 M☉ and Msat = 3.6+0.8–1.0 × 1014 h–1 M☉, respectively. To investigate the redshift evolution of the quasar-halo relationship, we also perform HOD modeling of the projected 2PCF measured by Shen et al. for SDSS quasars with median redshift 3.2. We find tentative evidence for an increase in the mass scale of quasar host halos—the inferred median mass of halos hosting central quasars at z ∼ 3.2 is Mcen = 14.1+5.8–6.9 × 1012 h–1 M☉. The cutoff profiles of the mean occupation functions of central quasars reveal that quasar luminosity is more tightly correlated with halo mass at higher redshifts. The average quasar duty cycle around the median host halo mass is inferred to be fq = 7.3+0.6–1.5 × 10–4 at z ∼ 1.4 and fq = 8.6+20.4–7.2 × 10–2 at z ∼ 3.2. We discuss the implications of our results for quasar evolution and quasar-galaxy co-evolution.

  5. Microlensing variability in time-delay quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Paraficz, D; Burud, I; Jakobsson, P; Eliasdottir, A

    2006-01-01

    We have searched for microlensing variability in the light curves of five gravitationally lensed quasars with well-determined time delays: SBS 1520+530, FBQ 0951+2635, RX J0911+0551, B1600+434 and HE 2149-2745. By comparing the light curve of the leading image with a suitably time offset light curve of a trailing image we find that two (SBS 1520+530 and FBQ 0951+2635) out of the five quasars have significant long-term (years) and short-term (100 days) brightness variations that may be attributed to microlensing.The short-term variations may be due to nanolenses, relativistic hot or cold spots in the quasar accretion disks, or coherent microlensing at large optical depth.

  6. QUASAR-GALAXY CLUSTERING THROUGH PROJECTED GALAXY COUNTS AT z = 0.6-1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies around quasars at z = 0.6-1.2 using photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. The quasar and galaxy cross-correlation functions are measured through the projected galaxy number density n(rp ) on scales of 0.05 p –1 Mpc around quasars for a sample of 2300 quasars from Schneider et al. We detect strong clustering signals at all redshifts and find that the clustering amplitude increases significantly with redshift. We examine the dependence of quasar-galaxy clustering on quasar and galaxy properties and find that the clustering amplitude is significantly larger for quasars with more massive black holes or with bluer colors, while there is no dependence on quasar luminosity. We also show that quasars have a stronger correlation amplitude with blue galaxies than with red galaxies. We finally discuss the implications of our findings

  7. Quasar-Cluster Associations and Gravitational Lensing by Large-Scale Matter Clumps

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Li-Zhi

    1996-01-01

    Motivated by the significant overdensity of background bright quasars recently detected behind the foreground clusters of galaxies on scale of $10$ arcminutes, we have investigated the possibility of attributing the quasar-cluster associations to gravitational lensing by large-scale matter inhomogeneities. Based on the conventional lensing models, we have shown that the reported quasar overdensity is unlikely to be generated by cluster matter alone. The situation does not change even if all t...

  8. Discovery of a Luminous Quasar in the Nearby Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, C A O; Coziol, R; Jablonski, F J; De la Reza, R; Lépine, J R D; Gregorio-Hetem, J; Torres, Carlos A. O.; Quast, Germano R.; Coziol, Roger; Jablonski, Francisco; Reza, Ramiro de la; Lepine, Jacques R. D.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane

    1997-01-01

    In the course of the Pico dos Dias survey (PDS), we identified the stellar like object PDS456 at coordinates alpha = 17h 28m 19.796s, delta = -14deg 15' 55.87'' (epoch 2000), with a relatively nearby (z = 0.184) and bright (B = 14.69) quasar. Its position at Galactic coordinates l_II = 10.4deg, b_II = +11.2deg, near the bulge of the Galaxy, may explain why it was not detected before. The optical spectrum of PDS456 is typical of a luminous quasar, showing a broad (FWHM ~ 4000 km/s) H_\\beta line, very intense FeII lines and a weak [OIII]\\lambda5007 line. PDS456 is associated to the infrared source IRAS 17254-1413 with a 60 \\mum infrared luminosity L_{60} = 3.8 x 10^{45} erg/s. The relatively flat slopes in the infrared (\\alpha(25,60) = -0.33 and \\alpha(12,25) = -0.78) and a flat power index in the optical (F_{\

  9. A quasar sample for the Lyα forest studies from the Data Release 10 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbaniuk O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new sample of the z≥ quasar spectra. It contains 102643 spectra which were visually selected from the SDSS DR10, and includes also a subsample of 65 976 spectra for the composite spectra compilation. This sample will be used for the Lyα forest studies, and can be used for other studies, including those of the quasar spectral properties and the spatial distribution of quasars at z>2. The compiled composite spectra will be used for the determination of the intrinsic spectrum in the Lyα forest studies. Those objects which were not included into the main sample and rejected during the visual examination, are 11192 quasars with the broad absorption lines, 6804 spectra with the damped Lyα systems, 1248 and 493 spectra with the absorption in the Lyα and Lyβ lines, respectively. The "non-quasar" objects, including 191 candidates for blazars and 30 galaxies with starburst, as well as 617 quasar spectra with wrong redshift, 417 incomplete spectra and 1497 spectra with low S/N ratio, were also excluded.

  10. An Apparent Redshift Dependence of Quasar Continuum: Implication for Cosmic Dust Extinction?

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., $\\alpha_{\

  11. Powerful Activity in the Bright Ages. I. A Visible/IR Survey of High Redshift 3C Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Bryan; Kotyla, JohnPaul; Tremblay, Grant R; Stanghellini, Carlo; Sparks, William B; Baum, Stefi A; Capetti, Alessandro; Macchetto, F Duccio; Miley, George K; O'Dea, Christopher P; Perlman, Eric S; Quillen, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    We present new rest frame UV and visible observations of 22 high-redshift (1 < z < 2.5) 3C radio galaxies and QSOs obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. Using a custom data reduction strategy in order to assure the removal of cosmic rays, persistence signal, and other data artifacts, we have produced high-quality science-ready images of the targets and their local environments. We observe targets with regions of UV emission suggestive of active star formation. In addition, several targets exhibit highly distorted host galaxy morphologies in the rest frame visible images. Photometric analyses reveals that brighter QSOs tend to be generally redder than their dimmer counterparts. Using emission line fluxes from the literature, we estimate that emission line contamination is relatively small in the rest frame UV images for the QSOs. Using archival VLA data, we have also created radio map overlays for each of our targets, allowing for analysis of the optical ...

  12. BROAD ABSORPTION LINE DISAPPEARANCE ON MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALES IN A LARGE QUASAR SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present 21 examples of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) trough disappearance in 19 quasars selected from systematic multi-epoch observations of 582 bright BAL quasars (1.9 –1. We discuss possible origins of this connection including disk-wind rotation and changes in shielding gas.

  13. Weak bump quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, B. J.; McDowell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the optical, ultraviolet and infrared continuum emission from quasars and their host galaxies was carried out. The main results were the discovery of quasars with unusually weak infrared emission and the construction of a quantitative estimate of the dispersion in quasar continuum properties. One of the major uncertainties in the measurement of quasar continuum strength is the contribution to the continuum of the quasar host galaxy as a function of wavelength. Continuum templates were constructed for different types of host galaxy and individual estimates made of the decomposed quasar and host continua based on existing observations of the target quasars. The results are that host galaxy contamination is worse than previously suspected, and some apparent weak bump quasars are really normal quasars with strong host galaxies. However, the existence of true weak bump quasars such as PHL 909 was confirmed. The study of the link between the bump strength and other wavebands was continued by comparing with IRAS data. There is evidence that excess far infrared radiation is correlated with weaker ultraviolet bumps. This argues against an orientation effect and implies a probable link with the host galaxy environment, for instance the presence of a luminous starburst. However, the evidence still favors the idea that reddening is not important in those objects with ultraviolet weak bumps. The same work has led to the discovery of a class of infrared weak quasars. Pushing another part of the envelope of quasar continuum parameter space, the IR-weak quasars have implications for understanding the effects of reddening internal to the quasars, the reality of ultraviolet turnovers, and may allow further tests of the Phinney dust model for the IR continuum. They will also be important objects for studying the claimed IR to x-ray continuum correlation.

  14. The cosmological evolution of flat-spectrum quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution and luminosity functions of a complete sample of quasars from the +- 40 declination strip of the Parkes 2.7-GHz survey have been investigated. The luminosity-volume (V/Vsub(m)) test strongly suggests that the flat-spectrum quasars which dominate the sample have an evolutionary history different from that of the steep-spectrum quasars which dominate the 3CR and 4C samples investigated previously. The bivariate luminosity function for the flat-spectrum quasars shows the same strong correlation between radio and optical luminosities exhibited by steep-spectrum quasars. The results of the luminosity-volume test considered in conjunction with radio structures, spectra, and source counts, lead to the tentative suggestion that the cosmological evolution of radio-active quasars is confined to those with extended radio structures. (author)

  15. Models of the quasar population. I. A new luminosity function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new functional form for the quasar luminosity function is tested using recent observational results for both bright and faint quasar count and redshift distributions. The form is of a fairly general type based on three free parameters and allows for quasars to undergo a combination of luminosity evolution and luminosity-dependent density evolution; an advantage to this approach is that it does not constrain quasars to follow a single type of evolution. Models of pure luminosity evolution or luminosity-dependent density evolution can be constructed, but the apparent magnitude distribution of observed quasars is best fitted by a combination model. The combination model also gives the correct redshift distribution for quasars with redshifts less than three and predicts that quasars brighter than B = 22 provide a 2-10 keV X-ray flux that is equal to 32 percent of the observed X-ray background. However, the model is flawed in that it predicts more high-redshift quasars than are observed. 45 references

  16. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.;

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a promine...

  17. Structure Function Analysis of Long Term Quasar Variability

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, W H; White, R L; Loomis, C

    2004-01-01

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of ~40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3...

  18. Discovery of DHM0054-284, a quasar of redshift 3.61

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery is reported of a quasar of redshift 3.61 detected in a broad band survey of stars using COSMOS measurements of UK Schmidt Telescope (UKST) photographs. The identification of the object as a quasar was confirmed by spectroscopic observations made with the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The quasar's redshift is the second highest so far detected and the highest for a quasar discovered using purely optical techniques. (author)

  19. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply at all

  20. MERLIN radio observations of the quasar 3C 273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MERLIN observations of the radio jet of the quasar 3C 273 at 408 and 1666 Mhz are presented. Most of the important features previously seen at 408 MHz are confirmed. The jet extends from 12 to 23 arcsec from the quasar, and has a single bright head at 408 MHz. At the higher resolution of the 1666-MHz map the head is seen to consist of at least three subcomponents, the brightest of which is set back from the outermost point of the jet. The ridgeline of emission shows oscillations from side to side ('wiggles'), the wavelength of which decreases markedly as the bright head is approached. (author)

  1. Catalog of candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 selected among X-Ray sources from the 3XMM-DR4 survey of the XMM-Newton observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorunzhev, G. A.; Burenin, R. A.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalog of 903 candidates for type 1 quasars at redshifts 3 catalog (the median X-ray flux is ≈5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-2 keV energy band) and located at high Galactic latitudes | b| > 20° in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) fields with a total area of about 300 deg2. Photometric SDSS data as well infrared 2MASS and WISE data were used to select the objects. We selected the point sources from the photometric SDSS catalog with a magnitude error δ mz' library that we compiled for these purposes using the EAZY software. Based on these data, we have rejected the objects whose spectral energy distributions are better described by the templates of stars at z = 0 and obtained a sample of quasars with photometric redshift estimates 2.75 3 in the investigated fields is shown to be about 80%. The normalized median absolute deviation (Δ z = | z spec - z phot|) is σ Δ z /(1+ z spec) = 0.07, while the outlier fraction is η = 9% when Δ z/(1 + z cпek.) > 0.2. The number of objects per unit area in our sample exceeds the number of quasars in the spectroscopic SDSS sample at the same redshifts approximately by a factor of 1.5. The subsequent spectroscopic testing of the redshifts of our selected candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 will allow the purity of this sample to be estimated more accurately.

  2. Seeking the epoch of maximum luminosity for dusty quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared luminosities νLν(7.8 μm) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 Survey Explorer. Infrared luminosity does not show a maximum at any redshift z < 5, reaching a plateau for z ≳ 3 with maximum luminosity νLν(7.8 μm) ≳ 1047 erg s–1; luminosity functions show one quasar Gpc–3 having νLν(7.8 μm) > 1046.6 erg s–1 for all 2 quasars first reached their maximum luminosity has not yet been identified at any redshift below 5. The most ultraviolet luminous quasars, defined by rest frame νLν(0.25 μm), have the largest values of the ratio νLν(0.25 μm)/νLν(7.8 μm) with a maximum ratio at z = 2.9. From these results, we conclude that the quasars most luminous in the ultraviolet have the smallest dust content and appear luminous primarily because of lessened extinction. Observed ultraviolet/infrared luminosity ratios are used to define 'obscured' quasars as those having >5 mag of ultraviolet extinction. We present a new summary of obscured quasars discovered with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and determine the infrared luminosity function of these obscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1. This is compared with infrared luminosity functions of optically discovered, unobscured quasars in the SDSS and in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. The comparison indicates comparable numbers of obscured and unobscured quasars at z ∼ 2.1 with a possible excess of obscured quasars at fainter luminosities.

  3. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies selected from the 40% sky area of the ALFALFA HI survey.I.Sample and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Wei; Lam, Man I; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The population of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies is crucial for understanding the extremes of galaxy formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (HI), the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample is absolutely one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local Universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galaxy images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended low surface brightness outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images in the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model for each galaxy image. Basing on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, mu_{0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined ...

  4. The real-space clustering of luminous red galaxies around z<0.6 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, N; Norberg, P; Porciani, C

    2008-01-01

    We measure the clustering of a sample of photometrically selected luminous red galaxies around a low redshift (0.2~ 10^{12} h^{-1} M_sun, Eddington ratios from 0.01 to 1 and lifetimes less than 10^{7} yr. Using simple models of halo occupation, these correspond to a number density of quasar hosts greater than 10^{-3} h^{3} Mpc^{-3} and stellar masses less than 10^{11} h^{-1} M_sun. The small-scale clustering signal can be in terpreted with the aid of our mock LRG catalogs, and depends on the manner in which quasars inhabit halos. We find that our small scale measurements are inconsistent with quasar positions being randomly subsampled from halo centers above a mass threshold, requiring a satellite fraction > 25 per cent.

  5. The dependence of quasar variability on black hole mass

    CERN Document Server

    Wold, M; Shang, Z

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the dependence of quasar variability on fundamental physical parameters like black hole mass, we have matched quasars from the QUEST1 Variability Survey with broad-lined objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The matched sample contains approximately 100 quasars, and the Sloan spectra are used to estimate black hole masses and bolometric luminosities. Variability amplitudes are measured from the QUEST1 light curves. We find that black hole mass correlates with several measures of the variability amplitude at the 99% significance level or better. The correlation does not appear to be caused by obvious selection effects inherent to flux-limited quasar samples, host galaxy contamination or other well-known correlations between quasar variability and luminosity/redshift. We evaluate variability as a function of rest-frame time lag using structure functions, and find further support for the variability--black hole mass correlation. The correlation is strongest for time lags of the order...

  6. Dust Reddening in SDSS Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, P F; Hall, P B; Richards, G T; Cooper, A S; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Jester, S; Brinkmann, J; Szokoly, G P; Hopkins, Philip F.; Strauss, Michael A.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Cooper, Ariana S.; Schneider, Donald P.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Jester, Sebastian; Szokoly, Gyula P.

    2004-01-01

    We explore the form of extragalactic reddening toward quasars using a sample of 9566 quasars with redshifts 0 0.1; less than 1% have E_{B-V} > 0.2, where the extinction is relative to quasars with modal colors. Reddening is uncorrelated with the presence of intervening narrow-line absorption systems, but reddened quasars are much more likely to show narrow absorption at the redshift of the quasar than are unreddened quasars. Thus the reddening towards quasars is dominated by SMC-like dust at the quasar redshift.

  7. Mapping the Galactic Halo with blue horizontal branch stars from the 2dF quasar redshift survey

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto; Mares, Peter J; CTIO,; University, Cornell

    2010-01-01

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from the 2Qz redshift survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index ~-2.5 in two different directions separated by 150 degrees on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase towards large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  8. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO WITH BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS FROM THE TWO-DEGREE FIELD QUASAR REDSHIFT SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch stars from the 2Qz Redshift Survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance, and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index ∼-2.5 in two different directions separated by about 1500 on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds, or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase toward large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non-Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  9. Quasars Probing Quasars II: The Anisotropic Clustering of Optically Thick Absorbers around Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, Jason X.

    2006-01-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We used a sample of 17 Lyman limit systems with column density N_HI > 10^19 cm^-2 selected from 149 projected quasar pair sightlines, to investigate the clustering pattern of optically thick absorbers around luminous quasars at z ~ 2.5. Specifically, we measured the quasar-absorber correlation function in the transverse direction, and found a ...

  10. Environment of the quasar PG 1613 + 65 (Mkn 876) - a close interacting pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic and two-color imaging of the environment of the bright, low-redshift quasar PG 1613 + 65 = Mkn 876 is presented. The quasar is situated in a poor cluster of galaxies of Abell richness class 0. The quasar's morphology includes a 25 arcsec long tidal tail emanating from the east side, 180 deg from the position angle of a secondary nucleus 1.9 arcsec from the main nucleus. The nebulous component of the quasar is analyzed and found to be more than twice as bright as a first-rank cluster galaxy. The average colors of the tidal tail and the main body are consistent with those of late-type spiral galaxies. The possibility that the quasar host is interacting with a very close neighbor is assessed, and the star-forming effects of such an interaction on the host galaxy are considered. 43 references

  11. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Christina M; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Schmidt, Kasper B; Ivezić, Željko; Ross, Nicholas P; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Riegel, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a pilot investigation to determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. We use a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 35,820 type 1 quasar candidates in a 239 square degree field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, using a combination of optical photometry and variability. Color analysis is performed on 5-band single- and multi-epoch SDSS optical photometry to a depth of r ~22.4. From these data, variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law model using 10 to >100 observations over timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type-1 quasars, largely from the SDSS. Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency ...

  12. Measuring Quasar Variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, E; Chambers, K C; Green, P J; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Marshall, P J; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Rix, H -W; Chlafly, E F S; Tonry, J L; Walter, F

    2014-01-01

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 10,000 square degree surveys. We use 100,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal time scales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01 to 10 years. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS dataset can efficiently distinguish between quasars and non-varying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in datasets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in del...

  13. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE NEAR-INFRARED SNAPSHOT SURVEY OF 3CR RADIO SOURCE COUNTERPARTS. III. RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS IN CONTEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the near-infrared (NIR) H-band photometric and morphological properties of low-z (z *) elliptical galaxies. The vast majority of FR II's (∼80%) occupy the most massive ellipticals and form a homogeneous population that is comparable to the population of radio-loud quasar (RLQ) host galaxies in the literature. However, a significant minority (∼20%) of the 3CR FR II's appears under-luminous with respect to quasar host galaxies. All FR II objects in this faint tail are either unusually red, or appear to be the brightest objects within a group. We discuss the apparent differences between the radio galaxy and RLQ host galaxy populations. RLQs appear to require ∼>1011 Msun host galaxies (and ∼109 Msun black holes), whereas radio galaxies and radio-quiet quasars can exist in galaxies down to ∼3 x 1010 Msun. This may be due to biases in the measured quasar host galaxy luminosities or populations studied, or due to a genuine difference in host galaxy. If due to a genuine difference, it would support the idea that radio and optical active galactic nuclei are two separate populations with a significant overlap.

  14. The density structure around quasars inferred from optical depth statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rollinde, E; Theuns, T; Petitjean, P; Chand, H

    2005-01-01

    We present a method for studying the proximity effect and use it to investigate the density structure around QSOs. It is based on the pixel optical depth probability distribution and its redshift evolution. We validate the method using mock spectra obtained from hydrodynamical simulations, and then apply it to a sample of 12 bright quasars at redshifts 2-3 observed with UVES at the VLT-UT2 Kueyen ESO telescope. These quasars do not show signatures of associated absorption and have a mean monochromatic luminosity of 5.4 10^31 ergs/s/Hz/h^2 at the Lyman limit. The distribution of optical depths changes considerably when the proper distance to the QSO is less than 10 Mpc/h. The size of this proximity region is small given that these QSOs are very bright, which suggests that the quasars are located in regions that are overdense by factors 2-10 on scales <= 10 Mpc/h.

  15. The sub-millimeter properties of broad absorption line quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Grimes, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out the first systematic survey of the sub-millimeter properties of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. 30 BAL quasars drawn from a homogeneously selected sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at redshifts 2 3 sigma significance. The far-infrared luminosities of these quasars are > 10^{13} L_solar. There is no correlation of sub-millimeter flux with either the strength of the broad absorption feature or with absolute magnitude in our sample. We compare the sub-millimeter f...

  16. Multiple images of the quasar 0957 + 561

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gravitationally imaged double quasar 0957 + 561 has been observed at an angular resolution of 0''.3 using the full VLA at 6 cm wavelength. The radio source G (2.3 mJy) was clearly resolved (deconvolved size 0''.33 x 0''.14 at P.A. = 1660); its centroid lies slightly north of both the nucleus of the primary lens galaxy G1 and the third VLBI component G'. Thus most of the flux in G is probably intrinsic to G1; its radio properties are quite similar to those of M87. Although the flux and position of G are consistent with the hypothesis that G' is the third quasar image B2, models fitted to the VLA structure of G do not include the anticipated point component. Limits on the flux of B2 as a function of its separation from the nucleus of the lens galaxy G1 are presented. Comparison of the maps with models of the imaging process suggests that the third quasar image lies within 0''.2 of the nucleus of the primary lens galaxy G1 and contains less than 1% of the flux of the bright B image. The possibility that 0957 + 561 is quintuple, and that the sum of the three missing images is the G radio source, is considered and found to be compatible with the optical and radio data if the three additional optical images suffer 1.6 mag of extinction in passing through the nucleus of the lens galaxy G1. A weak new radio source '' BN,'' with flux 0.34 mJy, was discovered 0''.35 north of the bright B quasar image. Detailed models of the image formation, compatible with previous radio and optical observations, predicted that the VLA radio jet, whose first image extends northeast of quasar image A, should have a second image of 0.4 mJy lying between the bright B quasar image and the nucleus of G1

  17. SDSS QUASARS IN THE WISE PRELIMINARY DATA RELEASE AND QUASAR CANDIDATE SELECTION WITH OPTICAL/INFRARED COLORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of 37,842 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, which have counterparts within 6'' in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Data Release. The overall WISE detection rate of the SDSS quasars is 86.7%, and it decreases to less than 50.0% when the quasar magnitude is fainter than i = 20.5. We derive the median color-redshift relations based on this SDSS-WISE quasar sample and apply them to estimate the photometric redshifts of the SDSS-WISE quasars. We find that by adding the WISE W1- and W2-band data to the SDSS photometry we can increase the photometric redshift reliability, defined as the percentage of sources with photometric and spectroscopic redshift difference less than 0.2, from 70.3% to 77.2%. We also obtain the samples of WISE-detected normal and late-type stars with SDSS spectroscopy, and present a criterion in the z – W1 versus g – z color-color diagram, z – W1 > 0.66(g – z) + 2.01, to separate quasars from stars. With this criterion we can recover 98.6% of 3089 radio-detected SDSS-WISE quasars with redshifts less than four and overcome the difficulty in selecting quasars with redshifts between 2.2 and 3 from SDSS photometric data alone. We also suggest another criterion involving the WISE color only, W1 – W2 > 0.57, to efficiently separate quasars with redshifts less than 3.2 from stars. In addition, we compile a catalog of 5614 SDSS quasars detected by both WISE and UKIDSS surveys and present their color-redshift relations in the optical and infrared bands. By using the SDSS ugriz, UKIDSS, YJHK, and WISE W1- and W2-band photometric data, we can efficiently select quasar candidates and increase the photometric redshift reliability up to 87.0%. We discuss the implications of our results on the future quasar surveys. An updated SDSS-WISE quasar catalog consisting of 101,853 quasars with the recently released WISE all-sky data is also provided.

  18. Leveraging Spitzer's Legacy: Quasars and Feedback at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon; Anderson, Scott; Bauer, Franz; Deo, Rajesh; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallagher, Sarah; Myers, Adam; Strauss, Michael; Zakamska, Nadia

    2009-04-01

    Recent research efforts to understand the evolution of galaxies and quasars are beginning to form a consistent picture. Galaxies and their supermassive black holes grow through mergers, but with decreasing characteristic mass scales over time. Much less, however, is known about the evolution of galaxies at high redshifts and the role played by energy injection from the onset of active black hole growth. Understanding these events requires investigating a statistically significant number of high-redshift quasars and crossing the L* boundary in luminosity. To construct an appropriate data set requires both relatively wide-areas (to find these rare objects) and moderate-depth imaging (to probe below L* in luminosity). Unfortunately, existing optical and MIR surveys fail to meet both of these requirements. Furthermore, both optical and MIR quasar selection are blindest at the most crucial redshifts. Here we propose to address these gaps with targeted IRAC observations of a few hundred high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Such a sample will enable the construction of a proper training set for the discovery of 2.5learn how to identify high-redshift quasars in other fields over a large range in luminosity. With this knowledge, we will crack open the high-z quasar discovery space within existing IRAC legacy surveys (SWIRE, XFLS, Bootes, COSMOS). With a large sample of high-redshift quasars spanning a large range in luminosity, we can turn the quasar luminosity function and quasar clustering analysis into tools for distinguishing between different evolutionary models and feedback prescriptions. In all, we will observe 330 SDSS quasars using 307 pointings/AORs, totaling 48.5 hours of IRAC time.

  19. Distinctive 21-cm structures of the first stars, galaxies and quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Li, Yuexing

    2014-12-01

    Observations of the redshifted 21-cm line with forthcoming radio telescopes promise to transform our understanding of the cosmic reionization. To unravel the underlying physical process, we investigate the 21-cm structures of three different ionizing sources - Population (Pop) III stars, the first galaxies and the first quasars - by using radiative transfer simulations that include both ionization of neutral hydrogen and resonant scattering of Lyα photons. We find that Pop III stars and quasars produce a smooth transition from an ionized and hot state to a neutral and cold state, because of their hard spectral energy distribution with abundant ionizing photons, in contrast to the sharp transition in galaxies. Furthermore, Lyα scattering plays a dominant role in producing the 21-cm signal because it determines the relation between hydrogen spin temperature and gas kinetic temperature. This effect, also called Wouthuysen-Field coupling, depends strongly on the ionizing source. It is strongest around galaxies, where the spin temperature is highly coupled to that of the gas, resulting in extended absorption troughs in the 21-cm brightness temperature. However, in the case of Pop III stars, the 21-cm signal shows both emission and absorption regions around a small H II bubble. For quasars, a large emission region in the 21-cm signal is produced, and the absorption region decreases as the size of the H II bubble becomes large due to the limited travelling time of photons. We predict that future surveys from large radio arrays, such as the Murchison Widefield Array, the Low Frequency Array and the Square Kilometre Array, might be able to detect the 21-cm signals of primordial galaxies and quasars, but possibly not those of Pop III stars, because of their small angular diameters.

  20. Discovery of Universal Elliptical Outflow Structures in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Lovegrove, Justin; Leiter, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-nine quasars in the background of the Magellanic Clouds had brightness records monitored by the MACHO project during the years 1992 - 99. Because the circumpolar fields of these quasars had no seasonal sampling defects, their observation produced data sets well suited to further careful analysis. Following a preliminary report wherein we showed the existence of reverberation in the data for one of the radio-quiet quasars in this group, we now show that similar reverberations have been seen in all of the 55 radio-quiet quasars with adequate data, making possible the determination of the quasar inclination to the observer's line of sight. The reverberation signatures indicate the presence of large-scale elliptical outflow structures similar to that predicted by the Elvis (2000) and "dusty torus" models of quasars, whose characteristic sizes vary within a surprisingly narrow range of scales. More importantly the observed opening angle relative to the polar axis of the universal elliptical outflow structure...

  1. COLD FLOWS AND THE FIRST QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have to be assembled within the first 800 million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation covering a volume (0.75 Gpc)3 appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of ∼109 M☉ black holes as early as z ∼ 7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches Mhalo > or approx. 1012M☉. This cold-flow-driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.

  2. COLD FLOWS AND THE FIRST QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Matteo, T.; Khandai, N.; DeGraf, C.; Feng, Y.; Croft, R. A. C. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Lopez, J. [Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Springel, V. [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 68118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBHs) have to be assembled within the first 800 million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation covering a volume (0.75 Gpc){sup 3} appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes as early as z {approx} 7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches M{sub halo} > or approx. 10{sup 1}2{sup M}{sub Sun }. This cold-flow-driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.

  3. Astrometric and Photometric Variability in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, A. H.; Bouquillon, S.; Penna, J. L.; Taris, F.; Anton, S.; Souchay, J.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Pinto, S. dos Reis Carvalho

    2010-05-01

    Quasars are the choicest objects to define a quasi-inertial reference frame. At the same time, they are active galactic nuclei powered by a massive black hole. As the astrometric precision of ground-based optical observations approaches the limit set by the forthcoming GAIA mission, astrometric stability can be investigated. Though the optical emission from the core region usually exceeds the other components by a factor of a hundred, the variability of those components must surely imply some measure of variability of the astrometric baricenter. Whether this is confirmed or not, it puts important constraints on the relationship of the quasar's central engine to the surrounding distribution of matter. To investigate the correlation between long-term optical variability and what is dubbed as the “random walk” of the astrometric center, a program is being pursued at the WFI/ESO 2.2m. The sample was selected from quasars known to undergo large-amplitude and long-term optical variations (Smith et al. 1993; Teerikorpi 2000). The observations are typically made every two months. The treatment is differential, comparing the quasar position and brightness against a sample of selected stars for which the average relative distances and magnitudes remain constant. The provisional results for four objects bring strong support to the hypothesis of a relationship between astrometric and photometric variability. A full account is provided by Andrei et al. (2009).

  4. Quasar Mass Functions Across Cosmic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    I present mass functions of actively accreting black holes detected in different quasar surveys which in concert cover a wide range of cosmic history. I briefly address what we learn from these mass functions. I summarize the motivation for such a study and the methods by which we determine black...... hole masses....

  5. Exploratory Study of the X-Ray Properties of Quasars With Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Chartas, George; Charlton, Jane C.

    2008-01-01

    We have used archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of quasars hosting intrinsic narrow UV absorption lines (intrinsic NALs) to carry out an exploratory survey of their X-ray properties. Our sample consists of three intrinsic-NAL quasars and one "mini-BAL" quasar, plus four quasars without intrinsic absorption lines for comparison. These were drawn in a systematic manner from an optical/UV-selected sample. The X-ray properties of intrinsic-NAL quasars are indistinguishable from those of...

  6. Radio structure in quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, observational attention is given to the extended extragalactic radio sources associated with quasars. The isolated compact radio sources, often identified with quasars, are only included in the discussions. Three aspects of the radio structure in quasars and their cosmic evolution are considered: a study of the parsec scale morphology in quasar cores, in relation to the extended morphologies; an investigation of possible epoch dependent hotspot properties as well as a more detailed investigation of this fine scale structure; a VLA project was carried out to obtain morphological information on scales of 0.5 arcsec on high redshift quasars and to investigate possible epoch dependent morphological properties. MERLIN observations at 0.1 arcsec resolution to supplement the VLA data were initiated. (Auth.)

  7. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ≈400-600 hard X-ray (∼> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH ∼24 cm–2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH ≈ 7 × 1024 cm–2 if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Kα line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%

  8. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  9. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fiore, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Matt, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  10. The 2QDES Pilot : the luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering.

    OpenAIRE

    Chehade, B.; Shanks, T.; Findlay, J.; Metcalfe, N.; Sawangwit, U.; Irwin, M; González-Solares, E.; Fine, S.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Croom, S.; Jurek, R. J.; Parkinson, D.; Bielby, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ${\\approx}10000$ quasars from ${\\approx}150$ deg$^2$ of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with $0.8{

  11. High-redshift obscured quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Sansigre, Alejo; Rawlings, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Using mid-infrared and radio criteria, we select a sample of candidate z~2 obscured quasars. Optical spectroscopy confirms about half of these as type-2 quasars, and modelling the population suggests 50-80% of the quasars are obscured. We find some flat radio spectrum type-2 quasars, and tentative evidence for obscuration unrelated to the torus. Using a similar sample, we also find evidence for a significant fraction of Compton-thick quasars.

  12. AN X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY OF HIGHLY RADIO-LOUD QUASARS AT z > 4: JET-LINKED EMISSION IN THE BRIGHTEST RADIO BEACONS OF THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a systematic study of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of a sample of 17 highly radio-loud quasars (HRLQs) at z > 4 with sensitive X-ray coverage from new Chandra and archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations. Eight of the new and archival observations are reported in this work for the first time. New Chandra observations of two moderately radio-loud and highly optically luminous quasars at z ∼> 4 are also reported. Our HRLQ sample represents the top ∼5% of radio-loud quasars (RLQs) in terms of radio loudness. We found that our HRLQs have an X-ray emission enhancement over HRLQs at lower redshifts (by a typical factor of ≈3), and this effect, after controlling for several factors which may introduce biases, has been solidly estimated to be significant at the 3σ-4σ level. HRLQs at z = 3-4 are also found to have a similar X-ray emission enhancement over z H ∼ 1023 cm–2) may be present. Our z > 4 HRLQs generally have higher X-ray luminosities than those for the composite broadband spectral energy distributions of HRLQs at lower redshift, which further illustrates and supports the X-ray emission enhancement of z > 4 HRLQs. Some of our HRLQs also show an excess of mid-infrared emission which may originate from the synchrotron emission of the relativistic jets. None of our z > 4 HRLQs is detected by the Fermi-LAT two-year survey, which provides constraints on jet-emission models.

  13. The quasar mass-luminosity plane - I. A sub-Eddington limit for quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.; Elvis, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We use 62185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample to explore the relationship between black hole mass and luminosity. Black hole masses were estimated based on the widths of their Hβ, MgII and CIV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. We find that, over the range 0.2 4.0, the most luminous low-mass quasars are at their Eddington luminosity, but the most luminous high-mass quasars in each redshift bin fall short of their Eddington luminosities, with the shortfall of the order of 10 or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ~0.15 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. We also examine the highest mass quasars in every redshift bin in an effort to learn more about quasars that are about to cease their luminous accretion. We conclude that the quasar mass-luminosity locus contains a number of new puzzles that must be explained theoretically.

  14. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...... that the black hole masses are very large, of order 1 to 10 billion solar masses, even at the highest redshifts of 4 to 6. The black holes must build up their mass very fast in the early universe. Yet they do not grow much larger than that: a maximum mass of about 10 billion solar masses is also observed....... Preliminary mass functions of active black holes are presented for several quasar samples, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, common concerns related to the application of the mass scaling relations, especially for high redshift quasars, are briefly discussed....

  15. FIRST-2MASS RED QUASARS: TRANSITIONAL OBJECTS EMERGING FROM THE DUST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a sample of 120 dust-reddened quasars identified by matching radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters survey with the near-infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and color-selecting red sources. Optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy provide broad wavelength sampling of their spectral energy distributions that we use to determine their reddening, characterized by E(B – V). We demonstrate that the reddening in these quasars is best described by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-like dust. This sample spans a wide range in redshift and reddening (0.1 ∼< z ∼< 3, 0.1 ∼< E(B – V) ∼< 1.5), which we use to investigate the possible correlation of luminosity with reddening. At every redshift, dust-reddened quasars are intrinsically the most luminous quasars. We interpret this result in the context of merger-driven quasar/galaxy co-evolution where these reddened quasars are revealing an emergent phase during which the heavily obscured quasar is shedding its cocoon of dust prior to becoming a 'normal' blue quasar. When correcting for extinction, we find that, depending on how the parent population is defined, these red quasars make up ∼< 15%-20% of the luminous quasar population. We estimate, based on the fraction of objects in this phase, that its duration is 15%-20% as long as the unobscured, blue quasar phase.

  16. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  17. Evolution of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Amanda; Kennefick, J.; Mahmood, A.

    2012-05-01

    A common practice when formulating quasar luminosity functions (QLF) has been to adopt an average spectral index, $\\alpha$, for the sample even though it is well known that quasars exhibit a broad range of spectral energy distributions (SED.) We have investigated the possible evolution of $\\alpha$ as a function of redshift, as any evolution in this parameter would introduce or mask evolution in the QLF. We imaged 103 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars in the optical and near-infrared bands, near in time to mitigate the effects of variability, in three redshift bins centered at $z\\approx 1.9$, $2.7$, and $4.0$, corresponding to look-back times of 10-12 billion years. We present restframe UV-optical SED’s and spectral indices and discuss possible evolution in our sample. We also use single epoch spectra of the quasars to estimate the mass of the central black hole and discuss possible correlations of quasar properties such as mass, luminosity, and spectral shape.

  18. The UV Properties of SDSS Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trammell, G B; Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Hall, P B; Anderson, S F; Brinkmann, J; Trammell, George B.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of the broadband UV/optical properties of z<3.4 quasars matched in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) General Data Release 1 (GR1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3 (SDSS DR3). Of the 6371 DR3 quasars covered by 204 GR1 tiles, 5380 have near-UV detections, while 3034 have both near-UV and far-UV detections using a matching radius of 7". Most of the DR3 sample quasars are detected in the near-UV until z~1.7, with the near-UV detection fraction dropping to ~50% by z~2. Statistical tests performed on the distributions of non-detections indicate that the optically-selected quasars missed in the UV tend to be optically faint or at high redshift. The GALEX positions are shown to be consistent with the SDSS astrometry to within an rms scatter of 0.6-0.7" in each coordinate, and empirically determined photometric errors from multi-epoch GALEX observations significantly exceed the Poissonian errors quoted in the GR1 object catalogs. The UV-detected quasars are well separated ...

  19. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Scott; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few per cent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad H-beta line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [OIII] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ~30-45 degrees, consistent with simple AGN unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  20. Bright and Faint Ends of Lyα Luminosity Functions at z = 2 Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGNs, Magnification Bias, and ISM H I Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Akira; Ouchi, Masami; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We present the Lyα luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3137 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 in five independent blank fields. This sample of LAEs is the largest to date and covers a very wide Lyα luminosity range of {log}{L}{Lyα }=41.7{--}44.4 erg s‑1. We determine the Lyα LF at z = 2.2 with unprecedented accuracy and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of {L}{Lyα }*={5.29}-1.13+1.67× {10}42 erg s‑1, {φ }{Lyα }*={6.32}-2.31+3.08× {10}-4 Mpc‑3, and α =-{1.75}-0.09+0.10, showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ({log}{L}{Lyα }\\gt 43.4 erg s‑1). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have a bright counterpart(s) in either the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at z ∼ 2 down to the faint magnitude limit of M UV ≃ ‑22.5 and to constrain the faint-end slope of the AGN UV LF, α AGN = ‑1.2 ± 0.1, which is flatter than those at z > 4. Based on the Lyα and UV LFs from our and previous studies, we find an increase of Lyα escape fraction {f}{esc}{Lyα } from z ∼ 0 to 6 by two orders of magnitude. This large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase can be explained neither by the evolution of stellar population nor by outflow alone, but by the evolution of neutral hydrogen H i density in the interstellar medium that enhances dust attenuation for Lyα by resonance scattering. Our uniform expanding shell models suggest that the typical H i column density decreases from {N}{{H}{{I}}}∼ 7× {10}19 (z ∼ 0) to ∼1 × 1018 cm‑2 (z ∼ 6) to explain the large {f}{esc}{Lyα } increase.

  1. Discovery of molecular gas around HD 131835 in an APEX molecular line survey of bright debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Juhász, A; Ábrahám, P; Balog, Z; Kóspál, Á; Pascucci, I; Szabó, Gy M; Vavrek, R; Curé, M; Csengeri, T; Grady, C; Güsten, R; Kiss, Cs

    2015-01-01

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30m radiotelescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk both at 70 and 100$\\mu$m, with a characteristic radius of ~170 au. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles $\\beta$ Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young ($\\leq$40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of detectable amount of gas in the m...

  2. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission line star VFTS 399

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J S; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Taylor, W D; Walborn, N R; Bird, A J; Sana, H; de Mink, S E; Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Langer, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Schneider, F R N; Soszyński, I

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. We find VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select HeI lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that ...

  3. The space density of Compton-thick AGN at z~0.8 in the zCOSMOS-Bright Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Gilli, R; Comastri, A; Iwasawa, K; Zamorani, G; Mainieri, V; Bongiorno, A

    2014-01-01

    The obscured accretion phase in BH growth is a key ingredient in many models linking the AGN activity with the evolution of their host galaxy. At present, a complete census of obscured AGN is still missing. The purpose of this work is to assess the reliability of the [NeV] emission line at 3426 A to pick up obscured AGN up to z~1 by assuming that [NeV] is a reliable proxy of the intrinsic AGN luminosity and using moderately deep X-ray data to characterize the amount of obscuration. A sample of 69 narrow-line (Type 2) AGN at z=0.65-1.20 were selected from the 20k-zCOSMOS Bright galaxy sample on the basis of the presence of the [NeV] emission. The X-ray properties of these galaxies were then derived using the Chandra-COSMOS coverage of the field; the X-ray-to-[NeV] flux ratio, coupled with X-ray spectral and stacking analyses, was then used to infer whether Compton-thin or Compton-thick absorption were present in these sources. Then the [NeV] luminosity function was computed to estimate the space density of Com...

  4. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an iP1 dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB zP1 magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 × 1047 erg s–1, and a black hole mass of 6.9 × 109 M☉. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Lyβ peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 iP1 dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 zP1 dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  5. Large SDSS quasar groups and their statistical significance

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Changbom; Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Heinamaki, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    We use a volume-limited sample of quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 quasar catalog to identify quasar groups and address their statistical significance. This quasar sample has a uniform selection function on the sky and nearly a maximum possible contiguous volume that can be drawn from the DR7 catalog. Quasar groups are identified by using the Friend-of-Friend algorithm with a set of fixed comoving linking lengths. We find that the richness distribution of the richest 100 quasar groups or the size distribution of the largest 100 groups are statistically equivalent with those of randomly-distributed points with the same number density and sky coverage when groups are identified with the linking length of 70 h-1Mpc. It is shown that the large-scale structures like the huge Large Quasar Group (U1.27) reported by Clowes et al. (2013) can be found with high probability even if quasars have no physical clustering, and does not challenge the initially homogeneous cosmological models. Our results are...

  6. Discovery of Molecular Gas around HD 131835 in an APEX Molecular Line Survey of Bright Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, A.; Henning, Th.; Juhász, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Balog, Z.; Kóspál, Á.; Pascucci, I.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Vavrek, R.; Curé, M.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Güsten, R.; Kiss, Cs.

    2015-11-01

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30 m radio telescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk at both 70 and 100 μm, with a characteristic radius of ˜170 AU. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles β Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young (≤40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of a detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young, and in terms of its disk, more massive analog of the β Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system, similar to HD 21997, possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.

  7. QUASAR SELECTION BASED ON PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a method for separating quasars from other variable point sources using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 light-curve data for ∼ 10,000 variable objects. To statistically describe quasar variability, we use a damped random walk model parametrized by a damping timescale, τ, and an asymptotic amplitude (structure function), SF∞. With the aid of an SDSS spectroscopically confirmed quasar sample, we demonstrate that variability selection in typical extragalactic fields with low stellar density can deliver complete samples with reasonable purity (or efficiency, E). Compared to a selection method based solely on the slope of the structure function, the inclusion of the τ information boosts E from 60% to 75% while maintaining a highly complete sample (98%) even in the absence of color information. For a completeness of C = 90%, E is boosted from 80% to 85%. Conversely, C improves from 90% to 97% while maintaining E = 80% when imposing a lower limit on τ. With the aid of color selection, the purity can be further boosted to 96%, with C = 93%. Hence, selection methods based on variability will play an important role in the selection of quasars with data provided by upcoming large sky surveys, such as Pan-STARRS and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). For a typical (simulated) LSST cadence over 10 years and a photometric accuracy of 0.03 mag (achieved at i ∼ 22), C is expected to be 88% for a simple sample selection criterion of >100 days. In summary, given an adequate survey cadence, photometric variability provides an even better method than color selection for separating quasars from stars.

  8. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Selected from the 40% Sky Area of the ALFALFA H I Survey. I. Sample and Statistical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man I.; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-06-01

    The population of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, which are objects with central surface brightnesses at least one magnitude fainter than the night sky, is crucial for understanding the extremes of galactic formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (H i), the α.40 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) sample is one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galactic images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended LSB outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images accurately in both the g and r bands for each galaxy in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture using the SExtractor software and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model using the Galfit software for each galactic image in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample. Based on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, {{μ }0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined a sample of LSB galaxies consisting of 1129 galaxies with {{μ }0}(B) > 22.5 mag arcsec‑2 and the axis ratio b/a > 0.3 from the 12,423 α.40 SDSS DR7 galaxies. This H i-selected sample of LSB galaxies is a relatively unbiased sample of gas-rich and disk-dominated LSB galaxies, which is complete both in H i observation and the optical magnitude within the limit of the SDSS DR7 photometric survey. This LSB galactic sample spans from 22.5 to 28.3 in {{μ }0}(B) with a fraction of 4% fainter than 25.0 mag arcsec‑2 in B-band central surface brightness and distributes from ‑27.0 to ‑12.3 mag in absolute magnitude in the B band (M(B)), including the 43 faintest galaxies (M(B) > ‑17.3 mag). This sample is

  9. The 1Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M J I; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T; Cool, R; Le Floc'h, E; Kochanek, C S; Armus, L; Bian, C; Higdon, J; Higdon, S; Papovich, C; Rieke, G; Rieke, M; Smith, J D; Soifer, B T; Weedman, D; Brown, Michael J. I.; Brand, Kate; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Cool, Richard; Floc'h, Emeric Le; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Armus, Lee; Bian, Chao; Higdon, Jim; Higdon, Sarah; Papovich, Casey; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia; Weedman, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We determine the rest-frame 8 micron luminosity function of type I quasars over the redshift range 1survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bootes field. The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) has measured redshifts for 270 of the R<21.7 sources and we estimate that the contamination of the remaining 22 sources by stars and galaxies is low. We are able to select quasars missed by ultra-violet excess quasar surveys, including reddened type I quasars and 2.2quasars with optical colors similar to main sequence stars. We find reddened type I quasars comprise 20% of the type I quasar population. Nonetheless, the shape, normalization, and evolution of the rest-frame 8 micron luminosity function is comparable to that of quasars selected from optical surveys. The 8 micron luminosity function of type I quasars is well approximated by a power-law with i...

  10. Extragalactic Extinction Laws and Quasar Structure from Color differences Between Images of Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio

    2011-11-01

    The action of the mean gravitational field of an intervening galaxy sufficiently aligned with a distant quasar can form several images of this object (multiple imaged quasar). Random fluctuations of the gravitational field induced by the highly inhomogeneous granulation of stars or in dark matter clumps of the lens galaxy mass distribution can subdivide the images in scales of microarcsecs (microlensing by stars) or miliarcsecs (mililensing by dark matter clumps). Anomalies induced by microlensing in the flux brightness of the images can be very strong for small sources or be averaged out by sufficiently large sources. Thus, microlensing magnification of the flux of a radially stratified source can be wavelength dependent (chromaticity). On the other hand, in their path through the lens galaxy the photons of the quasar images are also affected by the patchily distributed interstellar medium (dust extinction). Thus, the wavelength dependence of extinction can be obtained from the flux ratios between two images. In this work we review the use of quasar spectra to disentangle microlensing and dust extinction (based in the comparison between the continuum and emission line flux ratios for different images of the quasar) discussing the impact of the intrinsic source variability in this procedure. We will also review some results derived using this technique like the low fraction of mass in MACHOS in the dark halos of lens galaxies, the unexpected large sizes of the accretion disks present in the central region of lensed quasars or the derivation of extinction curves in the extragalactic domain that reveals a variability in dust properties similar to the one found in the Local Group of galaxies.

  11. Magnification of light from many distant quasars by gravitational lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Loeb, Abraham

    2002-06-27

    Exceptionally bright quasars with redshifts up to z = 6.28 have recently been discovered. Quasars are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies. Their maximum (Eddington) luminosity depends on the mass of the black hole, and the brighter quasars are inferred to have black holes with masses of more than a few billion solar masses. The existence of such massive black holes poses a challenge to models for the formation of structures in the early Universe, as it requires their formation within one billion years of the Big Bang. Here we show that up to one-third of known quasars with z approximately equal to 6 will have had their observed flux magnified by a factor of ten or more, as a consequence of gravitational lensing by galaxies along the line of sight. The inferred abundance of quasar host galaxies, as well as the luminosity density provided by the quasars, has therefore been substantially overestimated. PMID:12087397

  12. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  13. An HST/WFPC2 survey of bright young clusters in M31. IV. Ages and mass estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Perina, S; Barmby, P; Beasley, M A; Bellazzini, M; Brodie, J P; Federici, L; Pecci, F Fusi; Galleti, S; Hodge, P W; Huchra, J P; Kissler-Patig, M; Puzia, T H; Strader, J

    2009-01-01

    {Aims.} We present the main results of an imaging survey of possible young massive clusters (YMC) in M31 performed with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We present the images and color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of all of our targets. {Methods.} The reddening, age and, metallicity of the clusters were estimated by comparing the observed CMDs and luminosity functions with theoretical models. Stellar masses were estimated by comparison with theoretical models in the log(Age) vs. absolute integrated magnitude plane. {Results.} Nineteen of the twenty surveyed candidates were confirmed to be real star clusters. Three of the clusters were found not to be good YMC candidates from newly available integrated spectroscopy and were in fact found to be old from their CMD. Of the remaining sixteen clusters, fourteen have ages between 25 Myr and 280 Myr, two have older ages than 500 Myr (lower limits). By including ten other YMC with HST photometry from the literature we have...

  14. Hα Surface Brightness Profiles of Star-Forming Galaxies and Dependence on Halo Mass Using the HAGGIS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S.; Wilman, D.; Erwin, P.; Koppenhöfer, J.; Gutierrez, L.; Beckman, J.; Saglia, R.; Bender, R.

    2014-03-01

    We present the first results from the Hα Galaxy Groups Imaging Survey (HAGGIS), a narrow-band imaging survey of SDSS groups at z Issac Newton Telescope (INT). In total, we observed 100 galaxy groups with a wide range of halo mass (1012 - 1014 M⊙) in pairs of narrow-band filters selected to get continuum subtracted rest-frame Hα images for each galaxy. The excellent data allows us to detect Hα down to the 10-18 ergs/s/cm2/arcsec2 level. Here, we examine the role played by halo mass and galaxy stellar mass in deciding the overall star formation activity in star forming disks by comparing stacked Hα profiles of galaxies in different halo mass and stellar mass bins. With this preliminary study, we have found that the star-formation activity in star-forming galaxies decreases in larger halos compared to the field galaxies. Using median equivalent width profiles, we can infer how environmental processes affect star-forming galaxies differently at different radii.

  15. OBSCURATION BY GAS AND DUST IN LUMINOUS QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the connection between absorption by neutral gas and extinction by dust in mid-infrared (IR) selected luminous quasars. We use a sample of 33 quasars at redshifts 0.7 < z ≲ 3 in the 9 deg2 Boötes multiwavelength survey field that are selected using Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera colors and are well-detected as luminous X-ray sources (with >150 counts) in Chandra observations. We divide the quasars into dust-obscured and unobscured samples based on their optical to mid-IR color, and measure the neutral hydrogen column density N H through fitting of the X-ray spectra. We find that all subsets of quasars have consistent power law photon indices Γ ≈ 1.9 that are uncorrelated with N H. We classify the quasars as gas-absorbed or gas-unabsorbed if N H > 1022 cm–2 or N H < 1022 cm–2, respectively. Of 24 dust-unobscured quasars in the sample, only one shows clear evidence for significant intrinsic N H, while 22 have column densities consistent with N H < 1022 cm–2. In contrast, of the nine dust-obscured quasars, six show evidence for intrinsic gas absorption, and three are consistent with N H < 1022 cm–2. We conclude that dust extinction in IR-selected quasars is strongly correlated with significant gas absorption as determined through X-ray spectral fitting. These results suggest that obscuring gas and dust in quasars are generally co-spatial, and confirm the reliability of simple mid-IR and optical photometric techniques for separating quasars based on obscuration

  16. Toward an Understanding of Changing-look Quasars: An Archival Spectroscopic Search in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Eracleous, Michael; Green, Paul J.; Morganson, Eric; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Shen, Yue; Wilkinson, Tessa D.; Blanton, Michael R.; Dwelly, Tom; Georgakakis, Antonis; Greene, Jenny E.; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Merloni, Andrea; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    The uncertain origin of the recently discovered “changing-look” quasar phenomenon—in which a luminous quasar dims significantly to a quiescent state in repeat spectroscopy over ˜10-year timescales—may present unexpected challenges to our understanding of quasar accretion. To better understand this phenomenon, we take a first step toward building a sample of changing-look quasars with a systematic but simple archival search for these objects in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. By leveraging the >10-year baselines for objects with repeat spectroscopy, we uncover two new changing-look quasars and a third discovered previously. Decomposition of the multiepoch spectra and analysis of the broad emission lines suggest that the quasar accretion disk emission dims because of rapidly decreasing accretion rates (by factors of ≳2.5), while disfavoring changes in intrinsic dust extinction for the two objects where these analyses are possible. Broad emission line energetics also support intrinsic dimming of quasar emission as the origin for this phenomenon rather than transient tidal disruption events or supernovae. Although our search criteria included quasars at all redshifts and transitions from either quasar-like to galaxy-like states or the reverse, all of the clear cases of changing-look quasars discovered were at relatively low redshift (z˜ 0.2{--}0.3) and only exhibit quasar-like to galaxy-like transitions.

  17. A Systematic Search for Changing-Look Quasars in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, C.

    2015-09-01

    AGN are known to be variable phenomena. However, it is only relatively recently that multiple spectra of the same AGN at high redshift have become available, mainly in part due to large spectroscopic surveys such as the SDSS. I present results from a search for significant Broad Emission Line (BEL) changes in quasars selected based on their light curves in SDSS and PanSTARRS. Such changing-look quasars can provide direct observational evidence for the physical processes happening within the AGN.

  18. Seeking the Epoch of Maximum Luminosity for Dusty Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Vardanyan, Valeri; Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    Infrared luminosities vLv(7.8 um) arising from dust reradiation are determined for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars with 1.4 ~ 3 with maximum luminosity vLv(7.8 um) >~ 10^{47} erg per s; luminosity functions show one quasar per cubic Gpc having vLv(7.8 um) > 10^{46.6} erg per s for all 2 < z < 5. We conclude that the ...

  19. Quasar absorption spectra and the structure of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the spacing between absorption-line systems in quasar spectra and comparison against deep optical survey data for the separation between superclusters of galaxies indicates that the absorption originates in the superclusters. Supported by analogous data on the absorbing gas in the galactic and Magellanic Cloud halos, this inference sharpens theoretical conclusions as to the properties of superclusters. The problem of the unidentified quasar absorption lines is discussed

  20. Quasar absorption spectra and the structure of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of the spacing between absorption-line systems in quasar spectra and comparison against deep optical survey data for the separation between superclusters of galaxies indicates that the absorption originates in the superclusters. Supported by analogous data on the absorbing gas in the galactic and Magellanic Cloud halos, this inference sharpens theoretical conclusions as to the properties of superclusters. The problem of the unidentified quasar absorption lines is discussed.

  1. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Anne H; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming NFW cluster profiles, particularly a...

  2. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  3. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  4. A spectroscopic survey of the youngest field stars in the solar neighbourhood. I. The optically bright sample

    CERN Document Server

    Guillout, P; Frasca, A; Ferrero, R Freire; Marilli, E; Mignemi, G; Biazzo, K; Bouvier, J; Monier, R; Motch, C; Sterzik, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the first results of a ground-based programme conducted on 1-4m class telescopes. Our sample consists of 1097 active and presumably young stars, all of them being optical counterparts of RASS X-ray sources in the northern hemisphere. We concentrate on the 704 optically brightest (V_Ticho<=9.5 mag) candidates. We acquired high-res spectroscopy in the Halpha/Li spectral regions for 426 of such stars without relevant literature data. We describe the sample and the observations and we start to discuss its physical properties. We used a cross-correlation technique and other tools to derive accurate radial/rotational velocities and to perform a spectral classification for both single and SB2 stars. The spectral subtraction technique was used to derive chromospheric activity levels and Li abundances. We estimated the fraction of young single stars and multiple systems in stellar soft X-ray surveys and the contamination by more evolved systems, like RS CVn's. We classified stars on the basis of Li abund...

  5. Unveiling the Intrinsic X-ray Properties of Broad Absorption Line Quasars with a Relatively Unbiased Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Morabito, Leah K; Leighly, Karen M; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Shankar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a higher intrinsic fraction of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) than that obtained in optical surveys, on which most previous X-ray studies of BALQSOs have focused. Here we present Chandra observations of 18 BALQSOs at $z\\sim2$, selected from a near-infrared (2MASS) sample, where the BALQSO fraction is likely to be close to the intrinsic fraction. We measure photon indices using the stacked spectra of the optically-faint ($i-K_s\\geq 2.3$ mag) and optically-bright ($i-K_s < 2.3$ mag) samples to be $\\Gamma \\simeq 1.5$--2.1. We constrain their intrinsic column density by modelling the X-ray fractional hardness ratio, finding a mean column density of $3.5\\times10^{22}$ \\cmsq\\ assuming neutral absorption. We incorporate SDSS optical measurements (rest frame UV) to study the broadband spectral index between the X-ray and UV bands, and compare this to a large sample of normal quasars. We find that the optically-faint BALQSOs are X-ray weaker than the optically-bright ones, and ...

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Images of Nearby Luminous Quasars. 2; Results for Eight Quasars and Tests of the Detection Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1995-01-01

    Observations with the Wide-Field Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are presented for eight intrinsically luminous quasars with redshifts between 0.16 and 0.29. These observations, when combined with a similar HST study of the quasar PKS 2349-014, show that luminous nearby quasars exist in a variety of environments. Seven companion galaxies brighter than M(V) = 16.5 (H(sub 0) = 100 km s(sup -1) Mpc(sup -1), Omega(sub 0) = 1.0) lie within a projected distance of 25 kpc of the quasars; three of the companions are located closer than 3'' (6 kpc projected distance) from the quasars, well within the volume that would be enclosed by a typical L* host galaxy. The observed association of quasars and companion galaxies is statistically significant and may he an important element in the luminous-quasar phenomenon. Apparent host galaxies are detected for three of the quasars: PG 1116+215, 3C 273, and PG 1444+407; the hosts have an average absolute magnitude of about 0.6 mag brighter than L*. The agreement between the previously published major-axis directions in ground-based images and in the present HST images of 3C 273 and PG 1444+407 constitutes important evidence supporting the reality of these candidate host galaxies. Upper limits are placed on the visual-band brightnesses of representative galactic hosts for all the quasars. These limits are established by placing galaxy images obtained with HST underneath the quasars and measuring at what faintness level the known galaxies are detected. On average, the HST spirals would have been detected if they were as faint as 1 mag below L*, and the early-type galaxies could have been detected down to a brightness level of about L*, where L* is the Schechter characteristic luminosity of field galaxies. Smooth, featureless galaxy models (exponential disks or de Vaucouleurs profiles) are fitted to the residual light after a best-fitting point source is subtracted from the quasar images. The results show that smooth spiral

  7. Properties of galaxies in SDSS Quasar environments at z < 0.2

    OpenAIRE

    Coldwell, Georgina V.; Lambas, Diego G.

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the environment of low redshift, z < 0.2, SDSS quasars using the spectral and photometric information of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release (SDSS-DR3). We compare quasar neighbourhoods with field and high density environments through an analysis on samples of typical galaxies and groups. We compute the surrounding surface number density of galaxies finding that quasar environments systematically avoid high density regions. Their mean environments correspo...

  8. Bayesian High-Redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Peters, Christina M; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D; Trump, Jonathan R; Riegel, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection "wedges" and to 2.23. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  9. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  10. THE EVOLUTION OF THE DUSTY TORUS COVERING FACTOR IN QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have assembled a large sample of 5996 quasars at 2.0 ≤ z ≤ 2.4 (high-z) or 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 1.1 (low-z) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ninth and seventh data release and quasar catalogs. The spectral energy distributions of quasars were constructed by collecting WISE, UKIDSS, and GALEX photometric data in addition to SDSS data, from which the IR luminosity at 1-7 μm and bolometric luminosity at 1100 Å-1 μm were calculated. A red tail is clearly seen in the distribution of the spectral index over 1100 Å-1 μm for both the high-z and low-z sources; this tail is likely due to red or reddened quasars. The covering factor (CF) of the dusty torus is estimated as the ratio of the IR luminosity to the bolometric luminosity. We find significant anti-correlations between the CF and the bolometric luminosity, in both the high-z and low-z quasars; however, these two groups follow different tracks. At overlapping bolometric luminosities, the CF of high-z quasars is systematically larger than those of low-z quasars, implying an evolution of the CF with redshift

  11. The First High Redshift Quasar from Pan-STARRS

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, Eric; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Chambers, Ken; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Price, Paul; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of the first high redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i dropoutout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Widefield InfraRed Camera (SWIRC) at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph (TWIN) at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 x 10^47 erg/s and a black hole mass of 6.9 x 10^9 solar masses. It is a Broad Absorption Line quasar with a prominent Ly-beta peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than a hundred i dropout quasars, and could potentially find more than 10...

  12. The Quasar Mass-Luminosity Plane I: A Sub-Eddington Limit for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhardt, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to explore the relationship between black hole mass and luminosity. Black hole masses were estimated based on the widths of their H$\\beta$, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. We find that, over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, the most luminous low-mass quasars are at their Eddington luminosity, but the most luminous high-mass quasars in each redshift bin fall short of their Eddington luminosities, with the shortfall of order ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of $\\sim 0.15$ dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. We also examine the highest-mass quasars in every redshift bin in an effort to learn more about quasars that are about to cease their lu...

  13. Quasar Absorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  14. Exploratory Chandra observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Bian, Fuyan

    2016-01-01

    We report exploratory \\chandra\\ observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30. The quasar is clearly detected by \\chandra\\ with a possible component of extended emission. The rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity is 9.0$^{+9.1}_{-4.5}$ $\\times$ 10$^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$ with inferred photon index of $\\Gamma$ = 3.03$^{+0.78}_{-0.70}$. This quasar is X-ray bright, with inferred X-ray-to-optical flux ratio \\aox\\ $=-1.22^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, higher than the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The properties inferred from this exploratory observation indicate that this ultraluminous quasar might be growing with super-Eddington accretion and probably viewed with small inclination angle. Deep X-ray observation will help to probe the plausible extended emission and better constraint the spectral features for this ultraluminous quasar.

  15. X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH INSIGHTS INTO THE NATURE OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS AT LOW REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of ∼> 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization 'shielding gas' covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X

  16. X-Ray and Multiwavelength Insights into the Nature of Weak Emission-line Quasars at Low Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Anderson, Scott F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Hall, Patrick B.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad

    2012-03-01

    We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of >~ 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization "shielding gas" covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X

  17. Polarization structure of 12 gamma-ray quasars at 5 and 15 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukhnovskaya, Yu. N.; Gabuzda, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The results of dual-frequency polarization observations of 12 gamma-ray quasars are presented (as a continuation of a study of six blazars carried out earlier). The observations were obtained with the American Very Long Baseline Array. The distributions of intensity and polarization were obtained at 5 and 15 GHz. The degrees of polarization in the cores and jets of the 18 gamma-ray quasars do not stand out from those of other quasars. The brightness temperatures of the core components do not strongly exceed 1012 K.

  18. Resolving the Structure at the Heart of BAL Quasars Through Microlensing Induced Polarisation Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Hales, C A; Hales, Christopher A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2007-01-01

    While amongst the most luminous objects in the universe, many details regarding the inner structure of quasars remain unknown. One such area is the mechanism promoting increased polarisation in the broad absorption line troughs of certain quasars. This study shows how microlensing can be used to differentiate between two popular models that explain such polarisation through a realistic computational analysis. By examining a statistical ensemble of correlation data between two observables (namely image brightness and polarisation of the flux coming from the quasar), it was found that through spectropolarimetric monitoring it would be possible to discern between a model with an external scattering region and a model without one.

  19. Optical Microlensing and Accretion Disk Structure in the Lensed Quasar SDSS 1520+530

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Vigneshwar; Grinaski, Ian; MacLeod, Chelsea; Morgan, Christopher W.; Harris, Hugh C.; Kennington, James

    2015-01-01

    We analyze uncorrelated variability in seven seasons of SDSS r-band monitoring data from the doubly-imaged gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 1520+530 to yield a measurement of the size of the near-UV continuum emission region in this quasar. Photometry in the SBS 1520+530 system is complicated significantly by the proximity of a very bright star whose diffraction spike blends with the the lens, so we employed a mirror-flip subtraction technique to correct for this contamination. We conclude by testing our accretion disk measurement against the Quasar Accretion Disk Size - Black Hole Mass Relation.

  20. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Mckay, T; Rooney, P; Evrard, A E; Romer, A K; Perfecto, R; Song, J; Desai, S; Mohr, J; Wilcox, H; Bermeo, A; Jeltema, T; Hollowood, D; Bacon, D; Capozzi, D; Collins, C; Das, R; Gerdes, D; Hennig, C; Hilton, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S; Liddle, A; Mann, R G; Mehrtens, N; Nichol, R C; Papovich, C; Sahlén, M; Soares-Santos, M; Stott, J; Viana, P T; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Castander, F J; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Da Costa, L N

    2015-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) for a new sample of 106 X-Ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) since redshift 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, $m_{*}\\propto(\\frac{M_{200}}{1.5\\times 10^{14}M_{\\odot}})^{0.24\\pm 0.08}(1+z)^{-0.19\\pm0.34}$, and compare the observed relation to the simulation prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of $M_{200, z}=10^{13.8}M_{\\odot}$, at $z=1.0$: $m_{*, BCG}$ appears to have grown by $0.13\\pm0.11$ dex, in tension at $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ significance level with the 0.4 dex growth rate expected in the simulation. We show that...

  1. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). III. THE DEPENDENCE OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS SURFACE DENSITIES ON GALAXY PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bigiel, Frank [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, Jürgen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the correlation between CO and H I emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the H I column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee and Krumholz, which balances H{sub 2} formation and dissociation. The observed H I column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe H I column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse H I component that did not contribute to H{sub 2} shielding. We also find that the H{sub 2} column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stellar disk.

  2. Galaxies in X-Ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data. I. Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies since z~1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; Wilcox, H.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Hollowood, D.; Bacon, D.; Capozzi, D.; Collins, C.; Das, R.; Gerdes, D.; Hennig, C.; Hilton, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S.; Liddle, A.; Mann, R. G.; Mehrtens, N.; Nichol, R. C.; Papovich, C.; Sahlén, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stott, J.; Viana, P. T.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; da Costa, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, {m}*∝ ({M}200}/{1.5×{10}14{M}⊙}) 0.24+/-0.08(1+z)-0.19+/- 0.34, and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M200,z = 1013.8 M⊙ at z = 1.0: m*,BCG appears to have grown by 0.13 ± 0.11 dex, in tension at the ˜2.5σ significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  3. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). III. THE DEPENDENCE OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS SURFACE DENSITIES ON GALAXY PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the correlation between CO and H I emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the H I column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee and Krumholz, which balances H2 formation and dissociation. The observed H I column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe H I column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse H I component that did not contribute to H2 shielding. We also find that the H2 column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stellar disk

  4. The Discovery of the First "Changing Look" Quasar: New Insights into the Physics & Phenomenology of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Moran, Edward C; Myers, Adam D; Richards, Gordon T; Eracleous, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M; Gallo, Luigi; Urry, C Meg

    2014-01-01

    SDSS J015957.64+003310.5 is an X-ray selected, z=0.31 AGN from the Stripe 82X survey that transitioned from a Type 1 quasar to a Type 1.9 AGN between 2000 and 2010. This is the most distant AGN, and first quasar, yet observed to have undergone such a dramatic change. We re-observed the source with the double spectrograph on the Palomar 5m telescope in July 2014 and found that the spectrum is unchanged since 2010. From fitting the optical spectra, we find that the AGN flux dropped by a factor of ~8.5 between 2000 and 2010 while the broad H-alpha emission faded and broadened. Serendipitous X-ray observations caught the source in both the bright and dim state, showing a similar 2-10 keV flux diminution as the optical while lacking signatures of obscuration. The optical and X-ray changes coincide with $g$-band magnitude variations over multiple epochs of Stripe 82 observations. We demonstrate that variable absorption, as might be expected from the simplest AGN unification paradigm, does not explain the observed p...

  5. The Discovery of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high radio and optical luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maarten Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as being by far the most distant and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely iden...

  6. Cosmology with AGN: can we use quasars as standard candles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risaliti, G.

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear relation between X-ray and UV luminosity in quasars can be used to estimate their distance. Recently, we have shown that despite the large dispersion of the relation, a Hubble Diagram made of large samples of quasars can provide unique constraints on cosmology at high redshift. Furthermore, the dispersion of the relation is heavily affected by measurement errors: until now we have used serendipitous X-ray observations, but dedicated observations would significantly increase the precision of the distance estimates. I discuss the future role of XMM in this new field, showing (1) the fundamental contribution of the Serendipitous Source Catalogue and of large surveys, and (2) the breakthrough advancements we may achieve with the observation of a large number of SDSS quasars at high redshift: every 12-15 quasars observed at z~3 would be equivalent to discovering a supernova at that redshift.

  7. The Optical Variability of SDSS Quasars from Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. II. Color Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hengxiao; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the optical/ultraviolet (UV) color variations for a sample of 2169 quasars based on multi-epoch spectroscopy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases seven (DR7) and nine (DR9). To correct the systematic difference between DR7 and DR9 due to the different instrumental setup, we produced a correction spectrum by using a sample of F-stars observed in both DR7 and DR9. The correction spectrum was then applied to quasars when comparing the spectra of DR7 with DR9. In each object, the color variation was explored by comparing the spectral index of the continuum power-law fit on the brightest spectrum with the faintest one, and also by the shape of their difference spectrum. In 1876 quasars with consistent color variations from two methods, we found that most sources (1755, ∼94%) show the bluer-when-brighter (BWB) trend, and the redder-when-brighter (RWB) trend is detected in only 121 objects (∼6%). The common BWB trend is supported by the composite spectrum constructed from bright spectra, which is bluer than that from faint spectra, and also by the blue composite difference spectrum. The correction spectrum is proven to be highly reliable by comparing the composite spectrum from corrected DR9 and original DR7 spectra. Assuming that the optical/UV variability is triggered by fluctuations, the RWB trend can likely be explained if the fluctuations occur first in the outer disk region, and the inner disk region has not yet fully responded when the fluctuations are being propagated inward. In contrast, the common BWB trend implies that the fluctuations likely more often happen first in the inner disk region.

  8. The EUVE bright source list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroozas, B.; Mcdonald, K.; Antia, B.; Mcdonald, J.; Wiercigroch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial results for bright extreme ultraviolet sources discovered during the EUVE all-sky and deep ecliptic surveys have been published as a Bright Source List (BSL) and released to the astronomical community with a recent NASA research announcement (NRA 93-OSS-02, Appendix F). This paper describes the data processing software, the EUVE survey data set, and the production of the BSL at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The contents, format, and selection criteria for sources, the data processing strategy, some problems encountered, and a summary of the BSL results are presented.

  9. SDSS quasars in the WISE preliminary data release and quasar candidate selection with the optical/infrared colors

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zhang, Yanxia; Peng, Nanbo

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 37842 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, which have counterparts within 6$"$ in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Data Release. The overall WISE detection rate of the SDSS quasars is 86.7%, and it decreases to less than 50.0% when the quasar magnitude is fainter than $i=20.5$. We derive the median color-redshift relations based on this SDSS-WISE quasar sample and apply them to estimate the photometric redshifts of the SDSS-WISE quasars. We find that by adding the WISE W1 and W2-band data to the SDSS photometry we can increase the photometric redshift reliability, defined as the percentage of sources with the photometric and spectroscopic redshift difference less than 0.2, from 70.3% to 77.2%. We also obtain the samples of WISE detected normal and late-type stars with SDSS spectroscopy, and present a criterion in the $z-W1$ vs. $g-z$ color-color diagram, $z-W1>0.66(g-z)+2.01$, to separate quasars from stars. With this criterion we can...

  10. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  11. Measuring quasar variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 104 deg2 surveys. We use 105 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal timescales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01-10 yr. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS data set can efficiently distinguish between quasars and nonvarying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in data sets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in Δ magnitudes, is consistent with V(z, L, t) = A 0(1 + z)0.37(L/L 0)–0.16(t/1 yr)0.246, where L 0 = 1046 erg s–1 and A 0 = 0.190, 0.162, 0.147, or 0.141 in the g P1, r P1, i P1, or z P1filter, respectively. We also fit across all four filters and obtain median variability as a function of z, L, and λ as V(z, L, λ, t) = 0.079(1 + z)0.15(L/L 0)–0.2(λ/1000 nm)–0.44(t/1 yr)0.246.

  12. Large scale correlations of quasar polarisation vectors: Hints of extreme scale structures?

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanac, R A; Sluse, D; Lamy, H; Cabanac, Remi A.; Hutsemekers, Damien; Sluse, Dominique; Lamy, Herve

    2005-01-01

    A survey measuring quasar polarization vectors has been started in two regions towards the North and South Galactic Poles. Here, We review the discovery of significant correlations of orientations of polarization vectors over huge angular distances. We report new results including a larger sample of the quasars confirming the existence of coherent orientations at redshifts z>1.

  13. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ~ 0.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.;

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength...

  14. Quasar-Galaxy Clustering through Projected Galaxy Counts at z=0.6-1.2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shao-hua; Wang, Ting-Gui; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhou, Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies around quasars at redshifts from 0.6 to 1.2 using the photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. The quasar and galaxy cross-correlation functions are measured through the projected galaxy number density n(r_p) on scales $0.05

  15. FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF TYPE 1 QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey, we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 μm type 1 quasar template. We find that the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 μm, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths, we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with significant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 μm.

  16. The IRAS bright galaxy sample. II - The sample and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, B. T.; Sanders, D. B.; Neugebauer, G.; Madore, B. F.; Danielson, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    A statistically complete sample of 324 of the brightest infrared galaxies discovered at 60 microns in the IRAS all-sky survey is described. The results show that far-infrared emission is a significant luminosity component in the local universe, representing 25 percent of the luminosity emitted by stars in the same volume. Above 10 to the 11th solar luminosities, the infrared luminous galaxies are the dominant population of objects in the universe, being as numerous as the Seyfert galaxies and more numerous than quasars at higher luminosities. The infrared luminosity appears to be independent of the optical luminosity of galaxies. Most infrared bright galaxies appear to require much of the interstellar matter to be contributing to the observed infrared luminosity. Approximately 60-80 percent of the far-infrared luminosity of the local universe can be attributed, directly or indirectly, to recent or ongoing star formation.

  17. The Hamburg Quasar Monitoring Program (HQM) at Calar Alto. I. Low amplitude variability in quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeest, U.; Schramm, K. -J.

    1994-01-01

    HQM is an optical broad-band photometric monitoring program carried out since Sept.~1988. Our main intention is to search for indications of microlensing in a sample of $\\sim$\\,100 selected quasars; however, we also want to study the intrinsic variability. We use a CCD camera equipped to the MPIA 1.2$\\,$m telescope. Fully automatic photometric reduction relative to stars in the frame is done within a few minutes after each exposure, thus interesting brightness changes can be followed in detai...

  18. Fifty Years of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was dismissed largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maartin Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 leading to the general acceptance of the quasars as being extragalactic origin and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Subsequent radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts. However, claims for a more local population continued for at least several decades confused perhaps by the recognition of the much larger class of radio quiet quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN), and the uncertain connection with Seyfert galaxies and Zwicky’s compact galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the brightest extragalactic extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the mag 13 optical counterpart was known at least as early as 1887. Although, since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio interferometer positions, 3C273 eluded identification until the series of lunar occultations by Cyril Hazard and others were used to determine the position and morphology of the radio source.

  19. DOUBLE QUASARS: PROBES OF BLACK HOLE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS AND MERGER SCENARIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the available sample of double quasars, and investigate their physical properties. Our sample comprises 85 pairs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We derive physical parameters for the engine and the host, and model the dynamical evolution of the pair. First, we compare different scaling relationships between massive black holes and their hosts (bulge mass, velocity dispersion, and their possible redshift dependences), and discuss their consistency. We then compute dynamical friction timescales for the double quasar systems to investigate their frequency and their agreement with the merger drivenscenario for quasar triggering. In optical surveys, such as the SDSS, N double,qso/N qso ∼ 0.1%. Comparing typical merging timescales to expected quasar lifetimes, the fraction of double quasars should be roughly a factor of 10 larger than observed. Additionally, we find that, depending on the correlations between black holes and their hosts, the occurrence of double quasars could be redshift dependent. Comparison of our models to the SDSS quasar catalog suggests that double quasars should be more common at high redshift. We compare the typical separations at which double quasars are observed to the predictions of merger simulations. We find that the distribution of physical separations peaks at ∼30 kpc, with a tail at larger separations (∼100-200 kpc). The peak of the distribution is roughly consistent with the first episode of quasar activity found in equal mass mergers simulations. The tail of the quasar pairs distribution at large separations is instead inconsistent with any quasar activity predicted by published simulations. These large separation pairs are instead consistent with unequal mass mergers where gas is dynamically perturbed during the first pericentric passage, but the gas reaches the black hole only at the next apocenter, where the pair is observed.

  20. X-RAY EMISSION FROM OPTICALLY SELECTED RADIO-INTERMEDIATE AND RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an investigation into the X-ray properties of radio-intermediate and radio-loud quasars (RIQs and RLQs, respectively). We combine large, modern optical (e.g., SDSS) and radio (e.g., FIRST) surveys with archival X-ray data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT to generate an optically selected sample that includes 188 RIQs and 603 RLQs. This sample is constructed independently of X-ray properties but has a high X-ray detection rate (85%); it provides broad and dense coverage of the l-z plane, including at high redshifts (22% of objects have z = 2-5), and it extends to high radio-loudness values (33% of objects have R* = 3-5, using logarithmic units). We measure the 'excess' X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs relative to radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) as a function of radio loudness and luminosity, and parameterize the X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs both as a function of optical/UV luminosity and also as a joint function of optical/UV and radio luminosity. RIQs are only modestly X-ray bright relative to RQQs; it is only at high values of radio loudness (R* ∼> 3.5) and radio luminosity that RLQs become strongly X-ray bright. We find no evidence for evolution in the X-ray properties of RIQs and RLQs with redshift (implying jet-linked IC/CMB emission does not contribute substantially to the nuclear X-ray continuum). Finally, we consider a model in which the nuclear X-ray emission contains both disk/corona-linked and jet-linked components and demonstrate that the X-ray jet-linked emission is likely beamed but to a lesser degree than applies to the radio jet. This model is used to investigate the increasing dominance of jet-linked X-ray emission at low inclinations.