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Sample records for bright near-ir selected

  1. LENS MODELS OF HERSCHEL-SELECTED GALAXIES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-IR OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calanog, J. A.; Cooray, A.; Ma, B.; Casey, C. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Wardlow, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Amber, S. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Baker, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Baes, M. [1 Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bock, J. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bourne, N.; Dye, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Bussmann, R. S. [Department of Astronomy, Space Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Dannerbauer, H. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L.; Eales, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 μm bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (∼17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and previous lensing models for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). For four new sources that also have high-resolution submillimeter maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 μm magnification factor (μ{sub 880}) is ∼1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (μ{sub NIR}), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ∼2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.

  2. Lens Models of Herschel-Selected Galaxies From High-Resolution Near-IR Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Calanog, J A; Cooray, A; Wardlow, J; Ma, B; Amber, S; Baes, M; Bock, J; Bourne, N; Bussmann, R S; Casey, C M; Chapman, S C; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Dannerbauer, H; DeZotti, G; Dunne, L; Dye, S; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Furlanetto, C; Harris, A I; Ivison, R J; Maddox, S J; Magdis, G; Michalowski, M J; Negrello, M; Nightingale, J; O'Bryan, J M; Oliver, S J; Riechers, D; Scott, D; Serjeant, S; Simpson, J; Smith, M; Timmons, N; Thacker, C; Valiante, E; Vieira, J D

    2014-01-01

    We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 um-bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extra-galactic Survey (HerMES) and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Survey (H-ATLAS). Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (~17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and pre- vious lensing models for sub-millimeter galaxies. For four new sources that also have high-resolution sub-mm maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 um magnification factor (u_880) is ~1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (u_NIR), on average. We also find that the ...

  3. Large Brightness Variations of Uranus at Red and Near-IR Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Schmude, Richard W; Fox, Jim; Krobusek, Bruce A; Mallama, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Uranus is fainter when the Sun and Earth are near its equatorial plane than when they are near the projection of its poles. The average of the absolute values of the sub-Earth and sub-Sun latitudes (referred to as the sub-latitude here) is used to quantify this dependency. The rates of change of magnitude with sub-latitude for four of the Johnson-Cousins band-passes are B-band, -0.48 +/- 0.11 milli-magnitudes per degree; V-band, -0.84 +/- 0.04 ; R-band, -5.33 +/- 0.30; and I-band -2.79 +/- 0.41. Evaluated over the range of observed sub-latitudes, the blue flux changes by a modest 3% while the red flux varies by a much more substantial 30%. These disk-integrated variations are consistent with the published brightness characteristics of the North and South Polar Regions, with the latitudinal distribution of methane and with a planetary hemispheric asymmetry. Reference magnitudes and colors are also reported along with geometric albedos for the seven Johnson-Cousins band-passes.

  4. Near-IR Surface Brightness Fluctuations and Optical Colours of Magellanic Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, R A; Mouhcine, M; Liu, M C; Bruzual, G; De Batz, B; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Albarran, Marna Y.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Liu, Michael C.; Bruzual, Gustavo; Batz, Bertrand de

    2005-01-01

    This work continues our efforts to calibrate model surface brightness luminosities for the study of unresolved stellar populations, through the comparison with data of Magellanic Cloud star clusters. We present here the relation between absolute K_s-band fluctuation magnitude and (V - I) integrated colour, using data from the 2MASS and DENIS surveys, and from the literature. We compare the star cluster sample with the sample of early-type galaxies and spiral bulges studied by Liu et al. (2002). We find that intermediate-age to old clusters lie along a linear correlation with the same slope, within the errors, of that defined by the galaxies in the barM_{K_s} vs. (V - I) diagram. While the calibration by Liu et al. was determined in the colour range 1.05 = barM_{K_s} >= -9, 0.3 <= (V - I) <= 1.25. This implies, according to Bruzual & Charlot (2003) and Mouhcine & Lancon (2003) models, that the star clusters and the latest star formation bursts in the galaxies and bulges constitute an age sequence...

  5. Reddening Independent Quasar Selection from a Wide Field Optical and Near-IR Imaging Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbey, C N; Vivas, A K; Hodgkin, S T; Coppi, P S; McMahon, R G

    2000-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a wide field near-IR imaging survey that uses the Cambridge InfraRed Survey Instrument (CIRSI) on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). CIRSI is a JH-band mosaic imager that contains 4 Rockwell 1024$^{2}$ HgCdTe detectors (the largest IR camera in existence), allowing us to survey approximately 4 deg^2 per night to H ~ 19. Combining CIRSI observations with the deep optical imaging from the INT Wide Field Survey, we demonstrate a reddening independent quasar selection technique based on the (g - z) / (z - H) color diagram.

  6. The GOODS-MUSIC sample: a multicolour catalog of near-IR selected galaxies in the GOODS-South field

    CERN Document Server

    Grazian, A; De Santis, C; Fontana, A; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Nonino, M; Salimbeni, S; Vanzella, E

    2006-01-01

    We present a high quality multiwavelength (from 0.3 to 8.0 micron) catalog of the large and deep area in the GOODS Southern Field covered by the deep near-IR observations obtained with the ESO VLT. The catalog is entirely based on public data: in our analysis, we have included the F435W, F606W, F775W and F850LP ACS images, the JHKs VLT data, the Spitzer data provided by IRAC instrument (3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 micron), and publicly available U-band data from the 2.2ESO and VLT-VIMOS. We describe in detail the procedures adopted to obtain this multiwavelength catalog. In particular, we developed a specific software for the accurate "PSF-matching" of space and ground-based images of different resolution and depth (ConvPhot), of which we analyse performances and limitations. We have included both z-selected, as well as Ks-selected objects, yielding a unique, self-consistent catalog. The largest fraction of the sample is 90% complete at z~26 or Ks~23.8 (AB scale). Finally, we cross-correlated our data with all the ...

  7. A LABOCA survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South - submillimeter properties of near-IR selected galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, T R; Walter, F; Smail, I; Zheng, X Z; Knudsen, K K; Coppin, K E K; Kovács, A; Bell, E F; De Breuck, C; Dannerbauer, H; Dickinson, M; Gawiser, E; Lutz, D; Rix, H -W; Schinnerer, E; Alexander, D; Bertoldi, F; Brandt, W N; Chapman, S C; Ivison, R J; Koekemoer, A M; Kreysa, E; Kurczynski, P; Menten, K; Siringo, G; Swinbank, M; Van der Werf, P P

    2009-01-01

    Using the 330hr ESO-MPG 870-micron survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) obtained with the Large Apex BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX), we have carried out a stacking analysis at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths of a sample of 8266 near-infra-red (near-IR) selected (K_vega <= 20) galaxies, including 893 BzK galaxies, 1253 extremely red objects (EROs) and 737 distant red galaxies (DRGs), selected from the Multi-wavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). We measure average 870-micron fluxes of 0.20+-0.01mJy (20.0sigma), 0.45+-0.04mJy (11.3sigma), 0.42+-0.03mJy (14.0sigma), and 0.41+-0.04mJy (10.3sigma) for the K_vega <= 20, BzK, ERO and DRG samples, respectively. For the BzK, ERO and DRG subsamples, which overlap to some degree and are like to be at z ~ 1-2, this implies an average far-IR luminosity of ~2-6x10^{11} Lsolar and star formation rate of ~40-100Msolar. Splitting the BzK galaxies up into star-forming (sBzK) and passive (pBzK) galaxies, the f...

  8. Selective removal of demineralized enamel using a CO2 laser coupled with near-IR reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Saltiel, Daniel; Fried, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Detection and diagnosis of early dental caries lesions can be difficult due to variable tooth coloration, staining of the teeth and poor contrast between sound and demineralized enamel. These problems can be overcome by using near-infrared (NIR) imaging. Previous studies have demonstrated that lasers can be integrated with NIR imaging devices, allowing image-guided ablation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that NIR light at 1500 - 1700 nm can be used to guide a 9.3-μm CO2 laser for the selective ablation of early demineralization on tooth occlusal surfaces. The occlusal surfaces of ten sound human molars were used in this in-vitro study. Shallow simulated caries lesions of varying depth and position were produced on tooth occlusal surfaces using a demineralization solution. Sequential NIR reflectance images at 1500 - 1700 nm were used to guide the laser for selective ablation of the lesion areas. Digital microscopy and polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) were used to assess the selectivity of removal. This study demonstrates that high contrast NIR reflectance images can be used for the image-guided laser ablation of early demineralization from tooth occlusal surfaces.

  9. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey - Infrared (NGVS-IR): I. A new Near-UV/Optical/Near-IR Globular Cluster selection tool

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Roberto P; Lançon, Ariane; Peng, Eric W; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P; Mei, Simona; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Hudelot, Patrick; Courteau, Stéphane; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Balogh, Michael L; Boselli, Alessandro; Bournaud, Frédéric; Carlberg, Raymond G; Chapman, Scott C; Durrell, Patrick; Eigenthaler, Paul; Emsellem, Eric; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Gwyn, Stephen; Huertas-Company, Marc; Ilbert, Olivier; Jordán, Andrés; Läsker, Ronald; Licitra, Rossella; Liu, Chengze; MacArthur, Lauren; McConnachie, Alan; McCracken, Henry Joy; Mellier, Yannick; Peng, Chien Y; Raichoor, Anand; Taylor, Matthew A; Tonry, John L; Tully, R Brent; Zhang, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    The NGVS-IR project (Next Generation Virgo Survey - Infrared) is a contiguous near-infrared imaging survey of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. It complements the optical wide-field survey of Virgo (NGVS). The current state of NGVS-IR consists of Ks-band imaging of 4 deg^2 centered on M87, and J and Ks-band imaging of 16 deg^2 covering the region between M49 and M87. In this paper, we present the observations of the central 4 deg^2 centered on Virgo's core region. The data were acquired with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the total integration time was 41 hours distributed in 34 contiguous tiles. A survey-specific strategy was designed to account for extended galaxies while still measuring accurate sky brightness within the survey area. The average 5\\sigma limiting magnitude is Ks=24.4 AB mag and the 50% completeness limit is Ks=23.75 AB mag for point source detections, when using only images with better than 0.7" seeing (median seeing 0.54"). Star clusters are marginally resolved in these imag...

  10. Near-IR imaging of demineralization under sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum near-IR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using near-IR reflectance and near-IR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300 nm, 1460 nm, and 1500 - 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for comparison. The highest contrast for near- IR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 - 1700 nm. These near-IR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either co-polarization or crosspolarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500-1700-nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for near-IR reflectance measurements.

  11. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  12. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A; Simon, Jacob C; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H; Darling, Cynthia L; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-18

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity. PMID:24817806

  13. Selective ablation of pit and fissure caries from occlusal surfaces using λ=355-nm laser pulses and air-abrasion demonstrated using PS-OCT and near-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steven T.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    Several past studies have suggested that lasers with and without added chromophores can be used for the selective removal of dental caries from stained pit and fissures in preparation for composite sealant placement with minimal damage to sound, unstained tooth structure. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a new nondestructive imaging technology that can be used to acquire images of caries lesions in occlusal surfaces. PSOCT is ideally suited to measure the caries depth and severity before and after selective removal from occlusal surfaces. In this study, λ=355-nm laser pulses of 5-ns duration at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-1.3 J/cm2 were scanned across tooth surfaces to selectively remove decayed enamel with and without the addition of India ink. PS-OCT images were acquired before and after removal. The laser removal was also compared to air abrasion in order to compare selectivity of these two conservative caries removal technologies.

  14. Near-IR Extragalactic Background Results from the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemcov, Michael B.; CIBER

    2016-01-01

    The near IR extragalactic background light (EBL) encodes the integrated light production over cosmic history, so represents the total emission from all galaxies along the line of sight up to ancient first-light objects present during the epoch of reionization (EOR). This EOR emission necessarily comprises part of the background, and indeed a minimum level is required to supply enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium, corresponding to an EBL brightness less than 1 nW m^-2 sr^-1, about one tenth of the integrated galactic light (IGL). In addition to emission from these IGL and EOR populations, low surface brightness tidal streams of stars stripped by gravitational interactions during galaxy formation at low redshifts, called intrahalo light (IHL), may also contribute a significant fraction of the EBL. Models for these components can be constrained both through direct photometric measurements, as well as the new technique of EBL anisotropy intensity mapping that takes advantage of the fact that the Zodiacal Light is spatially smooth while distant populations produce anisotropies with distinct spatial and spectral characteristics. This talk will present recent results from the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER), a sounding rocket borne payload designed to measure both the fluctuations and direct photometric emission of the extra-galactic background light. The anisotropy of the near-IR EBL suggests the presence of a bright component approximately as bright as the IGL component near 1 micron which we interpret as the aggregate emission from low-redshift IHL. New direct photometric measurements from CIBER's low resolution spectrometer will also be discussed.

  15. Remote sensing of water vapor in the near IR from EOS/MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of spectral channels in the near-infrared IR which are to be employed for the derivation of total column water vapor using the MODIS instrument on the NASA's Earth Observing System. Data obtained show that the three near-IR water vapor channels on the MODIS instrument enable remote sensing of the total column water vapor with an absolute accuracy of +/- 13 percent. An absolute accuracy of +/-7 percent can be obtained if additional MODIS channels are used to decrease the effect of uncertainty in the spectral reflectance of the surface, subpixel clouds, haze, and temperature profile on the derived water vapor.

  16. Tunable graphene near-IR dielectric loaded waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlin; He, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Zhenyu; Lin, Fangting; Liu, Feng; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-07-01

    By integrating the graphene layer with the dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides, the tunable propagation properties have been investigated in the near-IR region, including the influences of operation frequency, the Fermi level of the graphene layer, and dielectric layer thickness. To improve the modulation properties, multiple unit cell (graphene-Al2O3) structure has been adopted. The results manifest that as the period number of the unit cell increases, the modulation depths of the propagation properties increase obviously. For instance, the modulation depth of propagation length can reach about 80% if the Fermi level changes in the range of 0.1–0.5 eV. As frequency increases, the effective index of the hybrid mode increases, while the propagation length shows a peak. The results are very helpful in understanding the tunable mechanisms of graphene plasmonic devices and designing novel waveguide structures, e.g. resonators and modulators.

  17. Near-IR spectroscopy of the highly inflated, hottest known Jupiter KOI-13.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use the WFC3 IR-G141 grism to measure the near-IR dayside emission spectrum of the highly inflated, hottest known Jupiter KOI-13.01 via secondary eclipses. The A-type host star of KOI-13.01 has the highest temperature among all known hot Jupiter hosts, producing extreme irradiation and making the planet's atmosphere probably quite different from others'. It is therefore an extreme and unique target to test exoplanetary atmosphere models and observed correlation between thermal inversion and irradiation. The host star of KOI-13.01 has a companion of same brightness and spectral type at 1.2 arcsec. Because the two stars will be well-resolved by WFC3, the stellar companion provides a unique advantage to calibrate the common-mode systematics of the eclipse light curves, enabling high precision and high fidelity spectroscopy of the planet's dayside emission. The WFC3 observations will definitively determine the presence or absence of a thermal inversion in the planet's upper atmosphere by probing the water bands between 1.1 - 1.7 microns. When combined with the Kepler nightside thermal emission measurement in visible light, the near-IR spectroscopy from WFC3 will also help tightly constrain its albedo and heat transport efficiency. Furthermore, resolving the binary and measuring the secondary eclipses will allow us to definitively verify whether the brigher star is indeed the host of the planet. This study can only be done with HST because of the ultra-high precision requisite and the coverage of water bands unavailable from ground.

  18. Near-IR imaging towards a puzzling YSO precessing jet

    CERN Document Server

    Paron, S; Ortega, M E

    2016-01-01

    At present there are many studies concerning jets towards low-mass young stellar objects, while equivalent studies towards massive or intermediate-mass young stellar objects are scarce. In a previous study, we found highly misaligned molecular outflows towards the infrared point source IRS. Using near-IR data acquired with Gemini-NIRI at the JHKs-broad-bands and narrow-bands centered at the emission lines of [FeII], H2 1-0 S(1), H2 2-1 S(1), Br-gamma, and CO 2-0 (bh), we studied the circumstellar environment of IRS with an angular resolution between 0.35" and 0.45". The emission in the JHKs-broad-bands shows, with great detail, the presence of a cone-like shape nebula extending to the north/northeast of the point source, which appears to be attached to it by a jet-like structure. In the three bands the nebula is resolved in a twisted-shaped feature composed by two arc-like features and a bow shock-like structure seen mainly in the Ks-band, which strongly suggests the presence of a precessing jet. An analysis ...

  19. Texaphyrin sensitized near-IR-to-visible photon upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fan; Sun, Wenfang; Castellano, Felix N

    2014-05-01

    Near-IR (NIR) absorption from a Cd(ii) texaphyrin (TXP) has been successfully coupled with rubrene triplet acceptors/annihilators in vacuum degassed dichloromethane to upconvert NIR (670-800 nm) incident photons into yellow fluorescence through sensitized triplet-triplet annihilation. Stern-Volmer analysis of dynamic energy transfer quenching of TXP by rubrene using transient absorption spectroscopy revealed Stern-Volmer and bimolecular quenching constants of 21,000 M(-1) and 5.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) respectively, for the triplet-triplet energy transfer process. The upconverted emission intensity with respect to the incident excitation power density at 750 nm was shown to vary between quadratic and linear, illustrating the expected kinetic limits for the light producing photochemistry under continuous wave illumination. Furthermore, with increasing TXP sensitizer concentration, the characteristic quadratic-to-linear crossover point shifted to lower incident photon power density. This is consistent with the notion that stronger photon capture in the sensitizer leads to experimental conditions promoting upconversion under milder excitation conditions. The maximum quantum yield of the TXP-sensitized rubrene upconverted fluorescence was 1.54 ± 0.04% under dilute conditions determined relative to [Os(phen)3](PF6)2 under continuous wave excitation conditions. This saturating quantum efficiency was realized when the incident light power dependence reached the quadratic-to-linear crossover point and was constant over the region where the composition displayed linear response to incident light power density. In pulsed laser experiments at higher sensitizer concentrations, the triplet-triplet annihilation quantum yield was determined to saturate at approximately 13%, corresponding to an upconversion yield of ∼10%, suggesting that the dichloromethane solvent either lowers the T2 state of the rubrene acceptor or is somehow attenuating the annihilation reaction between

  20. Overview of the Near-IR S0 galaxy Survey (NIRS0S)

    CERN Document Server

    Laurikainen, E; Buta, R; Knapen, J H

    2011-01-01

    A review of the results of the Near-IR S0 galaxy Survey (NIRS0S) is presented. NIRS0S is a magnitude (mB 12.5 mag) and inclination (< 65o) limited sample of 200 nearby galaxies, mainly S0s. It uses deep Ks -band images, typically reaching a surface brightness of 23.5 mag arcsec^(-2) . Detailed visual and photometric classifications were made, for the first time coding also the lenses in a systematic manner. As a comparison sample, a similar sized spiral galaxy sample with similar image quality was used. The main emphasis were to study whether the S0s are former spirals in which star formation has been ceased, and also, how robust are bars in galaxies. Based on our analysis the Hubble sequence was revisited: following the early idea by van den Bergh we suggested that the S0s are spread throughout the Hubble sequence in parallel tuning forks as spirals (S0a, S0b, S0c etc.). This is evidenced by our improved bulge-to-total (B/T) flux ratios, reaching as small values as typically found in late-type spirals. Th...

  1. Perspectives for the study of gas in protoplanetary disks and accretion/ejection phenomena in young stars with the near-IR spectrograph SPIROU at the CFHT

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, A; Delfosse, X

    2013-01-01

    Near-IR atomic and molecular transitions are powerful tools to trace the warm and hot gas in the circumstellar environment of young stars. Ro-vibrational transitions of H2 and H2O, and overtone transitions of CO at 2 micron centered at the stellar velocity trace hot (T~1500 K) gas in the inner few AU of protoplanetary disks. H2 near-IR lines displaying a blueshift of a few km/s probe molecular disk winds. H2 lines presenting blueshifts of hundreds of km/s reveal hot shocked gas in jets. Atomic lines such as the HeI line at 10830 A and the Hydrogen Paschen beta and Brakett gamma lines trace emission from accretion funnel flows and atomic disk winds. Bright forbidden atomic lines in the near-IR of species such as [Fe II], [N I], [S I], [S II], and [C I] trace atomic and ionized material in jets. The new near-IR high resolution spectrograph SPIROU planned for the Canada France Hawaii Telescope will offer the unique capability of combining high-spectral resolution (R~75000) with a large wavelength coverage (0.98 ...

  2. Imaging of occlusal dental caries (decay) with near-IR light at 1310-nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Christopher M.; Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Fried, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near- IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains, pigmentation, and hypomineralization (fluorosis). Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  3. Strong pollinator-mediated selection for increased flower brightness and contrast in a deceptive orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletvold, Nina; Trunschke, Judith; Smit, Mart; Verbeek, Jeffrey; Ågren, Jon

    2016-03-01

    Contrasting flower color patterns that putatively attract or direct pollinators toward a reward are common among angiosperms. In the deceptive orchid Anacamptis morio, the lower petal, which makes up most of the floral display, has a light central patch with dark markings. Within populations, there is pronounced variation in petal brightness, patch size, amount of dark markings, and contrast between patch and petal margin. We tested whether pollinators mediate selection on these color traits and on morphology (plant height, number of flowers, corolla size, spur length), and whether selection is consistent with facilitated or negative frequency-dependent pollination. Pollinators mediated strong selection for increased petal brightness (Δβpoll = 0.42) and contrast (Δβpoll = 0.51). Pollinators also tended to mediate stabilizing selection on brightness (Δγpoll = -0.27, n.s.) favoring the most common phenotype in the population. Selection for reduced petal brightness among hand-pollinated plants indicated a fitness cost associated with brightness. The results demonstrate that flower color traits influence pollination success and seed production in A. morio, indicating that they affect attractiveness to pollinators, efficiency of pollen transfer, or both. The documented selection is consistent with facilitated pollination and selection for color convergence toward cooccurring rewarding species. PMID:26878831

  4. Fluorenyl benzothiadiazole and benzoselenadiazole near-IR fluorescent probes for two-photon fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yao, Sheng; Kim, Bosung; Yue, Xiling

    2016-03-01

    Imaging biological samples with two-photon fluorescence (2PF) microscopy has the unique advantage of resulting high contrast 3D resolution subcellular image that can reach up to several millimeters depth. 2PF probes that absorb and emit at near IR region need to be developed. Two-photon excitation (2PE) wavelengths are less concerned as 2PE uses wavelengths doubles the absorption wavelength of the probe, which means 2PE wavelengths for probes even with absorption at visible wavelength will fall into NIR region. Therefore, probes that fluoresce at near IR region with high quantum yields are needed. A series of dyes based on 5-thienyl-2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazole and 5-thienyl-2, 1, 3-benzoselenadiazole core were synthesized as near infrared two-photon fluorophores. Fluorescence maxima wavelengths as long as 714 nm and fluorescence quantum yields as high as 0.67 were achieved. The fluorescence quantum yields of the dyes were nearly constant, regardless of solvents polarity. These diazoles exhibited large Stokes shift (two-photon absorption cross sections (up to 2,800 GM), and high two-photon fluorescence figure of merit (FM , 1.04×10-2 GM). Cells incubated on a 3D scaffold with one of the new probes (encapsulated in Pluronic micelles) exhibited bright fluorescence, enabling 3D two-photon fluorescence imaging to a depth of 100 µm.

  5. AOTF near-IR spectrometers for study of Lunar and Martian surface composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A.; Korablev, O.; Mantsevich, S.; Vyazovetskiy, N.; Fedorova, A.; Evdokimova, N.; Stepanov, A.; Titov, A.; Kalinnikov, Y.; Kuzmin, R.; Kiselev, A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bondarenko, A.; Dokuchaev, I.; Moiseev, P.; Victorov, A.; Berezhnoy, A.; Skorov, Y.; Bisikalo, D.; Velikodsky, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The series of the AOTF near-IR spectrometers is developed in Moscow Space Research Institute for study of Lunar and Martian surface composition in the vicinity of a lander or a rover. Lunar Infrared Spectrometer (LIS) is an experiment onboard Luna-Glob (launch in 2017) and Luna- Resurs (launch in 2019) Russian surface missions. It's a pencil-beam spectrometer to be pointed by a robotic arm of the landing module. The instrument's field of view (FOV) of 1° is co-aligned with the FOV(45°) of a stereo TV camera. Infrared Spectrometer for ExoMars (ISEM) is an experiment onboard ExoMars (launch in 2018) ESARoscosmos rover. It's spectrometer based on LIS with required redesign for ExoMars mission. The ISEM instrument is mounted on the rover's mast coaligned with the FOV (5°) of High Resolution camera (HRC). Spectrometers and are intended for study of the surface composition in the vicinity of the lander and rover. The spectrometers will provide measurements of selected surface areas in the spectral range of 1.15-3.3 μm. The spectral selection is provided by acoustooptic tunable filter (AOTF), which scans the spectral range sequentially. Electrical command of the AOTF allows selecting the spectral sampling, and permits a random access if needed.

  6. Non-LTE Line Formation in the Near-IR: Hot Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Przybilla, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Line-formation calculations in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the spectral energy distribution are complicated by an amplification of non-LTE effects. For hot stars this can make quantitative modelling of spectral lines in the near-IR challenging. An introduction to the modelling problems is given and several examples in the context of near-IR line formation for hydrogen and helium are discussed.

  7. Fluorescence imaging with multifunctional polyglycerol sulfates: novel polymeric near-IR probes targeting inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licha, Kai; Welker, Pia; Weinhart, Marie; Wegner, Nicole; Kern, Sylvia; Reichert, Stefanie; Gemeinhardt, Ines; Weissbach, Carmen; Ebert, Bernd; Haag, Rainer; Schirner, Michael

    2011-12-21

    We present a highly selective approach for the targeting of inflammation with a multivalent polymeric probe. Dendritic polyglycerol was employed to synthesize a polyanionic macromolecular conjugate with a near-infrared fluorescent dye related to Indocyanine Green (ICG). On the basis of the dense assembly of sulfate groups which were generated from the polyol core, the resulting polyglycerol sulfate (molecular weight 12 kD with ~70 sulfate groups) targets factors of inflammation (IC(50) of 3-6 nM for inhibition of L-selectin binding) and is specifically transported into inflammatory cells. The in vivo accumulation studied by near-IR fluorescence imaging in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated fast and selective uptake which enabled the differentiation of diseased joints (score 1-3) with a 3.5-fold higher fluorescence level and a signal maximum at 60 min post injection. Localization in tissues using fluorescence histology showed that the conjugates are deposited in the inflammatory infiltrate in the synovial membrane, whereas nonsulfated control was not detected in association with disease. Hence, this type of polymeric imaging probe is an alternative to current bioconjugates and provides future options for targeted imaging and drug delivery. PMID:22092336

  8. A car-borne highly sensitive near-IR diode-laser methane detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly sensitive automated car-borne detector for measuring methane concentration in real time is designed, developed and tested under laboratory and field conditions. Measurements were made with the help of an uncooled tunable near-IR 1.65-μm laser diode. The detector consists of a multipass optical cell with a 45-m long optical path and a base length of 0.5 m. The car-borne detector is intended for monitoring the methane concentration in air from the moving car to reveal the leakage of domestic gas. The sensitivity limit (standard deviation) under field conditions is 1 ppm (20 ppb under laboratory conditions) for a measuring time of 0.4 s. The measuring technique based on the detection of a single methane line ensured a high selectivity of methane detector relative to other gases. The methane detector can be easily modified for measuring other simple-molecule gases (e.g., CO, CO2, HF, NO2, H2O) by replacing the diode laser and varying the parameters of the control program. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  9. New near-IR observations of mesospheric CO2 and H2O clouds on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Pilorget, Cedric; Gondet, Brigitte; Murchie, Scott; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide clouds, which are speculated by models on solar and extra-solar planets, have been recently observed near the equator of Mars. The most comprehensive identification of Martian CO2 ice clouds has been obtained by the near-IR imaging spectrometer OMEGA. CRISM, a similar instrument with a higher spatial resolution, cannot detect these clouds with the same method due to its shorter wavelength range. Here we present a new method to detect CO2 clouds using near-IR data based on the c...

  10. Perspectives for the study of gas in protoplanetary disks and accretion/ejection phenomena in young stars with the near-IR spectrograph SPIROU at the CFHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, A.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.

    2013-11-01

    Near-IR atomic and molecular transitions are powerful tools to trace the warm and hot gas in the circumstellar environment of young stars. Ro-vibrational transitions of H_2 and H_2O, and overtone transitions of CO at 2 μm centered at the stellar velocity trace hot (T˜ 1500 K) gas in the inner few AU of protoplanetary disks. H_2 near-IR lines displaying a blueshift of a few km/s probe molecular disk winds. H_2 lines presenting blueshifts of hundreds of km/s reveal hot shocked gas in jets. Atomic lines such as the HeI line at 10830 Å and the Hydrogen Paschen β and Brakett γ lines trace emission from accretion funnel flows and atomic disk winds. Bright forbidden atomic lines in the near-IR of species such as [Fe II], [N I], [S I], [S II], and [C I] trace atomic and ionized material in jets. The new near-IR high resolution spectrograph SPIROU planned for the Canada France Hawaii Telescope will offer the unique capability of combining high-spectral resolution (R˜75000) with a large wavelength coverage (0.98 to 2.35 μm) in one single exposure. This will provide us with the means of probing accretion funnel flows, winds, jets, and hot gas in the inner disk simultaneously. This opens the exiting possibility of investigating their combined behavior in time by the means of monitoring observations and systematic surveys. SPIROU will be a powerful tool to progress our understanding of the connexion between the accretion/ejection process, disk evolution, and planet formation.

  11. Near-IR High-Resolution Imaging Polarimetry of the SU Aur Disk: Clues for Tidal Tails?

    CERN Document Server

    de Leon, Jerome; Karr, Jennifer L; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Sitko, Michael; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Usuda, Tomonori; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D; Carson, Joseph; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian E; Feldt, Markus; Follette, Katherine; Grady, Carol A; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present new high-resolution ($\\sim$0\\farcs09) $H$-band imaging observations of the circumstellar disk around the T Tauri star SU Aur. Our observations with Subaru-HiCIAO have revealed the presence of scattered light as close as 0\\farcs15 ($\\sim$20 AU) to the star. Within our image, we identify bright emission associated with a disk with a minimum radius of $\\sim$90 AU, an inclination of $\\sim$35$\\degr$ from the plane of the sky, and an approximate P.A. of 15$\\degr$ for the major axis. We find a brightness asymmetry between the northern and southern sides of the disk due to a non-axisymmetric disk structure. We also identify a pair of asymmetric tail structures extending east and west from the disk. The western tail extends at least 2\\farcs5 (350 AU) from the star, and is probably associated with a reflection nebula previously observed at optical and near-IR wavelengths. The eastern tail extends at least 1\\arcsec (140 AU) at the present signal-to-noise. These tails are likely due to an encounter with an uns...

  12. Radio detection of the near-IR discovered supernova 2010P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S. D.

    2012-09-01

    We report the radio detection of supernova 2010P (cf. CBETs 2145, 2149) in Arp 299 in EVLA (8459 MHz) observations from 15th Jun 2011. SN2010P was discovered in near-IR images on 18th Jan 2010, and classified as a Type Ib/IIb SN based on its optical spectrum obtained on 11th Feb 2010 (cf. CBET 2189).

  13. Monolayers of gold nanostars with two Near-IR LSPR capable of additive photothermal response

    KAUST Repository

    Pallavicini, Piersandro

    2015-07-06

    Monolayers of photothermally responsive gold nanostars on PEI-coated surfaces display two Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPR) in the near-IR region that can be laser-irradiated either separately, obtaining two different T jumps, or simultaneously, obtaining a T jump equal to the sum of what obtained with separate irradiations

  14. The Effect of Surface Brightness Dimming in the Selection of High-z Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, Valentina; Bradley, Larry; Pizzella, Alessandro; Kim, Soyoung

    2014-01-01

    Cosmological surface brightness dimming of the form $(1+z)^{-4}$ affects all sources. The strong dependence of surface brightness dimming on redshift z suggests the presence of a selection bias when searching for high-redshift galaxies, i.e. we tend to detect only those galaxies with a high surface brightness (SB). However, unresolved knots of emission are not affected by SB dimming, thus providing a way to test the clumpiness of high-z galaxies. Our strategy relies on the comparison of the total flux detected for the same source in surveys characterized by different depth. For all galaxies, deeper images permit the better investigation of low-SB features. Cosmological SB dimming makes these low-SB features hard to detect when going to higher and higher redshifts. We used the GOODS and HUDF Hubble Space Telescope legacy datasets to study the effect of SB dimming on low-SB features of high-redshift galaxies and compare it to the prediction for smooth sources. We selected a sample of Lyman-break galaxies at z~4...

  15. Preparation of Near IR Reflective Materials via Hollow Ballotini Enwrapped by TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Yin MA; Ping Sheng TANG; Yan Sheng LI

    2006-01-01

    Near IR reflective functional material was made via hollow ballotini enwrapped by TiO2according to IR reflective principles. Metatitanic acid covers on the surface of hollow ballotini through electrostatic attraction as pH is less than 2.5. The results of SEM and XRD spectrum show that TiO2 enwraps hollow ballotini well and the crystal form is anatase. When TiO2covering thickness is below 0.5 μm, reflectance swells along with the increase of thickness,whereas above 0.5 μm it keeps stable. Coatings made from mixing enwrapped HB with styrene-acrylic latex were coated on aluminum foil, and reflectances were mensurated. It is found that reflectance keeps stable when the coating can wrap the base and reflectances of the coating in visible range and in near IR range are 86% and 81%, respectively.

  16. Remote Sensing of Water Vapor and Thin Cirrus Clouds using MODIS Near-IR Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a major facility instrument on board the Terra Spacecraft, was successfully launched into space in December of 1999. MODIS has several near-IR channels within and around the 0.94 micrometer water vapor bands for remote sensing of integrated atmospheric water vapor over land and above clouds. MODIS also has a special near-IR channel centered at 1.375-micron with a width of 30 nm for remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In this paper, we describe briefly the physical principles on remote sensing of water vapor and cirrus clouds using these channels. We also present sample water vapor images and cirrus cloud images obtained from MODIS data.

  17. VVV: The near-IR Milky Way bulge and plane survey*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas P.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ESO public survey “VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea” (VVV started mapping the inner disk and bulge of our Galaxy with the VISTA 4m telescope in the near-IR in 2010. The planned survey area of 520 deg2 is observed in the Z, Y, J, H and Ks filters, and in addition more than 100 epochs of repeated imaging in Ks will be collected over ∼5 years. The final products will be a deep near-IR atlas in five passbands, and catalogue of more than a million variable sources. This public survey will provide data available to the whole community and therefore will enable further studies of the history of the Milky Way, its star cluster evolution, and the population census of the Galactic Bulge and center, as well as the investigations of the star formation regions in the disk.

  18. Post-Starburst Populations Near and Far - The Potential of Near-IR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lançon, A

    2000-01-01

    The efficient use of near-IR data in studies of external stellar populations depends on our ability to recognize the nature of the predominant sources of light, and to interprete these findings in terms of age and metallicity. Here we focus on elderly post-starburst populations, with ages of 0.1-1 Gyr. New models confirm that they are indeed expected to display specific spectral signatures in the near-IR, due to variable M stars of the asymptotic giant branch and to carbon stars. The signatures depend on age and metallicity. We summarize the status of current quantitative predictions and emphasize the importance of an empirical calibration of the spectral synthesis models.

  19. ARCONS: A 2024 Pixel Optical through Near-IR Cryogenic Imaging Spectrophotometer

    CERN Document Server

    Mazin, B A; Strader, M J; Bumble, B; O'Brien, K; Szypryt, P; Marsden, D; van Eyken, J C; Duggan, G E; Ulbricht, G; Stoughton, C; Johnson, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the design, construction, and commissioning results of ARCONS, the Array Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry. ARCONS is the first ground-based instrument in the optical through near-IR wavelength range based on Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs are revolutionary cryogenic detectors, capable of detecting single photons and measuring their energy without filters or gratings, similar to an X-ray microcalorimeter. MKIDs are nearly ideal, noiseless photon detectors, as they do not suffer from read noise or dark current and have nearly perfect cosmic ray rejection. ARCONS is an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) containing a lens-coupled 2024 pixel MKID array yielding a 20"x20" field of view, and has been deployed on the Palomar 200" and Lick 120" telescopes for 24 nights of observing. We present initial results showing that ARCONS and its MKID arrays are now a fully operational and powerful tool for astronomical observations.

  20. Deep near-IR observations of the Chandra Deep Field and of the HDF-South - Color and Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A; Iovino, A; Poli, F; Vanzella, E

    2001-01-01

    We present near-IR (J and Ks) number counts and colors of galaxies detected in deep VLT-ISAAC images centered on the Chandra Deep Field and Hubble Deep Field-South for a total area of 13.6 arcmin$^2$. The limiting surface brightness obtained is Ks$\\simeq$22.8 mag/arcsec$^2$ and J$\\simeq$24.5 (1$\\sigma$) on both fields. A d$log$N/dm relation with a slope of $\\sim0.34$ in J and $\\sim0.28$ in Ks is found in both fields with no evidence of decline near the magnitude limit. The median J-Ks color of galaxies becomes bluer at magnitudes fainter than Ks$\\sim18$, in agreement with the different number counts slope observed in the two bands. We find a fraction ($\\le5%$ of the total sample) of sources with color redder than J-Ks=2.3 at magnitudes Ks$>20$. Most of them appear as isolated sources, possibly elliptical or dusty starburst galaxies at redshift $z>2$. The comparison of the observed number counts with models shows that our J-band and Ks-band counts are consistent with the prediction of a model based on a small ...

  1. Polarization Resolved Near-IR Imaging of Sound and Carious Dental Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light is reflected from and transmitted through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of optical imaging devices. New optical imaging tools employing non-ionizing radiation are needed for the detection and assessment of dental caries. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liqu...

  2. N-annulated perylene fused porphyrins with enhanced near-IR absorption and emission

    KAUST Repository

    Jiao, Chongjun

    2010-09-17

    N-Annulated perylene fused porphyrins 1 and 2 were synthesized by oxidative dehydrogenation using a Sc(OTf)3/DDQ system. These newly synthesized hybrid molecules are highly soluble in organic solvents and exhibit remarkably intense near-IR absorption, as well as detectable photoluminescence quantum yields, all of which are comparable to or even exceed those of either meso-β doubly linked porphyrin dimer/trimer or bis/tri-N-annulated rylenes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Time-resolved optical/near-IR polarimetry of V404 Cyg during its 2015 outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbaz, T; Covino, S; Mooley, K; Fender, R P; Rumsey, C

    2016-01-01

    We present optical and near-IR linear polarimetry of V404 Cyg during its 2015 outburst and in quiescence. We obtained time resolved r'-band polarimetry when the source was in outburst, near-IR polarimetry when the source was near quiescence and multiple wave-band optical polarimetry later in quiescence. The optical to near-IR linear polarization spectrum can be described by interstellar dust and an intrinsic variable component. The intrinsic optical polarization, detected during the rise of one of the brightest flares of the outburst, is variable, peaking at 4.5 per cent and decaying to 3.5 per cent. We present several arguments that favour a synchrotron jet origin to this variable polarization, with the optical emission originating close to the jet base. The polarization flare occurs during the initial rise of a major radio flare event that peaks later, and is consistent with a classically evolving synchrotron flare from an ejection event. We conclude that the optical polarization flare represents a jet laun...

  4. Selection of high-brightness, laser-driven cathodes for electron accelerators and FELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very intense, low emittance pulsed beams of electrons can be generated from laser-driven cathodes either by thermionic- or photo-emission. Several hundreds of amperes of electrons per square centimeter were observed for pulse lengths up to 50 ns. A normalized beam brightness of 107 A/cm2/rad2 has been measured. These beams can be emission-gated at the cathode surface by modulating the laser-beam. Such beam bunching will generate picosecond-to-microsecond-long pulses at the source. A variety of cathodes are described, and a method of selection for specific applications is presented

  5. The relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture. Selection of frequency range for microwave remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of brightness temperature data acquired from field and aircraft experiments demonstrates a linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. However, the analysis of brightness temperature data acquired by the Skylab radiometer demonstrates a non-linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. In view of the above and also because of recent theoretical developments for the calculation of the dielectric constant and brightness temperature under varying soil moisture profile conditions, an attempt is made to study the theoretical relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture as a function of frequency. Through the above analysis, the appropriate microwave frequency range for soil moisture studies is recommended

  6. Near-IR and PS-OCT imaging of developmental defects in dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasuna, Krista; Fried, Daniel; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2007-02-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and near-IR (NIR) imaging are promising new technologies under development for monitoring early carious lesions. Fluorosis is a growing problem in the U.S., and the more prevalent mild fluorosis can be visually mistaken for early enamel demineralization. Some initial NIR images suggest that enamel defects and dental caries manifest different optical behavior in the NIR. Unfortunately, there is little quantitative information available regarding the differences in optical properties of sound enamel, enamel developmental defects, and demineralized enamel due to caries. This study tested the hypothesis that hypomineralized enamel due to fluorosis can be differentiated from demineralized enamel due to caries using NIR and PS-OCT imaging because of different optical behavior in the NIR. Thirty extracted human teeth with various degrees of suspected fluorosis and/or caries were imaged using PS-OCT and NIR transillumination. An InGaAs camera and a near-IR diode laser were used to measure the optical attenuation through transverse tooth sections (~200 μm). Developmental defects were clearly visible in the polarization-resolved OCT images, demonstrating that PS-OCT can be used to nondestructively measure the depth and possible severity of the defects. Enamel defects on whole teeth that could be imaged with high contrast with visible light were transparent in the near-IR while demineralized areas due to caries were opaque. In contrast, dental caries could be clearly distinguished from sound enamel. This study suggests that PS-OCT and NIR methods may potentially be used as tools to assess the severity and extent of enamel defects and for the differentiation of mild fluorosis defects from early carious lesions.

  7. The K20 survey. V The evolution of the near-IR Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzetti, L; Zamorani, G; Daddi, E; Menci, N; Fontana, A; Renzini, A; Mignoli, M; Poli, F; Saracco, P; Broadhurst, T J; Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, S; Giallongo, E; Gilmozzi, R

    2003-01-01

    We present the galaxy rest-frame near-IR Luminosity Function (LF) and its cosmic evolution to z=1.5 based on a spectroscopic survey of a magnitude limited sample of galaxies with Ks=1, whereas PLE models are more consistent with the data up to z=1.5. The GIF model (Kaufmann et al. 1999) shows a clear deficiency of red luminous galaxies at z=1 compared to our observations and predicts a decrease of luminous galaxies with redshift not observed in our sample.

  8. Near-IR imaging toward a puzzling young stellar object precessing jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paron, S.; Fariña, C.; Ortega, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The study of jets that are related to stellar objects in formation is important because it enables us to understand the history of how the stars have built up their mass. Many studies currently examine jets towards low-mass young stellar objects, while equivalent studies toward massive or intermediate-mass young stellar objects are rare. In a previous study, based on 12CO J = 3-2 and public near-IR data, we found highly misaligned molecular outflows toward the infrared point source UGPS J185808.46+010041.8 (IRS) and some infrared features suggesting the existence of a precessing jet. Methods: Using near-IR data acquired with Gemini-NIRI at the JHKs broad- and narrowbands centered on the emission lines of [FeII], H2 1-0 S(1), H2 2-1 S(1), Brγ, and CO 2-0 (bh), we studied the circumstellar environment of IRS with an angular resolution between 0.̋35 and 0.̋45. Results: The emission in the JHKs broadbands shows in great detail a cone-shaped nebula extending to the north-northeast of the point source, which appears to be attached to it by a jet-like structure. In the three bands the nebula is resolved in a twisted-shaped feature composed of two arc-like features and a bow-shock-like structure seen mainly in the Ks band, which strongly suggests the presence of a precessing jet. An analysis of proper motions based on our Gemini observations and UKIDSS data additionally supports the precession scenario. We present one of the best-resolved cone-like nebula that is most likely related to a precessing jet up to date. The analysis of the observed near-IR lines shows that the H2 is collisionally excited, and the spatially coincidence of the [FeII] and H2 emissions in the closer arc-like feature suggests that this region is affected by a J shock. The second arc-like feature presents H2 emission without [FeII], which suggests a nondissociated C shock or a less energetic J shock. The H2 1-0 S(1) continuum-subtracted image reveals several knots and filaments at a larger

  9. Development of highly luminescent and cytocompatible near-IR-emitting aqueous Ag2S quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Hocaoğlu, İbrahim; Sennaroğlu, Alphan ; Acar, Funda Havva Yağcı; Çizmeciyan, M. Natali; Erdem, Rengin ; Özen, Can ; Kurt, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Colloidally stable and highly luminescent near-IR emitting Ag2S quantum dots (NIRQDs) were prepared by a very simple aqueous method using 2-mercaptopropionic acid (2MPA) as a coating. Emission of Ag2S-2MPA NIRQDs can be tuned between 780 and 950 nm. These NIRQDs have photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQY) around 7–39% and exhibit excellent cytocompatibility even at 600 mg mL 1 in NIH/3T3 cells. With such improved properties, Ag2S-2MPA NIRQDs have a great potential in practical...

  10. New Line Parameters for Near-IR Methane and the Oxygen A-Band

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, L R

    2008-01-01

    Recent and ongoing studies by various groups will be described for near-IR methane and the oxygen A-band in the context of changes for the HITRAN 2008 database. For methane, a new global analysis of the bands of the main isotope 1 will permit a total replacement of the calculated positions and intensities up to 4800 cm_1 . A few improvements are also available near 6000 cm_1 . Probable revisions in methane broadening parameters throughout the infrared will also be detailed. For the oxygen A-b...

  11. Selective excitation of bright and dark plasmonic resonances of single gold nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Demichel, O; Francs, G Colas des; Bouhelier, A; Hertz, E; Billard, F; de Fornel, F; Cluzel, B

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic dark modes are pure near-field resonances since their dipole moments are vanishing in far field. These modes are particularly interesting to enhance nonlinear light-matter interaction at the nanometer scale because radiative losses are mitigated therefore increasing the intrinsic lifetime of the resonances. However, the excitation of dark modes by standard far field approaches is generally inefficient because the symmetry of the electromagnetic near-field distribution has a poor overlap with the excitation field. Here, we demonstrate the selective optical excitation of bright and dark plasmonic modes of single gold nanorods by spatial phase-shaping the excitation beam. Using two-photon luminescence measurements, we unambiguously identify the symmetry and the order of the emitting modes and analyze their angular distribution by Fourier-space imaging.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near IR (NIR) fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as contrast agents for tumor diagnosis. HSA nanoparticles are considered to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. In addition, NIR fluorescence properties of these nanoparticles are important for in vivo tumor diagnostics, with low autofluorescence and relatively deep penetration of NIR irradiation due to low absorption of biomatrices. The present study describes the synthesis of new NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, by entrapment of a NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles, which also significantly increases the photostability of the dye. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) were covalently conjugated to the NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles, increasing the potential fluorescent signal in tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model and a rat model. In future work we also plan to encapsulate cancer drugs such as doxorubicin within the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles for both colon cancer imaging and therapy. - Highlights: ► Near IR human serum albumin nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. ► Nanoparticles were shown to be physically and chemically stable and photostable. ► Tumor-targeting ligands were covalently conjugated to the nanoparticles. ► Specific colon cancer tumor detection was demonstrated in chicken-embryo and rat models.

  13. Near-IR spectroscopic imaging for skin hydration: the long and the short of it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attas, E Michael; Sowa, Michael G; Posthumus, Trevor B; Schattka, Bernhard J; Mantsch, Henry H; Zhang, Shuliang L

    2002-01-01

    Near-IR spectroscopic methods have been developed to determine the degree of hydration of human skin in vivo. Noncontact reflectance spectroscopic imaging was used to investigate the distribution of skin moisture as a function of location. A human study in a clinical setting has generated quantitative data showing the effects of a drying agent and a moisturizer on delineated regions of the forearms of eight volunteers. Two digital imaging systems equipped with liquid-crystal tunable filters were used to collect stacks of monochromatic images at 10-nm intervals over the 650-1050 and 960-1700 nm wavelength bands. Synthetic images generated from measurements of water absorption band areas at three different near-IR wavelengths (970, 1200, and 1450 nm) showed obvious differences in the apparent distribution of water in the skin. Changes resulting from the skin treatments were much more evident in the long-wavelength images than in the short-wavelength ones. The variable sensitivity of the method at different wavelengths has been interpreted as being the result of different penetration depths of the IR light used in the reflectance studies.

  14. Panchromatic Light Capture and Efficient Excitation Transfer Leading to Near-IR Emission of BODIPY Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritambhara; Gobeze, Habtom B; D'Souza, Francis; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2016-08-18

    All-BODIPY-based (BODIPY=boron-dipyrromethene) donor-acceptor systems capable of wide-band absorbance leading to efficient energy transfer in the near-IR region are reported. A covalently linked 3-pyrrolyl BODIPY-BODIPY dimer building block bearing an ethynyl group at the meso-aryl position is synthesized and coupled with three different monomeric BODIPY/pyrrolyl BODIPY building blocks with a bromo/iodo group under Pd(0) coupling conditions to obtain three covalently linked 3-pyrrolyl-BODIPY-based donor-acceptor oligomers in 19-29 % yield. The oligomers are characterized in detail by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and optical spectroscopy. Due to the presence of different functionalized BODIPY derivatives in the oligomers, panchromatic light capture (300-725 nm) is witnessed. Fluorescence studies reveal singlet-singlet energy transfer from BODIPY monomer to BODIPY dimer leading to emission in the 700-800 nm range. Theoretical modeling according to the Förster mechanism predicts ultrafast energy transfer due to good spectral overlap of the donor and acceptor entities. Femtosecond transient absorption studies confirm this to be the case and thus show the relevance of the currently developed all-BODIPY-based energy-funneling supramolecular sytems with near-IR emission to solar-energy harvesting applications. PMID:27168532

  15. Synthesis and characterization of near IR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles for optical detection of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Sarit; Pellach, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kam, Yossi [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Grinberg, Igor; Corem-Salkmon, Enav [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Rubinstein, Abraham [Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Margel, Shlomo, E-mail: shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2013-03-01

    Near IR (NIR) fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as contrast agents for tumor diagnosis. HSA nanoparticles are considered to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. In addition, NIR fluorescence properties of these nanoparticles are important for in vivo tumor diagnostics, with low autofluorescence and relatively deep penetration of NIR irradiation due to low absorption of biomatrices. The present study describes the synthesis of new NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles, by entrapment of a NIR fluorescent dye within the HSA nanoparticles, which also significantly increases the photostability of the dye. Tumor-targeting ligands such as peanut agglutinin (PNA) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies (anti-CEA) were covalently conjugated to the NIR fluorescent albumin nanoparticles, increasing the potential fluorescent signal in tumors with upregulated corresponding receptors. Specific colon tumor detection by the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles was demonstrated in a chicken embryo model and a rat model. In future work we also plan to encapsulate cancer drugs such as doxorubicin within the NIR fluorescent HSA nanoparticles for both colon cancer imaging and therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near IR human serum albumin nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were shown to be physically and chemically stable and photostable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor-targeting ligands were covalently conjugated to the nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific colon cancer tumor detection was demonstrated in chicken-embryo and rat models.

  16. Tunable diode and fibre laser spectroscopy in the near-IR for measurement of gas parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, George; Johnstone, Walter; Arsad, Norhana; Duffin, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    There has been much research performed in recent years on tunable diode laser spectroscopy for detection of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene, etc., which possess near-IR absorption lines. To attain adequate sensitivity with weak near-IR lines, wavelength modulation spectroscopy with phase-sensitive detection is normally employed. However injection current modulation of diode lasers produces both wavelength and amplitude modulation, with a phase shift dependent on the modulation frequency. This results in residual amplitude modulation on the output and in distortion of the harmonic signals derived from the absorption line. These are important issues for calibration and where it is desired to accurately recover the line-shape function in order to make simultaneous measurements of gas concentration, pressure or temperature in industrial applications. Here we discuss how calibration-free measurements may be obtained with diode lasers and explore the implications for fibre laser based systems for spectroscopy which conventionally employ thermal or piezoelectric tuning of the wavelength. In particular, we consider modulation techniques which may be applied to ring fibre lasers which use un-pumped erbium fibre as a saturable absorber to prevent mode-hopping or to DFB fibre lasers which use a short cavity with a Bragg grating to ensure single mode operation.

  17. Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Zillikens, M Carola; Stančákova, Alena; Finucane, Francis M; Ried, Janina S; Langenberg, Claudia; Zhang, Weihua; Beckmann, Jacques S; Luan, Jian'an; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Zhou, Yanhua; Smith, Albert Vernon; Zhao, Jing-Hua; Amin, Najaf; Vedantam, Sailaja; Shin, So-Youn; Haritunians, Talin; Fu, Mao; Feitosa, Mary F; Kumari, Meena; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Tikkanen, Emmi; Mangino, Massimo; Hayward, Caroline; Song, Ci; Arnold, Alice M; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Oostra, Ben A; Campbell, Harry; Cupples, L Adrienne; Davis, Kathryn E; Döring, Angela; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Estrada, Karol; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole L; Guiducci, Candace; Hofman, Albert; Humphries, Steve E; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C; Jula, Antti; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus K; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Lauren J; Kivimäki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kuusisto, Johanna; Liu, Yongmei; Ljunggren, Osten; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mooser, Vincent; Moreno, José Maria; Männistö, Satu; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Pascoe, Laura; Peltonen, Leena; Peral, Belén; Perola, Markus; Psaty, Bruce M; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B; Semple, Robert K; Skaric-Juric, Tatjana; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Song, Kijoung S; Spector, Timothy D; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Talmud, Philippa J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Clegg, Deborah J; Schadt, Eric; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Ripatti, Samuli; Borecki, Ingrid B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ingelsson, Erik; Jansson, John-Olov; Kaplan, Robert C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Groop, Leif; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Barroso, Inês; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Soranzo, Nicole; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Stefansson, Kari; Wichmann, H-Erich; Ohlsson, Claes; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Fox, Caroline S; Laakso, Markku; Loos, Ruth J F

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 32 loci influencing body mass index, but this measure does not distinguish lean from fat mass. To identify adiposity loci, we meta-analyzed associations between ∼2.5 million SNPs and body fat percentage from 36,626 individuals and followed up the 14 most significant (P < 10(-6)) independent loci in 39,576 individuals. We confirmed a previously established adiposity locus in FTO (P = 3 × 10(-26)) and identified two new loci associated with body fat percentage, one near IRS1 (P = 4 × 10(-11)) and one near SPRY2 (P = 3 × 10(-8)). Both loci contain genes with potential links to adipocyte physiology. Notably, the body-fat-decreasing allele near IRS1 is associated with decreased IRS1 expression and with an impaired metabolic profile, including an increased visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease and decreased adiponectin levels. Our findings provide new insights into adiposity and insulin resistance. PMID:21706003

  18. Empirical calibration of the near-IR Ca II triplet - III. Fitting functions

    CERN Document Server

    Cenarro, A J; Cardiel, N; Vazdekis, A; Peletier, R F

    2001-01-01

    Using a near-IR stellar library of 706 stars with a wide coverage of atmospheric parameters, we study the behaviour of the Ca II triplet strength in terms of effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity. Empirical fitting functions for recently defined line-strength indices, namely CaT*, CaT and PaT, are provided. These functions can be easily implemented into stellar populations models to provide accurate predictions for integrated Ca II strengths. We also present a thorough study of the various error sources and their relation to the residuals of the derived fitting functions. Finally, the derived functional forms and the behaviour of the predicted Ca II are compared with those of previous works in the field.

  19. Near-IR Spectral Imaging of Semiconductor Absorption Sites in Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Samson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We derive spectral maps of absorption sites in integrated circuits (ICs by varying the wavelength of the optical probe within the near-IR range. This method has allowed us to improve the contrast of the acquired images by revealing structures that have a different optical absorption from neighboring sites. A false color composite image from those acquired at different wavelengths is generated from which the response of each semiconductor structure can be deduced. With the aid of the spectral maps, nonuniform absorption was also observed in a semiconductor structure located near an electrical overstress defect. This method may prove important in failure analysis of ICs by uncovering areas exhibiting anomalous absorption, which could improve localization of defective edifices in the semiconductor parts of the microchip

  20. Fabrication of Large Area Fishnet Optical Metamaterial Structures Operational at Near-IR Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis W. Prather

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a fabrication process for large area (2 mm × 2 mm fishnet metamaterial structures for near IR wavelengths. This process involves: (a defining a sacrificial Si template structure onto a quartz wafer using deep-UV lithography and a dry etching process (b deposition of a stack of Au-SiO2-Au layers and (c a ‘lift-off’ process which removes the sacrificial template structure to yield the fishnet structure. The fabrication steps in this process are compatible with today’s CMOS technology making it eminently well suited for batch fabrication. Also, depending on area of the exposure mask available for patterning the template structure, this fabrication process can potentially lead to optical metamaterials spanning across wafer-size areas.

  1. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth A.; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons.

  2. Ultraviolet, Optical, and Near-IR Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Materials Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Szypryt, P; Bumble, B; Leduc, H G; Baker, L

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated 2024 pixel microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays in the ultraviolet/optical/near-IR (UVOIR) regime that are currently in use in astronomical instruments. In order to make MKIDs desirable for novel instruments, larger arrays with nearly perfect yield need to be fabricated. As array size increases, however, the percent yield often decreases due to frequency collisions in the readout. The per-pixel performance must also be improved, namely the energy resolution. We are investigating ways to reduce frequency collisions and to improve the per pixel performance of our devices through new superconducting material systems and fabrication techniques. There are two main routes that we are currently exploring. First, we are attempting to create more uniform titanium nitride films through the use of atomic layer deposition rather than the more traditional sputtering method. In addition, we are experimenting with completely new material systems for MKIDs, such as platinum silicide.

  3. Stimulus responsive nanogel with innate near IR fluorescent capability for drug delivery and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vineeth M; Shenoy, Sachin J; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-10-01

    A brighter, non toxic and biocompatible optical imaging agent is one of the major quests of biomedical research. Here in, we report a photoluminescent comacromer [PEG-poly(propylene fumarate)-citric acid-glycine] and novel stimulus (pH) responsive nanogel endowed with excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (EDF) for combined drug delivery and bioimaging applications. The comacromer when excited at different wavelengths in visible region from 400nm to 640nm exhibits fluorescent emissions from 510nm to 718nm in aqueous condition. It has high Stokes shift (120nm), fluorescent lifetime (7 nanoseconds) and quantum yield (50%). The nanogel, C-PLM-NG, prepared with this photoluminescent comacromer and N,N-dimethyl amino ethylmethacrylate (DMEMA) has spherical morphology with particle size around 100nm and 180nm at pH 7.4 (physiological) and 5.5 (intracellular acidic condition of cancer cells) respectively. The studies on fluorescence characteristics of C-PLM NG in aqueous condition reveal large red-shift with emissions from 523nm to 700nm for excitations from 460nm to 600nm ascertaining the EDF characteristics. Imaging the near IR emission with excitation at 535nm was accomplished using cut-off filters. The nanogel undergoes pH responsive swelling and releases around 50% doxorubicin (DOX) at pH 5.5 in comparison with 15% observed at pH 7.4. The studies on in vitro cytotoxicity with MTT assay and hemolysis revealed that the present nanogel is non-toxic. The DOX-loaded C-PLM-NG encapsulated in Hela cells induces lysis of cancer cells. The inherent EDF characteristics associated with C-PLM NG enable cellular imaging of Hela cells. The studies on biodistribution and clearance mechanism of C-PLM-NG from the body of mice reveal bioimaging capability and safety of the present nanogel. This is the first report on a polymeric nanogel with innate near IR emissions for bioimaging applications.

  4. Real-time near-IR imaging of laser-ablation crater evolution in dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    We have shown that the enamel of the tooth is almost completely transparent near 1310-nm in the near-infrared and that near-IR (NIR) imaging has considerable potential for the optical discrimination of sound and demineralized tissue and for observing defects in the interior of the tooth. Lasers are now routinely used for many applications in dentistry including the ablation of dental caries. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that real-time NIR imaging can be used to monitor laser-ablation under varying conditions to assess peripheral thermal and transient-stress induced damage and to measure the rate and efficiency of ablation. Moreover, NIR imaging may have considerable potential for monitoring the removal of demineralized areas of the tooth during cavity preparations. Sound human tooth sections of approximately 3-mm thickness were irradiated by a CO II laser under varying conditions with and without a water spray. The incision area in the interior of each sample was imaged using a tungsten-halogen lamp with band-pass filter centered at 131--nm combined with an InGaAs focal plane array with a NIR zoom microscope in transillumination. Due to the high transparency of enamel at 1310-nm, laser-incisions were clearly visible to the dentin-enamel junction and crack formation, dehydration and irreversible thermal changes were observed during ablation. This study showed that there is great potential for near-IR imaging to monitor laser-ablation events in real-time to: assess safe laser operating parameters by imaging thermal and stress-induced damage, elaborate the mechanisms involved in ablation such as dehydration, and monitor the removal of demineralized enamel.

  5. Possible near-IR channels for remote sensing precipitable water vapor from geostationary satellite platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B.-C.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, Ed R.; Conel, J. E.; Green, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of troposheric water vapor profiles from current geostationary weather satellites is made using a few broadband infrared (IR) channels in the 6-13 micron region. Uncertainties greater than 20% exist in derived water vapor values just above the surface from the IR emission measurements. In this paper, we propose three near-IR channels, one within the 0.94-micron water vapor band absorption region, and the other two in nearby atmospheric windows, for remote sensing of precipitable water vapor over land areas, excluding lakes and rivers, during daytime from future geostationary satellite platforms. The physical principles are as follows. The reflectance of most surface targets varies approximately linearly with wavelength near 1 micron. The solar radiation on the sun-surface-sensor ray path is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor. The ratio of the radiance from the absorption channel with the radiances from the two window channels removes the surface reflectance effects and yields approximately the mean atmospheric water vapor transmittance of the absorption channel. The integrated water vapor amount from ground to space can be obtained with a precision of better than 5% from the mean transmittance. Because surface reflectances vary slowly with time, temporal variation of precipitable water vapor can be determined reliably. High spatial resolution, precipitable water vapor images are derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visable-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, which measures solar radiation reflected by the surface in the 0.4-2.5 micron region in 10-nm channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 m from its platform on an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. The proposed near-IR reflectance technique would complement the IR emission techniques for remote sensing of water vapor profiles from geostationary satellite platforms, especially in the boundary layer where most of the water vapor is located.

  6. Relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-06-12

    Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 β-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C═C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes.

  7. The connection between radio loudness and central surface brightness profiles in optically selected low-luminosity active galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, A. J.; Uttley, P.; Körding, E.

    2011-08-01

    Recent results indicate a correlation between nuclear radio loudness of active galaxies and their central stellar surface-brightness profiles, in that 'core' galaxies (with inner logarithmic slope γ≤ 0.3) are significantly more radio loud than 'power-law' galaxies (γ≥ 0.5). This connection, which indicates possible links between radio loudness and galaxy formation history (e.g. through black hole spin), has so far only been confirmed for a radio-selected sample of galaxies. Furthermore, it has since been shown that the Nuker law, which was used to parametrize the brightness profiles in these studies, gives a poor description of the brightness profile, with its parameters varying systematically with the radial fitted extent of the profile. Here, we present an analysis of the central surface brightness profiles of the active galaxies of Hubble type T≤ 3, that were identified by the optically selected Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. We fit the brightness profiles using Sérsic, Core-Sérsic and, where necessary, Double-Sérsic models, which we fit to the semimajor axis brightness profiles extracted from high-resolution images of the galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope. We use these fits to classify the galaxies as 'Core', 'Sérsic' or 'Double-Sérsic'. We compare the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their host galaxies with this classification, and we recover the already established trend for Core galaxies to be more luminous and contain a higher mass supermassive black hole. Defining the radio loudness of an AGN as the ratio of the nuclear radio luminosity to [O III] line luminosity, which allows us to include most of the AGN in our sample and prevents a bias against dim nuclei that are harder to extract from the brightness profiles, we find that AGN hosted in Core galaxies are generally more radio loud than those hosted in Sérsic galaxies, although there is a large overlap between the two subsamples. The correlation

  8. GFIT2: an experimental algorithm for vertical profile retrieval from near-IR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Brian J.; Sherlock, Vanessa; Toon, Geoff; Wunch, Debra; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2016-08-01

    An algorithm for retrieval of vertical profiles from ground-based spectra in the near IR is described and tested. Known as GFIT2, the algorithm is primarily intended for CO2, and is used exclusively for CO2 in this paper. Retrieval of CO2 vertical profiles from ground-based spectra is theoretically possible, would be very beneficial for carbon cycle studies and the validation of satellite measurements, and has been the focus of much research in recent years. GFIT2 is tested by application both to synthetic spectra and to measurements at two Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) sites. We demonstrate that there are approximately 3° of freedom for the CO2 profile, and the algorithm performs as expected on synthetic spectra. We show that the accuracy of retrievals of CO2 from measurements in the 1.61μ (6220 cm-1) spectral band is limited by small uncertainties in calculation of the atmospheric spectrum. We investigate several techniques to minimize the effect of these uncertainties in calculation of the spectrum. These techniques are somewhat effective but to date have not been demonstrated to produce CO2 profile retrievals with sufficient precision for applications to carbon dynamics. We finish by discussing ongoing research which may allow CO2 profile retrievals with sufficient accuracy to significantly improve the scientific value of the measurements from that achieved with column retrievals.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Near-IR BN/KL outflow images (Bally+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, J.; Ginsburg, A.; Silvia, D.; Youngblood, A.

    2015-02-01

    The Gemini Multi-conjugate adaptive optics System (GeMS) at the Gemini South telescope on Cerro Pachon is the first and only sodium-based multi-laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics system. GeMS works with a LGS constellation of 5-spots: 4 of the LGS spots are at the corners of a 60" square, with the 5-th positioned in the center. The Adaptive Optics (AO) bench called Canopus is mounted on one of the f/16 Cassegrain ports. Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is a wide-field 4096 by 4096 pixel (85" by 85" field of view) camera designed to work at the diffraction limit of the 8- meter telescope in the near-infrared. Three 85" diameter fields were observed in OMC1 between 30 December 2012 and 28 February 2013 using GSAOI. Observations of each field were obtained through 1% bandpass narrow-band filters centered on the 1.644um [FeII] and 2.122um H2 emission lines and the broad-band Ks filter. The corrected images have FWHM diameters of 0.080" to 0.10", providing the highest angular resolution images of the BN/KL outflow ever obtained in the near-IR. (2 data files).

  10. A New Method for Wide-Field Near-IR Imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Momcheva, Ivelina G; van der Wel, Arjen; Brammer, Gabriel B; Mackenty, John; Nelson, Erica J; Leja, Joel; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    We present a new technique for wide and shallow observations using the near-infrared channel of Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Wide-field near-IR surveys with HST are generally inefficient, as guide star acquisitions make it impractical to observe more than one pointing per orbit. This limitation can be circumvented by guiding with gyros alone, which is possible as long as the telescope has three functional gyros. The method presented here allows us to observe mosaics of eight independent WFC3-IR pointings in a single orbit by utilizing the fact that HST drifts by only a very small amount in the 25 seconds between non-destructive reads of unguided exposures. By shifting the reads and treating them as independent exposures the full resolution of WFC3 can be restored. We use this "drift and shift" (DASH) method in the Cycle 23 COSMOS-DASH program, which will obtain 456 WFC3 $H_{160}$ pointings in 57 orbits, covering an area of 0.6 degree$^2$ in the COSMOS field down to $H_{160} ...

  11. The Chandra XBootes Survey - III: Optical and Near-IR Counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, K; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T; Kochanek, C S; Kenter, A T; Fabricant, D; Fazio, G G; Forman, W R; Green, P J; Jones, C J; McNamara, B R; Murray, S S; Najita, J R; Rieke, M; Shields, J C; Vikhlinin, A; Brand, Kate; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Kenter, Almus T.; Fabricant, Daniel; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Forman, William R.; Green, Paul J.; Jones, Christine J.; Namara, Brian R. Mc; Murray, Stephen S.; Najita, Joan R.; Rieke, Marcia; Shields, Joseph C.; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2006-01-01

    The XBootes Survey is a 5-ks Chandra survey of the Bootes Field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). This survey is unique in that it is the largest (9.3 deg^2), contiguous region imaged in X-ray with complementary deep optical and near-IR observations. We present a catalog of the optical counterparts to the 3,213 X-ray point sources detected in the XBootes survey. Using a Bayesian identification scheme, we successfully identified optical counterparts for 98% of the X-ray point sources. The optical colors suggest that the optically detected galaxies are a combination of z10). These objects are likely high redshift and/or dust obscured AGN. These sources have generally harder X-ray spectra than sources with 0.1

  12. Axion Decay and Anisotropy of Near-IR Extragalactic Background Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Chen, Xuelei; Zemcov, Michael; Smidt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is composed of the cumulative radiation from all galaxies and active galactic nuclei over cosmic history. In addition to point sources, the EBL also contains information from diffuse sources of radiation. The angular power spectra of the near-infrared intensities could contain additional signals, and a complete understanding of the nature of the infrared (IR) background is still lacking in the literature. Here we explore the constraints that can be placed on particle decays, especially candidate dark matter (DM) models involving axions that trace DM halos of galaxies. Axions with a mass around a few electronvolts will decay via two photons with wavelengths in the near-IR band and will leave a signature in the IR background intensity power spectrum. Using recent power spectra measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment, we find that the 0.6–1.6 μm power spectra can be explained by axions with masses around 4 eV. The total axion abundance Ω a ≃ 0.05, and it is comparable to the baryon density of the universe. The suggested mean axion mass and abundance are not ruled out by existing cosmological observations. Interestingly, the axion model with a mass distribution is preferred by the data, which cannot be explained by the standard quantum chromodynamics theory and needs further discussion.

  13. Axion decay and anisotropy of near-IR extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yan; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Chen, Xuelei; Zemcov, Michael; Smidt, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The extragalactic background light is expected to be comprised of the cumulative radiation from all galaxies and active galactic nuclei over the cosmic history. In addition to point sources, EBL also contains information from diffuse sources of radiation. An example is the intra-halo light, associated with diffuse stars in dark matter halos resulting from galaxy mergers and tidal interactions, identified based on measurements involving the angular power spectrum of infrared background anisotropies. The angular power spectra of the near-infrared intensities could still contain additional signals and a complete understanding of the nature of the IR background is still lacking in the literature. Here we explore the constraints that can be placed on the decay products associated with particle decays, especially candidate dark matter models involving axions that trace dark matter halos of galaxies. Axions with a mass around a few eV will decay via two photons with wavelengths in the near-IR band, and will leave a ...

  14. The Orion fingers: Near-IR spectral imaging of an explosive outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Youngblood, Allison; Bally, John

    2016-01-01

    We present near-IR (1.1-2.4 micron) position-position-velocity cubes of the 500-year-old Orion BN/KL explosive outflow with spatial resolution 1" and spectral resolution 86 km/s. We construct integrated intensity maps free of continuum sources of 15 H2 and [Fe II] lines while preserving kinematic information of individual outflow features. Included in the detected H2 lines are the 1-0 S(1) and 1-0 Q(3) transitions, allowing extinction measurements across the outflow. Additionally, we present dereddened flux ratios for over two dozen outflow features to allow for the characterization of the true excitation conditions of the BN/KL outflow. All ratios show the dominance of shock excitation of the H2 emission, although some features exhibit signs of fluorescent excitation from stellar radiation or J-type shocks. We also detect tracers of the PDR/ionization front north of the Trapezium stars in [O I] and [Fe II] and analyze other observed outflows not associated with the BN/KL outflow.

  15. A near-IR spectroscopic survey of massive jets towards EGOs

    CERN Document Server

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Linz, H; Lopez, R Garcia; Sanna, A

    2014-01-01

    We aim at deriving the main physical properties of massive jets from near-IR observations, comparing them to those of a large sample of jets from low-mass YSOs, and relating them to the main features of their driving sources. We present a NIR imaging (H2 and Ks) and low-resolution spectroscopic (0.95-2.50 um) survey of 18 massive jets towards GLIMPSE extended green objects, driven by intermediate- and high-mass YSOs, which have Lbol between 4x10^2 and 10^5 Lsun. As in low-mass jets, H2 is the primary NIR coolant, detected in all the analysed flows, whereas the most important ionic tracer is [FeII], detected in half of the sampled jets. Our analysis indicates that the emission lines originate from shocks at high temperatures and densities. No fluorescent emission is detected along the flows, regardless of the source Lbol. On average, the physical parameters of these massive jets (i.e. Av, temperature, column density, mass, and luminosity) have higher values than those measured in their low-mass counterparts. T...

  16. Near-IR luminescent lanthanide complexes with 1,8-diaminoanthraquinone-based chromophoric ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Oliver J; Ward, Benjamin D; Amoroso, Angelo J; Pope, Simon J A

    2016-04-12

    Three new chromophoric anthraquinone-based multidentate ligands have been synthesised in a step-wise manner from 1,8-dichloroanthraquinone. The ligands each comprise two dipicolyl amine units and react with trivalent lanthanide ions to form monometallic complexes of the form [Ln(L)](OTf)3 as indicated by MS studies and elemental analyses. Supporting DFT studies show that the monometallic species are highly favoured (>1000 kJ mol(-1)) over the formation of a 2 : 2 dimetallic congener. Both ligands and complexes absorb light efficiently (ε ∼ 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1)) in the visible part of the spectrum, with λabsca. 535-550 nm through an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) transition localised on the substituted anthraquinone unit. In all cases the complexes show a fluorescence band at ca. 675 nm due to the ICT emitting state. The corresponding Nd(iii), Yb(iii) and Er(iii) complexes also reveal sensitised near-IR emission characteristic of each ion following excitation of the ICT visible absorption band at 535 nm. PMID:26974664

  17. LIGO gravitational wave detection, primordial black holes and the near-IR cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A

    2016-01-01

    LIGO's discovery of a gravitational wave from two merging black holes (BHs) of similar masses rekindled suggestions that primordial BHs (PBHs) make up the dark matter (DM). If so, PBHs would add a Poissonian isocurvature density fluctuation component to the inflation-produced adiabatic density fluctuations. For LIGO's BH parameters, this extra component would dominate the small-scale power responsible for collapse of early DM halos at z>10, where first luminous sources formed. We quantify the resultant increase in high-z abundances of collapsed halos that are suitable for producing the first generation of stars and luminous sources. The significantly increased abundance of the early halos would naturally explain the observed source-subtracted near-IR cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations, which cannot be accounted for by known galaxy populations. For LIGO's BH parameters this increase is such that the observed CIB fluctuation levels at 2 to 5 micron can be produced if only a tiny fraction of baryons i...

  18. THE GEMINI SPECTRAL LIBRARY OF NEAR-IR LATE-TYPE STELLAR TEMPLATES AND ITS APPLICATION FOR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a spectroscopic library of late spectral type stellar templates in the near-IR range 2.15-2.42 μm, at R = 5300-5900 resolution, oriented to support stellar kinematics studies in external galaxies, such as the direct determination of the masses of supermassive black holes in nearby active (or non-active) galaxies. The combination of high spectral resolution and state-of-the-art instrumentation available in 8 m class telescopes has made the analysis of circumnuclear stellar kinematics using the near-IR CO band heads one of the most used techniques for such studies, and this library aims to provide the supporting data sets required by the higher spectral resolution and larger spectral coverage currently achieved with modern near-IR spectrographs. Examples of the application for kinematical analysis are given for data obtained with two Gemini instruments, but the templates can be easily adjusted for use with other near-IR spectrographs at similar or lower resolution. The example data sets are also used to revisit the 'template mismatch' effect and the dependence of the velocity dispersion values obtained from the fitting process with the characteristics of the stellar templates. The library is available in electronic form from the Gemini Web pages.

  19. Behavior of [S/Fe] Obtained from Near-IR S I Lines at 10456-9 Å

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada-Hidai, M.; Takeda, Y.

    2012-08-01

    Behavior of [S/Fe] was examined based on near-IR S I 10456-9 Å lines observed with the Subaru IRCS+AO188. We found that the behavior of their [S/Fe] shows a flat trend in the range of [Fe/H]Takada-Hidai (2011, 2012).

  20. Doubly and triply linked porphyrin-perylene monoimides as near IR dyes with large dipole moments and high photostability

    KAUST Repository

    Jiao, Chongjun

    2011-01-21

    Doubly and triply linked porphyrin-perylene monoimides 3 and 4, with extraordinary stability, large dipole moments, and strong near IR absorption, were prepared by means of one-pot oxidative cyclodehydrogenation promoted by FeCl 3. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. A CATALOG OF NEAR-IR SOURCES FOUND TO BE UNRESOLVED WITH MILLIARCSECOND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richichi, A. [National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand, 191 Siriphanich Bldg., Huay Kaew Rd., Suthep, Muang, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Fors, O. [Departament Astronomia i Meteorologia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (UB/IEEC), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Cusano, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Moerchen, M., E-mail: andrea@narit.or.th [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2012-12-15

    Calibration is one of the long-standing problems in optical interferometric measurements, particularly with long baselines which demand stars with angular sizes on the milliarcsecond scale and no detectable companions. While systems of calibrators have been generally established for the near-infrared in the bright source regime (K {approx}< 3 mag), modern large interferometers are sensitive to significantly fainter magnitudes. We aim to provide a list of sources found to be unresolved from direct observations with high angular resolution and dynamic range, which can be used to choose interferometric calibrators. To this purpose, we have used a large number of lunar occultations recorded with the ISAAC instrument at the Very Large Telescope to select sources found to be unresolved and without close companions. An algorithm has been used to determine the limiting angular resolution achieved for each source, taking into account a noise model built from occulted and unocculted portions of the light curves. We have obtained upper limits on the angular sizes of 556 sources, with magnitudes ranging from K{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 4 to 10, with a median of 7.2 mag. The upper limits on possible undetected companions (within Almost-Equal-To 0.''5) range from K{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 8 to 13, with a median of 11.5 mag. One-third of the sources have angular sizes {<=}1 mas, and two-thirds have sizes {<=}2 mas. This list of unresolved sources matches well the capabilities of current large interferometric facilities. We also provide available cross-identifications, magnitudes, spectral types, and other auxiliary information. A fraction of the sources are found to be potentially variable. The list covers parts of the Galactic Bulge and in particular the vicinity of the Galactic Center, where extinction is very significant and traditional lists of calibrators are often insufficient.

  2. Surface Brightness Fluctuations as Stellar Population Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Blakeslee, John P

    2009-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBF) can provide useful information about the unresolved stellar content of early-type galaxies and spiral bulges. The absolute SBF magnitude Mbar in a given passband depends on the properties of the stellar population and can be predicted by population synthesis models. SBF measurements in different bandpasses are sensitive to different evolutionary stages within the galaxy stellar population. Near-IR SBF magnitudes are sensitive to the evolution of stars wit...

  3. A Concept for Seeing-Limited Near-IR Spectroscopy on the Giant Magellan Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcoe, Robert A.; Furesz, Gabor; Egan, Mark; Malonis, Andrew; Hellickson, Tim

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple seeing-limited IR spectrometer design for the Giant Magellan Telescope, with continuous R = 6000 coverage from 0.87-2.50 microns for a 0:7" slit. The instrument's design is based on an asymmetric white pupil echelle layout, with dichroics splitting the optical train into yJ, H, and K channels after the pupil transfer mirror. A separate low-dispersion mode offers single-object R ~ 850 spectra which also cover the full NIR bandpass in each exposure. Catalog gratings and H2RG detectors are used to minimize cost, and only two cryogenic rotary mechanisms are employed, reducing mechanical complexity. The instrument dewar occupies an envelope of 1:8×1:5×1:2 meters, satisfying mass and volume requirements for GMT with comfortable margin. We estimate the system throughput at ~35% including losses from the atmosphere, telescope, and instrument (i.e. all coatings, gratings, and sensors). This optical efficiency is comparable to the FIRE spectrograph on Magellan, and we have specified and designed fast cameras so the GMT instrument will have an almost identical pixel scale as FIRE. On the 6.5 meter Magellan telescopes, FIRE is read-noise limited in the y and J bands, similar to other existing near-IR spectrometers and also to JWST/NIRSPEC. GMT's twelve-fold increase in collecting area will therefore offer gains in signal-to-noise per exposure that exceed those of moderate resolution optical instruments, which are already sky-noise limited on today's telescopes. Such an instrument would allow GMT to pursue key early science programs on the Epoch of Reionization, galaxy formation, transient astronomy, and obscured star formation environments prior to commissioning of its adaptive optics system. This design study demonstrates the feasibility of developing relatively affordable spectrometers at the ELT scale, in response to the pressures of joint funding for these telescopes and their associated instrument suites.

  4. LIGO Gravitational Wave Detection, Primordial Black Holes, and the Near-IR Cosmic Infrared Background Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    LIGO's discovery of a gravitational wave from two merging black holes (BHs) of similar masses rekindled suggestions that primordial BHs (PBHs) make up the dark matter (DM). If so, PBHs would add a Poissonian isocurvature density fluctuation component to the inflation-produced adiabatic density fluctuations. For LIGO's BH parameters, this extra component would dominate the small-scale power responsible for collapse of early DM halos at z ≳ 10, where first luminous sources formed. We quantify the resultant increase in high-z abundances of collapsed halos that are suitable for producing the first generation of stars and luminous sources. The significantly increased abundance of the early halos would naturally explain the observed source-subtracted near-IR cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations, which cannot be accounted for by known galaxy populations. For LIGO's BH parameters, this increase is such that the observed CIB fluctuation levels at 2-5 μm can be produced if only a tiny fraction of baryons in the collapsed DM halos forms luminous sources. Gas accretion onto these PBHs in collapsed halos, where first stars should also form, would straightforwardly account for the observed high coherence between the CIB and unresolved cosmic X-ray background in soft X-rays. We discuss modifications possibly required in the processes of first star formation if LIGO-type BHs indeed make up the bulk or all of DM. The arguments are valid only if the PBHs make up all, or at least most, of DM, but at the same time the mechanism appears inevitable if DM is made of PBHs.

  5. The near-IR shape of the big blue bump emission from quasars: under the hot dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, M; Blaes, Omer M; Kishimoto, Makoto; Antonucci, Robert; Blaes, Omer

    2006-01-01

    One primary difficulty in understanding the nature of the putative accretion disk in the central engine of AGNs is that some of its key intrinsic spectral signatures are buried under the emissions from the surrounding regions, i.e. the broad line region (BLR) and the obscuring torus. We argue here that these signatures can be revealed by using optical and near-IR polarization. At least in some quasars, the polarization is seen only in the continuum and is not shared by emission lines. In this case, the polarized flux is considered to show the intrinsic spectrum interior to the BLR, removing off the emissions from the BLR and torus. We have used this polarization to reveal the Balmer-edge feature and near-IR spectral shape of the central engine, both of which are important for testing the fundamental aspects of the models.

  6. Faecal near-IR spectroscopy to determine the nutritional value of diets consumed by beef cattle in east Mediterranean rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, S Y; Dvash, L; Roudman, M; Muklada, H; Barkai, D; Yehuda, Y; Ungar, E D

    2016-02-01

    Rapid assessment of the nutritional quality of diets ingested by grazing animals is pivotal for successful cow-calf management in east Mediterranean rangelands, which receive unpredictable rainfall and are subject to hot-spells. Clipped vegetation samples are seldom representative of diets consumed, as cows locate and graze selectively. In contrast, faeces are easily sampled and their near-IR spectra contain information about nutrients and their utilization. However, a pre-requisite for successful faecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (FNIRS) is that the calibration database encompass the spectral variability of samples to be analyzed. Using confined beef cows in Northern and Southern Israel, we calibrated prediction equations based on individual pairs of known dietary attributes and the NIR spectra of associated faeces (n=125). Diets were composed of fresh-cut green fodder of monocots (wheat and barley), dicots (safflower and garden pea) and natural pasture collected at various phenological states over 2 consecutive years, and, optionally, supplements of barley grain and dried poultry litter. A total of 48 additional pairs of faeces and diets sourced from cows fed six complete mixed rations covering a wide range of energy and CP concentrations. Precision (linearity of calibration, R2cal, and of cross-validation, R2cv) and accuracy (standard error of cross-validation, SEcv) were criteria for calibration quality. The calibrations for dietary ash, CP, NDF and in vitro dry matter digestibility yielded R2cal values >0.87, R2cv of 0.81 to 0.89 and SEcv values of 16, 13, 39 and 31 g/kg dry matter, respectively. Equations for nutrient intake were of low quality, with the exception of CP. Evaluation of FNIRS predictions was carried out with grazing animals supplemented or not with poultry litter, and implementation of the method in one herd over 2 years is presented. The potential usefulness of equations was also established by calculating the Mahalanobis (H

  7. The luminosity function and surface brightness distribution of HI selected galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH; Sprayberry, D

    2001-01-01

    We measure the z = 0 B-band optical luminosity function (LF) for galaxies selected in a blind Hi survey. The total LF of the Hi selected sample is flat, with Schechter parameters M*= -19.38+(+1.02)(-0.62) + 5 log h(100) mag and alpha = -1.03(-0.15)(+0.25), in good agreement with LFs of optically sel

  8. Cytochrome c oxidase as a primary photoacceptor when laser irradiating cell culture by visible and near IR-range light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on laser effect of visible and near IR-range light on HeLa cell culture are carried out with the purpose of proving the assumption that cytochrome c oxidase cultivated in cells in-vitro is a primary photoacceptor. It is shown that light absorption by certain chromophores in cytochrome oxidase molecule (CuA, CuB, hemes a and a3) changes the rate of their oxidation, i.e. influences oxidations velocity (and, probably its mechanism) of electrons transfer inside the molecule. It is supposed that these reactions are connected with molecular mechanism of strict laser therapy at the single cell level. 15 refs., 1 fig

  9. Impact of Humidity on Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based CO Detection Using a Near-IR Telecommunication Diode Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Xukun Yin; Lei Dong; Huadan Zheng; Xiaoli Liu; Hongpeng Wu; Yanfang Yang; Weiguang Ma; Lei Zhang; Wangbao Yin; Liantuan Xiao; Suotang Jia

    2016-01-01

    A near-IR CO trace gas sensor based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is evaluated using humidified nitrogen samples. Relaxation processes in the CO-N2-H2O system are investigated. A simple kinetic model is used to predict the sensor performance at different gas pressures. The results show that CO has a ~3 and ~5 times slower relaxation time constant than CH4 and HCN, respectively, under dry conditions. However, with the presence of water, its relaxation time constant can ...

  10. NEAR-IR Spectroscopy of Young Stars in the Braid Nebula Star Formation Region in Cygnus Ob7

    OpenAIRE

    Aspin, Colin; Beck, Tracy L.; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Davis, Chris J.; Schieven, G. M.; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Magakian, Tigran; Movsessian, Tigran; NIkogossian, Elena G.; Mitchison, Sharon; Smith, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    We present 1.4 to 2.5 um integral field spectroscopy of 16 stars in the Braid Nebula star formation region in Cygnus OB7. These data forms one aspect of a large-scale multi-wavelength survey aimed at determining an unbiased estimate of the number, mass distribution, and evolutionary state of the young stars within this one square degree area of the previously poorly studied Lynds 1003 molecular cloud. Our new spectroscopic data, when combined with 2MASS near-IR photometry, provide evidence of...

  11. Precision Determination of Atmospheric Extinction at Optical and Near IR Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Blondin, Stephane; /European Southern Observ. /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-08-24

    The science goals for future ground-based all-sky surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, PanSTARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a per cent or better, and absolute calibration of color measurements that are similarly accurate. This performance will need to be achieved with measurements made from multiple images taken over the course of many years, and these surveys will observe in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a technique to implement a new strategy to directly measure variations of atmospheric transmittance at optical wavelengths and application of these measurements to calibration of ground-based observations. This strategy makes use of measurements of the spectra of a small catalog of bright 'probe' stars as they progress across the sky and back-light the atmosphere. The signatures of optical absorption by different atmospheric constituents are recognized in these spectra by their characteristic dependences on wavelength and airmass. State-of-the-art models of atmospheric radiation transport and modern codes are used to accurately compute atmospheric extinction over a wide range of observing conditions. We present results of an observing campaign that demonstrate that correction for extinction due to molecular constituents and aerosols can be done with precisions of a few millimagnitudes with this technique.

  12. Interaction of near-IR laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu., E-mail: yakimov@lantanlaser.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, A. Ishlinsky Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction of 1.07-μm laser radiation with plasma of a continuous optical discharge (COD) in xenon and argon at a pressure of p = 3–25 bar and temperature of T = 15 kK has been studied. The threshold power required to sustain COD is found to decrease with increasing gas pressure to P{sub t} < 30 W in xenon at p > 20 bar and to P{sub t} < 350 W in argon at p > 15 bar. This effect is explained by an increase in the coefficient of laser radiation absorption to 20−25 cm{sup –1} in Xe and 1−2 cm{sup –1} in Ar due to electronic transitions between the broadened excited atomic levels. The COD characteristics also depend on the laser beam refraction in plasma. This effect can be partially compensated by a tighter focusing of the laser beam. COD is applied as a broadband light source with a high spectral brightness.

  13. Characterizing the Habitable Zones of Exoplanetary Systems with a Large Ultraviolet/Visible/Near-IR Space Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey; Roberge, Aki; Ayres, Thomas; Barman, Travis; Brown, Alexander; Davenport, James; Desert, Jean-Michel; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fleming, Brian; Fontenla, Juan; Fossati, Luca; Froning, Cynthia; Hallinan, Gregg; Hawley, Suzanne; Hu, Renyu; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James; Kowlaski, Adam; Loyd, Parke; Mauas, Pablo; Miguel, Yamila; Osten, Rachel; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Schneider, Christian; Segura, Antigona; Stocke, John; Tian, Feng; Tumlinson, Jason; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wood, Brian; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.

  14. VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV): The public ESO near-IR variability survey of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Minniti, D; Emerson, J P; Saito, R K; Hempel, M; Pietrukowicz, P; Ahumada, A V; Alonso, M V; Alonso-García, J; Arias, J I; Bandyopadhyay, R M; Barbá, R H; Bedin, L R; Bica, E; Borissova, J; Bronfman, L; Catelan, M; Clariá, J J; Cross, N; de Grijs, R; Dékány, I; Drew, J E; Fariña, C; Feinstein, C; Lajús, E Fernández; Gamen, R C; Geisler, D; Gieren, W; Goldman, B; González, O; Gunthardt, G; Gurovich, S; Hambly, N C; Irwin, M J; Ivanov, V D; Jordán, A; Kerins, E; Kinemuchi, K; Kurtev, R; López-Corredoira, M; Maccarone, T; Masetti, N; Merlo, D; Messineo, M; Mirabel, I F; Monaco, L; Morelli, L; Padilla, N; Parisi, M C; Pignata, G; Rejkuba, M; Roman-Lopes, A; Sale, S E; Schreiber, M R; Schröder, A C; Smith, M; Sodré, L; Soto, M; Tamura, M; Tappert, C; Thompson, M A; Toledo, I; Zoccali, M

    2009-01-01

    We describe the public ESO near-IR variability survey (VVV) scanning the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high. The survey will take 1929 hours of observations with the 4-metre VISTA telescope during five years (2010-2014), covering ~10^9 point sources across an area of 520 deg^2, including 33 known globular clusters and ~350 open clusters. The final product will be a deep near-IR atlas in five passbands (0.9-2.5 microns) and a catalogue of more than 10^6 variable point sources. Unlike single-epoch surveys that, in most cases, only produce 2-D maps, the VVV variable star survey will enable the construction of a 3-D map of the surveyed region using well-understood distance indicators such as RR Lyrae stars, and Cepheids. It will yield important information on the ages of the populations. The observations will be combined with data from MACHO, OGLE, EROS, VST, Spitzer, HST, Chandra, INTEGRAL, WISE, Fermi LAT, XMM-Newton, GAIA and ALMA for a complete under...

  15. Properties of the fullerene C60-containing PN Lin49 in the SMC; Explanations of strong near-IR excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Kemper, Francisca; Leal-Ferreira, Marcelo L.; Aleman, Isabel; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Cami, Jan; Ochsendorf, Bram; Peeters, Els

    2016-07-01

    We performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the fullerene C6o-containing planetary nebula (PN) Lin49 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Lin49 is a C-rich and metal- deficient PN (Z∼⃒0.0006) and its nebular abundances are in agreement with the AGB model for the initially 1.25Mʘ stars with the metallicity Z = 0.001 of Fishlock et al. (2014, [1]). By stellar absorption fitting with TLUSTY, we derived stellar abundances, effective temperature, and surface gravity. We constructed the photo-ionization model with CLOUDY in order to investigate physical conditions of Lin49. The model with the 0.005-0.1 μm radius graphite and a constant hydrogen density shell could not fit the ∼⃒1-5 μm SED owing to the strong near-IR excess. We propose that the near-IR excess indicates (1) the presence of extremely small carbon molecules or (2) the presence of high-density structure surrounding the central star.

  16. Simultaneous near-IR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral oxygenation and brain water during hypoxia-ischemia in two-week-old rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R. A.; Tuor, U. I.; Foniok, T.; Bascaramurty, S.; Ringland, K.; McKenzie, E.; Qiao, M.; Tomanek, B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2001-10-01

    Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy can potentially probe several parameters related to the onset of stroke and the ensuing tissue damage. One obvious marker of ischemia is cerebral oxygenation, which can be lowered sharply in stroke-affected tissue. Also commonly assessed, though less straightforward to recover, is the redox state of the cytochrome aa3 copper center. Finally, parameters that are in principle available but seldom recovered from in vivo near-IR spectra are changes in water concentration and scattering properties of the tissue. We have evaluated the potential for near-IR spectroscopy to detect relevant changes in cerebral oxygenation, blood volume, water content, and scattering properties in an infant rat stroke model that is well characterized by magnetic resonance imaging methods. The specific aim was to acquire near-IR spectra simultaneously with MR images and to correlate stroke-associated changes detected via these two modalities prior to, during and after a hypoxia-ischemia episode within this stroke model. Presented here are results from the design and testing of a near-IR illumination/detection system that is compatible with an MR imaging system, and the recovery of trends in the near-IR spectra that complement the hypoxic-ischemic changes observed in the MR images. Unexpectedly large intensity changes observed for the in vivo near-IR water absorptions are ascribed to hypoxia-induced variations in effective optical pathlength, suggesting that the water absorptions may prove generally useful as a means to track such changes.

  17. CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ∼30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales σ-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and σ-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E ≥ 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other γ-ray blazars and is likely to be the γ-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ∼3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ∼320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  18. The FUR to near-IR morphologies of luminous infrared galaxies in the goals sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the morphologies of a sample of 20 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) in the FUV, B, I, and H bands, using the Gini (G) and M20 parameters to quantitatively estimate the distribution and concentration of flux as a function of wavelength. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images provide an average spatial resolution of ∼80 pc. While our LIRGs can be reliably classified as mergers across the entire range of wavelengths studied here, there is a clear shift toward more negative M20 (more bulge-dominated) and a less significant decrease in G values at longer wavelengths. We find no correlation between the derived FUV G-M20 parameters and the global measures of the IR to FUV flux ratio (IRX). Given the fine resolution in our HST data, this suggests either that the UV morphology and IRX are correlated on very small scales, or that the regions emitting the bulk of the IR emission emit almost no FUV light. We use our multi-wavelength data to simulate how merging LIRGs would appear from z∼0.5–3 in deep optical and near-infrared images such as the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field, and use these simulations to measure the G-M20 at these redshifts. Our simulations indicate a noticeable decrease in G, which flattens at z⩾2 by as much as 40%, resulting in mis-classifying our LIRGs as disk-like, even in the rest-frame FUV. The higher redshift values of M20 for the GOALS sources do not appear to change more than about 10% from the values at z∼0. The change in G-M20 is caused by the surface brightness dimming of extended tidal features and asymmetries, and also the decreased spatial resolution which reduced the number of individual clumps identified. This effect, seen as early as z∼0.5, could easily lead to an underestimate of the number of merging galaxies at high-redshift in the rest-frame FUV.

  19. The FUR to near-IR morphologies of luminous infrared galaxies in the goals sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, S. M. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V.; Psychogyios, A. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003, Heraklion (Greece); Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Floc’h, E. Le [CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, Bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bridge, C. [Div. of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We compare the morphologies of a sample of 20 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) in the FUV, B, I, and H bands, using the Gini (G) and M{sub 20} parameters to quantitatively estimate the distribution and concentration of flux as a function of wavelength. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images provide an average spatial resolution of ∼80 pc. While our LIRGs can be reliably classified as mergers across the entire range of wavelengths studied here, there is a clear shift toward more negative M{sub 20} (more bulge-dominated) and a less significant decrease in G values at longer wavelengths. We find no correlation between the derived FUV G-M{sub 20} parameters and the global measures of the IR to FUV flux ratio (IRX). Given the fine resolution in our HST data, this suggests either that the UV morphology and IRX are correlated on very small scales, or that the regions emitting the bulk of the IR emission emit almost no FUV light. We use our multi-wavelength data to simulate how merging LIRGs would appear from z∼0.5–3 in deep optical and near-infrared images such as the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field, and use these simulations to measure the G-M{sub 20} at these redshifts. Our simulations indicate a noticeable decrease in G, which flattens at z⩾2 by as much as 40%, resulting in mis-classifying our LIRGs as disk-like, even in the rest-frame FUV. The higher redshift values of M{sub 20} for the GOALS sources do not appear to change more than about 10% from the values at z∼0. The change in G-M{sub 20} is caused by the surface brightness dimming of extended tidal features and asymmetries, and also the decreased spatial resolution which reduced the number of individual clumps identified. This effect, seen as early as z∼0.5, could easily lead to an underestimate of the number of merging galaxies at high-redshift in the rest-frame FUV.

  20. Colloidal silicon quantum dots: synthesis and luminescence tuning from the near-UV to the near-IR range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Batu; Shirahata, Naoto

    2014-02-01

    This review describes a series of representative synthesis processes, which have been developed in the last two decades to prepare silicon quantum dots (QDs). The methods include both top-down and bottom-up approaches, and their methodological advantages and disadvantages are presented. Considerable efforts in surface functionalization of QDs have categorized it into (i) a two-step process and (ii) in situ surface derivatization. Photophysical properties of QDs are summarized to highlight the continuous tuning of photoluminescence color from the near-UV through visible to the near-IR range. The emission features strongly depend on the silicon nanostructures including QD surface configurations. Possible mechanisms of photoluminescence have been summarized to ascertain the future challenges toward industrial use of silicon-based light emitters.

  1. Colloidal silicon quantum dots: synthesis and luminescence tuning from the near-UV to the near-IR range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batu Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes a series of representative synthesis processes, which have been developed in the last two decades to prepare silicon quantum dots (QDs. The methods include both top-down and bottom-up approaches, and their methodological advantages and disadvantages are presented. Considerable efforts in surface functionalization of QDs have categorized it into (i a two-step process and (ii in situ surface derivatization. Photophysical properties of QDs are summarized to highlight the continuous tuning of photoluminescence color from the near-UV through visible to the near-IR range. The emission features strongly depend on the silicon nanostructures including QD surface configurations. Possible mechanisms of photoluminescence have been summarized to ascertain the future challenges toward industrial use of silicon-based light emitters.

  2. Near-IR tunable laser based photoacoustic sensor for sub-ppb C2H2 detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Wang, Huili

    2015-05-01

    A photoacoustic sensor for the detection of acetylene (C2H2) based on an EDFA-amplified tunable laser at 1530.37 nm is reported. This sensor consists of a near-IR tunable external cavity diode laser combined with a fiber amplifier and wavelength modulation mechanism. In order to improve detection sensitivity and accuracy, an optimized resonant photoacoustic cell based on an acoustic longitudinal mode and automatic tracking of the acoustic resonance frequency using a speaker and a FPGA-based servo controller is implemented. The minimum detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio = 1) of 0.8 ppb for C2H2 is demonstrated at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Seasonal and Global Variations of Water Vapor and High Clouds Observed with MODIS near-IR Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Yang, Ping; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra Spacecraft has been collecting scientific data since February of 2000. MODIS is a major facility instrument for remote sensing of the atmosphere, land surfaces, and ocean color. On the MODIS instruments, there are five channels located within and around the .0.94 micron water vapor band absorption region for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. There is also a channel located at 1.375 micron for detecting thin cirrus clouds. We will describe the basic principles for using these near-IR channels for remote sensing of water vapor and high clouds. Based on our analysis of two years# measurements with these channels, we have found that reliable observations of water vapor and high clouds on regional and global scales can be made. We will present results on daily, seasonal and annual variations of water vapor and high clouds.

  4. Impact of Humidity on Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based CO Detection Using a Near-IR Telecommunication Diode Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xukun; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Xiaoli; Wu, Hongpeng; Yang, Yanfang; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    A near-IR CO trace gas sensor based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is evaluated using humidified nitrogen samples. Relaxation processes in the CO-N2-H2O system are investigated. A simple kinetic model is used to predict the sensor performance at different gas pressures. The results show that CO has a ~3 and ~5 times slower relaxation time constant than CH4 and HCN, respectively, under dry conditions. However, with the presence of water, its relaxation time constant can be improved by three orders of magnitude. The experimentally determined normalized detection sensitivity for CO in humid gas is 1.556 × 10(-8) W ⋅ cm (-1)/Hz(1/2).

  5. Colloidal silicon quantum dots: synthesis and luminescence tuning from the near-UV to the near-IR range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes a series of representative synthesis processes, which have been developed in the last two decades to prepare silicon quantum dots (QDs). The methods include both top-down and bottom-up approaches, and their methodological advantages and disadvantages are presented. Considerable efforts in surface functionalization of QDs have categorized it into (i) a two-step process and (ii) in situ surface derivatization. Photophysical properties of QDs are summarized to highlight the continuous tuning of photoluminescence color from the near-UV through visible to the near-IR range. The emission features strongly depend on the silicon nanostructures including QD surface configurations. Possible mechanisms of photoluminescence have been summarized to ascertain the future challenges toward industrial use of silicon-based light emitters. (review)

  6. Exploring the NRO Opportunity for a Hubble-sized Wide-field Near-IR Space Telescope -- NEW WFIRST

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Alan; Mountain, Matt; Postman, Marc; Elliott, Erin; Bendek, Eduardo; Bennett, David; Dalcanton, Julianne; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Guyon, Olivier; Hirata, Christopher; Kalirai, Jason; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Kruk, Jeff; Macintosh, Bruce; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Penny, Matthew; Perlmutter, Saul; Rieke, George; Riess, Adam; Rhoads, James; Shaklan, Stuart; Somerville, Rachel; Stern, Daniel; Thompson, Rodger; Weinberg, David

    2012-01-01

    We discuss scientific, technical and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.

  7. Impact of Humidity on Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based CO Detection Using a Near-IR Telecommunication Diode Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xukun Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A near-IR CO trace gas sensor based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS is evaluated using humidified nitrogen samples. Relaxation processes in the CO-N2-H2O system are investigated. A simple kinetic model is used to predict the sensor performance at different gas pressures. The results show that CO has a ~3 and ~5 times slower relaxation time constant than CH4 and HCN, respectively, under dry conditions. However, with the presence of water, its relaxation time constant can be improved by three orders of magnitude. The experimentally determined normalized detection sensitivity for CO in humid gas is 1.556 × 10 − 8   W ⋅ cm − 1 / Hz 1 / 2 .

  8. Exploring the NRO Opportunity for a Hubble-Sized Wide-Field Near-IR Space Telescope - New WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Alan; Spergel, David; Mountain, Matt; Postman, Mark; Elliott, Erin; Bendek, Eduardo; Bennett, David; Dalcanton, Julianne; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Guyon, Olivier; Hirata, Christopher; Kalirai, Jason; Kasdin, Jeremy; Kruk, Jeff; Macintosh, Bruce; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Penny, Matthew; Shaklan, Stuart; Stern, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We discuss scientific, technical, and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.

  9. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  10. Statistical inference for classification of RRIM clone series using near IR reflectance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Faridatul Aima; Madzhi, Nina Korlina; Hashim, Hadzli; Abdullah, Noor Ezan; Khairuzzaman, Noor Aishah; Azmi, Azrie Faris Mohd; Sampian, Ahmad Faiz Mohd; Harun, Muhammad Hafiz

    2015-08-01

    RRIM clone is a rubber breeding series produced by RRIM (Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia) through "rubber breeding program" to improve latex yield and producing clones attractive to farmers. The objective of this work is to analyse measurement of optical sensing device on latex of selected clone series. The device using transmitting NIR properties and its reflectance is converted in terms of voltage. The obtained reflectance index value via voltage was analyzed using statistical technique in order to find out the discrimination among the clones. From the statistical results using error plots and one-way ANOVA test, there is an overwhelming evidence showing discrimination of RRIM 2002, RRIM 2007 and RRIM 3001 clone series with p value = 0.000. RRIM 2008 cannot be discriminated with RRIM 2014; however both of these groups are distinct from the other clones.

  11. Development of a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer in resonance with transitions in the 900-1550 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-07-21

    Charge transfer and charge delocalisation processes play key roles in the functions of large biomolecular systems and organic/inorganic devices. Many of the short-lived transients involved in these processes can be sensitively detected by monitoring their low-energy electronic transitions in the near-IR region. Ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for investigating the structural dynamics of the short-lived transients as well as their electronic dynamics. In this study, we have developed a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer using the Raman pump pulse at 1190 nm and a broadband probe pulse covering the 900-1550 nm region. Spectral and temporal instrument responses of the spectrometer are estimated to be 5 cm(-1) and 120 fs, respectively. Time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectra of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (P3DDT) are recorded in toluene solution for investigating its structural changes following the photoexcitation. The spectra strongly indicate conformational changes of P3DDT in excited states associated with the elongation of its effective conjugation length. The results on P3DDT fully demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly developed femtosecond time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectrometer. PMID:27327140

  12. Integral field spectroscopy of selected areas of the Bright bar and Orion-S cloud in the Orion nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; López-Martín, L.; García-Rojas, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present integral field spectroscopy of two selected zones in the Orion nebula obtained with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer, covering the optical spectral range from 3500 to 7200 Å and with a spatial resolution of 1 arcsec. The observed zones are located on the prominent Bright bar and on the brightest area at the north-east of the Orion south cloud, both containing remarkable ionization fronts. We obtain maps of emission-line fluxes and ratios, electron density and temperatures, and chemical abundances. We study the ionization structure and morphology of both fields, whose ionization fronts show different inclination angles with respect to the plane of the sky. We find that the maps of electron density, O+/H+ and O/H ratios show a rather similar structure. We interpret this as produced by the strong dependence on density of the [O II] lines used to derive the O+ abundance, and that our nominal values of electron density - derived from the [S II] line ratio - may be slightly higher than the appropriate value for the O+ zone. We measure the faint recombination lines of O II in the field at the north-east of the Orion south cloud, allowing us to explore the so-called abundance discrepancy problem. We find a rather constant abundance discrepancy across the field and a mean value similar to that determined in other areas of the Orion nebula, indicating that the particular physical conditions of this ionization front do not contribute to this discrepancy. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  13. Biomarkers in disk-averaged near-UV to near-IR Earth spectra using Earthshine observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hamdani, S; Foellmi, C; Berthier, J; Billeres, M; Briot, D; Riaud, P; Schneider, J; Hamdani, Slim; Arnold, Luc

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the detectability of vegetation on a global scale on Earth's surface. Considering its specific reflectance spectrum showing a sharp edge around 700 nm, vegetation can be considered as a potential global biomarker. This work, based on observational data, aims to characterise and to quantify this signature in the disk-averaged Earth's spectrum. Earthshine spectra have been used to test the detectability of the "Vegetation Red Edge" (VRE) in the Earth spectrum. We obtained reflectance spectra from near UV (320 nm) to near IR (1020 nm) for different Earth phases (continents or oceans seen from the Moon) with EMMI on the NTT at ESO/La Silla, Chile. We accurately correct the sky background and take into account the phase-dependent colour of the Moon. VRE measurements require a correction of the ozone Chappuis absorption band and Rayleigh plus aerosol scattering. Results : The near-UV spectrum shows a dark Earth below 350 nm due to the ozone absorption. The Vegetation Red Edge is observed when forests are...

  14. Thiocyanate-free asymmetric ruthenium(II) dye sensitizers containing azole chromophores with near-IR light-harvesting capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guohua; Kaneko, Ryuji; Islam, Ashraful; Zhang, Yaohong; Sugawa, Kosuke; Han, Liyuan; Shen, Qing; Bedja, Idriss; Gupta, Ravindra Kumar; Otsuki, Joe

    2016-11-01

    A new series of thiocyanate-free bis-tridentate Ru(II) complexes containing azole ligands as well as an organometallic Ru-C bond are synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). CF3-substituted pyrazolyl, CF3-substituted triazolyl, and tetrazolyl derivatives are employed as ligands in the three neutral complexes PYZ, TRZ, and TEZ dyes, respectively. Despite their different structures, all the three complexes exhibit similar absorption features and panchromatic absorption covering the visible and near-IR regions. By switching from a pyrazolyl via triazolyl to tetrazolyl moiety in the ligand, the photocurrent value, open-circuit voltage, and overall efficiency are increased accordingly under the same conditions. Among them, photon-to-current conversion efficiency (ƞ) of TEZ dye reaches the maximum of 6.44% with a short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) of 17.8 mA cm-2, an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.54 V and fill factor (FF) of 0.67 under illumination of an AM1.5G solar simulator. TEZ dye shows a good long term light soaking stability and maintains up to more than 90% of the initial power conversion efficiency after 1000 h.

  15. An optical--near-IR study of a triplet of super star clusters in the starburst core of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Westmoquette, M S; Smith, L J; Seth, A C; Gallagher, J S; O'Connell, R W; Ryon, J E; Silich, S; Mayya, Y D; Munoz-Tunon, C; Gonzalez, D Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We present HST/STIS optical and Gemini/NIFS near-IR IFU spectroscopy, and archival HST imaging of the triplet of super star clusters (A1, A2 and A3) in the core of the M82 starburst. Using model fits to the STIS spectra, and the weakness of red supergiant CO absorption features (appearing at ~6 Myr) in the NIFS H-band spectra, the ages of A2 and A3 are $4.5\\pm1.0$~Myr. A1 has strong CO bands, consistent with our previously determined age of $6.4\\pm0.5$~Myr. The photometric masses of the three clusters are 4--$7\\times10^5$~\\Msol, and their sizes are $R_{\\rm eff}=159$, 104, 59~mas ($\\sim$2.8, 1.8, 1.0~pc) for A1,2 and 3. The STIS spectra yielded radial velocities of $320\\pm2$, $330\\pm6$, and $336\\pm5$~\\kms\\ for A1,2, and 3, placing them at the eastern end of the $x_2$ orbits of M82's bar. Clusters A2 and A3 are in high density (800--1000~\\cmt) environments, and like A1, are surrounded by compact H\\two\\ regions. We suggest the winds from A2 and A3 have stalled, as in A1, due to the high ISM ambient pressure. We ...

  16. Near-IR integral field spectroscopy of ionizing stars and young stellar objects on the borders of HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F; Deharveng, L; Zavagno, A; Bouret, J -C

    2009-01-01

    We present near-IR SINFONI observations of three Galactic HII regions: RVW79, RCW82 and RCW120. We identify the ionizing stars of each region: they are early to late O stars, close to the main sequence. We derive their stellar and wind properties using atmosphere models computed with the code CMFGEN. The cluster ionizing RCW~79 formed 2.3+/-0.5 Myr ago. Similar ages are estimated, albeit with a larger uncertainty, for the ionizing stars of the other two regions. In RCW79 the mechanical wind luminosity represents only 0.1% of the ionizing luminosity, questioning the influence of stellar winds on the dynamics of the the HII region. The young stellar objects show four main types of spectral features: H2 emission, Br gamma emission, CO bandheads emission and CO bandheads absorption. These features are typical of young stellar objects surrounded by disks and/or envelopes. The radial velocities of most YSOs are consistent with that of the ionized gas, firmly establishing that star formation is taking place on the b...

  17. Near-IR Electrochromic Film Prepared by Oxidative Electropolymerization of the Cyclometalated Pt(II) Chloride with a Triphenylamine Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dongfang; Bao, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Qian; Yang, Qichao; Feng, Yuquan; Wang, Hongwei; Yang, Chunxia; Liu, Kecheng

    2015-09-01

    A cyclometalated platinum chloride [(L)PtCl] {L = 4-[p-(diphenylamino)phenyl]-6-phenyl-2,2'-bipyridine} was successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MALDI-TOF MS, elemental analysis, and X-ray crystallography. Its oxidative electropolymerization proceeds smoothly on the working Pt and ITO electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. The film thickness can be easily tuned by controlling the CV scan number. The orange hybrid polymer film shows the nondiffusion-controlled redox processes and a unusually inverse dependence of ac impedance on its thickness. As a result of switching of the MLCT/ICT and dication absorption transitions, the adherent metallopolymer film exhibits the low-voltage-controlled anodic coloration near-IR electrochromism with significant optical contrast ratio (ΔT% = 88.8% at 820 nm), fast response time (1.9 s for the coloration step and 2.3 s for the bleaching step), and high coloration efficiency (CE = 363.3 C(-1)·cm(2)). PMID:26270128

  18. IGRINS Near-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Multiple Jets around LkH$\\alpha$ 234

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Heeyoung; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Pak, Soojong; Kim, Kang-Min; Oh, Jae Sok; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; Lee, Hye-In; Le, Huynh Anh Nguyen; Lee, Sungho; Jaffe, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star Lk{\\Ha} 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). Previous studies indicate that the region around Lk{\\Ha} 234 is complex, with several embedded YSOs and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H$-$ and K$-$band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 {\\FeII} and 14 H$_{2}$ emission lines. We revealed a new {\\FeII} jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of H$_{2}$ 1$-$0 S(1) $\\lambda$2.122 $\\micron$ line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H$_{2}$ emission at the systemic velocity (V$_{LSR}$ $=$ $-$10.2 {\\kms}) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity, {\\FeII} ...

  19. The Type IIP SN 2005ay: An Extensive Study From UltraViolet To Near-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufano, F. M.; Turatto, M.; Zampieri, L.; Gal-Yam, A.

    2006-08-01

    Several supernova types are thought to explode via the gravitational collapse of the core of massive stars at the end of their lifetimes. The great observational diversity has not been fully understood even if it clearly involves the progenitor masses and configurations at the time of explosion. These Supernovae, called Core Collapse Supernovae (CC SNe), are expected to dominate the counts of SNe observed at high redshifts and to be the only observable probe of the first generation stars (Pop III). Recently indicated as reliable distance indicators (Hamuy 02, Pastorello `03), CC SNe are objects of great interest but significantly less studied in comparison with the Termonuclear ones. With the aim to understand better the reasons of the heterogeneous behaviour , we have started an extensive study of the properties of SN II with different observational features (luminosity, velocity, etc..). Here we present the last results on our first observed target, SN2005ay, a Type IIP supernova observed in an extended way from the Ultraviolet wavelengths, provided by the GALEX , to the Optical and near-IR , obtained with IISP (Italian Intensive Supernova Program).

  20. ZnSe hollow nanospheres in mechanically stable near-IR antireflection coatings for ZnSe substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Luo, Rui-Chun; Mao, Yong-Qiang; Du, Xi-Wen; Yang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Though possessing low absorption throughout a wide infrared (IR) spectral regime, owing to a high refractive index, zinc selenide substrates are generally covered by antireflection coatings (ARCs) for practical optical uses. However, achieving a high transmission of ZnSe substrates in the near-IR (NIR) region is still challenging. Herein, for the first time, colloidal ZnSe hollow nanospheres (HNSs) smaller than 100 nm were prepared and adopted to assemble ARCs for ZnSe substrates. The voiding kinetics of the HNSs was found to agree well with the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, and the self-diffusion of the Zn ion in the core was faster than its diffusion through the ZnSe shell. With single-index ARCs, the transmission of ZnSe substrates was remarkably enhanced in the NIR region, with up to an 18% increase at 840 nm. Besides, the ZnSe HNS-based ARCs showed superior mechanical stability even under violent ultrasonication in organic solutions. We expect that ZnSe HNSs will make it possible to construct graded-index ARCs to realize omnidirectional and broadband antireflection in IR, through further tuning of HNSs’ void fraction.

  1. X-ray and Near-IR Variability of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937: From Quiescence Back to Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, Cindy R; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M; Woods, Peter M; Bassa, Cees

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) Monitoring of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937 in 2005-2006 with the RXTE, CXO, and HST has revealed that the source entered a phase of X-ray and near-IR radiative quiescence, simultaneous with timing stability. During its ~2001-2004 active period, the source exhibited two large, long-term X-ray pulsed-flux flares as well as short bursts, and large (>10x) torque changes. A series of four simultaneous observations with CXO and HST approximately equispaced in 2006 showed that its X-ray flux and spectrum and near-IR flux, both variable prior to 2005, stabilized. The near-IR flux (m_{F110W} > 24.8 mag, m_{F160W} ~ 22.70 mag) is considerably fainter in 2006 than previously measured. Recently, in 2007 March, this newfound quiescence was interrupted by a sudden flux enhancement, spectral changes and a pulse morphology change, simultaneous with a large spin-up glitch and near-IR enhancement. Specifically, our RXTE observations revealed a sudden pulsed flux increase by a factor of ~3 in the 2-10 ke...

  2. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  3. EVIDENCE FOR NON-STELLAR REST-FRAME NEAR-IR EMISSION ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Johannes U.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Leja, Joel [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-03-01

    We explore the presence of non-stellar rest-frame near-IR (2–5 μm) emission in galaxies at z ∼ 1. Previous studies identified this excess in relatively small samples and suggested that such non-stellar emission, which could be linked to the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons feature or hot dust emission, is associated with an increased star formation rate (SFR). In this Letter, we confirm and quantify the presence of an IR excess in a significant fraction of galaxies in the 3D-HST GOODS catalogs. By constructing a matched sample of galaxies with and without strong non-stellar near-IR emission, we find that galaxies with such emission are predominantly star-forming galaxies. Moreover, star-forming galaxies with an excess show increased mid- and far-IR and Hα emission compared to other star-forming galaxies without. While galaxies with a near-IR excess show a larger fraction of individually detected X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs), an X-ray stacking analysis, together with the IR-colors and Hα profiles, shows that AGNs are unlikely to be the dominant source of excess in the majority of galaxies. Our results suggest that non-stellar near-IR emission is linked to increased SFRs and is ubiquitous among star-forming galaxies. As such, the near-IR emission might be a powerful tool to measure SFRs in the era of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  4. An optical-near-IR study of a triplet of super star clusters in the starburst core of M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westmoquette, M. S. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Bastian, N. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Smith, L. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute and European Space Agency, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seth, A. C. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Gallagher III, J. S.; Ryon, J. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Silich, S.; Mayya, Y. D.; González, D. Rosa [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electronica, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, C.P. 72840, Puebla (Mexico); Muñoz-Tuñón, C., E-mail: westmoquette@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/vía Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-07-10

    We present HST/STIS optical and Gemini/NIFS near-IR IFU spectroscopy and archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the triplet of super star clusters (A1, A2, and A3) in the core of the M82 starburst. Using model fits to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra and the weakness of red supergiant CO absorption features (appearing at ∼6 Myr) in the NIFS H-band spectra, the ages of A2 and A3 are 4.5 ± 1.0 Myr. A1 has strong CO bands, consistent with our previously determined age of 6.4 ± 0.5 Myr. The photometric masses of the three clusters are 4-7 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}, and their sizes are R{sub eff} = 159, 104, 59 mas (∼2.8, 1.8, 1.0 pc) for A1, A2, and A3. The STIS spectra yielded radial velocities of 320 ± 2, 330 ± 6, and 336 ± 5 km s{sup –1} for A1, A2, and A3, placing them at the eastern end of the x{sub 2} orbits of M82's bar. Clusters A2 and A3 are in high-density (800-1000 cm{sup –3}) environments, and like A1, are surrounded by compact H II regions. We suggest the winds from A2 and A3 have stalled, as in A1, due to the high ISM ambient pressure. We propose that the three clusters were formed in situ on the outer x{sub 2} orbits in regions of dense molecular gas subsequently ionized by the rapidly evolving starburst. The similar radial velocities of the three clusters and their small projected separation of ∼25 pc suggest that they may merge in the near future unless this is prevented by velocity shearing.

  5. The Variable X-ray and Near-IR Behavior of the Particularly Anomaloux X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, Cindy R; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M; Woods, Peter M; Bassa, Cees

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray and near-IR observations of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937, believed to be a magnetar. This AXP underwent a period of extreme variability during 2001-2004, but subsequently entered an extended and unexpected quiescence in 2004-2006, during which we monitored it with RXTE, CXO, and HST. Its timing properties were stable for >3 years throughout the quiescent period. 1E 1048.1-5937 again went into outburst in March 2007, which saw a factor of >7 total X-ray flux increase which was anti-correlated with a pulsed fraction decrease, and correlated with spectral hardening, among other effects. The near-IR counterpart also brightened following the 2007 event. We discuss our findings in the context of the magnetar and other models.

  6. Near-IR supercontinuum generation based on a telecom single-mode fibre in an all-fibre format, and its power combining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-IR supercontinuum (SC) is generated based on a standard telecommunication single-mode (SM) fibre in an all-fibre format. The observed spectrum covers the spectral range from 1050 nm to 1700 nm. High-efficiency combining of the SC power is demonstrated for the first time, and the spectral SC properties are shown to be maintained after power combining. The results may find applications in sensing, spectroscopy and medicine. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  7. Near-IR supercontinuum generation based on a telecom single-mode fibre in an all-fibre format, and its power combining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumao Tao; Xiaolin Wang; Xiao, H; Zhou, P; Jing Hou [College of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, 410073 (China)

    2014-04-28

    Near-IR supercontinuum (SC) is generated based on a standard telecommunication single-mode (SM) fibre in an all-fibre format. The observed spectrum covers the spectral range from 1050 nm to 1700 nm. High-efficiency combining of the SC power is demonstrated for the first time, and the spectral SC properties are shown to be maintained after power combining. The results may find applications in sensing, spectroscopy and medicine. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  8. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies selected from the 40% sky area of the ALFALFA HI survey.I.Sample and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Wei; Lam, Man I; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The population of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies is crucial for understanding the extremes of galaxy formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (HI), the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample is absolutely one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local Universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galaxy images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended low surface brightness outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images in the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model for each galaxy image. Basing on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, mu_{0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined ...

  9. The Spectacular Radio-Near-IR-X-ray Jet of 3C 111: X-ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L; Hogan, Brandon; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phe- nomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the sub-parsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an in- creasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and HST observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observati...

  10. The innermost region of AGN tori: implications from the HST/NICMOS Type 1 point sources and near-IR reverberation

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Beckert, Thomas; Weigelt, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    Spatially resolving the innermost torus in AGN is one of the main goals of its high-spatial-resolution studies. This could be done in the near-IR observations of Type 1 AGNs where we see directly the hottest dust grains in the torus. We discuss two critical issues in such studies. Firstly, we examine the nuclear point sources in the HST/NICMOS images of nearby Type 1 AGNs, to evaluate the possible contribution from the central putative accretion disk. After a careful subtraction of host bulge flux, we show that near-IR colors of the point sources appear quite interpretable simply as a composite of a black-body-like spectrum and a relatively blue distinct component as expected for a torus and an accretion disk, respectively. Our radiative transfer models for clumpy tori also support this simple two-component interpretation. The observed near-IR colors suggest a fractional accretion disk contribution of ~25% or less at 2.2 micron. Secondly, we show that the innermost torus radii as indicated by the recent near-...

  11. Validation of Correction Algorithms for Near-IR Analysis of Human Milk in an Independent Sample Set-Effect of Pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrri, Gynter; Fusch, Gerhard; Kwan, Celia; Choi, Dasol; Choi, Arum; Al Kafi, Nisreen; Rochow, Niels; Fusch, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Commercial infrared (IR) milk analyzers are being increasingly used in research settings for the macronutrient measurement of breast milk (BM) prior to its target fortification. These devices, however, may not provide reliable measurement if not properly calibrated. In the current study, we tested a correction algorithm for a Near-IR milk analyzer (Unity SpectraStar, Brookfield, CT, USA) for fat and protein measurements, and examined the effect of pasteurization on the IR matrix and the stability of fat, protein, and lactose. Measurement values generated through Near-IR analysis were compared against those obtained through chemical reference methods to test the correction algorithm for the Near-IR milk analyzer. Macronutrient levels were compared between unpasteurized and pasteurized milk samples to determine the effect of pasteurization on macronutrient stability. The correction algorithm generated for our device was found to be valid for unpasteurized and pasteurized BM. Pasteurization had no effect on the macronutrient levels and the IR matrix of BM. These results show that fat and protein content can be accurately measured and monitored for unpasteurized and pasteurized BM. Of additional importance is the implication that donated human milk, generally low in protein content, has the potential to be target fortified. PMID:26927169

  12. Evidence for non-stellar rest-frame near-IR emission associated with increased star formation in galaxies at $z \\sim 1$

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Johannes U; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Nelson, Erica J; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel; Whitaker, Katherine E; Franx, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    We explore the presence of non-stellar rest-frame near-IR ($2-5 \\ \\mu \\mathrm{m}$) emission in galaxies at $z \\sim 1$. Previous studies identified this excess in relatively small samples and suggested that such non-stellar emission, which could be linked to the $3.3 \\ \\mu \\mathrm{m}$ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons feature or hot dust emission, is associated with an increased star formation rate (SFR). In this Letter, we confirm and quantify the presence of an IR excess in a significant fraction of galaxies in the 3D-HST GOODS catalogs. By constructing a matched sample of galaxies with and without strong non-stellar near-IR emission, we find that galaxies with such emission are predominantly star-forming galaxies. Moreover, star-forming galaxies with an excess show increased mid- and far-IR and H$\\alpha$ emission compared to other star-forming galaxies without. While galaxies with a near-IR excess show a larger fraction of individually detected X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs), an X-ray stacking analysis,...

  13. Conformers, infrared spectrum, UV-induced photochemistry, and near-IR-induced generation of two rare conformers of matrix-isolated phenylglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conformational space of α-phenylglycine (PG) have been investigated theoretically at both the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of approximation. Seventeen different minima were found on the investigated potential energy surfaces, which are characterized by different dominant intramolecular interactions: type I conformers are stabilized by hydrogen bonds of the type N–H···O=C, type II by a strong O–H···N hydrogen bond, type III by weak N–H···O–H hydrogen bonds, and type IV by a C=O···H–C contact. The calculations indicate also that entropic effects are relevant in determining the equilibrium populations of the conformers of PG in the gas phase, in particular in the case of conformers of type II, where the strong intramolecular O–H···N hydrogen bond considerably diminishes entropy by reducing the conformational mobility of the molecule. In consonance with the relative energies of the conformers and barriers for conformational interconversion, only 3 conformers of PG were observed for the compound isolated in cryogenic Ar, Xe, and N2 matrices: the conformational ground state (ICa), and forms ICc and IITa. All other significantly populated conformers existing in the gas phase prior to deposition convert either to conformer ICa or to conformer ICc during matrix deposition. The experimental observation of ICc had never been achieved hitherto. Narrowband near-IR irradiation of the first overtone of νOH vibrational mode of ICa and ICc in nitrogen matrices (at 6910 and 6930 cm−1, respectively) led to selective generation of two additional conformers of high-energy, ITc and ITa, respectively, which were also observed experimentally for the first time. In addition, these experiments also provided the key information for the detailed vibrational characterization of the 3 conformers initially present in the matrices. On the other hand, UV irradiation (λ = 255 nm) of PG isolated in a xenon matrix revealed that PG undergoes

  14. The radio surface brightness to diameter relation for galactic supernova remnants: sample selection and robust analysis with various fitting offsets

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, M Z; Vukotic, B; Arbutina, B; Goker, U D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present new empirical radio surface brightness-to-diameter ({\\Sigma} - D) relations for supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy. We also present new theoretical derivations of the {\\Sigma} - D relation based on equipartition or on constant ratio between cosmic rays and magnetic field energy. A new calibration sample of 60 Galactic SNRs with independently determined distances is created. Instead of (standard) vertical regression, used in previous papers, different fitting procedures are applied to the calibration sample in the log {\\Sigma} - log D plane. Non-standard regressions are used to satisfy the requirement that values of parameters obtained from the fitting of {\\Sigma} - D and D - {\\Sigma} relations should be invariant within estimated uncertainties. We impose symmetry between {\\Sigma} - D and D - {\\Sigma} due to the existence of large scatter in both D and {\\Sigma}. Using four fitting methods which treat {\\Sigma} and D symmetrically, different {\\Sigma} - D slopes {\\beta} are obtained ...

  15. Exoplanet Science with the European Extremely Large Telescope. The Case for Visible and Near-IR Spectroscopy at High Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Udry, S; Bouchy, F; Cameron, A Collier; Henning, T; Mayor, M; Pepe, F; Piskunov, N; Pollacco, D; Queloz, D; Quirrenbach, A; Rauer, H; Rebolo, R; Santos, N C; Snellen, I; Zerbi, F

    2014-01-01

    Exoplanet science is booming. In 20 years our knowledge has expanded considerably, from the first discovery of a Hot Jupiter, to the detection of a large population of Neptunes and super-Earths, to the first steps toward the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. Between today and 2025, the field will evolve at an even faster pace with the advent of several space-based transit search missions, ground-based spectrographs, high-contrast imaging facilities, and the James Webb Space Telescope. Especially the ESA M-class PLATO mission will be a game changer in the field. From 2024 onwards, PLATO will find transiting terrestrial planets orbiting within the habitable zones of nearby, bright stars. These objects will require the power of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) to be characterized further. The technique of ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy is establishing itself as a crucial pathway to measure chemical composition, atmospheric structure and atmospheric circulation in transiting exoplanets. A hig...

  16. Spectral phase transfer from near IR to deep UV by broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in an argon-filled hollow core waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, J. P.; Mendonça, C. R.; Zilio, S. C.; Misoguti, L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the implementation of a spectral phase transfer scheme from near IR to deep UV, in which the frequency conversion step is based on the broadband phase-matched four-wave mixing in a gas-filled hollow core waveguide. Micro joule level femtosecond pulses at 260 nm were generated by nonlinear mixing of a Ti:sapphire laser and its second-harmonic. The transfer of a π-step phase in a controllable manner was proposed and confirmed by a modulation observed in the generated deep UV femtosecond pulse spectrum due to an interference process. Numerical simulations confirmed our results.

  17. Harmonic generation of noble-gas atoms in the Near-IR regime using ab-initio time-dependent R-matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hassouneh, O; van der Hart, H W

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of ab-initio time-dependent R-matrix theory to obtain accurate harmonic generation spectra of noble-gas atoms at Near-IR wavelengths between 1200 and 1800 nm and peak intensities up to 1.8 X 10(14) W/cm(2) . To accommodate the excursion length of the ejected electron, we use an angular-momentum expansion up to Lmax = 279. The harmonic spectra show evidence of atomic structure through the presence of a Cooper minimum in harmonic generation for Kr, and of multielectron interaction through the giant resonance for Xe. The theoretical spectra agree well with those obtained experimentally.

  18. Detection of small scale fluctuations in the near-IR cosmic infrared background from long exposure 2MASS fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A; Mather, J; Skrutskie, M F; Cutri, R M

    2002-01-01

    We report first results for the cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations at 1.25, 1.65 and 2.17 micron obtained from long exposures constructed from 2MASS standard star fields. We have co-added and analyzed scans from one such field with a total exposure time > 1 hour, and removed sources and other artifacts. The stars and galaxies were clipped out to K_s~19^m leaving only high-z galaxies (or possibly local low-surface-brightness systems). The residual component of the diffuse emission on scales from a few arc-sec to a few arc-min has a power-law slope consistent with emission produced by clustered galaxies. The noise (and residual artifacts) contribution to the signal is small and the colors of the signal are very different from Galactic stars or air-glow. We therefore identify the signal as CIB fluctuations from the faint unresolved galaxies. We show that the present-day galaxies with no evolution would produce a significant deficit in the observed CIB fluctuations. Thus the dominant contribution to th...

  19. Analysis of the diffuse near-IR emission from 2MASS deep integration data foregrounds vs the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Odenwald, S; Mather, J C; Skrutskie, M F; Cutri, R M

    2003-01-01

    This is one of two papers in which we report the detection of structure in the cosmic infrared background (CIB) between 1.25 - 2.2 micron through the use of data from the Two Micron Sky Survey (2MASS). This paper concentrates on data assembly, analysis and the estimate of the various foreground contributions; the companion paper (Kashlinsky, Odenwald, Mather, Skrutskie, Cutri 2002, hereafter KOMSC) presents the cosmological results for the CIB fluctuations and their implications. By using repeated observations of a specific calibration star field, we were able to achieve integration times in excess of 3900 seconds compared to the 7.8 seconds in the standard 2MASS data product. This yielded a point source detection limit (3 \\sigma) of +18.5^m in K_s band. The resulting co-added images were processed to remove point sources to a limiting surface brightness of +20^m/arcsec$^2 or 40 nW/m^2/sr. The remaining maps contained over 90% of the pixels and were Fourier transformed to study the spatial structure of the di...

  20. A Technique for Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters Using MODIS Visible and Near-IR Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm to detect suspended sediments and shallow coastal waters using imaging data acquired with the Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS). The MODIS instruments on board the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts are equipped with one set of narrow channels located in a wide 0.4 - 2.5 micron spectral range. These channels were designed primarily for remote sensing of the land surface and atmosphere. We have found that the set of land and cloud channels are also quite useful for remote sensing of the bright coastal waters. We have developed an empirical algorithm, which uses the narrow MODIS channels in this wide spectral range, for identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. In our algorithm, we take advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micron that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  1. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  2. Optical and Near-IR Observations of the Faint and Fast 2008ha-like Supernova 2010ae

    CERN Document Server

    Stritzinger, M D; Valenti, S; Taddia, F; Rivera-Thorsen, T J; Leloudas, G; Maeda, K; Pastorello, A; Phillips, M M; Pignata, G; Baron, E; Burns, C R; Contreras, C; Folatelli, G; Hamuy, M; Hoeflich, P; Morrell, N; Prieto, J L; Benetti, S; Campillay, A; Haislip, J B; LaClutze, A P; Moore, J P; Reichart, D E

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy is presented for the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova (SN) 2010ae. Contingent on the adopted value of host extinction SN 2010ae reached a peak brightness of ~ -13.8 > M_V > -15.3 mag, while modeling of the UVOIR light curve suggests it produced 0.003--0.007 M_sun of 56^Ni, ejected ~ 0.30--0.60 M_sun of material, and had an explosion energy of ~ 0.04--0.30x10^51 erg. The values of these explosion parameters are similar to the peculiar SN 2008ha --for which we also present previously unpublished early phase optical and NIR light curves-- and places these two transients at the faint end of the 2002cx-like SN population. Detailed inspection of the post maximum NIR spectroscopic sequence indicates the presence of a multitude of spectral features, which are identified through SYNAPPS modeling to be mainly attributed to Co II. Comparison with a collection of published and unpublished NIR spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe, reveals t...

  3. The jet of the BL Lacertae object PKS 2201+044: MAD near-IR adaptive optics observations and comparison with optical, radio and X-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Donato, D.; Sambruna, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Giovannini, G.; Farinato, J.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2011-04-01

    Context. Relativistic jets are a common feature of radio loud active galactic nuclei. Multifrequency observations are a unique tool to constrain their physics. Aims: We report on a detailed study of the properties of the jet of the nearby BL Lac object PKS 2201+044, one of the rare cases where the jet is detected from radio to X-rays. Methods: We use new adaptive optics near-IR observations of the source, obtained with the ESO multi-conjugated adaptive optics demonstrator (MAD) at the Very Large Telescope. These observations acquired in Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics mode are combined with images previously achieved by HST, VLA and Chandra to perform a morphological and photometric study of the jet. Results: We find a noticeable similarity in the morphology of the jet at radio, near-IR and optical wavelengths. We construct the spectral shape of the main knot of jet that appears dominated by synchrotron radiation. Conclusions: On the basis of the jet morphology and the weak lines spectrum we suggest that PKS 2201+044 belongs to the class of radio sources intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs.

  4. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Selected from the 40% Sky Area of the ALFALFA H I Survey. I. Sample and Statistical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man I.; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-06-01

    The population of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, which are objects with central surface brightnesses at least one magnitude fainter than the night sky, is crucial for understanding the extremes of galactic formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (H i), the α.40 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) sample is one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galactic images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended LSB outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images accurately in both the g and r bands for each galaxy in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture using the SExtractor software and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model using the Galfit software for each galactic image in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample. Based on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, {{μ }0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined a sample of LSB galaxies consisting of 1129 galaxies with {{μ }0}(B) > 22.5 mag arcsec-2 and the axis ratio b/a > 0.3 from the 12,423 α.40 SDSS DR7 galaxies. This H i-selected sample of LSB galaxies is a relatively unbiased sample of gas-rich and disk-dominated LSB galaxies, which is complete both in H i observation and the optical magnitude within the limit of the SDSS DR7 photometric survey. This LSB galactic sample spans from 22.5 to 28.3 in {{μ }0}(B) with a fraction of 4% fainter than 25.0 mag arcsec-2 in B-band central surface brightness and distributes from -27.0 to -12.3 mag in absolute magnitude in the B band (M(B)), including the 43 faintest galaxies (M(B) > -17.3 mag). This sample is a blue LSB

  5. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Selected from the 40% Sky Area of the ALFALFA H I Survey. I. Sample and Statistical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man I.; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-06-01

    The population of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, which are objects with central surface brightnesses at least one magnitude fainter than the night sky, is crucial for understanding the extremes of galactic formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (H i), the α.40 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) sample is one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galactic images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended LSB outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images accurately in both the g and r bands for each galaxy in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture using the SExtractor software and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model using the Galfit software for each galactic image in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample. Based on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, {{μ }0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined a sample of LSB galaxies consisting of 1129 galaxies with {{μ }0}(B) > 22.5 mag arcsec‑2 and the axis ratio b/a > 0.3 from the 12,423 α.40 SDSS DR7 galaxies. This H i-selected sample of LSB galaxies is a relatively unbiased sample of gas-rich and disk-dominated LSB galaxies, which is complete both in H i observation and the optical magnitude within the limit of the SDSS DR7 photometric survey. This LSB galactic sample spans from 22.5 to 28.3 in {{μ }0}(B) with a fraction of 4% fainter than 25.0 mag arcsec‑2 in B-band central surface brightness and distributes from ‑27.0 to ‑12.3 mag in absolute magnitude in the B band (M(B)), including the 43 faintest galaxies (M(B) > ‑17.3 mag). This sample is

  6. A near-IR line of Mn I as a diagnostic tool of the average magnetic energy in the solar photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A A; Ariste, A L; Bueno, J T; Collados, M

    2006-01-01

    We report on spectropolarimetric observations of a near-IR line of Mn I located at 15262.702 A whose intensity and polarization profiles are very sensitive to the presence of hyperfine structure. A theoretical investigation of the magnetic sensitivity of this line to the magnetic field uncovers several interesting properties. The most important one is that the presence of strong Paschen-Back perturbations due to the hyperfine structure produces an intensity line profile whose shape changes according to the absolute value of the magnetic field strength. A line ratio technique is developed from the intrinsic variations of the line profile. This line ratio technique is applied to spectropolarimetric observations of the quiet solar photosphere in order to explore the probability distribution function of the magnetic field strength. Particular attention is given to the quietest area of the observed field of view, which was encircled by an enhanced network region. A detailed theoretical investigation shows that the...

  7. Multi-pollutants sensors based on near-IR telecom lasers and mid-IR difference frequency generation: development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the detection of VOC and other anthropic trace pollutants is an important challenge in the measurement of air quality. Infrared spectroscopy, allowing spectral regions rich in molecular absorption to be probed, is a suitable technique for in-situ monitoring of the air pollution. Thus the aim of this work was to develop instruments capable of detecting multiple pollutants for in-situ monitoring by IR spectroscopy. A first project benefited from the availability of the telecommunications lasers emitting in near-IR. This instrument was based on an external cavity diode laser (1500 - 1640 nm) in conjunction with a multipass cell (100 m). The detection sensitivity was optimised by employing a balanced detection and a sweep integration procedure. The instrument developed is deployable for in-situ measurements with a sensitivity of -8 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and allowed the quantification of chemical species such as CO2, CO, C2H2, CH4 and the determination of the isotopic ratio 13CO2/12CO2 in combustion environment The second project consisted in mixing two near-IR fiber lasers in a non-linear crystal (PPLN) in order to produce a laser radiation by difference frequency generation in the middle-IR (3.15 - 3.43 μm), where the absorption bands of the molecules are the most intense. The first studies with this source were carried out on detection of ethylene (C2H4) and benzene (C6H6). Developments, characterizations and applications of these instruments in the near and middle IR are detailed and the advantages of the 2 spectral ranges is highlighted. (author)

  8. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...... functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison......, and discussion of these mass functions will be made with other existing black hole mass functions, notably that based on the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog. We present the relationships used to estimate the black hole mass based on the MgII emission line; the relations are calibrated to the Hbeta and CIV relations...

  9. Herschel-ATLAS: VISTA VIKING near-IR counterparts in the Phase 1 GAMA 9h data

    CERN Document Server

    Fleuren, S; Dunne, L; Smith, D J B; Maddox, S J; González-Nuevo, J; Findlay, J; Auld, R; Baes, M; Bond, N A; Bonfield, D G; Bourne, N; Cooray, A; Buttiglione, S; Cava, A; Dariush, A; De Zotti, G; Driver, S P; Dye, S; Eales, S; Fritz, J; Gunawardhana, M L P; Hopwood, R; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M J; Kelvin, L; Lapi, A; Liske, J; Michalowski, M J; Negrello, M; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Prescott, M; Rigby, E E; Robotham, A; Scott, D; Temi, P; Thompson, M A; Valiante, E; van der Werf, P

    2012-01-01

    We identify near-infrared Ks band counterparts to Herschel-ATLAS sub-mm sources, using a preliminary object catalogue from the VISTA VIKING survey. The sub-mm sources are selected from the H-ATLAS Phase 1 catalogue of the GAMA 9h field, which includes all objects detected at 250, 350 or 500 um with the SPIRE instrument. We apply and discuss a likelihood ratio (LR) method for VIKING candidates within a search radius of 10" of the 22,000 SPIRE sources with a 5 sigma detection at 250 um. We find that 11,294(51%) of the SPIRE sources have a best VIKING counterpart with a reliability $R\\ge 0.8$, and the false identification rate of these is estimated to be 4.2%. We expect to miss ~5% of true VIKING counterparts. There is evidence from Z-J and J-Ks colours that the reliable counterparts to SPIRE galaxies are marginally redder than the field population. We obtain photometric redshifts for ~68% of all (non-stellar) VIKING candidates with a median redshift of 0.405. Comparing to the results of the optical identificati...

  10. Optical and near-IR spectroscopy of candidate red galaxies in two z~2.5 proto-clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, Michelle; De Breuck, Carlos; Ly, Chun; Kodama, Tadayuki; Kurk, Jaron; Seymour, Nick; Vernet, Joel; Stern, Daniel; Venemans, Bram; Kajisawa, Masaru; Tanaka, Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic campaign to follow-up red colour-selected candidate massive galaxies in two high redshift proto-clusters surrounding radio galaxies. We observed a total of 57 galaxies in the field of MRC0943-242 (z=2.93) and 33 in the field of PKS1138-262 (z=2.16) with a mix of optical and near-infrared multi-object spectroscopy. We confirm two red galaxies in the field of PKS1138-262 at the redshift of the radio galaxy. Based on an analysis of their spectral energy distributions, and their derived star formation rates from the H-alpha and 24um flux, one object belongs to the class of dust-obscured star-forming red galaxies, while the other is evolved with little ongoing star formation. This result represents the first red and mainly passively evolving galaxy to be confirmed as companion galaxies in a z>2 proto-cluster. Both red galaxies in PKS1138-262 are massive, of the order of 4-6x10^11 M_Sol. They lie along a Colour-Magnitude relation which implies that they formed the bulk of their stellar po...

  11. RGD-conjugated two-photon absorbing near-IR emitting fluorescent probes for tumor vascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R.; Githaiga, Grace W.; Woodward, Adam W.; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700-1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue.

  12. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Mckay, T; Rooney, P; Evrard, A E; Romer, A K; Perfecto, R; Song, J; Desai, S; Mohr, J; Wilcox, H; Bermeo, A; Jeltema, T; Hollowood, D; Bacon, D; Capozzi, D; Collins, C; Das, R; Gerdes, D; Hennig, C; Hilton, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S; Liddle, A; Mann, R G; Mehrtens, N; Nichol, R C; Papovich, C; Sahlén, M; Soares-Santos, M; Stott, J; Viana, P T; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Castander, F J; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Da Costa, L N

    2015-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) for a new sample of 106 X-Ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) since redshift 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, $m_{*}\\propto(\\frac{M_{200}}{1.5\\times 10^{14}M_{\\odot}})^{0.24\\pm 0.08}(1+z)^{-0.19\\pm0.34}$, and compare the observed relation to the simulation prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of $M_{200, z}=10^{13.8}M_{\\odot}$, at $z=1.0$: $m_{*, BCG}$ appears to have grown by $0.13\\pm0.11$ dex, in tension at $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ significance level with the 0.4 dex growth rate expected in the simulation. We show that...

  13. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. I. UV and near-IR observations, multi-colour catalogues, and photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Hudelot, P.; Vibert, D.; Comte, V.; Conseil, S.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Milliard, B.; Morrison, G.; Schiminovich, D.; Treyer, M.; Van Werbaeke, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet with the GALEX satellite (far- and near-ultraviolet channels) and in the near-infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera (Ks band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg2, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimised to measure the physical properties (e.g., star formation rate, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions, and the build-up of the multi-colour catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-χ2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the Ks-band photometry, while the T0007 u∗-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches NUVAB ~ 25 (at 5σ) and KAB ~ 22 (at 3σ). The large spectroscopic sample (~51 000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy of σz ≤ 0.04 and a fraction of catastrophic failures η ≤ 2% down to i ~ 23. We present various tests on the Ks-band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing our results with existing overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) diagram at low redshift (z ≤ 0.25) based on the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A102The images, catalogues, and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to NUV

  14. Doppler-free spectroscopy measurement of isotope shifts and hyperfine components of near-IR xenon and krypton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    spectral line can be resolved when overcoming the limitation set by Doppler broadening. In this contribution, a non-linear absorption technique based on selective saturation of individual atomic transitions, the so-called Lamb-dip spectroscopy method was applied with the use of a tunable single-mode diode laser. A pump beam with wave vector +k is used to burn a hole into the velocity distribution function of atoms or ions. When tuning the laser, the hole is detected by means of a weak probe beam that originates from the same laser, with a counter-propagating wave vector -k. The hole in the absorption spectrum is visible at the line center: Lamb-dip. Modulating the pump beam and processing the probe beam signal with a lock-in amplifier allows to solely detect Lamb-dip positions with highly improved accuracy. (author)

  15. Near IR Astrometry of Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P

    2013-01-01

    We report on the progress of our five-year program for astrometric monitoring of magnetars using high-resolution NIR observations using the laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) supported NIRC2 camera on the 10-meter Keck telescope. We have measured the proper motion of two of the youngest magnetars, SGR\\,1806$-$20 and SGR\\,1900+14, which have counterparts with K $\\sim$21\\,mag, and have placed a preliminary upper limit on the motion of the young AXP\\,1E\\,1841$-$045. The precision of the proper motion measurement is at the milliarcsecond per year level. Our proper motion measurements now provide evidence to link SGR\\,1806$-$20 and SGR\\,1900+14 with neighboring young star clusters. At the distances of these magnetars, their proper motion corresponds to transverse space velocities of $350\\pm100\\,\\mathrm{km\\,s^{-1}}$ and $130\\pm30\\,\\mathrm{km\\,s^{-1}}$ respectively. The upper limit on the proper motion of AXP\\,1E\\,1841$-$045 is $160\\,\\mathrm{km\\,s^{-1}}$. With the sample of proper motions available, we conclu...

  16. Generation of near IR radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of infrared radiation by electronic stimulated Raman scattering in alkali vapours is a simple and useful method for obtaining tunable narrow-band infrared radiation. In this communication we report generation of IR radiation using Sodium vapour. The system used consist of solid state Nd+3. Glass laser at (1.06 micro meter), dye cell, heat pipe oven and the ethanol cell. The S.H.G(0.53 micro meter) was generated using KD*P non-linear crystal. This S.H.G. consist of a train of picosecond pulses. The width of these pulses was about 30 picoseconds. The train is incident normally on a day cell (Rh 6G) of 1 cm width

  17. Ultrafast Photochemistry of Copper(II) Monochlorocomplexes in Methanol and Acetonitrile by Broadband Deep-UV-to-Near-IR Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Myasnikova, Olesya S; Panov, Maxim S; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Moroz, Pavel N; Zamkov, Mikhail; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2016-03-24

    Photochemistry of copper(II) monochlorocomplexes in methanol and acetonitrile solutions is studied by UV-pump/broadband deep-UV-to-near-IR probe femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon 255 and 266 nm excitation, the complexes in acetonitrile and methanol, respectively, are promoted to the excited ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) state, which has a short (sub-250 fs) lifetime. From the LMCT state, the complexes decay via internal conversion to lower-lying ligand field (LF) d-d excited states or the vibrationally hot ground electronic state. A minor fraction of the excited complexes relaxes to the LF electronic excited states, which are relatively long-lived with lifetimes >1 ns. Also, in methanol solutions, about 3% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming copper(I) solvatocomplexes and chlorine atoms, which then further react forming long-lived photoproducts. In acetonitrile, about 50% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming radical and ionic products in a ratio of 3:2. Another minor process observed following excitation only in methanol solutions is the re-equilibration between several forms of the copper(II) ground-state complexes present in solutions. This re-equilibration occurs on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to nanoseconds.

  18. The EUVE bright source list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroozas, B.; Mcdonald, K.; Antia, B.; Mcdonald, J.; Wiercigroch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial results for bright extreme ultraviolet sources discovered during the EUVE all-sky and deep ecliptic surveys have been published as a Bright Source List (BSL) and released to the astronomical community with a recent NASA research announcement (NRA 93-OSS-02, Appendix F). This paper describes the data processing software, the EUVE survey data set, and the production of the BSL at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The contents, format, and selection criteria for sources, the data processing strategy, some problems encountered, and a summary of the BSL results are presented.

  19. Long-term monitoring of the archetype Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15: X-ray, optical and near-IR variability of the corona, disc and torus

    CERN Document Server

    Lira, P; Uttley, P; McHardy, I M M; Videla, L

    2015-01-01

    We present long term monitoring of MCG-6-30-15 in X-rays, optical and near-IR wavelengths, collected over five years of monitoring. We determine the power spectrum density of all the observed bands and show that after taking into account the host contamination similar power is observed in the optical and near-IR bands. There is evidence for a correlation between the light curves of the X-ray photon flux and the optical B-band, but it is not possible to determine a lag with certainty, with the most likely value being around zero days. Strong correlation is seen between the optical and near-IR bands. Cross correlation analysis shows some complex probability distributions and lags that range from 10 to 20 days, with the near-IR following the optical variations. Filtering the light curves in frequency space shows that the strongest correlations are those corresponding to the shortest time-scales. We discuss the nature of the X-ray variability and conclude that this is intrinsic and cannot be accounted for by abso...

  20. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission line star VFTS 399

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J S; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Taylor, W D; Walborn, N R; Bird, A J; Sana, H; de Mink, S E; Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Langer, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Schneider, F R N; Soszyński, I

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. We find VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select HeI lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that ...

  1. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  2. First detection of Mars atmospheric hydroxyl: CRISM Near-IR measurement versus LMD GCM simulation of OH Meinel band emission in the Mars polar winter atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd Clancy, R.; Sandor, Brad J.; García-Muñoz, Antonio; Lefèvre, Franck; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Montmessin, Franck; Murchie, Scott L.; Nair, Hari

    2013-09-01

    Visible and near-IR Meinel band emissions originate from excited OH in the terrestrial upper atmosphere (Meinel, I.A.B. [1950]. Astrophys. J. 111, 555. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/145296), and have recently been detected in the Venus nightside upper mesosphere (Piccioni, G. et al. [2008]. Astron. Astrophys. 483, L29-L33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:200809761). Meinel band observations support key studies of transport and photochemistry in both of these atmospheres. In the case of Mars, OH regulates the basic stability of the CO2 atmosphere to photolytic decomposition (to CO and O2, e.g. Parkinson, T.D., Hunten, D.M. [1972]. J. Atmos. Sci. 29, 1380-1390. http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/1520-0469(1972)0292.0.CO;2), and yet has never been measured. We present the first detection of Mars atmospheric OH, associated with CRISM near-IR spectral limb observations of polar night Meinel band emissions centered at 1.45 and 2.9 μm. Meinel band (1-0), (2-1), and (2-0) average limb intensities of 990 ± 280, 1060 ± 480, and 200 ± 100 kiloRayleighs (kR), respectively, are determined for 70-90 NS polar winter latitudes over altitudes of 40-56 km. Additional OH bands, such as (3-2), (3-1), and (4-2), present ⩽1σ measurements. Uncertainty in the (4-2) band emission rate contributes to increased uncertainty in the determination of the O2(1Δg) (0-0)/(0-1) band emission ratio A00/A01=47-12+26. An average profile retrieval for Mars OH polar nightglow indicates 45-55 km altitude levels for volume emission rates (VER) of 0.4 (2-0) to 2 (1-0, 2-1) × 104 photons/(cm3 s). Similar to polar night O2(1Δg) emission (e.g. Clancy, R.T. et al. [2012]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 117, E00J10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011JE004018), Meinel OH band emission is supported by upper level, winter poleward transport of O and H in the deep Hadley solsticial circulations of Mars. The retrieved OH emission rates are compared to polar winter OH nightglow simulated by the LMD (Laboratoire de M

  3. Determination of organic additives in mortars by near-IR spectroscopy. A novel approach to designing a sample set with high-variability components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Marcelo; Peguero, Anna

    2007-02-01

    Industrial mortars consist primarily of a mixture of cement and an aggregate plus a small amount of additives that are used to modify specific properties. Using too high or too low additive rates usually results in the loss of desirable properties in the end product. This entails carefully controlling the amounts of additives added to mortar in order to ensure correct dosing and/or adequate homogeneity in the final mixture. Near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy has proved effective for this purpose as it requires no sample pretreatment and affords expeditious analyses. The purpose of this work was to determine two organic additives (viz. Ad1 and Ad2) in mortars by using partial least squares regression multivariate calibration models constructed from NIR spectroscopic data. The additives are used to expedite setting and increase cohesion between particles in the mortar. In order to ensure that the sample set contained natural variability in the samples, we used a methodology based on experimental design to construct a representative set of samples. This novel design is based on a hexagonal antiprism that encompasses the concentration ranges spanned by the analytes and the variability inherent in each additive. The D-optimality criterion was used to obtain various combinations between Ad1 and Ad2 additive classes. The partial least squares calibration models thus constructed for each additive provided accurate predictions: the intercept and the slope of the plots of predicted values versus reference values for each additive were close to 0 and 1, respectively, and their confidence ranges included the respective value. The ensuing analytical methods were validated by using an external sample set.

  4. Relative Throughput of the Near-IR Science Instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope as Measured During Ground Testing the Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malumuth, Eliot; Birkmann, Stephan; Kelly, Douglas M.; Kimble, Randy A.; Lindler, Don; Martel, Andre; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rowlands, Neil; Te Plate, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Data were obtained for the purpose of measuring the relative throughput of the Near-IR Science Instruments (SIs) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) as part of the second and third cryogenic-vacuum tests (CV2CV3) of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) conducted at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in 2014 and 20152016, at the beginning and end of the environmental test program, respectively. This Poster focuses on data obtained as part of the Initial Optical Baseline and as part of the Final Performance test -- two epochs that roughly bracket the CV3 test. The purpose of the test is to trend relative throughput to monitor for any potential changes from gross problems such as contamination or degradation of an optical element. Point source data were taken at a variety of wavelengths for NIRCam Module A and Module B, NIRSpec, NIRISS, Guider 1 and Guider 2 using the Laser Diode (LD) 1.06 micron, LD 1.55 micron, 2.1 micron LED and 3.5 micron LED, as well as for NIRCam Mod A and B and NIRISS using a tungsten source and the F277W, and F480M filters. Spectra were taken using the G140M, G235M, and G395M gratings for NIRSpec, the GRISMR grism for NIRCam Mod A and B and the GR150C grism for NIRISS. The results of these measurements are compared to what would be expected given the efficiency of each of the optical elements in each SI. Although these data were taken as a check against gross problems, they can also be used to provide the first relative throughput estimate for each SI through the various filters source wavelengths measured in their flight-like configurations.

  5. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  6. Near-IR spectroscopy of asteroids 21 Lutetia, 89 Julia, 140 Siwa, 2181 Fogelin, and 5480 (1989YK8), potential targets for the Rosetta mission; remote observations campaign on IRTF

    CERN Document Server

    Birlan, M; Belskaya, I; Fornasier, S; Barucci, M A; Binzel, R P; Vernazza, P; Fulchignoni, M; Birlan, Mirel; Bus, Schelte J.; Belskaya, Irina; Fornasier, Sonia; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Binzel, Richard P.; Vernazza, Pierre; Fulchignoni, Marcello

    2004-01-01

    In the frame of the international campaign to observe potential target asteroids for the Rosetta mission, remote observations have been carried out between Observatoire de Paris, in Meudon-France, and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea. The SpeX instrument was used in the 0.8-2.5 microns spectral region, for two observing runs in March and June 2003. This paper presents near-IR spectra of the asteroids 21 Lutetia, 89 Julia, 140 Siwa, 2181 Fogelin, and 5480 (1989YK8). Near-IR spectra of the asteroids 21 Lutetia and 140 Siwa are flat and featureless. The spectrum of 89 Julia reveals absorption bands around 1 and 2 microns, which may indicate the presence of olivine and olivine-pyroxene mixtures and confirm the S-type designation. The small main-belt asteroids 2181 Fogelin and 5480 (1989YK8) are investigated spectroscopically for the first time. Near-IR spectra of these asteroids also show an absorption feature around 1 micron, which could be and indicator of igneous/metamorphic surface of the obj...

  7. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. I. Selection and Follow-up Observations from 329 Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, A; Norris, J E; Beers, T C; Bessell, M S; Rhee, J; Fechner, C; Marsteller, B; Rossi, S; Thom, C; Wisotzki, L; Reimers, D

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of 1777 bright (91.0) metal-poor ([Fe/H]20%) and higher values with increasing distance from the Galactic plane. Although the numbers of stars at low metallicity are falling rapidly at the lowest metallicities, there is evidence that the fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars is increasing rapidly as a function of declining metallicity. For ~60 objects, high-resolution data have already been obtained; one of these, HE 1327-2326, is the new record holder for the most iron-deficient star known.

  8. Spatial Brightness Perception of Trichromatic Stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Houser, Kevin W.

    2012-11-16

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. The results indicate that light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, V(λ)-based photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. The results suggest further development of metrics to predict brightness perception is warranted, and that including age as a variable in predictive models may be valuable.

  9. Colors and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta as Seen by the Dawn Framing Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, S. E.; Li, J.-Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.; Nathues, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has been in orbit around the asteroid Vesta since July, 2011. The on-board Framing Camera has acquired thousands of high-resolution images of the regolith-covered surface through one clear and seven narrow-band filters in the visible and near-IR wavelength range. It has observed bright and dark materials that have a range of reflectance that is unusually wide for an asteroid. Material brighter than average is predominantly found on crater walls, and in ejecta surrounding caters in the southern hemisphere. Most likely, the brightest material identified on the Vesta surface so far is located on the inside of a crater at 64.27deg S, 1.54deg . The apparent brightness of a regolith is influenced by factors such as particle size, mineralogical composition, and viewing geometry. As such, the presence of bright material can indicate differences in lithology and/or degree of space weathering. We retrieve the spectral and photometric properties of various bright terrains from false-color images acquired in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO). We find that most bright material has a deeper 1-m pyroxene band than average. However, the aforementioned brightest material appears to have a 1-m band that is actually less deep, a result that awaits confirmation by the on-board VIR spectrometer. This site may harbor a class of material unique for Vesta. We discuss the implications of our spectral findings for the origin of bright materials.

  10. THE RADIO SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS-TO-DIAMETER RELATION FOR GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: SAMPLE SELECTION AND ROBUST ANALYSIS WITH VARIOUS FITTING OFFSETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovic, M. Z.; Urosevic, D.; Arbutina, B. [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vukotic, B. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade 38 (Serbia); Goeker, Ue. D., E-mail: marko@math.rs [Physics Department, Bogazici University, Bebek 34342, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, we present new empirical radio surface-brightness-to-diameter ({Sigma}-D) relations for supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy. We also present new theoretical derivations of the {Sigma}-D relation based on equipartition or on a constant ratio between cosmic rays and magnetic field energy. A new calibration sample of 60 Galactic SNRs with independently determined distances is created. Instead of (standard) vertical regression, used in previous papers, different fitting procedures are applied to the calibration sample in the log {Sigma}-log D plane. Non-standard regressions are used to satisfy the requirement that values of parameters obtained from the fitting of {Sigma}-D and D-{Sigma} relations should be invariant within estimated uncertainties. We impose symmetry between {Sigma}-D and D-{Sigma} due to the existence of large scatter in both D and {Sigma}. Using four fitting methods that treat {Sigma} and D symmetrically, different {Sigma}-D slopes {beta} are obtained for the calibration sample. Monte Carlo simulations verify that the slopes of the empirical {Sigma}-D relation should be determined by using orthogonal regression because of its good performance in data sets with severe scatter. The slope derived here ({beta} = 4.8) is significantly steeper than those derived in previous studies. This new slope is closer to the updated theoretically predicted surface-brightness-diameter slope in the radio range of the Sedov phase. We also analyze the empirical {Sigma}-D relations for SNRs in a dense environment of molecular clouds and for SNRs evolving in the lower-density interstellar medium. Applying new empirical relations to estimate distances of Galactic SNRs results in a dramatically changed distance scale.

  11. Spitzer bright, UltraVISTA faint sources in COSMOS: the contribution to the overall population of massive galaxies at z=3-7

    CERN Document Server

    Caputi, K I; Laigle, C; McCracken, H J; Fevre, O Le; Fynbo, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Capak, P; Salvato, M; Taniguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed a sample of 574 Spitzer 4.5 micron-selected galaxies with [4.5]24 (AB) over the UltraVISTA ultra-deep COSMOS field. Our aim is to investigate whether these mid-IR bright, near-IR faint sources contribute significantly to the overall population of massive galaxies at redshifts z>=3. By performing a spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis using up to 30 photometric bands, we have determined that the redshift distribution of our sample peaks at redshifts z~2.5-3.0, and ~32% of the galaxies lie at z>=3. We have studied the contribution of these sources to the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) at high redshifts. We found that the [4.5]24 galaxies produce a negligible change to the GSMF previously determined for Ks~50% of the galaxies with stellar masses Mst>~6 x 10^10 Msun. We also constrained the GSMF at the highest-mass end (Mst>~2 x 10^11 Msun) at z>=5. From their presence at 5=

  12. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  13. CA BrightStor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CA推出的BrightStor系列存储管理解决方案已经成为企业电子商务体系架构管理战略中举足轻重的组成部分。BrightStor是一整套企业级的智能化存储管理解决方案,定位在存储硬件设备和上层应用之间,通过各种集成化的产品和工具为驻留在企业任何位置的数据提供全方位的、有效的存储管理和保护。

  14. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  15. Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Wahhaj, Zahed [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001 Santiago (Chile); Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Chun, Mark [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa [Arcetri Observatory/INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125-Firenze (Italy); Biller, Beth A. [Institute for Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hayward, Thomas L., E-mail: jrmales@as.arizona.edu [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present the first ground-based CCD (λ < 1 μm) image of an extrasolar planet. Using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system's VisAO camera, we detected the extrasolar giant planet β Pictoris b in Y-short (Y{sub S} , 0.985 μm), at a separation of 0.470 ± 0.''010 and a contrast of (1.63 ± 0.49) × 10{sup –5}. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1 with an empirically estimated upper limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager instrument on the Gemini South telescope, in CH {sub 4S,1%} (1.58 μm), K{sub S} (2.18 μm), and K {sub cont} (2.27 μm). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L2.5 ± 1.5, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log (L {sub bol}/L {sub ☉}) = –3.86 ± 0.04, which is consistent with prior estimates for β Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs (BDs). This yields a hot-start mass estimate of 11.9 ± 0.7 M {sub Jup} for an age of 21 ± 4 Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our L {sub bol}-based hot-start estimate for temperature is T {sub eff} = 1643 ± 32 K (not including model-dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of R = 1.43 ± 0.02 R {sub Jup}, this T {sub eff} is ∼250 K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 BD. Other young, low-gravity (large-radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field BDs. In contrast, β Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.

  16. The environment of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, S. D.; Bomans, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) we investigated the clustering properties of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in comparison to normal, High Surface Brightness (HSB) galaxies. We selected LSB galaxies and HSB galaxies with well measured redshifts from the SDSS data base and performed three-dimensional neighbour counting analysis within spheres of radii between 0.8 Mpc and 8.0 Mpc. As a second analysis method we used an N-th neighbour analysis with N var...

  17. Probing the evolution of the near-IR luminosity function of galaxies to z ~ 3 in the Hubble Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Chincarini, G; Vanzella, E; Longhetti, M; Cristiani, S; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Nonino, M

    2006-01-01

    [Abridged] We present the rest-frame Js-band and Ks-band luminosity function of a sample of about 300 galaxies selected in the HDF-S at Ks0.8 suggests that a significant fraction of them increases their stellar mass at 13. Thus, our results suggest that the assembly of high-mass galaxies is spread over a large redshift range and that the increase of their stellar mass has been very efficient also at very high redshift at least for a fraction of them.

  18. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  19. Broad-band spectrophotometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-12b from the near-UV to the near-IR

    CERN Document Server

    Mallonn, M; Weingrill, J; von Essen, C; Strassmeier, K G; Piotto, G; Pagano, I; Scandariato, G; Csizmadia, Sz; Herrero, E; Sada, P V; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Künstler, A; Bernt, I; Granzer, T

    2015-01-01

    The detection of trends or gradients in the transmission spectrum of extrasolar planets is possible with observations at very low spectral resolution. Transit measurements of sufficient accuracy using selected broad-band filters allow for an initial characterization of the atmosphere of the planet. We obtained time series photometry of 20 transit events and analyzed them homogeneously, along with eight light curves obtained from the literature. In total, the light curves span a range from 0.35 to 1.25 microns. During two observing seasons over four months each, we monitored the host star to constrain the potential influence of starspots on the derived transit parameters. We rule out the presence of a Rayleigh slope extending over the entire optical wavelength range, a flat spectrum is favored for HAT-P-12b with respect to a cloud-free atmosphere model spectrum. A potential cause of such gray absorption is the presence of a cloud layer at the probed latitudes. Furthermore, in this work we refine the transit pa...

  20. Near-IR squaraine dye-loaded gated periodic mesoporous organosilica for photo-oxidation of phenol in a continuous-flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Parijat; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Anees, Palapuravan; Menon, Nishanth Venugopal; Kang, Yuejun; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-09-01

    Periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) has been widely used for the fabrication of a variety of catalytically active materials. We report the preparation of novel photo-responsive PMO with azobenzene-gated pores. Upon activation, the azobenzene gate undergoes trans-cis isomerization, which allows an unsymmetrical near-infrared squaraine dye (Sq) to enter into the pores. The gate closure by cis-trans isomerization of the azobenzene unit leads to the safe loading of the monomeric dye inside the pores. The dye-loaded and azobenzene-gated PMO (Sq-azo@PMO) exhibits excellent generation of reactive oxygen species upon excitation at 664 nm, which can be effectively used for the oxidation of phenol into benzoquinone in aqueous solution. Furthermore, Sq-azo@PMO as the catalyst was placed inside a custom-built, continuous-flow device to carry out the photo-oxidation of phenol to benzoquinone in the presence of 664-nm light. By using the device, about 23% production of benzoquinone with 100% selectivity was achieved. The current research presents a prototype of transforming heterogeneous catalysts toward practical use. PMID:26601266

  1. Broad-band spectrophotometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-12b from the near-UV to the near-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonn, M.; Nascimbeni, V.; Weingrill, J.; von Essen, C.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Piotto, G.; Pagano, I.; Scandariato, G.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Herrero, E.; Sada, P. V.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Künstler, A.; Bernt, I.; Granzer, T.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The detection of trends or gradients in the transmission spectrum of extrasolar planets is possible with observations at very low spectral resolution. Transit measurements of sufficient accuracy using selected broad-band filters allow for an initial characterization of the atmosphere of the planet. Aims: We want to investigate the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-12b for an increased absorption at the very blue wavelength regions caused by scattering. Furthermore, we aim for a refinement of the transit parameters and the orbital ephemeris. Methods: We obtained time series photometry of 20 transit events and analyzed them homogeneously, along with eight light curves obtained from the literature. In total, the light curves span a range from 0.35 to 1.25 microns. During two observing seasons over four months each, we monitored the host star to constrain the potential influence of starspots on the derived transit parameters. Results: We rule out the presence of a Rayleigh slope extending over the entire optical wavelength range, a flat spectrum is favored for HAT-P-12b with respect to a cloud-free atmosphere model spectrum. A potential cause of such gray absorption is the presence of a cloud layer at the probed latitudes. Furthermore, in this work we refine the transit parameters, the ephemeris and perform a TTV analysis in which we found no indication for an unseen companion. The host star showed a mild non-periodic variability of up to 1%. However, no stellar rotation period could be detected to high confidence.

  2. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since Z similar to 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J; Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Vikram, V.

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z similar to 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m(*) proportional to (M-200/1.5 x 10(14)M(circle dot))(0.24 +/- 0.08)(1+z)(-0.19 +/- 0.34), and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M-200,M-z = 10(13.8)M(circle dot); at z = 1.0: m(*, BCG) appears to have grown by 0.13 +/- 0.11 dex, in tension at the similar to 2.5 sigma significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  3. A novel high-brightness broadband light-source technology from the VUV to the IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Stephen; Smith, Don; Besen, Matthew; Partlow, Matthew; Stolyarov, Daniil; Zhu, Huiling; Holber, William

    2010-04-01

    A novel technology has been developed which enables high-brightness, broadband light output from the VUV to the IR spectral regions. A focused laser is used to sustain a high-pressure xenon discharge inside a bulb, creating a smaller, hotter discharge than can be obtained by using an electrically-driven discharge. This allows for continuous output down to 120 nm wavelength and into the infrared. Application areas include hyperspectral imaging, standoff detection, surveillance, bioanalytical instrumentation, microscopy, and materials studies. Laser-driven optical discharges were first investigated over 30 years ago, providing the initial technical understanding of such discharges. However it took the convergence of two separate elements - the availability of low-cost, high-efficiency CW diode lasers; and a market need for high-brightness, broadband light source - to provide the impetus for further development in this area. Using near-IR CW diode lasers at power levels from 15 W to over 2000 W, we have generated high-pressure xenon discharges having temperatures as high as 10,000 C. The optical brightness of these discharges can be over an order of magnitude higher than those obtainable from the brightest xenon arc lamps, and can be several orders of magnitude brighter than deuterium lamps. Results from modeling of these discharges as well as experimental measurements will be presented.

  4. Recovery of surface reflectance spectra and evaluation of the optical depth of aerosols in the near-IR using a Monte-Carlo approach: Application to the OMEGA observations of high latitude regions of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Poulet, François; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Gondet, Brigitte; 10.1029/2006JE002845

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of radiative transfer through atmospheric particles based on Monte Carlo methods. This model can be used to analyze and remove the contribution of aerosols in remote sensing observations. We have developed a method to quantify the contribution of atmospheric dust in near-IR spectra of the Martian surface obtained by the OMEGA imaging spectrometer on board Mars Express. Using observations in the nadir pointing mode with significant differences in solar incidence angles, we can infer the optical depth of atmospheric dust, and we can retrieve the surface reflectance spectra free of aerosol contribution. Martian airborne dust properties are discussed and constrained from previous studies and OMEGA data. We have tested our method on a region at 90{\\deg}E and 77{\\deg}N extensively covered by OMEGA, where significant variations of the albedo of ice patches in the visible have been reported. The consistency between reflectance spectra of ice-covered and ice-free regions recovered at different incid...

  5. Magellan Adaptive Optics first-light observations of the exoplanet $\\beta$ Pic b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI

    CERN Document Server

    Males, Jared R; Morzinski, Katie M; Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C; Skemer, Andrew J; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Katherine B; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Biller, Beth A; Nielsen, Eric L; Hinz, Philip M; Rodigas, Timothy J; Hayward, Thomas L; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Toomey, Douglas W; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2014-01-01

    We present the first ground-based CCD ($\\lambda < 1\\mu$m) image of an extrasolar planet. Using MagAO's VisAO camera we detected the extrasolar giant planet (EGP) $\\beta$ Pictoris b in $Y$-short ($Y_S$, 0.985 $\\mu$m), at a separation of $0.470 \\pm 0.010''$ and a contrast of $(1.63 \\pm 0.49) \\times 10^{-5}$. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1, with an empirically estimated upper-limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the NICI instrument on the Gemini-South telescope, in $CH_{4S,1\\%}$ ($1.58$ $\\mu m$), $K_S$ ($2.18\\mu m$), and $K_{cont}$ (2.27 $\\mu m$). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L$2.5\\pm1.5$, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log$(L_{bol}/L_{Sun})$ = $-3.86 \\pm 0.04$, which is consistent with prior estimates for $\\beta$ Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs. This yields a hot-start mass estimate of $11.9 \\pm 0.7$ $M_{Jup}$ for an age of $21\\pm4$ M...

  6. Calibrating the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation from the infrared surface brightness technique I. The p-factor, the Milky Way relations, and a universal K-band relation

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, J; Fouque, P; Barnes, T G; Pietrzynski, G; Nardetto, N; Weber, M; Granzer, T; Strassmeier, K

    2011-01-01

    We determine Period-Luminosity relations for Milky Way Cepheids in the optical and near-IR bands. These relations can be used directly as reference for extra-galactic distance determination to Cepheid populations with solar metallicity, and they form the basis for a direct comparison with relations obtained in exactly the same manner for stars in the Magellanic Clouds, presented in an accompanying paper. In that paper we show that the metallicity effect is very small and consistent with a null effect, particularly in the near-IR bands, and we combine here all 111 Cepheids from the Milky Way, the LMC and SMC to form a best relation. We employ the near-IR surface brightness (IRSB) method to determine direct distances to the individual Cepheids after we have recalibrated the projection factor using the recent parallax measurements to ten Galactic Cepheids and the constraint that Cepheid distances to the LMC should be independent of pulsation period. We confirm our earlier finding that the projection factor for c...

  7. A Minireview of the Natures of Radiation-Induced Point Defects in Pure and Doped Silica Glasses and Their Visible/Near-IR Absorption Bands, with Emphasis on Self-Trapped Holes and How They Can Be Controlled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Griscom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The natures of most radiation-induced point defects in amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2 are well known on the basis of 56 years of electron spin resonance (ESR and optical studies of pure and doped silica glass in bulk, thin-film, and fiber-optic forms. Many of the radiation-induced defects intrinsic to pure and B-, Al-, Ge-, and P-doped silicas are at least briefly described here and references are provided to allow the reader to learn still more about these, as well as some of those defects not mentioned. The metastable self-trapped holes (STHs, intrinsic to both doped and undoped silicas, are argued here to be responsible for most transient red/near-IR optical absorption bands induced in low-OH silica-based optical fibers by ionizing radiations at ambient temperatures. However, accelerated testing of a-SiO2-based optical devices slated for space applications must take into account the highly supralinear dependence on ionizing-dose-rate of the initial STH creation rate, which if not recognized would lead to false negatives. Fortunately, however, it is possible to permanently reduce the numbers of environmentally or operationally created STHs by long-term preirradiation at relatively low dose rates. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance and utility of rigorously derived fractal-kinetic formalisms that facilitate reliable extrapolation of radiation-induced optical attenuations in silica-based photonics recorded as functions of dose rate backward into time domains unreachable in practical laboratory times and forward into dose-rate regimes for which there are no present-day laboratory sources.

  8. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  9. The Bright SHARC Survey The Cluster Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Romer, A K; Holden, B P; Ulmer, M P; Pildis, R A; Merrelli, A J; Adami, C; Burke, D J; Collins, C A; Metevier, A J; Kron, Richard G; Commons, K

    1999-01-01

    We present the Bright SHARC (Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster) Survey, which is an objective search for serendipitously detected extended X-ray sources in 460 deep ROSAT PSPC pointings. The Bright SHARC Survey covers an area of 178.6 sq.deg and has yielded 374 extended sources. We discuss the X-ray data reduction, the candidate selection and present results from our on-going optical follow-up campaign. The optical follow-up concentrates on the brightest 94 of the 374 extended sources and is now 97% complete. We have identified thirty-seven clusters of galaxies, for which we present redshifts and luminosities. The clusters span a redshift range of 0.0696Bright SHARC clusters have not been listed in any previously ...

  10. The radio properties of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M.; Bertotti, G. (Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica e la Cosmologia (Italy) Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics (Italy))

    1990-03-01

    The radio properties of a sample of 69 bright spectroscopically selected Seyfert galaxies, which suffers from little bias toward Markarian galaxies with strong UV excess. At variance with most of the earlier results, generally based on galaxy samples which are strongly biased toward the inclusion of Markarian objects, there is no clear evidence of a significant difference in the major radio properties (radio power, radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, radio spectral index and radio size) of type 1 and type 2 Seyferts. The resulting observational scenario appears now to be more consistent than before with the idea that Seyfert 2 galaxies are simply Seyfert 1 obscured objects. 70 refs.

  11. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  12. All things bright and beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    'All Things Bright and Beautiful' was exhibited in 20/21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe, which is sited in a 'redundant' church. The fundamental question that the exhibition explored concerned the role of 'the animal' within contemporary art and within secular society, which in turn hoped to prompt reflections on our understanding of the place of 'the human' in the world and in nature. If there is no divine order, as posited by the hymn 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', where does this leave...

  13. Lyman break and UV-selected galaxies at $z \\sim 1$ I. Stellar populations from ALHAMBRA survey

    CERN Document Server

    Oteo, I; Cepa, J; Pérez-García, A M; Ederoclite, A; Sánchez-Portal, M; Pintos-Castro, I; Pérez-Martínez, R; Aguerri, J A L; Alfaro, E J; Aparicio-Villegas, T; Benítez, N; Broadhurst, T; Cabrera-Caño, J; Castander, F J; Cerviño, M; Cristobal-Hornillos, D; Fernandez-Soto, A; Gonzalez-Delgado, R M; Husillos, C; Infante, L; Martínez, V J; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Matute, I; Moles, M; Molino, A; del Olmo, A; Perea, J; Prada, F; Quintana, J M

    2013-01-01

    We take advantage of the exceptional photometric coverage provided by the combination of GALEX data in the UV and the ALHAMBRA survey in the optical and near-IR to analyze the physical properties of a sample of 1225 GALEX-selected Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at $0.8 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 1.2$ located in the COSMOS field. This is the largest sample of LBGs studied at that redshift range so far. According to a spectral energy distribution fitting with synthetic stellar population templates, we find that LBGs at $z \\sim 1$ are mostly young galaxies with a median value of 341 Myr and have intermediate dust attenuation, $ \\sim 0.20$. Due to their selection criterion they are UV-bright galaxies and have high dust-corrected total SFRs, with a median value of 46.4 $M_\\odot {\\rm yr}^{-1}$. The median value of the stellar mass of the LBGs in the sample is $\\log{M_*/M_\\odot} = 9.74$. We obtain that the dust-corrected total SFR of LBGs increases with stellar mass and the specific SFR is lower for more massive galaxies (dow...

  14. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  15. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J M [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); McDonald, G S [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Chamorro-Posada, P [Departmento de TeorIa de la Senal y Comunicaciones e IngenierIa Telematica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-02-16

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts.

  16. GPM Intercalibrated Radiometer Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Chou, Joyce

    2013-04-01

    One of the keys to consistent precipitation retrieval from passive microwave radiometer measurements (whether imagers or sounders) is accurate, long-term consistent brightness temperature retrievals. This becomes doubly important when there measurements are taken from radiometers on multiple platforms, from multiple agencies, with many different purposes. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission addresses this issue directly with the production of intercalibrated brightness temperatures from all the partner satellites contributing to the GPM mission. These intercalibrated brightness temperatures are given the product designation: 1C within GPM. This paper will describe the GPM approach to intercalibration 1C products. The intercalibration and creation of the products uses a 5-step methodology: comparison of the partner standard products (either Tb or Ta) with the GPM reference standard; determination of adjustments that should be made to each product to create consistent brightness temperatures; re-orbitization of all orbits (in non-realtime) to be in the standard GPM south-south orbit; application of the adjustments to the partner provide 1B(or 1A) products; production of 1C products in HDF5 using a "standard" logical format for any radiometer regardless of its 1B format. This paper describes each of these steps and provides the background for them. It discusses in some detail the current 1C logical format and why this format facilitates use by downstream product algorithms and end-users. Most importantly it provides the analysis approach established by the GPM inter-calibration working group in establishing the adjustments to be made at the 1C level. Finally, using DMSP F16-18, it provides examples of the 1C products and discusses the adjustments that are made.

  17. Bright solitons from defocusing nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Borovkova, Olga V.; Kartashov, Yaroslav; Torner Sabata, Lluís; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-01-01

    We report that defocusing cubic media with spatially inhomogeneous nonlinearity, whose strength increases rapidly enough toward the periphery, can support stable bright localized modes. Such nonlinearity landscapes give rise to a variety of stable solitons in all three dimensions, including one-dimensional fundamental and multihump states, two-dimensional vortex solitons with arbitrarily high topological charges, and fundamental solitons in three dimensions. Solitons maintain their coherence ...

  18. Matter wave interference pattern in the collision of bright solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in a quasi one-dimensional regime in a time-dependent trap and show analytically that it is possible to observe matter wave interference patterns in the intra-trap collision of two bright solitons by selectively tuning the trap frequency and scattering length.

  19. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  20. Globe at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sze Leung; Pun, Jason Chun Shing; SO, Chu-wing; Shibata, Yukiko; Walker, Constance Elaine; Agata, Hidehiko

    2015-08-01

    The Global at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (GaN-MN) is an international project for long-term monitoring of night sky conditions around the world. The GaN-MN consists of fixed monitoring stations each equipped with a Sky Quality Meter - Lensed Ethernet (SQM-LE), which is a specialized light sensor for night sky brightness (NSB) measurement. NSB data are continuously collected at high sampling frequency throughout the night, and these data will be instantly made available to the general public to provide a real-time snapshot of the global light pollution condition. A single data collection methodology, including data sampling frequency, data selection criteria, device design and calibration, and schemes for data quality control, was adopted to ensure uniformity in the data collected. This is essential for a systematic and global study of the level of light pollution. The data collected will also provide the scientific backbone in our efforts to contribute to dark sky conservation through education to the general public and policy makers. The GaN-MN project is endorsed by the IAU IYL Executive Committee Working Group as a major Cosmic Light program in the International Year of Light.

  1. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  2. High-brightness electron injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators and synchrotron light sources require pulse trains of high peak brightness and, in some applications, high-average power. Recent developments in the technology of photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for electron-linac injector applications offer promising advances over conventional electron injectors. Reduced emittance growth in high peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by using high field strengths and by linearizing the radial component of the cavity electric field at the expense of lower shunt impedance

  3. High brightness beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented

  4. Effects of Alpha-Element Enhancement and the Thermally Pulsing-Asymptotic Giant Branch on Surface Brightness Fluctuation Magnitudes and Broadband Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun-chul; Blakeslee, John P

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of alpha-element enhancement and the thermally pulsing-asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars on the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) magnitudes and broadband colors of simple stellar populations and compare to the empirical calibrations. We consider a broad range of ages and metallicities using the recently updated Teramo BaSTI isochrones. We find that the alpha-element enhanced I-band SBF magnitudes are brighter and their integrated V - I colors are redder, mostly because of oxygen enhancement effects on the upper red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch. The Teramo BaSTI and Padova isochrones that include TP-AGB stars fit the I-band and near-IR SBF empirical trends better than past models. Our results indicate that alpha-enhanced SBF models may be necessary to match red massive galaxies, while solar-scaled models may be adequate to match bluer galaxies.

  5. The Bright New Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Associate Professor Adela Coman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available By the end of 2008, Mr. Paul Volcker gave financiers a devastating critique. “For all its talented participants, for all its rich rewards” he said, the “bright new financial system” has “failed the test of the marketplace”.In light of the events of recent weeks, it is hard to disagree. A financial system that ends up with the government taking over some of its biggest institutions in serial weekend rescues and which requires the promise of 700 billion dollars in public money to stave off catastrophe is not a trustworthy system. The disappearance of all five big American investment banks – either by bankruptcy or rebirth as commercial banks – is powerful evidence that Wall Street failed “the test of the marketplace”. Something went wrong.But what exactly and why? A more serious analysis needs to distinguish between three separate questions: what is Mr. Volcker’s “bright new financial system”? Second, how far was today’s mess created by instabilities that are inseparable from modern finance and how far was it fuelled by other errors and distortions? Third, to the extent that modern finance does bear the blame, what is the balance between its costs and its benefits and how can it be improved?

  6. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission-line star VFTS 399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Bartlett, E. S.; Broos, P. S.; Townsley, L. K.; Taylor, W. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Bird, A. J.; Sana, H.; de Mink, S. E.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Langer, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Soszyński, I.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. Aims: One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. Methods: To accomplish this we performed a time-resolved analysis of optical, infrared and X-ray observations. Results: We found VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select He i lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that the accretor is a neutron star. Conclusions: VFTS 399 appears to be the first high-mass X-ray binary identified within 30 Dor, sharing many observational characteristics with classical Be X-ray binaries. Comparison of the current properties of VFTS 399 to binary-evolution models suggests a progenitor mass ≳25 M⊙ for the putative neutron star, which may host a magnetic field comparable in strength to those of magnetars. VFTS 399 is now the second member of the cohort of rapidly rotating "single" O-type stars in 30 Dor to show evidence of binary interaction resulting in spin-up, suggesting that this may be a viable evolutionary pathway for the formation of a subset of this stellar population. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory under program ID 182.D-0222.

  7. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  8. [Bright light therapy for elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Masako

    2015-06-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) holds considerable promise for sleep problems in the elderly. BLT for community-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significant improvement in sleep parameters. In the institutional setting, BLT was effective in reducing daytime nap duration. Morning BLT was found to advance the peak circadian rhythm and increase activity level in daytime and melatonin level at night. Light therapy could be used in combination with other nonpharmacological methods such as social activities, outside walking, physical exercises, which showed greater effects than independent BLT on sleep and cognitive function. BLT treatment strategy was proposed in the present paper. We should pay more attentions to BLT in community setting for mental and physical well-being. PMID:26065132

  9. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  10. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  11. Soliton fay identities: II. Bright soliton case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a set of bilinear matrix identities that generalize the ones that have been used to construct the bright soliton solutions for various models. As an example of an application of these identities, we present a simple derivation of the N-bright soliton solutions for the Ablowitz–Ladik hierarchy. (paper)

  12. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies. Th

  13. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D) space varying from bright to dark. The

  14. Incoherently coupled dark-bright photorefractive solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Coskun, Tamer H.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Afanasjev, Vsevolod V.

    1996-11-01

    We report the observation of incoherently coupled dark-bright spatial soliton pairs in a biased bulk photorefractive crystal. When such a pair is decoupled, the dark component evolves into a triplet structure, whereas the bright one decays into a self-defocusing beam.

  15. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  16. Most Luminous z=9-10 Galaxies: A First Determination of the Bright End of the z~9 and z~10 UV Luminosity Functions using all five CANDELS Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwens, R J; Labbe, I; Illingworth, G D; Fazio, G; Coe, D; Holwerda, B; Smit, R; Stefanon, M; van Dokkum, P G; Trenti, M; Ashby, M; Huang, J; Spitler, L; Straatman, C; Bradley, L; Magee, D

    2015-01-01

    The deep, wide-area (900 arcmin**2) near-IR/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS program represents a significant resource for constraining the bright end of the z~9 and z~10 luminosity functions (LFs) in the UV. We recently reported the discovery of 6 luminous z~9-10 candidates over the GOODS-North+South fields, but extending this search to the full CANDELS program was limited due to the lack of HST-depth 1.05-micron observations in the other 3 CANDELS fields. Here we attempt to significantly realize the potential of CANDELS for z=9-10 science by combining a search over all 5 fields with results from a new HST program (B9-CANDELS) designed to follow up the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns. The targeted z~9-10 candidates are preselected by taking advantage of the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-IR observations. With our follow-up program now 91% complete, we identify 4 new high-prob...

  17. Designers predict a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As power plant designers and builders, there is a bright future for the industry. The demand for electricity will continue to grow, and the need for new plants will increase accordingly. But companies that develop and supply these plants must adapt to new ways of doing business if they expect to see the dawn of this new age. Several factors will have a profound effect on the generation and use of electricity in future years. Instant communications now reach all corners of the globe, making people everywhere aspire to a higher standard of living. The economic surge needed to satisfy these appetites will, in turn, be fed by a network of suppliers who are themselves restructuring to serve global markets, unimpeded by past nationalistic barriers to trade. The strong correlation between economic progress and the growing demand for electricity is well recognized. A ready supply of affordable electricity is a necessary underpinning for any economic expansion. As economies advance and jobs increase, electric demand grows geometrically, fueled by an ever-improving quality of life. Coupled with increasing demand is the worldwide trend toward privatization of the generation industry. The reasons may vary in different parts of the world, but the effect is the same--companies are battling intensely for the right to build or purchase generating facilities. Those companies, like the industry they serve, are themselves in a period of transition. Once a closed, monopolistic group of owners in a predominantly services-based market, they are, thanks to competitive forces, being driven steadily toward a product-based structure

  18. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  19. The structure of bright zinc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIODRAG STOJANOVIC

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The structures of bright zinc coatings obtained from acid sulfate solutions in the presence of dextrin/salicyl aldehyde mixture were examined. It was shown by the STM technique that the surfaces of bright zinc coatings are covered by hexagonal zinc crystals, the tops of planes of which are flat and mutually parallel and which exhibit smoothness on the atomic level. X-Ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the bright zinc coatings showed that the zinc crystallites are oriented in the (110 plane only.

  20. Multi-pollutants sensors based on near-IR telecom lasers and mid-IR difference frequency generation: development and applications; Instruments de mesure multi-polluants par spectroscopie infrarouge bases sur des lasers fibres et par generation de difference de frequences: developpement et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousin, J

    2006-12-15

    At present the detection of VOC and other anthropic trace pollutants is an important challenge in the measurement of air quality. Infrared spectroscopy, allowing spectral regions rich in molecular absorption to be probed, is a suitable technique for in-situ monitoring of the air pollution. Thus the aim of this work was to develop instruments capable of detecting multiple pollutants for in-situ monitoring by IR spectroscopy. A first project benefited from the availability of the telecommunications lasers emitting in near-IR. This instrument was based on an external cavity diode laser (1500 - 1640 nm) in conjunction with a multipass cell (100 m). The detection sensitivity was optimised by employing a balanced detection and a sweep integration procedure. The instrument developed is deployable for in-situ measurements with a sensitivity of < 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} and allowed the quantification of chemical species such as CO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and the determination of the isotopic ratio {sup 13}CO{sub 2}/{sup 12}CO{sub 2} in combustion environment The second project consisted in mixing two near-IR fiber lasers in a non-linear crystal (PPLN) in order to produce a laser radiation by difference frequency generation in the middle-IR (3.15 - 3.43 {mu}m), where the absorption bands of the molecules are the most intense. The first studies with this source were carried out on detection of ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}). Developments, characterizations and applications of these instruments in the near and middle IR are detailed and the advantages of the 2 spectral ranges is highlighted. (author)

  1. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  2. The solar brightness temperature at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuseski, R. A.; Swanson, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the brightness temperature of the sun near 36 GHz and 93 GHz were made using the new moon as a calibration source. Provided the brightness temperature of the moon is known and all measurements are reduced to the same zenith angle, a simple expression can be used for the sun-to-new moon ratio which is independent of antenna gain, atmospheric absorption and reemission, and radiometer calibration constants. This ratio was measured near 36 GHz and at two frequencies near 93 GHz with a Dicke switched superheterodyne radiometer system and a 2.4 m Cassegrain antenna. The slopes of the solar brightness temperature spectrum based on these ratios were measured. The absolute solar brightness spectrum derived from all current available measurements supplemented by the present ones is also plotted and discussed.

  3. A spectroscopic atlas of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for amateur astronomers interested in practical spectroscopy or spectrography, this reference book identifies more than 70 (northern hemisphere) bright stars that are suitable observational targets. It provides finder charts for locating these sometimes-familiar stars.

  4. Development of a high brightness ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightness and emittance of an ion beam can depend on the ion temperature, aberrations and scattering, as well as other factors. However, it is the ion temperature which determines the irreducible minimum value of the emittance and hence brightness, as the other components can be eliminated by careful design. An ion source design is presented which has attained this minimum value for the emittance; the dependence of the ion temperature on the plasma source parameters is discussed

  5. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  6. Astronomical Science with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics: A Brief Review, a Current Snapshot, and a Bright Future

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, M C

    2006-01-01

    We briefly discuss the past, present, and future state of astronomical science with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO). We present a tabulation of refereed science papers from LGS AO, amounting to a total of 23 publications as of May 2006. The first decade of LGS AO science (1995-2004) was marked by modest science productivity (~1 paper/year), as LGS systems were being implemented and commissioned. The last two years have seen explosive science growth (~1 paper/month), largely due to the new LGS system on the Keck II 10-meter telescope, and point to an exciting new era for high angular resolution science. To illustrate the achievable on-sky performance, we present an extensive collection of Keck LGS performance measurements from the first year of our brown dwarf near-IR imaging survey. We summarize the current strengths and weaknesses of LGS compared to Hubble Space Telescope, offer a list of desired improvements, and look forward to a bright future for LGS given its wide-scale implementation on large ...

  7. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices. PMID:26764780

  8. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  9. Changes of the local magnetic properties of the optically excited Nd3+ ions and their manifestation in the near IR spectra of the Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Temerov, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    Polarized absorption spectra of f-f transitions 4I9/2 → 4F3/2 and (2H9/2 + 4F5/2) in the Nd3+ ion in the Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 single crystal were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 2-40 K and as a function of magnetic field in the range of 0-65 kOe at 2 K. It was found out that the selection rules for f-f electron transitions substantially changed in the magnetically ordered state of the crystal, and they strongly depended on the orientation of the Fe and Nd ions magnetic moments relative to the light polarization. The splitting of the ground and excited states of the Nd3+ ion in the exchange field of the Fe sublattice were determined. It was revealed that the value of the exchange splitting (the exchange interaction) in the excited states did not correlate with the theoretical Landé factors. The Landé factors of the excited states were experimentally found. In general, the local magnetic properties in the vicinity of the excited ion depend substantially on its electron state. In particular: (1) in one of the excited states a weak ferromagnetic moment appears, (2) the changes of type of the local magnetic anisotropy take place in some excited states, and (3) in some excited states the energetically favorable orientation of the Nd3+ ion magnetic moment is opposite to that in the ground state. In some excited states the nonequivalent Nd3+ centers were found out.

  10. Continuous in-situ methane measurements at paddy fields in a rural area of India with poor electric infrastructure, using a low-cost instrument based on open-path near-IR laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidemori, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Sasago, H.; Takahashi, K.; Imasu, R.; Takeuchi, W.; Adachi, M.; Machida, T.; Terao, Y.; Nomura, S.; Dhaka, S. K.; Singh, J.

    2015-12-01

    In southeast and south Asia, the previous satellite observations suggest that the methane emission from rice paddies is significant and important source of methane during rainy season. Since it is difficult to measure methane stably and continuously at rural areas such as the paddy fields in terms of infrastructures and maintenances, there are large uncertainties in quantitative estimation of methane emission in these areas and there are needs for more certification between satellite and ground based measurements. To measure methane concentrations continuously at difficult situations such as the center of paddy fields and wetlands, we developed the continuous in-situ measurement system, not to look for your lost keys under the streetlight. The methane gas sensor is used an open-path laser based measurement instrument (LaserMethane, ANRITSU CORPORATION), which can quickly and selectively detect average methane concentrations on the optical path of the laser beam. The developed system has the power supply and telecommunication system to run the laser gas sensor in rural areas with poor electricity infrastructure.The methane measurement system was installed at paddy fields of Sonepat, Haryana on the north of Delhi in India and has been operated from the end of 2014. The air sampling along with our measurement has been carried out once a week during daytime to calibrate the laser instrument. We found that the seasonal variation of methane concentrations was different from the satellite observations and there were significant diurnal variations, which it was difficult to detect from occasional air samplings. We will present details of the measurement system and recent results of continuous methane measurements in India.

  11. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi bright blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Healey, S E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Jackson, M S; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kadler, M; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knodlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broad-band spectral properties of the \\gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical and other hard X-ray/gamma-ray data, collected within three months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars.The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual Log $\

  12. Spectral Index Changes with Brightness for -Ray Loud Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. H. Yang; R. S. Yang; J. J. Nie; J. H. Fan

    2014-09-01

    Based on Fermi 1FGL and 2FGL data, a sample of 572 -ray loud blazars are selected, in which each source has both -ray flux and spectral index in 1FGL and 2FGL, respectively. Theoretic relation of spectral index changes depending on -ray brightness is obtained. The correlations between the ratio of -ray flux densities and the differences of the -ray spectral indices are discussed for the three subclasses of HBL, LBL and FSRQs. Results show that the ratio is related with the differences for the three subclasses. It is consistent with the theoretical result and it indicates that the spectrum becomes flat as the source brightens in the -ray band.

  13. Spectroscopic Surface Brightness Fluctuations: Amplifying Bright Stars in Unresolved Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzkus, M.; Dreizler, S.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on our early-stage efforts to resolve the Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) in the spectral dimension. Combining the diagnostic power of SBFs with the physical information content of spectra seems a tempting possibility to gain new insights into the bright stars in unresolved stellar populations. The new VLT integral field spectrograph MUSE is the first instrument that enables spectroscopic SBFs observationally.

  14. Observing Faint Companions Close to Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Progress in a number of technical areas is enabling imaging and interferometric observations at both smaller angular separations from bright stars and at deeper relative contrast levels. Here we discuss recent progress in several ongoing projects at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First, extreme adaptive optics wavefront correction has recently enabled the use of very short (i.e., blue) wavelengths to resolve close binaries. Second, phase-based coronagraphy has recently allowed observations of faint companions to within nearly one diffraction beam width of bright stars. Finally, rotating interferometers that can observe inside the diffraction beam of single aperture telescopes are being developed to detect close-in companions and bright exozodiacal dust. This paper presents a very brief summary of the techniques involved, along with some illustrative results.

  15. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  16. Bright perspectives for nuclear photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of new high-power, short-pulse laser facilities in combination with novel technologies for the production of highly brilliant, intense γ beams (like, e.g., Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Bucharest, MEGaRay in Livermore or a planned upgrade of the HIγS facility at Duke University), unprecedented perspectives will open up in the coming years for photonuclear physics both in basic sciences as in various fields of applications. Ultra-high sensitivity will be enabled by an envisaged increase of the γ-beam spectral density from the presently typical 102γ/eVs to about 104γ/eVs, thus enabling a new quality of nuclear photonics, assisted by new γ-optical elements. Photonuclear reactions with highly brilliant γ beams will allow to produce radioisotopes for nuclear medicine with much higher specific activity and/or more economically than with conventional methods. This will open the door for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes. The isotopic, state-selective sensitivity of the well-established technique of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) will be boosted by the drastically reduced energy bandwidth (<0.1%) of the novel γ beams. Together with a much higher intensity of these beams, this will pave the road towards a γ-beam based non-invasive tomography and microscopy, assisting the management of nuclear materials, such as radioactive waste management, the detection of nuclear fissile material in the recycling process or the detection of clandestine fissile materials. Moreover, also secondary sources like low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beams of high intensity and high brilliance or a new type of positron source with significantly increased brilliance, for the first time fully polarized, can be realized and lead to new applications in solid state physics or material sciences. (authors)

  17. The historical investigation of cometary brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W.

    1998-12-01

    The interpretation of the way in which the brightness of a comet varied as a function of both its heliocentric and geocentric distance was essentially started by Isaac Newton in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Astronomers have argued about the form of this variability ever since, and for many years it was regarded as an important clue as to the physical nature of the cometary nucleus and its decay process. This paper reviews our understanding of the causes of cometary brightness variability between about 1680 and the 1950s.

  18. Silicon microspheres for near-IR communication applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpengüzel, Ali; Demir, Abdullah

    2008-06-01

    We have performed transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized elastic light scattering calculations at 90° and 0° in the o-band at 1.3 µm for a 15 µm radius silicon microsphere with a refractive index of 3.5. The quality factors are on the order of 107 and the mode/channel spacing is 7 nm, which correlate well with the refractive index and the optical size of the microsphere. The 90° elastic light scattering can be used to monitor a dropped channel (drop port), whereas the 0° elastic scattering can be used to monitor the transmission channel (through port). The optical resonances of the silicon microspheres provide the necessary narrow linewidths that are needed for high-resolution optical communication applications. Potential telecommunication applications include filters, modulators, switches, wavelength converters, detectors, amplifiers and light sources. Silicon microspheres show promise as potential building blocks for silicon-based electrophotonic integration.

  19. Near-IR phosphorescent metalloporphyrin as a photochemical upconversion sensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fan; Sommer, Jonathan R; Myahkostupov, Mykhaylo; Schanze, Kirk S; Castellano, Felix N

    2013-08-28

    The phosphorescent metalloporphyrin sensitizer PtTPTNP (TPTNP = tetraphenyltetranaphtho[2,3]porphyrin) has been successfully coupled with perylenediimide (PDI) or rubrene utilized as triplet acceptors/annihilators to upconvert 690 nm incident photons into yellow fluorescence through sensitized triplet-triplet annihilation at overall efficiencies in the 6-7% range while exhibiting exceptional photostability. PMID:23857114

  20. UV, optical and near-IR diagnostics of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of a few spectroscopic diagnostics of massive stars. We explore the following wavelength ranges: UV (1000 to 2000 A), optical (4000--7000 A) and near-infrared (mainly H and K bands). The diagnostics we highlight are available in O and Wolf-Rayet stars as well as in B supergiants. We focus on the following parameters: effective temperature, gravity, surface abundances, luminosity, mass loss rate, terminal velocity, wind clumping, rotation/macroturbulence and surface magnetic field.

  1. Near IR observations of η Car: Reaching its critical rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Mehner, Andrea; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    We report a preliminary result in the monitoring of η Carinae in JHKs bands through the “spectroscopic” event of 2014.5 at InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF) located in South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). The latest photometric data, combined with the data taken with the MK-II photometer [1], show a sign of the same cyclic variation in the J-H vs. H-K diagram reported by Mehner et al.[2]. The change can still be attributed to an apparent increase in black-body temperature, potentially reaching 3,000 to 6,000K as of March 2015.

  2. TNG Near-IR Photometry of five Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, E; Perina, S; Origlia, L

    2004-01-01

    We present near--infrared J and K observations of giant stars in five metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters (namely M3, M5, M10, M13 and M92) obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). This database has been used to determine the main photometric properties of the red giant branch (RGB) from the (K,J-K) and, once combined with the optical data, in the (K,V-K) Color Magnitude Diagrams. A set of photometric indices (the RGB colors at fixed magnitudes) and the major RGB evolutionary features (slope, bump, tip) have been measured. The results have been compared with the relations obtained by Ferraro et al. 2000 and with the theoretical expectations, showing a very good agreement.

  3. Near-IR observations of PSR J1357-6429

    CERN Document Server

    Zyuzin, D; Shibanov, Yu; Danilenko, A; Mennickent, R E; Kirichenko, A

    2015-01-01

    PSR J1357$-$6429 is a young radio pulsar that was detected in X-rays and $\\gamma$-rays. We present the high spatial resolution near-infrared imaging of the pulsar field in $J$, $H$ and $K_s$ bands obtained with the VLT/NaCo using the Adaptive Optic system. We found a faint source at the most precise pulsar radio position which we propose as the pulsar near-infrared counterpart candidate. It is confidently detected in the $J$ and $K_s$ bands, with $J$ = 23.51$\\pm$0.24 and $K_s$ = 21.82$\\pm$0.25. There is a hint of the source in the $H$ band with an upper limit $H$ $>$ 22.8. The dereddened source fluxes are compatible with the extrapolation of the pulsar X-ray spectrum towards the near-infrared. If the candidate is the true counterpart, by this property PSR J1357$-$6429 would be similar to the nearby middle-age pulsar PSR B0656+14. In this case, both pulsars demonstrate an unusually high near-infrared efficiency relative to the X-ray efficiency as compared to other pulsars detected in both ranges.

  4. Near-IR Field Variable Stars in Cygnus OB7

    CERN Document Server

    Wolk, Scott J; Aspin, Colin A

    2013-01-01

    We present a subset of the results of a three season, 124 night, near-infrared monitoring campaign of the dark clouds Lynds 1003 and Lynds 1004 in the Cygnus OB7 star forming region. In this paper, we focus on the field star population. Using three seasons of UKIRT J, H and K band observations spanning 1.5 years, we obtained high-quality photometry on 9,200 stars down to J=17 mag, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.04 mag. After excluding known disk bearing stars we identify 149 variables - 1.6% of the sample. Of these, about 60 are strictly periodic, with periods predominantly < 2 days. We conclude this group is dominated by eclipsing binaries. A few stars have long period signals of between 20 and 60 days. About 25 stars have weak modulated signals, but it was not clear if these were periodic. Some of the stars in this group may be diskless young stellar objects with relatively large variability due to cool star spots. The remaining ~60 stars showed variations which appear to be purely stochastic...

  5. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  6. Dark Matter in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that L

  7. Dark matter in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; Persic, M; Salucci, P

    1997-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that LSB galaxie

  8. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  9. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Vladusich

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D space varying from bright to dark. The results of many previous psychophysical studies suggest, by contrast, that achromatic colors are represented as points in a color space composed of two or more perceptual dimensions. The nature of these perceptual dimensions, however, presently remains unclear. Here we provide direct evidence that brightness and darkness form the dimensions of a two-dimensional (2-D achromatic color space. This color space may play a role in the representation of object surfaces viewed against natural backgrounds, which simultaneously induce both brightness and darkness signals. Our 2-D model generalizes to the chromatic dimensions of color perception, indicating that redness and greenness (blueness and yellowness also form perceptual dimensions. Collectively, these findings suggest that human color space is composed of six dimensions, rather than the conventional three.

  10. A photometric investigation of a bright Geminid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degewij, J.; Diggelen, Johannes van

    1968-01-01

    Photographic observations of meteors in the Netherlands started with a bright Geminid of photographic magnitude −8 observed on December 11, 1955, 21h39m55s by M. Alberts. From the assumed radiant and velocity we have constructed the trajectory of the bolide. The luminosity of the trail has been dete

  11. Alberta Associations for Bright Children Members' Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Association for Bright Children, Edmonton.

    This handbook is designed to provide information to parents of gifted children in Alberta, Canada. The handbook outlines the mission and objectives of the Alberta Associations for Bright Children and describes the structure of the non-profit organization. The booklet then addresses: (1) the characteristics of gifted children; (2) the rights of…

  12. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Kline, Christopher E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark; Devlin, Tina M.; Moore, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness...

  13. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  14. Shedding light on emotional perception: Interaction of brightness and semantic content in extrastriate visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Antonio; Keil, Andreas; Porcu, Emanuele; Müller, Matthias M

    2016-06-01

    The rapid extraction of affective cues from the visual environment is crucial for flexible behavior. Previous studies have reported emotion-dependent amplitude modulations of two event-related potential (ERP) components - the N1 and EPN - reflecting sensory gain control mechanisms in extrastriate visual areas. However, it is unclear whether both components are selective electrophysiological markers of attentional orienting toward emotional material or are also influenced by physical features of the visual stimuli. To address this question, electrical brain activity was recorded from seventeen male participants while viewing original and bright versions of neutral and erotic pictures. Bright neutral scenes were rated as more pleasant compared to their original counterpart, whereas erotic scenes were judged more positively when presented in their original version. Classical and mass univariate ERP analysis showed larger N1 amplitude for original relative to bright erotic pictures, with no differences for original and bright neutral scenes. Conversely, the EPN was only modulated by picture content and not by brightness, substantiating the idea that this component is a unique electrophysiological marker of attention allocation toward emotional material. Complementary topographic analysis revealed the early selective expression of a centro-parietal positivity following the presentation of original erotic scenes only, reflecting the recruitment of neural networks associated with sustained attention and facilitated memory encoding for motivationally relevant material. Overall, these results indicate that neural networks subtending the extraction of emotional information are differentially recruited depending on low-level perceptual features, which ultimately influence affective evaluations. PMID:26994832

  15. Photometry of the Variable Bright Red Supergiant Betelgeuse from the Ground and from Space with the BRITE Nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Robert B. Minor, Edward Guinan, Richard Wasatonic Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) is a large, luminous semi-regular red supergiant of spectral class M1.5-2Iab. It is the 8th brightest star in the night sky. Betelgeuse is 30,000 times more luminous than the Sun and 700 times larger. It has an estimated age of ~8 +/- 2 Myr. Betelgeuse explode in a Type II supernova (anytime within the next million years). When it explodes, it will shine with about the intensity of a full moon and may be visible during the day. However, it is too far away to cause any major damage to Earth. Photometry of this pre-supernova star has been ongoing at Villanova for nearly 45 years. These observations are being used to define the complex brightness variations of this star. Semi-regular periodic light variations have been found with periods of 385 days up to many years. These light variations are used to study its unstable atmosphere and resulting complex pulsations. Over the last 15 years, it has been observed by Wasatonic who has accumulated a large photometric database. The ground-based observations are limited to precisions of 1.5%, and due to poor weather, limit observations to about 1-2 times per week. However, with the recent successful launch of the BRITE Nano-satellites (http://www.brite-constellation.at) during 2013-14, it is possible to secure high precision photometry of bright stars, including Betelgeuse, continuously for up to 3 months. Villanova has participated in the BRITE guest investigators program and has been awarded observing time and data rights many bright stars, including Betelgeuse. BRITE blue and red observations of Betelgeuse were carried out during the Nov-Feb 2013-14 season and the 2014-15. These datasets were given to Villanova and have been combined with coexistent photometry from Wasatonic. Although BRITE's red data is saturated, the blue data is useable. The BRITE datasets were combined with our ground-based V, red, and near-IR photometry. Problems were

  16. A Spitzer Transit of the Most Inflated Planet Known, Around an Extremely Bright Sub-giant Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Thomas; Collins, Karen; Colon, Knicole; James, David; Kriedberg, Laura; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph; Siverd, Robert; Stassun, Keivan; Stevens, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    KELT-11b is a newly discovered transiting Saturn-mass planet (Mp~0.22MJ) that promises to become a unique benchmark. KELT-11b orbits HD 93396,the second brightest star in the near-IR (K=6.122) and the third brightest star in the optical (V=8.04) to host a transiting giant planet. This makes KELT-11 comparable to the well-studied benchmarks HD 189733 and HD 209458. But unlike these other bright systems, KELT-11b's host star is a sub-giant, with log(g)~3.7. Thus KELT-11b is the first transiting giant planet known around a sub-giant star bright enough for precise follow-up observations. Furthermore, KELT-11b is the most inflated planet known, with the lowest surface gravity (log[g]~2.5) of any transiting planet. This makes it an exciting target for atmospheric characterization and studying the effect of post main-sequence evolution of a host star on a hot Jupiter. But to correctly interpret any follow-up observations, we will first need to measure accurate stellar and planetary parameters for the system via a precise transit observation. Unfortunately, this is effectively impossible to do from the ground. Spitzer's ability to provide high precision continuous photometry provides the only current way in which we may precisely observe a complete transit of KELT-11b. We therefore propose for 15.5 hours, to observe a single transit KELT-11b at 3.6um. This would reduce the uncertainties on the transit depth and stellar density by at least a factor of twenty, and will improve the model-derived stellar mass by at least a factor of ten, compared to ground-based observations. This will serve two goals. First, it will be a valuable legacy to the community, by providing a precise set of system parameters that will enable future observation and interpretation of this unique, bright, system. Second, an observation of a transit will allow us to strongly constrain the mass of KELT-11, and thus help resolve the disagreement over the true masses of the 'retired A stars' radial

  17. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M; Grygar, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Hrabovsk'y, M; Mandat, D; Nosek, D; Palatka, M; Pandey, S B; Pech, M; Schovanek, P; De Postigo, A U; Vítek, S; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin; R}\\'idk\\'y, Jan {; Grygar, Ji{r}\\'i; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hrabovsk\\'y, Miroslav; Mand\\'at, Du{s}an; Nosek, Dalibor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pandey, Shashi B.; Pech, Miroslav; Schov\\'anek, Petr; S}m\\'ida, Radom\\'ir {; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; V\\'itek, Stanislav

    2006-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ~ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  18. Quantum Bright Soliton in a Disorder Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, K.; Delande, D.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2009-11-01

    At very low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with attractive interactions tend to form a bright soliton. When exposed to a sufficiently weak external potential, the shape of the soliton is not modified, but its external motion is affected. We develop in detail the Bogoliubov approach for the problem, treating, in a non-perturbative way, the motion of the center of mass of the soliton. Quantization of this motion allows us to discuss its long time properties. In particular, in the presence of a disordered potential, the quantum motion of the center of mass of a bright soliton may exhibit Anderson localization, on a localization length which may be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  19. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  20. Bright Solitary Waves in Malignant Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-García, Víctor M.; Calvo, Gabriel F.; Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Diego, D.; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis

    2011-01-01

    We put forward a nonlinear wave model describing the fundamental physio-pathologic features of an aggressive type of brain tumors: glioblastomas. Our model accounts for the invasion of normal tissue by a proliferating and propagating rim of active glioma cancer cells in the tumor boundary and the subsequent formation of a necrotic core. By resorting to numerical simulations, phase space analysis and exact solutions, we prove that bright solitary tumor waves develop in such systems.

  1. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  2. Recognizing emotions in faces : effects of acute tryptophan depletion and bright light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    aan het Rot, Marije; Coupland, Nicholas; Boivin, Diane B.; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N.

    2010-01-01

    In healthy never-depressed individuals, acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) may selectively decrease the accurate recognition of fearful facial expressions. Here we investigated the perception of facial emotions after ATD in more detail. We also investigated whether bright light, which can reverse ATD'

  3. On the origin of facular brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Kostik, R

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the CaIIH line core brightness on the strength and inclination of photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the solar disc center. We use three simultaneous datasets obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of BaII 4554 A line registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in FeI 1.56 $\\mu$m lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in CaIIH that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the CaIIH brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, that propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature min...

  4. Search for bright stars with infrared excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright stars, stars with visual magnitude smaller than 6.5, can be studied using small telescope. In general, if stars are assumed as black body radiator, then the color in infrared (IR) region is usually equal to zero. Infrared data from IRAS observations at 12 and 25μm (micron) with good flux quality are used to search for bright stars (from Bright Stars Catalogues) with infrared excess. In magnitude scale, stars with IR excess is defined as stars with IR color m12−m25>0; where m12−m25 = −2.5log(F12/F25)+1.56, where F12 and F25 are flux density in Jansky at 12 and 25μm, respectively. Stars with similar spectral type are expected to have similar color. The existence of infrared excess in the same spectral type indicates the existence of circum-stellar dust, the origin of which is probably due to the remnant of pre main-sequence evolution during star formation or post AGB evolution or due to physical process such as the rotation of those stars

  5. LA Palma Night-Sky Brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, C R; Benn, Chris R.; Ellison, Sara L.

    1998-01-01

    The brightness of the moonless night sky above La Palma was measured on 427 CCD images taken with the Isaac Newton and Jacobus Kapteyn Telescopes on 63 nights during 1987 - 1996. The median sky brightness at high elevation, high galactic latitude and high ecliptic latitude, at sunspot minimum, is B = 22.7, V = 21.9, R = 21.0, similar to that at other dark sites. The main contributions to sky brightness are airglow and zodiacal light. The sky is brighter at low ecliptic latitude (by 0.4 mag); at solar maximum (by 0.4 mag); and at high airmass (0.25 mag brighter at airmass 1.5). Light pollution (line + continuum) contributes < 0.03 mag in U, approximately 0.02 mag in B, approximately 0.10 mag in V, approximately and 0.10 mag in R at the zenith. This paper is a summary of results which are presented in full elsewhere (Benn & Ellison 1998, La Palma Technical Note 115).

  6. Dynamic properties of bright points in an active region

    CERN Document Server

    Keys, Peter H; Jess, David B; Mackay, Duncan H; Keenan, Francis P

    2014-01-01

    Context. Bright points (BPs) are small-scale, magnetic features ubiquitous across the solar surface. Previously, we have observed and noted their properties for quiet Sun regions. Here, we determine the dynamic properties of BPs using simultaneous quiet Sun and active region data. Methods. High spatial and temporal resolution G-band observations of active region AR11372 were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Three subfields of varying polarity and magnetic flux density were selected with the aid of magnetograms obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Bright points within these subfields were subsequently tracked and analysed. Results. It is found that BPs within active regions display attenuated velocity distributions with an average horizontal velocity of ~0.6 km/s, compared to the quiet region which had an average velocity of 0.9 km/s. Active region BPs are also ~21% larger than quiet regio...

  7. Metamaterials with angle selective emissivity in the near-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Werner, Douglas H

    2013-03-11

    Metamaterials have been previously studied for their ability to tailor the dispersive IR emissivity of a surface. Here, we investigate two metamaterial structures based on an electromagnetic band-gap surface and a dielectric resonator array for use as near-IR emitters with custom angle selectivity. A genetic algorithm is successfully employed to optimize the metamaterial structures to have minimum emissivity in the normal direction and high emissivity at custom off-normal angles specified by the designer. Two symmetry conditions are utilized to achieve emissivity patterns that are azimuthally stable or distinct in the two orthogonal plane cuts.

  8. Metamaterials with angle selective emissivity in the near-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, Jeremy A; Werner, Douglas H

    2013-03-11

    Metamaterials have been previously studied for their ability to tailor the dispersive IR emissivity of a surface. Here, we investigate two metamaterial structures based on an electromagnetic band-gap surface and a dielectric resonator array for use as near-IR emitters with custom angle selectivity. A genetic algorithm is successfully employed to optimize the metamaterial structures to have minimum emissivity in the normal direction and high emissivity at custom off-normal angles specified by the designer. Two symmetry conditions are utilized to achieve emissivity patterns that are azimuthally stable or distinct in the two orthogonal plane cuts. PMID:23482092

  9. A high brightness proton injector for the Tandetron accelerator at Jožef Stefan Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelicon, Primož, E-mail: primoz.pelicon@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Podaru, Nicolae C., E-mail: info@highvolteng.com [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands); Vavpetič, Primož; Jeromel, Luka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potocnik, Nina [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); LOTRIČ Metrology ltd, Selca 163, SI-4227 Selca (Slovenia); Ondračka, Simon [Jožef Stefan Institute, Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gottdang, Andreas; Mous, Dirk J.M. [High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., P.O. Box 99, Amersfoort 3800AB (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Jožef Stefan Institute recently commissioned a high brightness H{sup −} ion beam injection system for its existing tandem accelerator facility. Custom developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa, the multicusp ion source has been tuned to deliver at the entrance of the Tandetron™ accelerator H{sup −} ion beams with a measured brightness of 17.1 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1} at 170 μA, equivalent to an energy normalized beam emittance of 0.767 π mm mrad MeV{sup 1/2}. Upgrading the accelerator facility with the new injection system provides two main advantages. First, the high brightness of the new ion source enables the reduction of object slit aperture and the reduction of acceptance angle at the nuclear microprobe, resulting in a reduced beam size at selected beam intensity, which significantly improves the probe resolution for micro-PIXE applications. Secondly, the upgrade strongly enhances the accelerator up-time since H and He beams are produced by independent ion sources, introducing a constant availability of {sup 3}He beam for fusion-related research with NRA. The ion beam particle losses and ion beam emittance growth imply that the aforementioned beam brightness is reduced by transport through the ion optical system. To obtain quantitative information on the available brightness at the high-energy side of the accelerator, the proton beam brightness is determined in the nuclear microprobe beamline. Based on the experience obtained during the first months of operation for micro-PIXE applications, further necessary steps are indicated to obtain optimal coupling of the new ion source with the accelerator to increase the normalized high-energy proton beam brightness at the JSI microprobe, currently at 14 A m{sup −2} rad{sup −2} eV{sup −1}, with the output current at 18% of its available maximum.

  10. A possible low-level explanation of "temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion"

    CERN Document Server

    Karmakar, Subhajit

    2009-01-01

    Based upon physiological observation on time dependent orientation selectivity in the cells of macaque's primary visual cortex together with the psychophysical studies on the tuning of orientation detectors in human vision we suggest that time dependence in brightness perception can be accommodated through the time evolution of cortical contribution to the orientation tuning of the ODoG filter responses. A set of Difference of Gaussians functions has been used to mimic the time dependence of orientation tuning. The tuning of orientation preference and its inversion at a later time have been considered in explaining qualitatively the temporal dynamics of brightness perception observed in "Brief presentations reveal the temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion" for 58 and 82 ms of stimulus exposure.

  11. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. IV - The large-scale space distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Gott, J. Richard, III; Schneider, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from a statistical analysis of published observational data on a sample of 860 northern dwarf and low-surface-brightness (D/LSB) galaxies with delta = 0 deg or greater and b between -40 and 40 deg, selected from the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies (Nilson et al., 1973). The results are presented in extensive redshift/space maps, histograms, graphs and tables and characterized in detail. It is shown that the distribution of D/LSB galaxies closely resembles that of bright galaxies, apparently ruling out biased-star-formation models predicting a uniform distribution of D/LSBs. Although bright galaxies outside clusters are somewhat more clustered than the H I-rich D/LSBs, the latters' pairwise peculiar velocity (460 + or - 50 km/sec) is similar to that of the former.

  12. The MWA GLEAM 4Jy Sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, C A; Seymour, N; White, S V; Murphy, Tara; Sadler, E M; Callingham, J R; Hunstead, R W; Hughes, J; Wall, J V; Bell, M E; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B-Q; Gaensler, B M; Hancock, P J; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Morgan, J; Offringa, A R; Procopio, P; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  13. A catalogue of bright (K < 9) M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Frith, J; Jones, H R A; Barnes, J R; Pavlenko, Y; Martin, E L; Brown, C; Kuznetsov, M K; Marocco, F; Tata, R; Cappetta, M

    2013-01-01

    Using the Position and Proper Motion Extended-L (PPMXL) catalogue, we have used optical and near-infrared colour cuts together with a reduced proper motion cut to find bright M dwarfs for future exoplanet transit studies. PPMXL's low proper motion uncertainties allow us to probe down to smaller proper motions than previous similar studies. We have combined unique objects found with this method to that of previous work to produce 8479 K<9 M dwarfs. Low resolution spectroscopy was obtained of a sample of the objects found using this selection method to gain statistics on their spectral type and physical properties. Results show a spectral type range of K7-M4V. This catalogue is the most complete collection of K<9 M dwarfs currently available and is made available here.

  14. The Stability of F-star Brightness on Century Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Michael B; Stassun, Keivan G; Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The century-long photometric record of the DASCH project provides a unique window into the variability of stars normally considered to be photometrically inactive. In this paper, we look for long-term trends in the brightness of F stars, with particular attention to KIC 8462852,an F3 main sequence star that has been identified as significant short-term variability according to Kepler observations. Although a simple search for variability suggests long-term dimming of a number of F stars, we find that such trends are artifacts of the 'Menzel Gap' in the DASCH data. That includes the behavior of KIC 8462852, which we believe is consistent with constant flux over the full duration of observations. We do, however, present a selection of F stars thatdo have significant photometric trends, even after systematics are taken into account.

  15. CD4+CD25bright T cells in human intestinal lamina propria as regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Shin; Kanai, Takanori; Oshima, Shigeru; Uraushihara, Koji; Totsuka, Teruji; Sawada, Taisuke; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Koganei, Kazutaka; Fukushima, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2004-09-01

    It is well known that immune responses in the intestine remain in a state of controlled inflammation, suggesting that not only active suppression by regulatory T cells plays an important role in the normal intestinal homeostasis, but also its dysregulation leads to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we demonstrate that the CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells reside in the human intestinal lamina propria (LP) and functionally retain regulatory activities. All human LP CD4(+) T cells regardless of CD25 expression constitutively expressed CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein, and Foxp3 and proliferate poorly. Although LP CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells showed an activated and anergic/memory phenotype, they did not retain regulatory activity. In LP CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, however, cells expressing CD25 at high levels (CD4(+)CD25(bright)) suppressed the proliferation and various cytokine productions of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells by themselves produced fewer amounts of IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-10. Interestingly, LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells with regulatory T activity were significantly increased in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. These results suggest that CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells found in the normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa selectively inhibit the host immune response and therefore may contribute to the intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:15322172

  16. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  17. Evolution of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X.; Hammer, F.; Yang, Y. B.; Liang, Y. C.

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology, and stellar population of bulgeless low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and M r LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics, including mergers rather than by their large-scale environment.

  18. Raman beam combining for laser brightness enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Allen, Graham S.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Sridharan, Arun K.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Barty, Chrisopher B. J.

    2015-10-27

    An optical source capable of enhanced scaling of pulse energy and brightness utilizes an ensemble of single-aperture fiber lasers as pump sources, with each such fiber laser operating at acceptable pulse energy levels. Beam combining involves stimulated Raman scattering using a Stokes' shifted seed beam, the latter of which is optimized in terms of its temporal and spectral properties. Beams from fiber lasers can thus be combined to attain pulses with peak energies in excess of the fiber laser self-focusing limit of 4 MW while retaining the advantages of a fiber laser system of high average power with good beam quality.

  19. Monitoring of bright blazars with MAGIC telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, C. C.; Satalecka, K.; Thom, M; Backes, M.; Bernardini, E.; Bonnoli, G.; Galante, N.; Goebel, F; Lindfors, E.; Majumdar, P.; Stamerra, A.; Wagner, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Blazars, a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) characterized by a close orientation of their relativistic outflows (jets) towards the line of sight, are a well established extragalactic TeV $\\gamma$-ray emitters. Since 2006, three nearby and TeV bright blazars, Markarian (Mrk) 421, Mrk 501 and 1ES 1959+650, are regularly observed by the MAGIC telescope with single exposures of 30 to 60 minutes. The sensitivity of MAGIC allows to establish a flux level of 30% of the Crab flux for each such o...

  20. Quantum bright soliton in a disorder potential

    OpenAIRE

    Sacha, K.; Delande, D; Zakrzewski, J.

    2009-01-01

    At very low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with attractive interactions tend to form a bright soliton. When exposed to a sufficiently weak external potential, the shape of the soliton is not modified, but its external motion is affected. We develop in detail the Bogoliubov approach for the problem, treating, in a non-perturbative way, the motion of the center of mass of the soliton. Quantization of this motion allows us to discuss its long time properties. In particula...

  1. The role of the Fraunhofer lines in solar brightness variability

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Tagirov, R V; Schmutz, W K

    2015-01-01

    The solar brightness varies on timescales from minutes to decades. A clear identification of the physical processes behind such variations is needed for developing and improving physics-based models of solar brightness variability and reconstructing solar brightness in the past. This is, in turn, important for better understanding the solar-terrestrial and solar-stellar connections. We estimate the relative contributions of the continuum, molecular, and atomic lines to the solar brightness variations on different timescales. Our approach is based on the assumption that variability of the solar brightness on timescales greater than a day is driven by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. We calculated the solar brightness variations employing the solar disc area coverage of magnetic features deduced from the MDI/SOHO observations. The brightness contrasts of magnetic features relative to the quiet Sun were calculated with a non-LTE radiative transfer code as functions of disc position and waveleng...

  2. The bright end of the z ~ 7 UV Luminosity Function from a wide and deep HAWK-I survey

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Paris, D; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Boutsia, K; Santini, P; Testa, V; Dickinson, M; Giavalisco, M; Bouwens, R; Cuby, J -G; Mannucci, F; Clément, B; Cristiani, S; Fiore, F; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Maiolino, R; Menci, N; Moorwood, A; Nonino, M; Renzini, A; Rosati, P; Salimbeni, S; Vanzella, E

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) We present here the second half of an ESO Large Programme, which exploits the unique combination of area and sensitivity provided in the near-IR by the camera Hawk-I at the VLT. We have obtained - 30 observing hours with Hawk-I in the Y-band of two high galactic latitude fields. We combined the Y-band data with deep J and K Hawk-I observations, and with FORS1/FORS2 U, B, V, R, I, and Z observations to select z-drop galaxies having Z - Y > 1, no optical detection and flat Y - J and Y - K colour terms. We detect 8 high-quality candidates in the magnitude range Y = 25.5 - 26.5 that we add to the z-drop candidates selected in two Hawk-I pointings over the GOODS-South field. We use this full sample of 15 objects found in -161 arcmin^2 of our survey to constrain the average physical properties and the evolution of the number density of z ~ 7 LBGs. A stacking analysis yields a best-fit SED with photometric redshift z= 6.85 +0.20 -0.15 and an E(B-V)=0.05 +0.15 -0.05. We compute a binned estimate of the z ~...

  3. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  4. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense. PMID:26659183

  5. At Bright Band Inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright band as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater. Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright band. Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  6. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ZengWei; ZHU Di; QU NingSong

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed,and nanocrystal-line nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents.Unlike traditional methods,the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing.Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits,pinholes and nodules.Furthermore,comparing with the deposit prepared by tradi-tional methods,the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm.Every diffraction peak's intensity of the deposit was reduced,the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased.The microhardness notably increased.The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force.It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.Key.words:electrodeposition,electroforming,hard particle,nanocrystalline,bright nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  7. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm–3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  8. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    will be selected is shown in Fig. 1. This sample falls into two principal classes of stars: (1) Hot luminous H-burning stars (O to F stars). Analyses of OB star variability have the potential to help solve two outstanding problems: the sizes of convective (mixed) cores in massive stars and the influence of rapid rotation on their structure and evolution. (2) Cool luminous stars (AGB stars, cool giants and cool supergiants). Measurements of the time scales involved in surface granulation and differential rotation will constrain turbulent convection models. Mass loss from these stars (especially the massive supernova progenitors) is a major contributor to the evolution of the interstellar medium, so in a sense, this sample dominates cosmic ``ecology'' in terms of future generations of star formation. The massive stars are believed to share many characteristics of the lower mass range of the first generation of stars ever formed (although the original examples are of course long gone). BRITE observations will also be used to detect some Jupiter- and even Neptune-sized planets around bright host stars via transits, as expected on the basis of statistics from the Kepler exoplanet mission. Detecting planets around such very bright stars will greatly facilitate their subsequent characterization. BRITE will also use surface spots to investigate stellar rotation. The following Table summarizes launch and orbit parameters of BRITE-Constellation components. The full version of this paper describing in more detail BRITE-Constellation will be published separately in a journal. The symposium presentation is available at http://iaus301.astro.uni.wroc.pl/program.php

  9. Bright galaxies at z=9-11 from pure-parallel HST observations: Building a unique sample for JWST with Spitzer/IRAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stephanie; Trenti, Michele; Bouwens, Rychard

    2016-08-01

    The combination of observations taken by Hubble and Spitzer revealed the unexpected presence of sources as bright as our own Milky Way as early as 400 Myr after the Big Bang, potentially highlighting a new highly efficient regime for star formation in L>L* galaxies at very early times. Yet, the sample of high-quality z>8 galaxies that have both HST and Spitzer/IRAC imaging is still very small, particularly at high luminosities. We propose here to remedy this situation and efficiently follow-up with Spitzer/IRAC the most promising z>8 sources from our Hubble Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which covers a footprint on the sky similar to CANDELS, provides a deeper search than ground-based surveys like UltraVISTA, and is robust against cosmic variance because of its 180 independent lines of sight. The proposed new 3.6 micron observations will continue the Spitzer cycle 12 BORG911 program and target 15 additional fields, leveraging over 300 new HST orbits (350 sqarcmin) to identify a final sample of about 5 to 10 bright galaxies at z >= 8.5. For optimal time use (just over 22 hours), our goal is to readily discriminate between z>8 sources (undetected or marginally detected in IRAC) and z~2 interlopers (strongly detected in IRAC) with just 1-2 hours per pointing. The high-quality candidates that we will identify with IRAC will be ideal targets for further studies to investigate the reionization state of the inter-galactic medium through near-IR Keck/VLT spectroscopy. They will also be uniquely suited to measurement of the redshift and stellar population properties through JWST/NIRSPEC observations, with the potential to elucidate how the first generations of stars are assembled in the earliest stages of the epoch of reionization.

  10. INVESTIGATION ON THE CAUSES OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP BRIGHTNESS REVERSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia M. M. Eiras

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Some high brightness eucalyptus Kraft pulps have shown poor brightness stability. In most cases, the causes have notbeen identified and permanent solutions have not been found. This work focused on evaluating the brightness stability profile of pulpsbleached by in sequences such as O(DC(PODD, O(DC(PODP, OD(PODD, OD(PODP, ODHT(PODD, ODHT(PODP, OA/D(PODD, OA/D(PODP, OAD(PODD and O(ZeD(PO. Brightness stability tests induced by according to Tappi UM200 procedureon samples bleached to 90±0.5% ISO. Brightness stability was measured after each bleaching stage of the various sequences andexpressed as brightness loss in % ISO. The results indicate that pulps bleached with sequences ending with a peroxide stage havehigher brightness stability compared to those ending with a chlorine dioxide stage. Pulps bleached with a standard sequence, initiatingwith a (DC stage, show brightness stability similar to that of pulp bleached by an ECF (Elementary chlorine free sequence initiatingwith a regular D0 stage. ECF sequences, initiated with hot stages produce pulps with higher brightness stability than sequencesinitiating with a regular D0 stage. The profile across the bleaching sequences shows a tendency of increased brightness stability inalkaline stages containing peroxide and decreased stability in those stages containing chlorine and/or chlorine dioxide, parallelingpulp carbonyl group content.

  11. X-ray bright points and He I lambda 10830 dark points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using near-simultaneous full disk Solar X-ray images and He I 10830 lambda, spectroheliograms from three recent rocket flights, dark points identified on the He I maps were compared with X-ray bright points identified on the X-ray images. It was found that for the largest and most obvious features there is a strong correlation: most He I dark points correspond to X-ray bright points. However, about 2/3 of the X-ray bright points were not identified on the basis of the helium data alone. Once an X-ray feature is identified it is almost always possible to find an underlying dark patch of enhanced He I absorption which, however, would not a priori have been selected as a dark point. Therefore, the He I dark points, using current selection criteria, cannot be used as a one-to-one proxy for the X-ray data. He I dark points do, however, identify the locations of the stronger X-ray bright points

  12. Modelling Solar and Stellar Brightness Variabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, K. L.; Shapiro, A. I.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance, TSI and SSI, have been measured from space since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating the observed variability by relating it to solar surface magnetism. Despite significant progress, there remains persisting controversy over the secular change and the wavelength-dependence of the variation with impact on our understanding of the Sun's influence on the Earth's climate. We highlight the recent progress in TSI and SSI modelling with SATIRE. Brightness variations have also been observed for Sun-like stars. Their analysis can profit from knowledge of the solar case and provide additional constraints for solar modelling. We discuss the recent effort to extend SATIRE to Sun-like stars.

  13. Hybrid quantum repeater using bright coherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loock, P; Ladd, T D; Sanaka, K; Yamaguchi, F; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, W J; Yamamoto, Y

    2006-06-23

    We describe a quantum repeater protocol for long-distance quantum communication. In this scheme, entanglement is created between qubits at intermediate stations of the channel by using a weak dispersive light-matter interaction and distributing the outgoing bright coherent-light pulses among the stations. Noisy entangled pairs of electronic spin are then prepared with high success probability via homodyne detection and postselection. The local gates for entanglement purification and swapping are deterministic and measurement-free, based upon the same coherent-light resources and weak interactions as for the initial entanglement distribution. Finally, the entanglement is stored in a nuclear-spin-based quantum memory. With our system, qubit-communication rates approaching 100 Hz over 1280 km with fidelities near 99% are possible for reasonable local gate errors.

  14. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  15. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  16. Tunneling Dynamics Between Atomic Bright Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Yang, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling behavior between two bright solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive contact interactions between atoms. The explicit tunneling properties including tunneling particles and oscillation period are described analytically, which indicates that the periodic tunneling form is a nonlinear Josephson type oscillation. The results suggest that the breathing behavior of solitons comes from the tunneling mechanism in an effective double-well potential, which is quite different from the modulational instability mechanism for Akhmediev breather and K-M breather. Furthermore, we obtain a phase diagram for two soliton interaction which admits tunneling property, particle-like property, interference property, and a resonant interaction case. The explicit conditions for them are clarified based on the defined critical distance $d_c$ and spatial interference period $D$.

  17. Considerations for high-brightness electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators are now used in many areas of physics research and in industrial and medical applications. New uses are being studied to address major societal needs in energy production, materials research, generation of intense beams of radiation at optical and suboptical wavelengths, treatment of various kinds of waste, and so on. Many of these modern applications require a high intensity beam at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. Considerations for ion and electron accelerators are often different, but there are also many commonalties, and in fact, techniques derived for one should perhaps more often be considered for the other as well. We discuss some aspects of high-brightness electron sources here from that point of view. 6 refs

  18. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Borish, H. Jacob; Burkhardt, Andrew; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Matthews, Allison; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    We present updates from our seventh year of operation including new club content, continued assessments, and our fifth annual Star Party. Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.

  19. Moon night sky brightness simulation for the Xinglong station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a sky brightness monitor at the Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, we collected data from 22 dark clear nights and 90 moon nights. We first measured the sky brightness variation with time for dark nights and found a clear correlation between sky brightness and human activity. Then with a modified sky brightness model of moon nights and data from these nights, we derived the typical value for several important parameters in the model. With these results, we calculated the sky brightness distribution under a given moon condition for the Xinglong station. Furthermore, we simulated the sky brightness distribution of a moon night for a telescope with a 5° field of view (such as LAMOST). These simulations will be helpful for determining the limiting magnitude and exposure time, as well as planning the survey for LAMOST during moon nights

  20. Annular bright and dark field imaging of soft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here polyethylene, as an example of an important soft material, was studied by STEM annular bright and dark field. The contrast as function of the probe size/shape and the detector collection angle are discussed. The results are compared to conventional bright field transmission electron microscopy, electron energy filtered imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping. Annular bright and dark field gave a higher contrast than conventional transmission and analytical mapping techniques

  1. Variability, Brightness Temperature, Superluminal Motion, Doppler Boosting, and Related Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2003-01-01

    We review the observations of rapid flux density variations in compact radio sources, and discuss the inverse Compton limit to the maximum brightness temperature of incoherent synchrotron sources in comparison with recent VLBA observations. The apparent agreement of the theoretical brightness temperature limit due to inverse Compton cooling and the brightness temperatures observed by early VLBI observations appears to have been fortuitous. VLBA observations have greatly improved the quality of the data, but many of the early issues remain unresolved.

  2. Research on Brightness Measurement of Intense Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Huang; Yang, GuoJun; Li, YiDing; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The mostly research fasten on high emission density of injector to study electron beam's brightness in LIA. Using the injector(2MeV) was built to research brightness of multi-pulsed high current(KA) electron beam, and researchs three measurement method (the pepper-pot method, beam collimator without magnetic field, beam collimator with magnetic field method) to detect beam's brightness with time-resolved measurement system.

  3. INVESTIGATION ON THE CAUSES OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP BRIGHTNESS REVERSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kátia M. M. Eiras; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Ana Márcia M. L. Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Some high brightness eucalyptus Kraft pulps have shown poor brightness stability. In most cases, the causes have notbeen identified and permanent solutions have not been found. This work focused on evaluating the brightness stability profile of pulpsbleached by in sequences such as O(DC)(PO)DD, O(DC)(PO)DP, OD(PO)DD, OD(PO)DP, ODHT(PO)DD, ODHT(PO)DP, OA/D(PO)DD, OA/D(PO)DP, OAD(PO)DD and O(Ze)D(PO). Brightness stability tests induced by according to Tappi UM200 procedureon samples bleached to...

  4. Relationships between brightness of nighttime lights and population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naizhuo, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Brightness of nighttime lights has been proven to be a good proxy for socioeconomic and demographic statistics. Moreover, the satellite nighttime lights data have been used to spatially disaggregate amounts of gross domestic product (GDP), fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission, and electric power consumption (Ghosh et al., 2010; Oda and Maksyutov, 2011; Zhao et al., 2012). Spatial disaggregations were performed in these previous studies based on assumed linear relationships between digital number (DN) value of pixels in the nighttime light images and socioeconomic data. However, reliability of the linear relationships was never tested due to lack of relative high-spatial-resolution (equal to or finer than 1 km × 1 km) statistical data. With the similar assumption that brightness linearly correlates to population, Bharti et al. (2011) used nighttime light data as a proxy for population density and then developed a model about seasonal fluctuations of measles in West Africa. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory used sub-national census population data and high spatial resolution remotely-sensed-images to produce LandScan population raster datasets. The LandScan population datasets have 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution which is consistent with the spatial resolution of the nighttime light images. Therefore, in this study I selected 2008 LandScan population data as baseline reference data and the contiguous United State as study area. Relationships between DN value of pixels in the 2008 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) stable light image and population density were established. Results showed that an exponential function can more accurately reflect the relationship between luminosity and population density than a linear function. Additionally, a certain number of saturated pixels with DN value of 63 exist in urban core areas. If directly using the exponential function to estimate the population density for the whole brightly

  5. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, logg. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure logg to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex (Bastien et al. 2013). Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag<13) candidate planet-hosting stars with Teff=4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, an astrophysical bias exists that contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50%...

  6. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  7. The grand unifying theory of bright echoes in the fetal and neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Ingrid M; Filly, Roy A; Bowie, James; Barkovich, A James

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate that the high-amplitude reflecting structures in the fetal and neonatal brain can be explained by the echogenicity of their leptomeningeal coverings or leptomeningeal origins. The leptomeninges, especially the pia mater, constitute the "grand unifying theory of bright reflectors" in the fetal and neonatal brain. Images from fetal and neonatal sonograms were selected to illustrate the objectives above. PMID:23011630

  8. Monitoring of bright, nearby Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    R. Wagner; Backes, M.; Satalecka, K.; Bonnoli, G.; M. Doert(); B. Steinke(Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München, Germany); Strah, N.; Terzic, T.; Tescaro, D.; Uellenbeck, M.; The MAGIC Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Observations and detections of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) by Cherenkov telescopes are often triggered by information about high flux states in other wavelength bands. To overcome this bias, the VHE gamma-ray telescope MAGIC has conducted dedicated monitoring observations of nearby AGN since 2006. Three well established, TeV-bright blazars were selected to be observed regularly: Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES1959+650. The goals of these observations are to obtain an unbiased distribution of flux ...

  9. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy.Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The

  10. HIRS channel 12 brightness temperature dataset and its correlations with major climate indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Shi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS upper tropospheric water vapor channel (channel 12 brightness temperature dataset is developed using intersatellite calibrated data. In this dataset, only those pixels affected by upper tropospheric clouds are discarded. Compared to the previous version that was based on column-clear-sky data, the new version has much better daily spatial coverage. The HIRS observation patterns are compared to microwave sounder measurements. The differences between the two types of sounders vary with respect to brightness temperature with larger differences for higher (dry values. Correlations between the HIRS upper tropospheric water vapor channel brightness temperatures and several major climate indices show strong signals during cold seasons. The selected climate indices track climate variation signals covering regions from the tropics to the poles. Qualitatively, moist signals are correlated with troughs and ascending branches of the circulation, while dry signals occur with ridges and descent. These correlations show the potential of using the upper tropospheric water vapor channel brightness temperature dataset together with a suite of many atmospheric variables to monitor regional climate changes and locate global teleconnection patterns.

  11. A complete sample of bright Swift short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avanzo, P; Bernardini, M G; Nava, L; Campana, S; Covino, S; D'Elia, V; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Melandri, A; Sbarufatti, B; Vergani, S D; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-01

    We present a carefully selected sample of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) observed by the Swift satellite up to June 2013. Inspired by the criteria we used to build a similar sample of bright long GRBs (the BAT6 sample), we selected SGRBs with favorable observing conditions for the redshift determination on ground, ending up with a sample of 36 events, almost half of which with a redshift measure. The redshift completeness increases up to about 70% (with an average redshift value of z = 0.85) by restricting to those events that are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift Burst Alert Telescope energy band. Such flux-limited sample minimizes any redshift-related selection effects, and can provide a robust base for the study of the energetics, redshift distribution and environment of the Swift bright population of SGRBs. For all the events of the sample we derived the prompt and afterglow emission in both the observer and (when possible) rest frame and tested the consistency with the correlations valid for long GRBs. The ...

  12. Dark and bright vortex solitons in electromagnetically induced transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that dark and bright vortex solitons can exist in three-state electromagnetically induced transparent media under some appropriate conditions. We also analyse the stability of the dark and bright vortex solitons. This work may provide other research opportunities in nonlinear optical experiments and may result in a substantial impact on technology

  13. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan;

    2014-01-01

    for cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared...

  14. Surface photometry of bulge dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM

    1999-01-01

    We present results of broad band BVRI observations of a sample of galaxies with a low surface brightness (LSB) disk and a bulge. These galaxies are well described as exponential disks and exponential bulges with no preferred value for either scale length or central surface brightness. The median B b

  15. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nangle, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  16. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  17. Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Brightness Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G.; Stern, S.; Egan, A. F.; Miles, P. F.; Parker, J. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Versteeg, M. H.; Feldman, P. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an ultraviolet (UV) spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that is designed to map the lunar albedo at far-UV wavelengths. LAMP primarily measures interplanetary Hydrogen Lyman-alpha sky-glow and far-UV starlight reflected from the night-side lunar surface, including permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the poles. Dayside observations are also obtained. Brightness maps sorted by wavelength (including the Lyman-alpha wavelength of 121.6 nm) are reported for the polar regions, with a few regions of interest reported in more detail. LAMP's spectral range of 58 nm to 196 nm includes a water ice spectral feature near 160 nm, which provides a diagnostic tool for detecting water on the lunar surface that is complementary to recent discoveries using infrared and radio frequency techniques. Progress towards producing far-UV albedo maps and searching for water ice signatures will be reported. We'll discuss how LAMP data may address questions regarding how water is formed on the moon, transported through the lunar atmosphere, and deposited in the PSRs.

  18. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Sandra; Troup, Nicholas William; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Barcos-Munoz, Loreto D.; Beaton, Rachael; Bittle, Lauren; Borish, Henry J.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dean, Janice; Hancock, Danielle; King, Jennie; Prager, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Wenger, Trey; Zucker, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Now entering our sixth year of operation, Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts beyond Virginia's Standards of Learning. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.DSBK has amassed over 15,000 contact hours since 2009 and we continue to broaden our impact. One important step we have taken in the past year is to establish a graduate student led assessment program to identify and implement directed learning goals for DSBK outreach. The collection of student workbooks, observations, and volunteer surveys indicates broad scale success for the program both in terms of student learning and their perception of science. The data also reveal opportunities to improve our organizational and educational practices to maximize student achievement and overall volunteer satisfaction for DSBK's future clubs and outreach endeavors.

  19. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed, and nanocrystalline nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents. Unlike traditional methods, the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing. Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits, pinholes and nodules. Furthermore, comparing with the deposit prepared by traditional methods, the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm. Every diffraction peak’s intensity of the deposit was reduced, the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased. The microhardness notably increased. The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force. It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  20. Antilensing: the bright side of voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Clarkson, Chris; Maartens, Roy; Bacon, David; Meures, Nikolai; Beynon, Emma

    2013-01-11

    More than half of the volume of our Universe is occupied by cosmic voids. The lensing magnification effect from those underdense regions is generally thought to give a small dimming contribution: objects on the far side of a void are supposed to be observed as slightly smaller than if the void were not there, which together with conservation of surface brightness implies net reduction in photons received. This is predicted by the usual weak lensing integral of the density contrast along the line of sight. We show that this standard effect is swamped at low redshifts by a relativistic Doppler term that is typically neglected. Contrary to the usual expectation, objects on the far side of a void are brighter than they would be otherwise. Thus the local dynamics of matter in and near the void is crucial and is only captured by the full relativistic lensing convergence. There are also significant nonlinear corrections to the relativistic linear theory, which we show actually underpredicts the effect. We use exact solutions to estimate that these can be more than 20% for deep voids. This remains an important source of systematic errors for weak lensing density reconstruction in galaxy surveys and for supernovae observations, and may be the cause of the reported extra scatter of field supernovae located on the edge of voids compared to those in clusters. PMID:23383886

  1. Chromatic variations suppress suprathreshold brightness variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Bell, Jason; Gheorghiu, Elena; Malkoc, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Most objects in natural scenes are suprathreshold in both color (chromatic) and luminance contrast. How salient is each dimension? We have developed a novel method employing a stimulus similar to that used by B. C. Regan and J. D. Mollon (1997) who studied the relative saliencies of the two chromatic cardinal directions. Our stimuli consist of left- and right-oblique modulations of color and/or luminance defined within a lattice of circles. In the "separated" condition, the two modulations were presented separately as forced-choice pairs, and the task was to indicate which was more salient. In the "combined" condition, the two orthogonal-in-orientation modulations were added, and the task was to indicate the more salient orientation. The ratio of color to luminance contrast at the PSE was calculated for both conditions. Across color directions, 48% more luminance contrast relative to color contrast was required to achieve a PSE in the "combined" compared to the "separated" condition. A second experiment showed that the PSE difference was due to the luminance being masked by the color, rather than due to superior color grouping. We conclude that suprathreshold brightness variations are masked by suprathreshold color variations. PMID:20884478

  2. Intercomparisons of Nine Sky Brightness Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Spoelstra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across the Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from −16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and −7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m2 on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m2 on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  3. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Interpreting Central Surface Brightness and Color Profiles in Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David R.; Wise, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope imagery has revealed dust features in the central regions of many (50%--80%) nearby bright elliptical galaxies. If these features are an indication of an underlying smooth diffuse dust distribution, then the interpretation of central surface brightness and color profiles in elliptical galaxies becomes significantly more difficult. In this Letter, diagnostics for constraining the presence of such an underlying central dust distribution are presented. We show that easily detectable central color gradients and flattened central surface brightness profiles can be induced by even small amounts of smoothly distributed dust (~100 M⊙). Conversely, combinations of flat surface brightness profiles and flat color gradients or steep surface brightness profiles and steep color gradients are unlikely to be caused by dust. Taken as a whole, these results provide a simple observational tautology for constraining the existence of smooth diffuse dust distributions in the central regions of elliptical galaxies.

  5. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Brian; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Bittle, L.; Borish, H.; Burkhardt, A.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Graninger, D.; Lauck, T.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Romero, C.; Sokal, K. R.; Stierwalt, S.; Walker, L.; Wenger, T.; Zucker, C.

    2014-01-01

    Our public outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) fosters science literacy in Virginia by bringing a hands-on approach to astronomy that engages children's natural excitement and curiosity. We are an entirely volunteer-run group based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia and we enthusiastically utilize astronomy as a 'gateway science.' We create long-term relationships with students during an 8 to 10 week long, after-school astronomy club at under served elementary schools in neighboring counties, and we visited 3 different schools in 2013. Additionally, we organize and participate in science events throughout the community. The fifth year of DSBK was marked by surpassing 10,000 contact hours in Spring 2013 Semester and by ringing in the fall semester with our biggest, most successful star party to date. We hosted the Third Annual Central Virginia Star Party, free and open to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Nearly four hundred people of all ages attended, double the number from previous years. Joining with local astronomical societies, we offered an enlightening and exciting night with resources rarely accessible to the public, such as an IR camera and a portable planetarium. With numerous telescopes pointed at the sky, and a beautifully clear night with views of the Milky Way, the International Space Station, and numerous meteors, the star party was a fantastic opportunity to introduce many of our guests to the natural wonders of our night sky and enjoy some of the darkest skies on the eastern seaboard.

  6. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.

  7. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R. L.; Borish, J.; Corby, J. F.; Dorsey, G.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Prager, B. J.; Ries, P. A.; Romero, C. E.; Sokal, K. R.; Tang, X.; Walker, L. M.; Yang, A. J.; Zasowski, G.

    2012-01-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a program that brings astronomy education to elementary schools throughout central Virginia. In a relaxed, out-of-classroom atmosphere, we are able to foster the innate curiosity that young students have about science and the world around them. We target schools that are under-served due to their rural locale or special needs students, demonstrating that science is a fun and creative process to a segment of the population that might not otherwise be exposed to astronomy. Families are included in the learning experience during semi-annual `star parties'. Since last January, we have expanded the breadth and depth of our educational capabilities. We have developed new programs for use in our digital planetarium. We held the first Central Virginia Star Party, providing an atmosphere where local children from multiple schools were able to share their love for astronomy. Local government and University officials were also invited so that they could experience our focused science outreach. Most recently, we have become part of Ivy Creek School's Club Day activities, bringing our program to a new segment of the elementary school system in Albemarle County: those that have `low-incidence' disabilities, requiring special attention. We continue to develop a curriculum for after-school programs that functions as either a series of one-time activities or several months of focused outreach at one school. Many of these activities are provided on our website, http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/, for the wider astronomical community, including the new planetarium work. We have extended our book project to include two bilingual astronomy books called `Snapshots of the Universe,' one in Spanish and English, the other in French and English. These books introduce young people to some of the many wonders of the Universe through art and captions developed by DSBK volunteers.

  8. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Borish, J.; Crawford, S. B.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Jackson, L.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Prager, B.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Walker, L.; Whelan, D. G.; Zucker, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to engage young children's natural excitement and curiosity, the outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to elementary schools in Virginia. We hope to enhance children's view and understanding of science while exploring the Universe using fun activities. DSBK focuses on rural and underserved schools in Albemarle County and offers a semester-long astronomy club for third through fifth grade students. We believe regular interactions foster personal relationships between students and volunteers that encourage a life-long interest in science. In our fourth year of hosting clubs, we returned to Ivy Creek Elementary School, where we saw wonderful responses from a special group of students with `low-incidence' disabilities. DSBK has grown to realize a broader reach beyond local astronomy clubs; we hope to ignite a spark of interest in astronomy and science more widely- in more children, their families, and their teachers. We also hosted the Second Annual Central Virginia Star Party with an open invitation to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Throughout the year, DSBK now holds 'one-off' programs (akin to astronomy field days) for elementary schools and children's groups throughout Virginia. Furthermore, we are in the final stages of a project to create two bilingual astronomy books called "Snapshots of the Universe", in Spanish and French with English translations. This art book will be made available online and we are working to get a copy in every elementary school in the state. DSBK has begun to reach out to elementary school teachers in order to provide them with useful and engaging classroom material. We have adapted our volunteer-created activities into useful and ready-to-use lessons, available online. After improvements based on research through interactions and feedback from teachers, we have explicitly identified the learning goals in terms of Virginia's Standards of Learning

  9. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  10. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with Virtual Observatory tools

    CERN Document Server

    Aberasturi, M; Montesinos, B; Gálvez-Ortiz, M C; Solano, E; Martín, E L

    2014-01-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ~ 25,000 deg^2. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (R ~ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 A and 7120-7150 A. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured H{\\alpha} and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sod...

  11. Spectroscopy of bright quasars: emission lines and internal extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Bachev, R; Semkov, E; Mihov, B

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to improve the existing knowledge about the most powerful engines in the Universe - quasars. Although a lot is already known, we still have only a vague idea how these engines work exactly, why they behave as they do, and what the relation is between their evolution and the evolution of their harboring galaxy. Methods we used are based on optical spectroscopy of visually bright quasars, many of which have recently been discovered as X-ray sources, but eventually missed in color-selected surveys. The spectra typically cover the 4200-7000 AA region, allowing measurements of the characteristics of the hydrogen lines, the FeII contribution, and other lines of interest. We present accurate redshift estimates and Seyfert type classification of the objects. We also show that the contribution of the host galaxy to the optical continuum is non-negligible in many cases, as is the intrinsic AGN absorption. Consequences of not correcting for those factors when estimating different quasar ...

  12. Triggered Star Formation in the Orion Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H T; Zhang, Z W; Hu, J Y; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Jing-Yao

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an empirical and effective set of criteria, based on the 2MASS colors, to select candidate classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). This provides a useful tool to study the young stellar population in star-forming regions. Here we present our analysis of the bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) B 35, B 30, IC 2118, LDN 1616, LDN 1634, and Orion East to show how massive stars interact with molecular clouds to trigger star formation. Our results support the radiation-driven implosion model in which the ionization fronts from OB stars compress a nearby cloud until the local density exceeds the critical value, thereby inducing the cloud to collapse to form stars. We find that only BRCs associated with strong IRAS 100 micron emission (tracer of high density) and H-alpha emission (tracer of ionization fronts) show signs of ongoing star formation. Relevant timescales, including the ages of O stars, expanding HII regions, and the ages of CTTS, are consistent with sequential star formation. We also find that CTTS are ...

  13. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  14. The lowest spatial frequency channel determines brightness perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, A; Morrone, M C

    2007-05-01

    This study investigates the role played by individual spatial scales in determining the apparent brightness of greyscale patterns. We measured the perceived difference in brightness across an edge in the presence of notch filtering and high-pass filtering for two stimulus configurations, one that elicits the perception of transparency and one that appears opaque. For both stimulus configurations, the apparent brightness of the surfaces delimited by the border decreased monotonically with progressive (ideal) high-pass filtering, with a critical cut-off at 1 c/deg. Using two octave ideal notch filtering, the maximum detrimental effect on apparent brightness was observed at about 1c/deg. Critical frequencies for apparent brightness did not vary with contrast, viewing distance, or surface size, suggesting that apparent brightness is determined by the channel tuned at 1 c/deg. Modelling the data with the local energy model [Morrone, M. C., & Burr, D. C. (1988). Feature detection in human vision: a phase dependent energy model. Proceedings of the Royal Society (London), B235, 221-245] at 1c/deg confirmed the suggestion that this channel mediates apparent brightness for both opaque and transparent borders, with no need for pooling or integration across spatial channels. PMID:17395237

  15. Two protostar candidates in the bright-rimmed dark cloud LDN 1206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Michael E.; Shure, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of several near IR objects associated with two IRAS point sources in the LDN 1206 region is reported. IRAS 22272 + 6358A is probably a 'protostar' which is seen only in scattered light at near-IR wavelengths because of heavy obscuration by an almost edge-on circumstellar disk. In contrast, IRAS 22272 + 6358B is directly visible at these wavelengths and is perhaps an object which lies between protostars and T-Tauri stars in its evolution. Both direct and polarimetric K-band images of the region are presented, as well as spectral energy distributions constructed from J, H, K, L, L-prime, and M data and published far-IR and mm data.

  16. Sky Brightness Measurements at Haleakala, 1955-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBonte, Barry

    2003-11-01

    Measurements of the brightness of the clear daytime sky at Haleakala, Maui are presented for the interval 1955 through 2002. The observations are made near the direction of the Sun, where forward scattering off aerosols dominates the sky brightness. The Haleakala summit at 3054 m is normally above the inversion layer. The Haleakala sky is dark; the observed brightness per airmass has a median of 10 millionths of the solar disk and a mode of 5 millionths, with Rayleigh scattering contributing 1 millionth. There is no demonstrable long-term trend in the data.

  17. A complex multi-notch astronomical filter to suppress the bright infrared sky

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J; Leon-Saval, S G; Haynes, R; Roth, M M; Löhmannsröben, H -G; Horton, A J; Cuby, J -G; Birks, T A; Lawrence, J S; Gillingham, P; Ryder, S D; Trinh, C

    2011-01-01

    A long-standing and profound problem in astronomy is the difficulty in obtaining deep near-infrared observations due to the extreme brightness and variability of the night sky at these wavelengths. A solution to this problem is crucial if we are to obtain the deepest possible observations of the early Universe since redshifted starlight from distant galaxies appears at these wavelengths. The atmospheric emission between 1000 nm and 1800 nm arises almost entirely from a forest of extremely bright, very narrow hydroxyl emission lines that varies on timescales of minutes. The astronomical community has long envisaged the prospect of selectively removing these lines, while retaining high throughput between the lines. Here we demonstrate such a filter for the first time, presenting results from the first on-sky tests. Its use on current 8m telescopes and future 30m telescopes will open up many new research avenues in the years to come.

  18. Visible Color and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, S. E.; Li, J. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) collected images of the surface of Vesta at a pixel scale of 70 m in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase through its clear and seven color filters spanning from 430 nm to 980 nm. The surface of Vesta displays a large diversity in its brightness and colors, evidently related to the diverse geology [1] and mineralogy [2]. Here we report a detailed investigation of the visible colors and photometric properties of the apparently bright materials on Vesta in order to study their origin. The global distribution and the spectroscopy of bright materials are discussed in companion papers [3, 4], and the synthesis results about the origin of Vestan bright materials are reported in [5].

  19. Bright Prospect for the Polyester Industrial Filament Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Some large companies from Americaand Europe have constructed plantsin China or established long-termstable cooperation relationship withChinese enterprises. A bright devel-opment prospect has therefore beenbrought to the polyester industrial fila-ment sector in China.

  20. Are solar brightness variations faculae- or spot-dominated?

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Yeo, K L; Schmutz, W K

    2016-01-01

    Regular spaceborne measurements have revealed that solar brightness varies on multiple timescales, variations on timescales greater than a day being attributed to surface magnetic field. Independently, ground-based and spaceborne measurements suggest that Sun-like stars show a similar, but significantly broader pattern of photometric variability. To understand whether the broader pattern of stellar variations is consistent with the solar paradigm we assess relative contributions of faculae and spots to solar magnetically-driven brightness variability. We investigate how the solar brightness variability as well as its facular and spot contributions depend on the wavelength, timescale of variability, and position of the observer relative to the ecliptic plane. We perform calculations with the SATIRE model, which returns solar brightness with daily cadence from solar disc area coverages of various magnetic features. Moving the observer away from the ecliptic plane increases the amplitude of 11-year variability a...

  1. Hubble ultra deep field object surface brightness variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of adjacent pixel brightness variation in log scale was applied to ultra deep field objects captured by the Hubble telescope. The local surface brightness fluctuation has a Gaussian-like distribution implying a random accretion of material, with collisions, as a random-walk motion. The larger fluctuation of log brightness in the mid to outer regions of some galaxies is consistent with the presence of dark matter. The absence of such fluctuation enhancement in two i-drop candidates at z ∼ 3 may mean that some dark matter is the result of nucleosynthesis in the evolution process. Large fluctuation in the B+V bands in contrast to the i+z band near the center in an i-drop candidate at z ∼ 3 was interpreted to be an AGN center. The distribution average shifts towards zero for more spiral galaxies, signifying the use of local surface brightness fluctuation distribution as a morphology parameter

  2. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  3. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  4. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  5. Analytically derived conversion of spectral band radiance to brightness temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Alexander [Spectral Sciences, Inc., 44th Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States)], E-mail: lex@spectral.com

    2008-05-15

    Simple analytic expressions for brightness temperature have been derived in terms of band response function spectral moments. Accuracy measures are also derived. Application of these formulas to GOES-12 Sounder thermal infrared bands produces brightness temperature residuals between -5.0 and 2.5 mK for a 150-400 K temperature range. The magnitude of residuals for the five ASTER Radiometer thermal infrared bands over the same temperature range is less than 0.22 mK.

  6. Night Sky Brightness and Light Pollution in Comunidad de Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Zamorano Calvo, Jaime; Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Gómez Castaño, José; Ocaña González, Francisco; Gallego Maestro, Jesús; Pila Díez, Berenice; Nievas Rosillo, Miguel; Tapia Ayuga, Carlos; Fernández Domínguez, Alberto; Pascual Ramírez, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary results of a study of the night sky background brightness around the city of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers are presented. Data-retrieval methodology includes an automatic procedure to measure from a moving vehicle which allows to speed up the data gathering. The night sky brightness, an astronomical quality parameter that accounts for luminous flux from the sky, is closely related with the light pollution. The map with the spatial distribution of the night s...

  7. Supercontinuum generation with bright and dark solitons in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Milián, Carles; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically and experimentally supercontinuum generation in optical fibers with dark and bright solitons simultaneously contributing into the spectral broadening and dispersive wave generation. We report a novel type of weak trapped radiation arising due to interaction of bright solitons with the dark soliton background. This radiation expresses itself as two pulses with the continuously shifting spectra constituting the short and long wavelength limits of the continuum. Our theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement.

  8. Facial Expression Recognition using Entropy and Brightness Features

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Rizwan Ahmed; Meyer, Alexandre; Konik, Hubert; Bouakaz, Saïda

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper proposes a novel framework for universal facial expression recognition. The framework is based on two sets of features extracted from the face image: entropy and brightness. First, saliency maps are obtained by state-of-the-art saliency detection algorithm i.e. "frequencytuned salient region detection". Then only localized salient facial regions from saliency maps are processed to extract entropy and brightness features. To validate the performance of sali...

  9. Millimeter-wave brightness temperatures of military vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemarich, Joseph; Cassidy, Thomas W.; Shiner, R.; Agravante, Hiroshi H.; Dixon, David; Moffa, Philip; Quon, Bill H.; Yujiri, Larry; Dahlstrom, R.

    1999-07-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometers operating at 97 and 140 GHz were used to obtain passive MMW images and brightness temperatures of military vehicles at various altitudes and depression angles. The line-scanning radiometer system used for the measurements is described, and several passive MMW images are presented. The upper-bound MMW brightness temperatures of a number of different types of vehicles in an open area were determined and shown to have similar values at various depression angles.

  10. New Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies Detected Around Nearby Spirals

    OpenAIRE

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC,672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC,2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their abs...

  11. Synthesizing SMOS Zero-Baselines with Aquarius Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Dinnat, E.; Le Vine, D.; Kainulainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    SMOS [1] and Aquarius [2] are ESA and NASA missions, respectively, to make L-band measurements from the Low Earth Orbit. SMOS makes passive measurements whereas Aquarius measures both passive and active. SMOS was launched in November 2009 and Aquarius in June 2011.The scientific objectives of the missions are overlapping: both missions aim at mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). Additionally, SMOS mission produces soil moisture product (however, Aquarius data will eventually be used for retrieving soil moisture too). The consistency of the brightness temperature observations made by the two instruments is essential for long-term studies of SSS and soil moisture. For resolving the consistency, the calibration of the instruments is the key. The basis of the SMOS brightness temperature level is the measurements performed with the so-called zero-baselines [3]; SMOS employs an interferometric measurement technique which forms a brightness temperature image from several baselines constructed by combination of multiple receivers in an array; zero-length baseline defines the overall brightness temperature level. The basis of the Aquarius brightness temperature level is resolved from the brightness temperature simulator combined with ancillary data such as antenna patterns and environmental models [4]. Consistency between the SMOS zero-baseline measurements and the simulator output would provide a robust basis for establishing the overall comparability of the missions.

  12. Evolution of Bright Screening-photovoltaic Spatial Optical Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the dynamical evolution of bright screening-photovoltaic (SP) spatial solitons in biased photovoltaic-photorefractive materials in the case of neglecting the material loss and the diffusion is presented. When an incident optical beam is a bright SP soliton, the beam propagates along a linear path with its shape kept unchanged. When the incident optical beam is slightly different from a bright SP soliton, the beam reshapes itself and tries to evolve into a bright SP soliton after a short distance. However, when the incident optical beam is significantly different from a SP bright soliton, the beam cannot evolve into a stable bright SP soliton, and tends to experience periodic compression and expansion. For a low-intensity input beam, the wave experiences a periodic process of compression first and then expansion during the initial part of the cycle. For a high-intensity input beam, however, the wave will initially diffract and then experiences compression during the cycle.

  13. Image Contrast Enhancement for Brightness Preservation Based on Dynamic Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histogram equalization is an efficient process often employed in consumer electronic systems for image contrast enhancement. In addition to an increase in contrast, it is also required to preserve the mean brightness of an image in order to convey the true scene information to the viewer. A conventional approach is to separate the image into sub-images and then process independently by histogram equalization towards a modified profile. However, due to the variations in image contents, the histogram separation threshold greatly influences the level of shift in mean brightness with respect to the uniform histogram in the equalization process. Therefore, the choice of a proper threshold, to separate the input image into sub-images, is very critical in order to preserve the mean brightness of the output image. In this research work, a dynamic range stretching approach is adopted to reduce the shift in output image mean brightness. Moreover, the computationally efficient golden section search algorithm is applied to obtain a proper separation into sub-images to preserve the mean brightness. Experiments were carried out on a large number of color images of natural scenes. Results, as compared to current available approaches, showed that the proposed method performed satisfactorily in terms of mean brightness preservation and enhancement in image contrast.

  14. The TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey (TESIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Ceca, R D; Severgnini, P; Braito, V; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Hopp, U; Mannucci, F; Maraston, C

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying on a near-IR very low resolution spectroscopic follow-up in parallel with XMM-Newton observations of a complete sample of ~30 bright (K'<18.5) Extremely Red Objects (EROs) selected over an area of 360 arcmin^2 of the MUNICS survey. We here present the preliminary results of the spectroscopic and X-ray data analysis.

  15. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with virtual observatory tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberasturi, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Montesinos, B.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Solano, E.; Martín, E. L. [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ∼25,000 deg{sup 2}. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (R≈ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  16. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with virtual observatory tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ∼25,000 deg2. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (R≈ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  17. Search for Bright Nearby M Dwarfs with Virtual Observatory Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberasturi, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Montesinos, B.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Solano, E.; Martín, E. L.

    2014-08-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ~25,000 deg2. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope ( {R} \\approx 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, real, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  18. Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright AGNs I: Results of Single-epoch Multifrequency Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Hodgson, Jeffrey A; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jongho; Kim, Jae-Young; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Sincheol; Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Soon-Wook; Kino, Motoki; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    We present results of single-epoch very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of gamma-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) at 22, 43, 86, and 129~GHz bands, which are part of a KVN key science program, Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright AGNs (iMOGABA). We selected a total of 34 radio-loud AGNs of which 30 sources are gamma-ray bright AGNs with flux densities of $>6\\times10^{-10}$~ph~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$. Single-epoch multi-frequency VLBI observations of the target sources were conducted during a 24-hr session on 2013 November 19 and 20. All observed sources were detected and imaged at all frequency bands with or without a frequency phase transfer technique which enabled the imaging of 12 faint sources at 129~GHz, except for one source. Many of the target sources are resolved on milliarcsecond scales, yielding a core-jet structure with the VLBI core dominating the synchrotron emission on the milliarcsecond scale. CLEAN flux densities of the target s...

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): detection of low-surface-brightness galaxies from SDSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard P.; Baldry, I. K.; Kelvin, L. S.; James, P. A.; Driver, S. P.; Prescott, M.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Moffett, A. J.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the GAMA equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS PHOTO, combining gri images weighted to maximise the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their g - i and J - K colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The photometry is carried out using an AUTO aperture for each detection giving surface brightnesses of μr ≳ 25 mag arcsec-2 and magnitudes of r > 19.8 mag. None of these galaxies are bright enough to be within the GAMA main survey limit but could be part of future deeper surveys to measure the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.

  20. TESTING MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS WITH ROTATION CURVES OF DWARF AND LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwarf and low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are ideal objects to test modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), because in most of these galaxies the accelerations fall below the threshold where MOND supposedly applies. We have selected from the literature a sample of 27 dwarf and LSB galaxies. MOND is successful in explaining the general shape of the observed rotation curves for roughly three quarters of the galaxies in the sample presented here. However, for the remaining quarter, MOND does not adequately explain the observed rotation curves. Considering the uncertainties in distances and inclinations for the galaxies in our sample, a small fraction of poor MOND predictions is expected and is not necessarily a problem for MOND. We have also made fits taking the MOND acceleration constant, a 0, as a free parameter in order to identify any systematic trends. We find that there appears to be a correlation between central surface brightness and the best-fit value of a0, in the sense that lower surface brightness galaxies tend to have lower a0. However, this correlation depends strongly on a small number of galaxies whose rotation curves might be uncertain due to either bars or warps. Without these galaxies, there is less evidence of a trend, but the average value we find for a0 ∼ 0.7 x 10-8 cm s-2 is somewhat lower than derived from previous studies. Such lower fitted values of a0 could occur if external gravitational fields are important.

  1. The SDSS View of the Palomar-Green Bright Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jester, S; Richards, G T; Green, R F; Schmidt, M; Hall, P B; Strauss, M A; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Stoughton, C; Gunn, J E; Brinkmann, J; Kent, S M; Smith, J A; Tucker, D L; Yanny, B; Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Yanny, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, we define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). We find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects w...

  2. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-08-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a "slow" bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of mathcal {R} equiv R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon dominated inner and dark matter dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on same the relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  3. Bright Solid State Source of Photon Triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Khoshnegar, Milad; Predojević, Ana; Dalacu, Dan; Prilmüller, Maximilian; Lapointe, Jean; Wu, Xiaohua; Tamarat, Philippe; Lounis, Brahim; Poole, Philip; Weihs, Gregor; Majedi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Producing advanced quantum states of light is a priority in quantum information technologies. While remarkable progress has been made on single photons and photon pairs, multipartite correlated photon states are usually produced in purely optical systems by post-selection or cascading, with extremely low efficiency and exponentially poor scaling. Multipartite states enable improved tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics as well as implementations of complex quantum optical networks and protocols. It would be favorable to directly generate these states using solid state systems, for better scaling, simpler handling, and the promise of reversible transfer of quantum information between stationary and flying qubits. Here we use the ground states of two optically active coupled quantum dots to directly produce photon triplets. The wavefunctions of photogenerated excitons localized in these ground states are correlated via molecular hybridization and Coulomb interactions. The formation of a triexciton leads...

  4. Bright artificial light subsensitizes a central muscarinic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsaver, S C; Majchrzak, M J

    1987-12-14

    Supersensitivity of a muscarinic mechanism is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Bright artificial light is efficacious in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). We studied the effect of constant bright light (11,500 lux) on the sensitivity of adult, male rats to oxotremorine, 1.5 mg/kg ip, using a repeated measures design. Oxotremorine challenges were proceeded by the injection of methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg ip, by 30 minutes. Temperature was telemetrically measured every 10 minutes for 120 minutes starting 10 minutes after the injection of oxotremorine. Prior to and after 7 continuous days of exposure to bright light, the sample exhibited a hypothermic response of 2.50 +/- 0.48 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) and 0.29 +/- 0.31 degrees C (mean +/- SEM), respectively (p less than 0.0014). All 7 animals exhibited blunting to the thermic response to oxotremorine. Bright light also blocked the capacity of amitriptyline to supersensitize a central muscarinic mechanism. Exposure to light at an intensity of 300 lux for 7 days had no effect on the thermic response to oxotremorine. These data are consistent with the hypotheses that the biology of depression involves supersensitivity of central muscarinic mechanisms and that the effects of bright artificial light are not the consequence of shifting circadian rhythms. PMID:3695799

  5. The night sky brightness at Potsdam-Babelsberg

    CERN Document Server

    Puschnig, Johannes; Posch, Thomas; Schwarz, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the results of a 2 years (2011--2012) time series of night sky photometry performed at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics in Potsdam (AIP). This observatory is located on top of a hill ("Babelsberg"), 22\\,km to the southwest of the center of Berlin. The measurements have been performed with a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter. We find night sky brightness values ranging from 16.5 to 20.3 mag$_{\\rm SQM}$ arcsec$^{-2}$; the latter (best) value corresponds to 4.7 times the natural zenithal night sky brightness. We discuss the influence of clouds, of the Moon and other factors on the night sky brightness. With respect to the influence of the Moon, it turns out that Potsdam-Babelsberg, despite its proximity to Berlin, still shows a circalunar periodicity of the night sky brightness, although it is much weaker than naturally. The light-pollution-enhancing effect of clouds dominates the night sky brightness by far. Overcast nights with light pollution (up to 16.5 mag$_{\\rm SQM}$ arcsec$^{-2}$) are brighter ...

  6. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  7. Night sky brightness at San Pedro Martir Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Plauchu-Frayn, I; Colorado, E; Herrera, J; Cordova, A; Cesena, U; Avila, F

    2016-01-01

    We present optical UBVRI zenith night sky brightness measurements collected on eighteen nights during 2013--2016 and SQM measurements obtained daily over twenty months during 2014--2016 at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional on the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) in Mexico. The UBVRI data is based upon CCD images obtained with the 0.84m and 2.12m telescopes, while the SQM data is obtained with a high-sensitivity, low-cost photometer. The typical moonless night sky brightness at zenith averaged over the whole period is U = 22.68, B = 23.10, V = 21.84, R = 21.04, I = 19.36, and SQM = 21.88 mag/square arcsec, once corrected for zodiacal light. We find no seasonal variation of the night sky brightness measured with the SQM. The typical night sky brightness values found at OAN-SPM are similar to those reported for other astronomical dark sites at a similar phase of the solar cycle. We find a trend of decreasing night sky brightness with decreasing solar activity during period of the observations. This trend im...

  8. Guidance towards Best Practice in Psychophysical Procedures Used when Measuring Relative Spatial Brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Chan, A; Engelke, U;

    This report reviews evidence for the procedures and other factors of experiments carried out to investigate relative spatial brightness, making recommendations of those aspects that ought to be considered as essential, or at least desirable, for best practice. These factors include the size...... and complexity of the visual field employed in trials, evaluation mode (separate, simultaneous, sequential or successive) and experimental biases associated with selection of stimulus range and response mode. Some of the issues raised will be considered, by some, to be obvious and already standard practice...

  9. Bright and Not-So-Bright Prospects for Women in Physics in China-Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-An; Yang, Zhongqin; Ma, Wanyun

    2009-04-01

    Science in China-Beijing is enjoying a healthy increase in funding year by year, so the prospects for physicists are also bright. However, employment discrimination against women, formerly unthinkable, is becoming more and more explicit as the country evolves toward a market economy. Some recruitment notices bluntly state that only men will be considered, or impose restrictions upon potential female candidates. Female associate professors in many institutions are forced to retire at age 55, compared with 60 for men. This double-pinching discrimination against both younger and older women threatens to lead to a "pincer" effect, more serious than the "scissors" effect. Indeed, the ratio of senior-level women physicists in general has dropped significantly in recent years in China. Ironically, the number of female students applying for graduate studies is on the rise, as it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to compete with men in the job market with just an undergraduate degree. The Chinese Physical Society has made certain efforts to promote the image of women physicists, but it will take time and effort to reverse the trend.

  10. High-brightness ultra-cold metastable neon-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents detailed characteristics of an ultra-cold bright metastable neon atomic beam which we have been using for atom-interferometric applications. The basis of the device is an atomic beam released from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) which is operated with a high intensity trapping laser, high magnetic quadrupole field, and large laser detuining. Mainly due to the complex structure of three dimensional magnetic field and laser beams, a bright small spot of atoms is formed near the center of the quadrupole magnetic field under an appropriate operating condition. We obtained the minimum trap diameter of 50 micron meter, the atomic density nearly 10^{13}cm^{-3}, and the atomic temperature slightly less than the Doppler limited temperature of 200 micro-K. By releasing trapped atoms we obtained an bright cold atomic beam which is not far from the collision limited atomic density.

  11. The Spectroscopic Properties of Bright Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, M G

    2006-01-01

    The properties of bright extragalactic planetary nebulae are reviewed based upon the results of low and high resolution spectroscopy. It is argued that bright extragalactic planetary nebulae from galaxies (or subsystems) with and without star formation have different distributions of central star temperature and ionization structure. As regards the chemical compositions, oxygen and neon are generally found to be unchanged as a result of the evolution of the stellar progenitors. Nitrogen enrichment may occur as a result of the evolution of the progenitors of bright planetary nebulae in all stellar populations, though this enrichment may be (more) random in old stellar populations. Helium abundances appear to be influenced by the chemical evolution of the host galaxy, with planetary nebulae in dwarf spheroidals having systematically elevated abundances. Neither the age nor the metallicity of the progenitor stellar population has a strong effect upon the kinematics observed for nebular shells. Both the range of ...

  12. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog $-$ II. 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Stanek, K Z; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Prieto, J L; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J; Bishop, D W; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Godoy-Rivera, D; Goss, N; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Skowron, D M; Thompson, Todd A; Woźniak, P R; Avíla, C G; Bock, G; Carballo, J -L G; Conseil, E; Contreras, C; Cruz, I; andújar, J M F; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Koff, R A; Krannich, G; Madore, B F; Marples, P; Masi, G; Morrell, N; Monard, L A G; Munoz-Mateos, J C; Nicholls, B; Nicolas, J; Wagner, R M; Wiethoff, W S

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright ($m_V\\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  13. New Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies Detected Around Nearby Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D; Zilch, T; Blauensteiner, M; Elvov, M; Hochleitner, P; Hubl, B; Kerschhuber, G; Küppers, S; Neyer, F; Pölzl, R; Remmel, P; Schneider, O; Sparenberg, R; Trulson, U; Willems, G; Ziegler, H

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC,672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC,2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M_B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26.1 mag/sq arcsec. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC,891 and NGC,2683.

  14. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies detected around nearby spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.; Willems, G.; Ziegler, H.

    2015-10-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26ṃ1/□″. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC891 and NGC2683.

  15. Automated Detection and Tracking of Solar Magnetic Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Crockett, P J; Mathioudakis, M; Keenan, F P

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Bright Points (MBPs) in the internetwork are among the smallest objects in the solar photosphere and appear bright against the ambient environment. An algorithm is presented that can be used for the automated detection of the MBPs in the spatial and temporal domains. The algorithm works by mapping the lanes through intensity thresholding. A compass search, combined with a study of the intensity gradient across the detected objects, allows the disentanglement of MBPs from bright pixels within the granules. Object growing is implemented to account for any pixels that might have been removed when mapping the lanes. The images are stabilized by locating long-lived objects that may have been missed due to variable light levels and seeing quality. Tests of the algorithm employing data taken with the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), reveal that ~90% of MBPs within a 75"x 75" field of view are detected.

  16. RF Manipulations for Higher Brightness LHC-Type Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Damerau, H; Gilardoni, S; Hancock, S

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the transverse brightness of beams for the LHC, ever more complicated RF manipulations have been proposed in the PS machine to reduce the intensity demands per PS batch on the upstream PS Booster. Several schemes based on cascades of batch compression, bunch merging, as well as the more routine bunch splitting have been successfully commissioned and higher brightness beams have been delivered to the downstream accelerators for measurement. Despite all this complexity, longitudinal and transverse beam quality are well preserved. In addition, to profit fully from the brightness of all four PS Booster rings, the injection of twice 4 bunches into harmonic 9 buckets in the PS has been made operational as an alternative to the usual double-batch transfer of 4 + 2 bunches into harmonic 7. This paper summarizes the new beam production schemes, their implementation in the PS low-level RF system and the experimental results..

  17. Dark-bright ring solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockhofe, J; Schmelcher, P [Zentrum fuer Optische Quantentechnologien, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kevrekidis, P G [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst MA 01003-4515 (United States); Frantzeskakis, D J, E-mail: jstockho@physnet.uni-hamburg.de, E-mail: kevrekid@math.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece)

    2011-10-14

    We study dark-bright (DB) ring solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. In the limit of large densities of the dark component, we describe the soliton dynamics by means of an equation of motion for the ring radius. The presence of the bright, 'filling' species is demonstrated to have a stabilizing effect on the ring dark soliton. Near the linear limit, we discuss the symmetry-breaking bifurcations of DB soliton stripes and vortex-bright soliton clusters from the DB ring and relate the stabilizing effect of filling to changes in the bifurcation diagram. Finally, we show that the stabilization by means of a second component is not limited to the radially symmetric structures, but can also be observed in a cross-like DB soliton configuration. (fast track communication)

  18. Bright Stuff on Ceres = Sulfates and Carbonates on CI Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Fries, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of the DAWN spacecraft's observations of the surface of Ceres indicate that there are bright areas, which can be explained by large amounts of the Mg sulfate hexahydrate (MgSO4•6(H2O)), although the identification appears tenuous. There are preliminary indications that water is being evolved from these bright areas, and some have inferred that these might be sites of contemporary hydro-volcanism. A heat source for such modern activity is not obvious, given the small size of Ceres, lack of any tidal forces from nearby giant planets, probable age and presumed bulk composition. We contend that observations of chondritic materials in the lab shed light on the nature of the bright spots on Ceres

  19. Exploring the Multi-Wavelength, Low Surface Brightness Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, R J; Gal, R R; Mahabal, A A; Odewahn, S C

    2000-01-01

    Our current understanding of the low surface brightness universe is quite incomplete, not only in the optical, but also in other wavelength regimes. As a demonstration of the type of science which is facilitated by a virtual observatory, we have undertaken a project utilizing both images and catalogs to explore the multi-wavelength, low surface brightness universe. Here, we present some initial results of this project. Our techniques are complimentary to normal data reduction pipeline techniques in that we focus on the diffuse emission that is ignored or removed by more traditional algorithms. This requires a spatial filtering which must account for objects of interest, in addition to observational artifacts (e.g., bright stellar halos). With this work we are exploring the intersection of the catalog and image domains in order to maximize the scientific information we can extract from the federation of large survey data.

  20. The possible origin of facular brightness in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the Ca ii H line core brightness on the strength and inclination of the photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the center of the solar disc. We use three simultaneous data sets that were obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of Ba ii 4554 Å line, registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in Fe i 1.56 μm lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in Ca ii H that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the Ca ii H brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, which propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature minimum height that is measured from Ba ii line. The Ca ii H brightness is maximum at locations where the phase shift between temperature and velocity oscillations lies within 0°-100°. There is an indirect influence of convective motions on the Ca ii H brightness. The higher the amplitude of convective velocities is and the greater the height is where they change their direction of motion, the brighter the facula. In summary, our results lead to conclusions that facular regions appear bright not only because of the Wilson depression in magnetic structures, but also owing to real heating.

  1. Bright and dark excitons in semiconductor carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We report electronic structure calculations of finite-length semiconducting carbon nanotubes using the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and the time dependent Hartree Fock (TD-HF) approach coupled with semiempirical AM1 and ZINDO Hamiltonians. We specifically focus on the energy splitting, relative ordering, and localization properties of the optically active (bright) and optically forbidden (dark) states from the lowest excitonic band of the nanotubes. These excitonic states are very important in competing radiative and non-radiative processes in these systems. Our analysis of excitonic transition density matrices demonstrates that pure DFT functionals overdelocalize excitons making an electron-hole pair unbound; consequently, excitonic features are not presented in this method. In contrast, the pure HF and A111 calculations overbind excitons inaccurately predicting the lowest energy state as a bright exciton. Changing AM1 with ZINDO Hamiltonian in TD-HF calculations, predicts the bright exciton as the second state after the dark one. However, in contrast to AM1 calculations, the diameter dependence of the excitation energies obtained by ZINDO does not follow the experimental trends. Finally, the TD-DFT approach incorporating hybrid functions with a moderate portion of the long-range HF exchange, such as B3LYP, has the most generality and predictive capacity providing a sufficiently accurate description of excitonic structure in finite-size nanotubes. These methods characterize four important lower exciton bands. The lowest state is dark, the upper band is bright, and the two other dark and nearly degenerate excitons lie in-between. Although the calculated energy splittings between the lowest dark and the bright excitons are relatively large ({approx}0.1 eV), the dense excitonic manifold below the bright exciton allows for fast non-radiative relaxation leasing to the fast population of the lowest dark exciton. This rationalizes the low

  2. Effects of Bright Light Treatment on Psychomotor Speed in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Paavo Tulppo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days. A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both treatment was given every morning between 8–12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time x group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024 but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308. Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year.

  3. Do low surface brightness galaxies have dense disks?

    CERN Document Server

    Saburova, A S

    2010-01-01

    The disk masses of four low surface brightness galaxies (LSB) were estimated using marginal gravitational stability criterion and the stellar velocity dispersion data which were taken from Pizzella et al., 2008 [1]. The constructed mass models appear to be close to the models of maximal disk. The results show that the disks of LSB galaxies may be significantly more massive than it is usually accepted from their brightnesses. In this case their surface densities and masses appear to be rather typical for normal spirals. Otherwise, unlike the disks of many spiral galaxies, the LSB disks are dynamically overheated.

  4. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  5. The brightness variations of Comet Halley at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, K. R.; Jackson, B.; Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The reasons for the intrinsic brightness variations of up to 500 percent on time scales as short as a few hours detected by Sekanina (1984) in Comet Halley between October 1982 and February 1984 are discussed. It is shown that solar wind-modulated electrostatic dust blowoff from the night side of the comet is consistent with the observed brightness variations. The variations coincide with the encounter of high-speed streams with the comet. The stream's propagation time to the comet and the sun's rotation during this transit were used to locate the stream origin on the coronal surface, and the results are shown.

  6. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  7. High-brightness displays in integrated weapon sight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tim; Hogan, Tim

    2014-06-01

    In the past several years Kopin has demonstrated the ability to provide ultra-high brightness, low power display solutions in VGA, SVGA, SXGA and 2k x 2k display formats. This paper will review various approaches for integrating high brightness overlay displays with existing direct view rifle sights and augmenting their precision aiming and targeting capability. Examples of overlay display systems solutions will be presented and discussed. This paper will review significant capability enhancements that are possible when augmenting the real-world as seen through a rifle sight with other soldier system equipment including laser range finders, ballistic computers and sensor systems.

  8. Variations in the Fe mineralogy of bright Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John; Erard, Stephane; Geissler, Paul; Singer, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Bright regions on Mars are interpreted as 'soil' derived by chemical alteration of crustal rocks, whose main pigmentary component is ferric oxide or oxyhydroxide. The mineralogy and mineralogic variability of ferric iron are important evidence for the evolution of Martian soil: mineralogy of ferric phases is sensitive to chemical conditions in their genetic environments, and the spatial distributions of different ferric phases would record a history of both chemical environments and physical mixing. Reflectance spectroscopic studies provide several types of evidence that discriminate possible pigmentary phases, including the position of a crystal field absorption near 0.9 microns and position and strengths of absorptions in the UV-visible wavelength region. Recent telescopic spectra and laboratory measurements of Mars soil analogs suggest that spectral features of bright soil can be explained based on a single pigmentary phase, hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), occurring in both 'nanophase' and more crystalline forms. Here we report on a systematic investigation of Martian bright regions using ISM imaging spectrometer data, in which we examined spatial variations in the position and shape of the approximately 0.9 microns absorption. We found both local and regional heterogeneities that indicate differences in Fe mineralogy. These results demonstrate that bright soils do not represent a single lithology that has been homogenized by eolian mixing, and suggest that weathering of soils in different geologic settings has followed different physical and chemical pathways.

  9. Bright-dark incoherently coupled photovoltaic soliton pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Chun-Feng; Pei Yan-Bo; Zhou Zhong-Xiang; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2005-01-01

    The coupling between two mutually incoherent optical beams that propagate collinearly in open-circuit photovoltaic photorefractive media is investigated. It is shown that an incoherently coupled bright-dark spatial soliton pair can be formed due to photovoltaic effect. The physical properties of such a soliton pair are also discussed.

  10. Star Formation Rates in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    The low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies found in recent surveys (e.g.,\\ Schombert et al. 1992, AJ, 103, 1107) tend to be blue and gas rich. These properties along with their low mean surface luminosity and H i densities imply an inefficient mode of star formation. The Hα images that we presen

  11. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Forward Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Peipmeier, Jeffrey; Kim, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007) [1]. It is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. One of the spaceborne instruments is an L-band radiometer with a shared single feedhorn and parabolic mesh reflector. While the radiometer measures the emission over a footprint of interest, unwanted emissions are also received by the antenna through the antenna sidelobes from the cosmic background and other error sources such as the Sun, the Moon and the galaxy. Their effects need to be considered accurately, and the analysis of the overall performance of the radiometer requires end-to-end performance simulation from Earth emission to antenna brightness temperature, such as the global simulation of L-band brightness temperature simulation over land and sea [2]. To assist with the SMAP radiometer level 1B algorithm development, the SMAP forward brightness temperature simulator is developed by adapting the Aquarius simulator [2] with necessary modifications. This poster presents the current status of the SMAP forward brightness simulator s development including incorporating the land microwave emission model and its input datasets, and a simplified atmospheric radiative transfer model. The latest simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the ability of supporting the SMAP L1B algorithm development.

  12. Quadrature measurements of a bright squeezed state via sideband swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, J.; Glockl, O.; Leuchs, G.;

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of an arbitrary quadrature of a bright quantum state of light is a commonly requested action in many quantum information protocols, but it is experimentally challenging with previously proposed schemes. We suggest that the quadrature be measured at a specific sideband frequency of...

  13. Compact collimators for high brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, H.J.; Ma, H.; Ho, C.; Li, M.; Mu, C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes

  14. Minimum-phase distribution of cosmic source brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimum-phase distributions of brightness (profiles) for cosmic radio sources 3C 144 (the wave lambda=21 cm), 3C 338 (lambda=3.5 m), and 3C 353 (labda=31.3 cm and 3.5 m) are obtained. A real possibility for the profile recovery from module fragments of its Fourier-image is shown

  15. The HI dominated Low Surface Brightness Galaxy KKR17

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Man I; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Du, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Nan

    2014-01-01

    We present new narrow-band (H$\\alpha$ and [OIII]) imagings and optical spectrophotometry of HII regions for a gas-rich low surface brightness irregular galaxy, KKR 17. The central surface brightness of the galaxy is $\\mu_0(B)$ = 24.15 $\\pm$0.03 mag~sec$^{-2}$. The galaxy was detected by \\emph{Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey} (ALFALFA), and its mass is dominated by neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. In contrast, both the stellar masses of the bright HII and diffuse stellar regions are small. In addition, the fit to the spectral energy distribution to each region shows the stellar populations of HII and diffuse regions are different. The bright HII region contains a large fraction of O-type stars, revealing the recent strong star formation, whereas the diffuse region is dominated by median age stars, which has a typical age of $\\sim$ 600 Myrs. Using the McGaugh's abundance model, we found that the average metallicity of KKR 17 is 12 + (O/H) = 8.0 $\\pm$ 0.1. The star formation rate of KKR 17 is 0.21$\\pm$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$...

  16. The "Brightness Rules" Alternative Conception for Light Bulb Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Joel A.; Stuessy, Carol

    2006-01-01

    An alternative conception for the observed differences in light bulb brightness was revealed during an unguided inquiry investigation in which prospective elementary teachers placed identical bulbs in series, parallel, and combination direct current circuits. Classroom observations, document analyses, and video and audio transcriptions led to the…

  17. Exploring the Multi-Wavelength, Low Surface Brightness Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, R. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Gal, R. R.; Odewahn, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    Our current understanding of the low surface brightness universe is quite incomplete, not only in the optical, but also in other wavelength regimes. We have, therefore, begun an exploration of the multi-wavelength, low surface brightness universe. This project currently involves data from DPOSS (Digitized Palomar Optical Sky Survey), 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey), IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite), and several neutral hydrogen surveys. We present some initial results of this work as well as discuss the implications of this work on future virtual observatories. Our main scientific goals have been the search for low surface brightness galaxies, including local group dwarf spheroidals, and also optical counterparts to high velocity clouds. Our techniques are complimentary to normal data reduction pipeline techniques in that we focus on the diffuse emission that is ignored or removed by more traditional algorithms. This requires, of course, a spatial filtering which must account for objects of interest, in addition to observational artifacts (e.g.,\\ bright stellar halos). Finally, with this work, we are exploring the intersection of the catalog and image domains in order to maximize the scientific information we can extract from the federation of large survey data.

  18. The star-bright hour : [poems] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2003-01-01

    Autori lühitutvustus lk. 231. Sisu: The star-bright hour ; The debt ; Not a dream ; Fog-bound ; Corals in an Ancient river ; Frou-frou 1-3. Orig.: Tähetund ; Vilepuhuja ; Võlg ; "Mitte viirastus, meelepett..." ; Udus ; Korallid Emajões ; Froufrou 1-3

  19. The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: The star-bright hour ; Not a dream ; The Piper ; Corals in an ancent river. Luuletused pärinevad kogumikust "Tuulelaeval valgusest on aerud = Windship with Oars of Light. (Tallinn : Huma, 2001). Orig.: Tähetund ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett ; Vilepuhuja ; Korallid Emajões

  20. Enhancing the brightness of high current electron guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.; Boyd, J.K.; Caporaso, G.; Weir, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    Concepts such as the two-beam accelerator offer the possibility of translating pulsed power technology into a form useful to the design of high luminosity accelerators for high-energy physics applications. Realization of the promise of these concepts will require the design of electron guns which are optimized with respect to beam brightness at current levels of approximately 1 kA. Because high luminosity implies accelerator operation at high repetition rates, the high-current beam source must be designed so that the beam does not intercept the electrodes. In our investigations of electron gun configurations, we have found that the brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. To investigate the sensitivity of beam brightness to these factors in a manner suitable for modelling transient phenomena at the beam head, we have developed a Darwin approximation particle code, DPC. The main component in our experimental program is a readily modified electron gun that allows us to test many candidate cathode materials, types, and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MW/cm. We have also developed several diagnostics suitable for measuring the brightness of intense, low-emittance beams.

  1. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Tugay, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  2. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  3. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  4. A 20 GHz Bright Sample for Delta > 72 deg - II. Multi-frequency Follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, R; Verma, R; Prandoni, I; Carretti, E; Mack, K -H; Massardi, M; Procopio, P; Zanichelli, A; Gregorini, L; Mantovani, F; Gawronski, M P; Peel, M W

    2013-01-01

    We present follow-up observations at 5, 8 and 30 GHz of the K-band Northern Wide Survey (KNoWS) 20 GHz Bright Sample, performed with the 32-m Medicina Radio Telescope and the 32-m Torun Radio Telescope. The KNoWS sources were selected in the Northern Polar Cap (Delta > 72 deg) and have a flux density limit S(20GHz) = 115 mJy. We include NVSS 1.4 GHz measurements to derive the source radio spectra between 1.4 and 30 GHz. Based on optical identifications, 68 per cent of the sources are QSOs, and 27 per cent are radio galaxies. A redshift measurement is available for 58 per cent of the sources. The radio spectral properties of the different source populations are found to be in agreement with those of other high-frequency selected samples.

  5. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF EINSTEIN A-COEFFICIENT RATIOS OF BRIGHT [Fe II] LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe+ lines have been computed by several authors with results that differ from each other by up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties that in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines that would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-Very Large Telescope X-shooter instrument between 3000 Å and 24700 Å, we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH 1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratios ≥100. Among these latter lines, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose dereddened intensity ratios are direct functions of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH 1 through intensity ratios of atomic species, H I  recombination lines and H2 ro-vibrational transitions. We provide seven reliable A-coefficient ratios between bright [Fe II] lines, which are compared with the literature determinations. In particular, the A-coefficient ratios involving the brightest near-infrared lines (λ12570/λ16440 and λ13209/λ16440) are in better agreement with the predictions by the Quinet et al. relativistic Hartree-Fock model. However, none of the theoretical models predict A-coefficient ratios in agreement with all of our determinations. We also show that literature data of near-infrared intensity ratios better agree with our determinations than with theoretical expectations

  6. The formation of submillimetre-bright galaxies from gas infall over a billion years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Desika; Turk, Matthew; Feldmann, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Hopkins, Philip; Thompson, Robert; Hayward, Christopher; Ball, David; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-09-24

    Submillimetre-bright galaxies at high redshift are the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe and are characterized by prodigious emission in the far-infrared, with a flux of at least five millijanskys at a wavelength of 850 micrometres. They reside in haloes with masses about 10(13) times that of the Sun, have low gas fractions compared to main-sequence disks at a comparable redshift, trace complex environments and are not easily observable at optical wavelengths. Their physical origin remains unclear. Simulations have been able to form galaxies with the requisite luminosities, but have otherwise been unable to simultaneously match the stellar masses, star formation rates, gas fractions and environments. Here we report a cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation that is able to form a submillimetre galaxy that simultaneously satisfies the broad range of observed physical constraints. We find that groups of galaxies residing in massive dark matter haloes have increasing rates of star formation that peak at collective rates of about 500-1,000 solar masses per year at redshifts of two to three, by which time the interstellar medium is sufficiently enriched with metals that the region may be observed as a submillimetre-selected system. The intense star formation rates are fuelled in part by the infall of a reservoir gas supply enabled by stellar feedback at earlier times, not through major mergers. With a lifetime of nearly a billion years, our simulations show that the submillimetre-bright phase of high-redshift galaxies is prolonged and associated with significant mass buildup in early-Universe proto-clusters, and that many submillimetre-bright galaxies are composed of numerous unresolved components (for which there is some observational evidence). PMID:26399829

  7. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF EINSTEIN A-COEFFICIENT RATIOS OF BRIGHT [Fe II] LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Lorenzetti, D. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Alcalá, J. M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Bonito, R.; Stelzer, B., E-mail: teresa.giannini@oa-roma.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe{sup +} lines have been computed by several authors with results that differ from each other by up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties that in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines that would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-Very Large Telescope X-shooter instrument between 3000 Å and 24700 Å, we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH 1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratios ≥100. Among these latter lines, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose dereddened intensity ratios are direct functions of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH 1 through intensity ratios of atomic species, H I  recombination lines and H{sub 2} ro-vibrational transitions. We provide seven reliable A-coefficient ratios between bright [Fe II] lines, which are compared with the literature determinations. In particular, the A-coefficient ratios involving the brightest near-infrared lines (λ12570/λ16440 and λ13209/λ16440) are in better agreement with the predictions by the Quinet et al. relativistic Hartree-Fock model. However, none of the theoretical models predict A-coefficient ratios in agreement with all of our determinations. We also show that literature data of near-infrared intensity ratios better agree with our determinations than with theoretical expectations.

  8. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties of lunar soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wu Ji; Li Dihui; Zhang Xiaohui; Jiang Jingshan; A T Altyntsev; B I Lubyshev

    2005-12-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become attractive due to the existence of He3 and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization as nuclear fuel for power generation.Although the composition of the lunar surface soil can be determined by optical and /X-ray spectrometers, etc., the evaluation of the total reserves of He3 and ilmenite within the regolith and in the lunar interior are still not available.In this paper,we give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope.We also present the results of the microwave dielectric properties of terrestrial analogues of lunar soil and,discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  9. Bright solitons in a PT-symmetric chain of dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Kirikchi, Omar B; Susanto, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence and stability of fundamental bright discrete solitons in a parity-time (PT)-symmetric coupler composed by a chain of dimers, that is modelled by linearly coupled discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equations with gain and loss terms. We use a perturbation theory for small coupling between the lattices to perform the analysis, which is then confirmed by numerical calculations. Such analysis is based on the concept of the so-called anti-continuum limit approach. We consider the fundamental onsite and intersite bright solitons. Each solution has symmetric and antisymmetric configurations between the arms. The stability of the solutions is then determined by solving the corresponding eigenvalue problem. We obtain that both symmetric and antisymmetric onsite mode can be stable for small coupling, on the contrary of the reported continuum limit where the antisymmetric solutions are always unstable. The instability is either due to the internal modes crossing the origin or the appearance of a quart...

  10. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Grimes, Jacob T; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Segalov, Zvi; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren-Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2005-01-01

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  11. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Wijnholds, S J; Abdalla, F B; Brouw, W N; Ciardi, B; Iliev, I T; Harker, G J A; Mellema, G; Bernardi, G; Zarka, P; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Hassall, T E; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Reich, W; van Nieuwpoort, R; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with LOFAR, similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of t...

  12. Histogram Equalization with Range Offset for Brightness Preserved Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Ibrahim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simple modification to Global Histogram Equalization (GHE, a well known digital image enhancement method, has been proposed. This proposed method known as Histogram Equalization with Range Offset (HERO is divided into two stages. In its first stage, an intensity mapping function is constructed by using the cumulative density function of the input image, similar to GHE. Then, during the second stage, an offset for the intensity mapping function will be determined to maintain the mean brightness of the image, which is a crucial criterion for digital image enhancement in consumer electronic products. Comparison with some of the current histogram equalization based enhancement methods shows that HERO successfully preserves the mean brightness and give good enhancement to the image.

  13. A ROSAT Bright Source Catalog Survey with the Swift Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, D B

    2004-01-01

    We consider the prospects for a complete survey of the 18,811 sources of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (BSC) with NASA's Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission. By observing each BSC source for 500 s with the satellite's imaging X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, this "Swift Bright (Source) Catalog Survey" (Swift-BCS) would derive ~20 mCrab, 10-100 keV) with the wide-field Burst Alert Telescope (BAT); and a two-year all-sky BAT survey down to >~1 mCrab. The resulting expansion of the catalog of identified X-ray sources from 2000 to 18,000 will provide a greatly-enriched set of targets for observation by XMM-Newton, Chandra, and future high-energy observatories.

  14. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for Precision Photometry of Bright Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Rucinski, S M; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Scholtz, A L

    2013-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.

  15. Cometary activity in 2060 Chiron at minimum brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, A M; Silva, Adrian M.; Cellone, Sergio A.

    2001-01-01

    We present two-colour CCD imaging of 2060 Chiron obtained between 1996 and 1998 with the 2.15 m telescope at CASLEO (San Juan, Argentina). These post-perihelion observations show that Chiron was then near its historical brightness minima, however a coma was clearly detected. The dynamical state of the coma is studied by means of azimuthally averaged surface brightness profiles, which show the signatures of radiation pressure on the dust grain distribution. Aperture photometry shows an achromatic dimming with an amplitude \\~ 0.09 mag in approximately one hour. If due to rotation of the nucleus, this rather high amplitude is used to derive a new value for the nuclear magnitude, m_0 ~ 6.80 mag.

  16. Microwave Brightness Temperature and Lunar Son Dielectric Property Retrieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; D.H. Li; A.T. Altyntsev; B.I. Lubyshev

    2005-01-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become more and more attractive to the scientists duo to the existence of abundant 3He and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization. Although the soil composition determination on the lunar surface is available by visible light spectrometer, γ/X-ray spectrometer etc, the evaluations on the total reserves of 3He and ilmenite in the lunar deep and on the thickness of the lunar soil are still impossible so far. In this paper, the authors first give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 Meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope; then introduce our researches on the microwave dielectric properties of lunar soil simulators; finally, discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  17. Sunspot bright rings and the thermal diffusivity of solar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, T., Jr.; Fowler, L. A.; Foukal, P.

    1983-01-01

    Raster-scan observations of 10 sunspots, made in 1980 and 1981 with the 512-channel diode array and vacuum telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, are reported. Data from several 10-min scans of 0.25-A passbands of clean continuum were summed to give an rms noise level of 0.25 percent, corrected by applying a limb-darkening curve, and analyzed to determine the average intensity for each of eight segments of a series of concentric rings around each sunspot. Faculae and pores were identified and discarded in constructing radial intensity profiles. Marginally significant bright symmetric rings (peak amplitude 0.1-0.3 percent) not attributable to residual facular signal or instrumental effects were observed around 6 of 10 sunspots. No evidence of more intense bright rings was found. These findings are discussed in terms of thermal-diffusion models proposed to explain the fate of the radiative flux blocked by sunspots.

  18. Operational Performance Improvements to BRIght Target Explorer Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Yun

    The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE)-Constellation is composed of six nano-satellites funded by Austria, Canada, and Poland, and each of them is equipped with an optical telescope that observes stars with visual magnitude +3.5 or brighter. BRITE-Constellation has provided numerous images of bright stars from Low Earth Orbit, which will eventually lead to investigation of origin of the Universe. This thesis presents the contribution of the author to BRITE mission, especially in BRITE Operations. The author performed antenna steering experiments on UniBRITE and BRITE-Toronto, to improve data downlink. To improve scientific data collection from BRITE satellites, the author computed available observation time for multiple targets every orbit, which resulted in collection of twice the amount of scientific data. Also, the author increased the available observation time for each target from 32 minutes to 48 minutes by improving the performance of the star tracker on-board BRITE-Toronto.

  19. Production of strongly bound 39K bright solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Lepoutre, S; Boissé, A; Berthet, G; Salomon, G; Aspect, A; Bourdel, T

    2016-01-01

    We report on the production of 39 K matter-wave bright solitons, i.e., 1D matter-waves that propagate without dispersion thanks to attractive interactions. The volume of the soliton is studied as a function of the scattering length through three-body losses, revealing peak densities as high as $\\sim 5 \\times 10^{20} m^{-3}$. Our solitons, close to the collapse threshold, are strongly bound and will find applications in fundamental physics and atom interferometry.

  20. Algebraic bright and vortex solitons in defocusing media

    OpenAIRE

    Borovkova, Olga V.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Boris A. Malomed; Torner, Lluis

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that spatially inhomogeneous defocusing nonlinear landscapes with the nonlinearity coefficient growing toward the periphery as [1+abs(r)]**a support one- and two-dimensional fundamental and higher-order bright solitons, as well as vortex solitons, with algebraically decaying tails. The energy flow of the solitons converges as long as nonlinearity growth rate exceeds the dimensionality, i.e., a>D. Fundamental solitons are always stable, while multipoles and vortices are stable i...

  1. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration.

  2. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  3. High-brightness switchable multiwavelength remote laser in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zeng Bin; Li Guihua; Chu Wei; Ni Jielei; Zhang Haisu [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Xu Huailiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We demonstrate a harmonic-seeded switchable multiwavelength laser in air driven by intense midinfrared femtosecond laser pulses, in which population inversion occurs at an ultrafast time scale (i.e., less than {approx}200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular nitrogen ions by strong-field ionization of inner-valence electrons. The bright multiwavelength laser in air opens the perspective for remote detection of multiple pollutants based on nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

  4. The Morphology of Low Surface Brightness Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, S.; Schombert, J.; Bothun, G.

    1994-01-01

    Images of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies are presented. These galaxies are generally late types; however, they are not dwarfs, being intrinsically large and luminous. The morphology of LSB galaxies is discussed in terms of the physical interpretation of the Hubble sequence, the stages of which are found to be nonlinear in the sense that smaller physical differences separate mid to early type spirals than late types.

  5. Survival analysis of the optical brightness of GRB host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Racz, I I; Bagoly, Z; Toth, L V

    2015-01-01

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescopes. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the data of the GRBs. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution which is in the DEEP2 galaxies catalog.

  6. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncato, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges. The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP). Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP). The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different gray shades. These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in is blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this “solution” by the visual system. PMID:25368570

  7. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    OpenAIRE

    Offringa, A. R.; De Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Ciardi, B.; Iliev, I. T.; Harker, G. J. A.; Mellema, G.; Bernardi, G.; Zarka, P.; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness ...

  8. Distance Measurements and Stellar Population Properties via Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) are one of the most powerful techniques to measure the distance and to constrain the unresolved stellar content of extragalactic systems. For a given bandpass, the absolute SBF magnitude \\bar{M} depends on the properties of the underlying stellar population. Multi-band SBFs allow scientists to probe different stages of the stellar evolution: UV and blue wavelength band SBFs are sensitive to the evolution of stars within the hot Horizontal Branch (HB) and...

  9. Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinner, Joshua E.; Huchery, Cindy; MacNeil, M. Aaron; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; McClanahan, Tim R.; Maina, Joseph; Maire, Eva; Kittinger, John N.; Hicks, Christina C.; Mora, Camilo; Allison, Edward H.; D'Agata, Stephanie; Hoey, Andrew; Feary, David A.; Crowder, Larry; Williams, Ivor D.; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent; Wantiez, Laurent; Edgar, Graham; Stuart-Smith, Rick D.; Sandin, Stuart A.; Green, Alison L.; Hardt, Marah J.; Beger, Maria; Friedlander, Alan; Campbell, Stuart J.; Holmes, Katherine E.; Wilson, Shaun K.; Brokovich, Eran; Brooks, Andrew J.; Cruz-Motta, Juan J.; Booth, David J.; Chabanet, Pascale; Gough, Charlie; Tupper, Mark; Ferse, Sebastian C. A.; Sumaila, U. Rashid; Mouillot, David

    2016-07-01

    Ongoing declines in the structure and function of the world’s coral reefs require novel approaches to sustain these ecosystems and the millions of people who depend on them. A presently unexplored approach that draws on theory and practice in human health and rural development is to systematically identify and learn from the ‘outliers’—places where ecosystems are substantially better (‘bright spots’) or worse (‘dark spots’) than expected, given the environmental conditions and socioeconomic drivers they are exposed to. Here we compile data from more than 2,500 reefs worldwide and develop a Bayesian hierarchical model to generate expectations of how standing stocks of reef fish biomass are related to 18 socioeconomic drivers and environmental conditions. We identify 15 bright spots and 35 dark spots among our global survey of coral reefs, defined as sites that have biomass levels more than two standard deviations from expectations. Importantly, bright spots are not simply comprised of remote areas with low fishing pressure; they include localities where human populations and use of ecosystem resources is high, potentially providing insights into how communities have successfully confronted strong drivers of change. Conversely, dark spots are not necessarily the sites with the lowest absolute biomass and even include some remote, uninhabited locations often considered near pristine. We surveyed local experts about social, institutional, and environmental conditions at these sites to reveal that bright spots are characterized by strong sociocultural institutions such as customary taboos and marine tenure, high levels of local engagement in management, high dependence on marine resources, and beneficial environmental conditions such as deep-water refuges. Alternatively, dark spots are characterized by intensive capture and storage technology and a recent history of environmental shocks. Our results suggest that investments in strengthening fisheries

  10. Bright spots among the world’s coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinner, Joshua E; Huchery, Cindy; MacNeil, M Aaron; Graham, Nicholas A J; McClanahan, Tim R; Maina, Joseph; Maire, Eva; Kittinger, John N; Hicks, Christina C; Mora, Camilo; Allison, Edward H; D'Agata, Stephanie; Hoey, Andrew; Feary, David A; Crowder, Larry; Williams, Ivor D; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent; Wantiez, Laurent; Edgar, Graham; Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Sandin, Stuart A; Green, Alison L; Hardt, Marah J; Beger, Maria; Friedlander, Alan; Campbell, Stuart J; Holmes, Katherine E; Wilson, Shaun K; Brokovich, Eran; Brooks, Andrew J; Cruz-Motta, Juan J; Booth, David J; Chabanet, Pascale; Gough, Charlie; Tupper, Mark; Ferse, Sebastian C A; Sumaila, U Rashid; Mouillot, David

    2016-07-21

    Ongoing declines in the structure and function of the world’s coral reefs require novel approaches to sustain these ecosystems and the millions of people who depend on them3. A presently unexplored approach that draws on theory and practice in human health and rural development is to systematically identify and learn from the ‘outliers’—places where ecosystems are substantially better (‘bright spots’) or worse (‘dark spots’) than expected, given the environmental conditions and socioeconomic drivers they are exposed to. Here we compile data from more than 2,500 reefs worldwide and develop a Bayesian hierarchical model to generate expectations of how standing stocks of reef fish biomass are related to 18 socioeconomic drivers and environmental conditions. We identify 15 bright spots and 35 dark spots among our global survey of coral reefs, defined as sites that have biomass levels more than two standard deviations from expectations. Importantly, bright spots are not simply comprised of remote areas with low fishing pressure; they include localities where human populations and use of ecosystem resources is high, potentially providing insights into how communities have successfully confronted strong drivers of change. Conversely, dark spots are not necessarily the sites with the lowest absolute biomass and even include some remote, uninhabited locations often considered near pristine6. We surveyed local experts about social, institutional, and environmental conditions at these sites to reveal that bright spots are characterized by strong sociocultural institutions such as customary taboos and marine tenure, high levels of local engagement in management, high dependence on marine resources, and beneficial environmental conditions such as deep-water refuges. Alternatively, dark spots are characterized by intensive capture and storage technology and a recent history of environmental shocks. Our results suggest that investments in strengthening fisheries

  11. Developing high brightness beams for heavy ion driven inertial fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, J.W.; Ahle, L.A.; Anders, A; Bieniosek, F.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Grote, D. P.; Henestroza, E.; Leung, K.N.; Molvik, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers require large currents and bright beams. In this paper we review the two different approaches for building HIF injectors and the corresponding ion source requirements. The traditional approach uses large aperture, low current density ion sources, resulting in a very large injector system. A more recent conceptual approach merges high current density mini-beamlets into a large current beam in order to significantly reduce the size of the injector. Experimen...

  12. Bright flares in supergiant fast X-ray transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakura, N.; Postnov, K.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2014-08-01

    At steady low-luminosity states, supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) can be at the stage of quasi-spherical settling accretion on to slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars from the OB-companion winds. At this stage, a hot quasi-static shell is formed above the magnetosphere, the plasma entry rate into magnetosphere is controlled by (inefficient) radiative plasma cooling, and the accretion rate on to the neutron star is suppressed by a factor of ˜30 relative to the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton value. Changes in the local wind velocity and density due to, e.g. clumps, can only slightly increase the mass accretion rate (a factor of ˜10) bringing the system into the Compton-cooling-dominated regime and led to the production of moderately bright flares (Lx ≲ 1036 erg s-1). To interpret the brightest flares (Lx > 1036 erg s-1) displayed by the SFXTs within the quasi-spherical settling accretion regimes, we propose that a larger increase in the mass accretion rate can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time-scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass of the shell. This view is consistent with the energy released in SFXT bright flares (˜1038-1040 erg), their typical dynamic range (˜100) and with the observed dependence of these characteristics on the average unflaring X-ray luminosity of SFXTs. Thus, the flaring behaviour of SFXTs, as opposed to steady HMXBs, may be primarily related to their low X-ray luminosity allowing sporadic magnetic reconnection to occur during magnetized plasma entry into the magnetosphere.

  13. Brightness limitations in multi-kiloampere electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuristic relationships such as the Lawson-Penner criterion, used to scale Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier gain and efficiency over orders of magnitude in beam current and brightness, have no fundamental basis. The brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. The design of low emittance, high current electron guns has received considerable attention at Livermore over the past few years. The measured brightnesses of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) guns are less than predicted with the EBQ gun design code; this discrepancy is due to plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode in the code. The EBQ code is well suited to exploring the current limits of gridless relativistic Pierce columns with moderate current density (2) at the cathode. As EBQ uses a steady-state calculation it is not amenable for study of transient phenomena at the beam head. For this purpose, a Darwin approximation code, DPC, has been written. The main component in our experimental cathode development effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 6 references, 6 figures

  14. Night-sky brightness and extinction at Mt. Shatdzhatmaz

    CERN Document Server

    Kornilov, V; Voziakova, O; Shatsky, N; Safonov, B; Gorbunov, I; Potanin, S; Cheryasov, D; Senik, V

    2016-01-01

    The photometric sky quality of Mt. Shatdzhatmaz, the site of Sternberg Astronomical Institute Caucasian Observatory 2.5 m telescope, is characterized here by the statistics of the night-time sky brightness and extinction. The data were obtained as a by-product of atmospheric optical turbulence measurements with the MASS (Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor) device conducted in 2007--2013. The factors biasing night-sky brightness measurements are considered and a technique to reduce their impact on the statistics is proposed. The single-band photometric estimations provided by MASS are easy to transform to the standard photometric bands. The median moonless night-sky brightness is 22.1, 21.1, 20.3, and 19.0 mag per square arcsec for the $B$, $V$, $R$, and $I$ spectral bands, respectively. The median extinction coefficients for the same photometric bands are 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, and 0.09 mag. The best atmospheric transparency is observed in winter.

  15. Bright Soil Churned by Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove 22.7 meters (74 feet) toward the southwest on the 1,861st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (March 28, 2009). After the drive, the rover took this image with its front hazard-avoidance camera, looking back at the tracks from the drive. As usual since losing the use of its right-front wheel in 2006, Spirit drove backwards. The immobile right-front wheel churned up a long stripe of bright soil during this drive. Where Spirit has found such bright soil in the past, subsequent analysis of the composition found concentrations of sulfur or silica that testified to past action of water at the site. When members of the rover team saw the large quantity of bright soil exposed by the Sol 1861 drive, they quickly laid plans to investigate the composition with Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The Sol 1861 drive took the rover past the northwest corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate,' making progress on a route around the western side of Home Plate. The edge of Home Plate forms the horizon on the right side of this image. Husband Hill is on the horizon on the left side. For scale, the parallel rover wheel tracks are about 1 meter (40 inches) apart. The rover's hazard-avoidance cameras take 'fisheye' wide-angle images.

  16. HSV Brightness Factor Matching for Gesture Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar M. Hasan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of gesture recognition research is to establish a system which can identify specific human gestures and use these identified gestures to be carried out by the machine, In this paper, we introduce a new method for gesture recognition that based on computing the local brightness for each block of the gesture image, the gesture image is divided into 25x25 blocks each of 5x5 block size, and we calculated the local brightness of each block, so, each gesture produces 25x25 features value, our experimental shows that more that %60 of these features are zero value which leads to minimum storage space, this brightness value is calculated from the HSV (Hue, Saturation and Value color model that used for segmentation operation, the recognition rate achieved is %91 using 36 training gestures and 24 different testing gestures. This Paper focuses on the hand gesture instead of the whole body movement since hands are the most flexible part of the body and can transfer the most meaning, we build a gesture recognition system that can communicate with the machine in natural way without any mechanical devices and without using the normal input devices which are the keyboard and mouse and the mathematical equations will be the translator between the gestures and the telerobotic.

  17. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Das

    2013-03-01

    Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but low in star formation and hence low in surface brightness. They often have bright bulges that are similar to those found in early type galaxies. The bulges can host low luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that have relatively low mass black holes. GLSB galaxies are usually isolated systems and are rarely found to be interacting with other galaxies. In fact many GLSB galaxies are found under dense regions close to the edges of voids. These galaxies have very massive dark matter halos that also contribute to their stability and lack of evolution. In this paper we briefly review the properties of this unique class of galaxies and conclude that both their isolation and their massive dark matter halos have led to the low star formation rates and the slower rate of evolution in these galaxies.

  18. South African night sky brightness during high aerosol epochs

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Hartmut; Marang, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Sky conditions in the remote, dry north-western interior of South Africa are now the subject of considerable interest in view of the imminent construction of numerous solar power plants in this area. Furthermore, the part of this region in which the core of the SKA is to be located (which includes SALT) has been declared an Astronomical Advantage Zone, for which sky brightness monitoring will now be mandatory. In this project we seek to characterise the sky brightness profile under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Key factors are of course the lunar phase and altitude, but in addition the sky brightness is also significantly affected by the atmospheric aerosol loading, as that influences light beam scattering. In this paper we chose to investigate the sky characteristics soon after the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991, which resulted in huge ash masses reaching the stratosphere (where they affected solar irradiance for several years). We re-reduced photometric sky measurements from the South Afric...

  19. BRITE-Constellation: nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Moffat, A F J; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Zwintz, K; CCD,

    2014-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, the brightness and temperature variations of stars generally brighter than mag(V) ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of six nanosats (hence Constellation): two from Austria, two from Canada, and two from Poland. Each 7 kg nanosat carries an optical telescope of aperture 3 cm feeding an uncooled CCD. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter, the other with a red filter. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~24 degrees), so up to about 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously, sampled in 32 pixel x 32 pixel sub-rasters. Photometry of additional fainter targets, with reduced precision but thorough time sampling, will be possible through onboard data processing. The BRITE sample is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all e...

  20. The LEGUE high latitude bright survey design for the LAMOST pilot survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Yang Zhang; Shuang Gao; Norbert Christlieb; Zhan-Wen Han; Jin-Liang Hou; Hsu-Tai Lee; Xiao-Wei Liu; Kai-Ke Pan; Hong-Chi Wang; Jeffrey L.Carlin; Fan Yang; Chao Liu; Li-Cai Deng; Heidi Jo Newberg; Hao-Tong Zhang; Sébastien Lépine; Yan Xu

    2012-01-01

    We describe the footprint and input catalog for bright nights in the LAMOST Pilot Survey,which began in October 2011.Targets are selected from two stripes in the north and south Galactic Cap regions,centered at δ =29°,with 10° width in declination,covering right ascensions of 135°to 290°and-30°to 30°respectively.We selected spectroscopic targets from a combination of the SDSS and 2MASS point source catalogs.The catalog of stars defining the field centers(as required by the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the center of the LAMOST field)consists of all V < 8m stars from the Hipparcos catalog.We employ a statistical selection algorithm that assigns priorities to targets based on their positions in multidimensional color/magnitude space.This scheme overemphasizes rare objects and de-emphasizes more populated regions of magnitude and color phase space,while ensuring a smooth,well-understood selection function.A demonstration of plate design is presented based on the Shack-Hartmann star catalog and an input catalog that was generated by our target selection routines.

  1. Faint warm debris disks around nearby bright stars explored by AKARI and IRSF

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Debris disks are important observational clues for understanding planetary-system formation process. In particular, faint warm debris disks may be related to late planet formation near 1 AU. A systematic search of faint warm debris disks is necessary to reveal terrestrial planet formation. Aims: Faint warm debris disks show excess emission that peaks at mid-IR wavelengths. Thus we explore debris disks using the AKARI mid-IR all-sky point source catalog (PSC), a product of the second generation unbiased IR all-sky survey. Methods : We investigate IR excess emission for 678 isolated main-sequence stars for which there are 18 micron detections in the AKARI mid-IR all-sky catalog by comparing their fluxes with the predicted fluxes of the photospheres based on optical to near-IR fluxes and model spectra. The near-IR fluxes are first taken from the 2MASS PSC. However, 286 stars with Ks<4.5 in our sample have large flux errors in the 2MASS photometry due to saturation. Thus we have measured accurate J, H...

  2. VVV High proper motion stars I. The catalogue of bright Ks < 13.5 stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtev, R; Beamin, J C; Folkes, S L; Ramirez, K Pena; Ivanov, V D; Borissova, J; Villanueva, V; Minniti, D; Mendez, R; Lucas, P W; Smith, L C; Pinfield, D J; Kuhn, M A; Jones, H R A; Antonova, A; Yip, A K P

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the stellar content near the Sun is important for a broad range of topics ranging from the search for planets to the study of Milky Way structure. The most powerful method for identifying potentially nearby stars is proper motion (PM) surveys. All old optical surveys avoid, or are at least substantially incomplete, near the Galactic plane. The depth and breadth of the "Vista Variables in Via Lactea" (VVV) near-IR survey significantly improves this situation. Taking advantage of the VVV survey database, we have measured PMs in the densest regions of the MW bulge and southern plane in order to complete the census of nearby objects. We have developed a custom PM pipeline based on VVV catalogues from the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU), by comparing the first epoch of JHKs with the multi-epoch Ks-bands acquired later. Taking advantage of the large time baseline between the 2MASS and the VVV observations, we also obtained 2MASS-VVV PMs. We present a near-IR proper motion catalogue for the whole...

  3. The bright end of the galaxy luminosity function at z ~ 7: before the onset of mass quenching?

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, R A A; McLure, R J; Rogers, A B; McCracken, H J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Furusawa, H; Fynbo, J P U; Taniguchi, Y; Afonso, J; Bremer, M N; Fevre, O Le

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a new search for bright star-forming galaxies at z ~ 7 within the UltraVISTA DR2 and UKIDSS UDS DR10 data, which together provide 1.65 sq deg of near-infrared imaging with overlapping optical and Spitzer data. Using a full photo-z analysis to identify high-z galaxies and reject contaminants, we have selected a sample of 34 luminous (-22.7 < M_UV < -21.2) galaxies with the 6.5 < z < 7.5. Crucially, the deeper imaging provided by UltraVISTA DR2 confirms all of the robust objects previously uncovered by Bowler et al. (2012), validating our selection technique. Our sample includes the most massive galaxies known at z ~ 7, with M_* ~ 10^{10} M_sun, and the majority are resolved, consistent with larger sizes (r_{1/2} ~ 1 - 1.5 kpc) than displayed by less massive galaxies. From our final sample, we determine the form of the bright end of the rest-frame UV galaxy luminosity function (LF) at z ~ 7, providing strong evidence that the bright end of the z = 7 LF does not decline as s...

  4. Simultaneous multi-band detection of Low Surface Brightness galaxies with Markovian modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Petremand, M; Lavigne, F; Collet, Ch; van Driel, W; Bonnarel, F; Louys, M; Sabatini, S; MacArthur, L A

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the detection of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings - typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B and I band images (covering 1.3 square degrees in total) of the Virgo cluster. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (i) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (ii) Virgo...

  5. Bright, NIR-emitting Au23 from Au25: characterization and applications including biolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kumar, R C Arun; Paul, Soumya; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai Vyomakesannair; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-10-01

    A novel interfacial route has been developed for the synthesis of a bright-red-emitting new subnanocluster, Au(23), by the core etching of a widely explored and more stable cluster, Au(25)SG(18) (in which SG is glutathione thiolate). A slight modification of this procedure results in the formation of two other known subnanoclusters, Au(22) and Au(33). Whereas Au(22) and Au(23) are water soluble and brightly fluorescent with quantum yields of 2.5 and 1.3 %, respectively, Au(33) is organic soluble and less fluorescent, with a quantum yield of 0.1 %. Au(23) exhibits quenching of fluorescence selectively in the presence of Cu(2+) ions and it can therefore be used as a metal-ion sensor. Aqueous- to organic-phase transfer of Au(23) has been carried out with fluorescence enhancement. Solvent dependency on the fluorescence of Au(23) before and after phase transfer has been studied extensively and the quantum yield of the cluster varies with the solvent used. The temperature response of Au(23) emission has been demonstrated. The inherent fluorescence of Au(23) was used for imaging human hepatoma cells by employing the avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19711391

  6. SMARTS optical and infrared monitoring of 12 gamma-ray bright blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Bonning, E W; Bailyn, C; Buxton, M; Chatterjee, R; Coppi, P; Fossati, G; Isler, J; Maraschi, L

    2012-01-01

    We present multiwavelength data for twelve blazars observed from 2008-2010 as part of an ongoing optical-infrared photometric monitoring project. Sources were selected to be bright, southern (dec < 20 deg) blazars observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, with daily and weekly gamma-ray fluxes made available from the start of the Fermi mission. Light curves are presented for the twelve blazars in BVRJK at near-daily cadence. We find that optical and infrared fluxes are well correlated in all sources. Gamma-ray bright flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in our sample have optical/infrared emission correlated with gamma-rays consistent with inverse Compton-scattering models for GeV emission. In FSRQs, the variability amplitude decreases towards optical/IR wavelengths, consistent with the presence of a thermal emission component from the accretion disk varying on significantly longer timescales than the jet synchrotron emission. In BL Lac objects, variability is mainly constant across wavelengths, cons...

  7. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Chequers, Matthew H; Widrow, Lawrence M; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a "slow" bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of $\\mathcal{R} \\equiv R_c/a_b \\sim 2$. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon dominated inner and dark matter dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter do...

  8. Empirical determination of Einstein A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines

    CERN Document Server

    Giannini, T; Nisini, B; Lorenzetti, D; Alcala', J M; Bacciotti, F; Bonito, R; Podio, L; Stelzer, B

    2014-01-01

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe^+ lines have been computed by several authors, with results that differ from each other up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties which in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines, which would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-VLT X-shooter instrument between 3,000 A, and 24,700 A, we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratio > 100. Among these latter, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose de-reddened intensity ratio is a direct function of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH1 thr...

  9. Early Performance and Results from the Globe at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yukiko; Cheung, Sze Leung; Pun, Jason Chun Shing; SO, Chu-wing; Walker, Constance Elaine; Agata, Hidehiko

    2015-08-01

    The Global at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (GaN-MN) is an international project for long-term monitoring of night sky conditions around the world. The GaN-MN consists of fixed monitoring stations each equipped with a Sky Quality Meter - Lensed Ethernet (SQM-LE), which is a specialized light sensor for night sky brightness (NSB) measurement. NSB data are continuously collected at high sampling frequency throughout the night, and these data will be instantly made available to the general public to provide a real-time snapshot of the global light pollution condition. The huge NSB database accumulated also provides the basis for studies of the temporal and geographical variations of light pollution and its correlation with various natural and artificial factors. In order to ensure the quality of data collected between the monitoring sites, detailed guidelines of setting and location selection are defined, and a user workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan to introduce and discuss the installation procedures and data analysis for participants. In this presentation, the user workshop and early performance of the GaN-MN will be reported. The GaN-MN project is endorsed by the IAU Executive Committee Working Group as a major Cosmic Light program in the International Year of Light.

  10. Brightness-equalized quantum dots: Engineering strategies derived from spectral trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Lim, Sung Jun

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that absorb and emit light at wavelengths tunable by the size of the crystal. Size-tuning provides access to a broad range of optical spectra, however it is fundamentally problematic for many applications because it leads to a large mismatch in absorption cross-section and fluorescence brightness across a series of colors. We have recently demonstrated engineering strategies to generate multicolor, extinction-matched, and brightness-matched quantum dots based on colloidal multi-domain core/shell structures. We use alloyed cores with composition-tunable bandgaps and finely adjust the domain size and electronic properties of the shell to precisely match both absorption cross-section and quantum yield. Using this strategy, it is possible to tune fluorescence wavelength, extinction, and quantum yield independently, vastly expanding the photophysical landscape of these materials. Moreover compared with conventional size-tuning strategies, this enables access to a wider spectral range with compact dimensions. The equalized optical properties translate from the ensemble level down to the single-molecule level, setting the stage for new possibilities in highly quantitative, multiplexed imaging in cells and tissue. However selection of appropriate structural parameters to generate specific optical properties is challenging without insight into the photophysics of these materials. Here we describe the evolution of the optical properties of alloyed cores during the shell growth process that provide new insights into general engineering strategies.

  11. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    CERN Document Server

    McClelland, J J; Knuffman, B; Twedt, K A; Schwarzkopf, A; Wilson, T M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 uK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Never...

  12. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  13. Two-dimensional bright and dark-in-bright dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate solitons on a one-dimensional optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2016-08-01

    We study the statics and dynamics of anisotropic, stable, bright and dark-in-bright dipolar quasi-two-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons on a one-dimensional (1D) optical-lattice (OL) potential. These solitons mobile in a plane perpendicular to a 1D OL trap can have both repulsive and attractive contact interactions. Dark-in-bright solitons are the excited states of bright solitons. The solitons, when subjected to a small perturbation, exhibit sustained breathing oscillation. Dark-in-bright solitons can be created by phase imprinting a bright soliton. At medium velocities the collision between two solitons is found to be quasi-elastic. Results are demonstrated by a numerical simulation of the three-dimensional mean-field Gross–Pitaevskii equation in three spatial dimensions employing realistic interaction parameters for a dipolar 164Dy BEC.

  14. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  15. Efficacy of a single sequence of intermittent bright light pulses for delaying circadian phase in humans. : Phase delaying efficacy of intermittent bright light

    OpenAIRE

    Gronfier, Claude; Wright, Kenneth,; Kronauer, Richard,; Jewett, Megan,; Czeisler, Charles,

    2004-01-01

    International audience It has been shown in animal studies that exposure to brief pulses of bright light can phase shift the circadian pacemaker and that the resetting action of light is most efficient during the first minutes of light exposure. In humans, multiple consecutive days of exposure to brief bright light pulses have been shown to phase shift the circadian pacemaker. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a single sequence of brief bright light pulses administered ...

  16. Collision induced splitting of bright soliton in Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yue-Yue; Zhang Jie-Fang

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the collision dynamics of bright soliton in Bose-Einstein condensate with trapezoid potential. It is found that besides the total reflection and total transmission, one bright soliton can be divided into two bright solitons with different amplitudes in a controllable manner.

  17. Large-Scale Structure in the NIR-Selected MUNICS Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Botzler, C S; Bender, R; Drory, N; Feulner, G; Hill, G J; Hopp, U; Maraston, C; De Oliveira, C M

    2003-01-01

    The Munich Near-IR Cluster Survey (MUNICS) is a wide-area, medium-deep, photometric survey selected in the K' band. The project's main scientific aims are the identification of galaxy clusters up to redshifts of unity and the selection of a large sample of field early-type galaxies up to z < 1.5 for evolutionary studies. We created a Large Scale Structure catalog, using a new structure finding technique specialized for photometric datasets, that we developed on the basis of a friends-of-friends algorithm. We tested the plausibility of the resulting galaxy group and cluster catalog with the help of Color-Magnitude Diagrams (CMD), as well as a likelihood- and Voronoi-approach.

  18. A new astronomical method for determining the brightness of the night sky and its application to study long-term changes in the level of light pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ściężor, T.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, I present a new method that has been developed for determining the brightness of a cloudless night sky, on the basis of widely available amateur observations of comets. The tests show the correctness of the method, which makes it possible to determine the level of light pollution, defined as the brightness of the artificial sky glow, through the use of the archival observations of comets. The use of data bases of comet observations in Poland in the period 1994-2009 has led to a positive verification of the known model map of the brightness of the night sky. Also, it has been possible to find changes in the level of light pollution in this period, at the selected observation sites.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of bright (KFrith+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, J.; Pinfield, D. J.; Jones, H. R. A.; Barnes, J. R.; Pavlenko, Y.; Martin, E. L.; Brown, C.; Kuznetsov, M. K.; Marocco, F.; Tata, R.; Cappetta, M.

    2014-10-01

    Using the Position and Proper Motion Extended-L (PPMXL) catalogue, we have used optical and near-infrared colour cuts together with a reduced proper motion cut to find bright M dwarfs for future exoplanet transit studies. PPMXL's low proper motion uncertainties allow us to probe down to smaller proper motions than previous similar studies. We have combined unique objects found with this method to that of previous work to produce 8479 K<9 M dwarfs. Low-resolution spectroscopy was obtained of a sample of the objects found using this selection method to gain statistics on their spectral type and physical properties. Results show a spectral-type range of K7-M4V. This catalogue is the most complete collection of K<9 M dwarfs currently available and is made available here. (1 data file).

  20. Do aposematism and Batesian mimicry require bright colours? A test, using European viper markings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüster, Wolfgang; Allum, Christopher S E; Bjargardóttir, I Birta; Bailey, Kimberley L; Dawson, Karen J; Guenioui, Jamel; Lewis, John; McGurk, Joe; Moore, Alix G; Niskanen, Martti; Pollard, Christopher P

    2004-12-01

    Predator avoidance of noxious prey, aposematism and defensive mimicry are normally associated with bright, contrasting patterns and colours. However, noxious prey may be unable to evolve conspicuous coloration because of other selective constraints, such as the need to be inconspicuous to their own prey or to specialist predators. Many venomous snakes, particularly most vipers, display patterns that are apparently cryptic, but nevertheless highly characteristic, and appear to be mimicked by other, non-venomous snakes. However, predator avoidance of viper patterns has never been demonstrated experimentally. Here, the analysis of 813 avian attacks on 12,636 Plasticine snake models in the field shows that models bearing the characteristic zigzag band of the adder (Vipera berus) are attacked significantly less frequently than plain models. This suggests that predator avoidance of inconspicuously but characteristically patterned noxious prey is possible. Our findings emphasize the importance of mimicry in the ecological and morphological diversification of advanced snakes. PMID:15590601

  1. Limitations of the Oriented Difference of Gaussian Filter in Special Cases of Brightness Perception Illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Ashish; Roy, Sourya; Mallick, Arijit; Ghosh, Kuntal

    2016-03-01

    The Oriented Difference of Gaussian (ODOG) filter of Blakeslee and McCourt has been successfully employed to explain several brightness perception illusions which include illusions of both brightness-contrast type, for example, Simultaneous Brightness Contrast and Grating Induction and the brightness-assimilation type, for example, the White effect and the shifted White effect. Here, we demonstrate some limitations of the ODOG filter in predicting perceived brightness by comparing the ODOG responses to various stimuli (generated by varying two parameters, namely, test patch length and spatial frequency) with experimental observations of the same. PMID:26562859

  2. Limitations of the Oriented Difference of Gaussian Filter in Special Cases of Brightness Perception Illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Ashish; Roy, Sourya; Mallick, Arijit; Ghosh, Kuntal

    2016-03-01

    The Oriented Difference of Gaussian (ODOG) filter of Blakeslee and McCourt has been successfully employed to explain several brightness perception illusions which include illusions of both brightness-contrast type, for example, Simultaneous Brightness Contrast and Grating Induction and the brightness-assimilation type, for example, the White effect and the shifted White effect. Here, we demonstrate some limitations of the ODOG filter in predicting perceived brightness by comparing the ODOG responses to various stimuli (generated by varying two parameters, namely, test patch length and spatial frequency) with experimental observations of the same.

  3. Human responses to bright light of different durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Santhi, Nayantara; St Hilaire, Melissa; Gronfier, Claude; Bradstreet, Dayna S; Duffy, Jeanne F; Lockley, Steven W; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A

    2012-07-01

    Light exposure in the early night induces phase delays of the circadian rhythm in melatonin in humans. Previous studies have investigated the effect of timing, intensity, wavelength, history and pattern of light stimuli on the human circadian timing system. We present results from a study of the duration–response relationship to phase-delaying bright light. Thirty-nine young healthy participants (16 female; 22.18±3.62 years) completed a 9-day inpatient study. Following three baseline days, participants underwent an initial circadian phase assessment procedure in dim light (bright light pulse (∼10,000 lux) of 0.2 h, 1.0 h, 2.5 h or 4.0 h duration during a 4.5 h controlled-posture episode centred in a 16 h wake episode. After another 8 h sleep episode, participants completed a second circadian phase assessment. Phase shifts were calculated from the difference in the clock time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) between the initial and final phase assessments. Exposure to varying durations of bright light reset the circadian pacemaker in a dose-dependent, non-linear manner. Per minute of exposure, the 0.2 h duration was over 5 times more effective at phase delaying the circadian pacemaker (1.07±0.36 h) as compared with the 4.0 h duration (2.65±0.24 h). Acute melatonin suppression and subjective sleepiness also had a dose-dependent response to light exposure duration. These results provide strong evidence for a non-linear resetting response of the human circadian pacemaker to light duration.

  4. Bright source lasers and experiments at very high irradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Bright Source has been assembled to explore the effects of intense coherent ultraviolet radiation on matter. This ultra-high brightness excimer laser is used to study the response of atoms, ions, and plasmas to the unique conditions the laser can provide. Primary areas of interest include properties and behavior of highly energetic atomic species, studies of possible intense field-induced nuclear transitions, pumping for x-ray lasers, and incoherent x-ray sources. The project consists of two phases: Los Alamos Bright Source I (LABS I) that is now in operation and is producing experimental data at an intensity up to 7 x 1017 watts/cm2 with 25 mJ of radiation and LABS II that will deliver between .1 and 1 J at an intensity of 1018 to 1020 w/cm2. At these high intensities we observe collisionless excitations to the KeV level. The exact nature of the excitation process is not known and is itself part of the investigation. Because of the coherent nature of the pump and the very large fields obtainable, new regimes of optical excitation can be expected and examined. Work is underway with LABS I to produce highly ionized species and measure their spectral and other properties. This equipment has proven to be highly reliable in the last year and should afford the opportunity for many basic studies. LABS II with its increased pulse energy and intensity will support studies involving larger pump volume and higher excitation levels. It should serve as a test bed for studies of pumping schemes for x-ray lasers. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Beyond pragmatism: defending the 'bright line' of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Achas K

    2014-01-01

    It is usually accepted by ethicists that birth does not alter moral status. Rather, it is thought that the rule according full legal rights at birth is pragmatic. Pragmatic reasoning is vulnerable to competing practical concerns and stronger moral principles. This 'bright line' has therefore been criticised both by those who believe personhood begins before birth and those who believe it begins afterward. In particular, a recent article by Giubilini and Minerva puts forward both pragmatic and moral arguments in favour of permitting infanticide, and the New South Wales Court of Criminal Appeal has suggested there is a strong case for abandoning the bright line (R v Iby (2005) 63 NSWLR 278). If we desire to defend current legal doctrine against such criticism, a medical and philosophical basis for the law should be articulated. This article suggests such a medical and philosophical basis. It argues that both the multiplicity of biological changes occurring in the neonate at birth and the extrauterine context (the world) provide a justification for the distinction drawn at law between abortion and infanticide. With reference to Robert Nozick's 'experience machine' thought-experiment and elements of phenomenological philosophy, it advances two propositions to explain the status-changing nature of the neonate's emergence out of the womb. First, that expressing sentience in the world is essential for the attainment of personhood. Second, that having become a person, the harm in killing is disruption of this engagement with the world and the reduction from personhood to non-existence. This is the distinction between a neonate's death and the termination of a foetus, underscoring the qualitative difference between the two sides of the bright line drawn in law. PMID:24866181

  6. Confidence intervals for concentration and brightness from fluorescence fluctuation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryse, Kenneth M; Rong, Xi; Whisler, Jordan A; McConnaughey, William B; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Melnykov, Artem V; Elson, Elliot L; Genin, Guy M

    2012-09-01

    The theory of photon count histogram (PCH) analysis describes the distribution of fluorescence fluctuation amplitudes due to populations of fluorophores diffusing through a focused laser beam and provides a rigorous framework through which the brightnesses and concentrations of the fluorophores can be determined. In practice, however, the brightnesses and concentrations of only a few components can be identified. Brightnesses and concentrations are determined by a nonlinear least-squares fit of a theoretical model to the experimental PCH derived from a record of fluorescence intensity fluctuations. The χ(2) hypersurface in the neighborhood of the optimum parameter set can have varying degrees of curvature, due to the intrinsic curvature of the model, the specific parameter values of the system under study, and the relative noise in the data. Because of this varying curvature, parameters estimated from the least-squares analysis have varying degrees of uncertainty associated with them. There are several methods for assigning confidence intervals to the parameters, but these methods have different efficacies for PCH data. Here, we evaluate several approaches to confidence interval estimation for PCH data, including asymptotic standard error, likelihood joint-confidence region, likelihood confidence intervals, skew-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (BCa), and Monte Carlo residual resampling methods. We study these with a model two-dimensional membrane system for simplicity, but the principles are applicable as well to fluorophores diffusing in three-dimensional solution. Using simulated fluorescence fluctuation data, we find the BCa method to be particularly well-suited for estimating confidence intervals in PCH analysis, and several other methods to be less so. Using the BCa method and additional simulated fluctuation data, we find that confidence intervals can be reduced dramatically for a specific non-Gaussian beam profile. PMID:23009839

  7. Ultra-high resolution and high-brightness AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Ghosh, Amal; Prache, Olivier; Draper, Russ; Fellowes, Dave

    2012-06-01

    As part of its continuing effort to improve both the resolution and optical performance of AMOLED microdisplays, eMagin has recently developed an SXGA (1280×3×1024) microdisplay under a US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD contract that combines the world's smallest OLED pixel pitch with an ultra-high brightness green OLED emitter. This development is aimed at next-generation HMD systems with "see-through" and daylight imaging requirements. The OLED pixel array is built on a 0.18-micron CMOS backplane and contains over 4 million individually addressable pixels with a pixel pitch of 2.7 × 8.1 microns, resulting in an active area of 0.52 inches diagonal. Using both spatial and temporal enhancement, the display can provide over 10-bits of gray-level control for high dynamic range applications. The new pixel design also enables the future implementation of a full-color QSXGA (2560 × RGB × 2048) microdisplay in an active area of only 1.05 inch diagonal. A low-power serialized low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) interface is integrated into the display for use as a remote video link for tethered systems. The new SXGA backplane has been combined with the high-brightness green OLED device developed by eMagin under an NVESD contract. This OLED device has produced an output brightness of more than 8000fL with all pixels on; lifetime measurements are currently underway and will presented at the meeting. This paper will describe the operational features and first optical and electrical test results of the new SXGA demonstrator microdisplay.

  8. Magneto-optical control of bright atomic solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Potting, S.; Zobay, O.; Meystre, P.; Wright, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    In previous work we showed that bright atomic solitons can arise in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in the form of gap solitons even for repulsive many-body interactions. Here we further explore the properties of atomic gap solitons and show that their internal structure can be used to both excite them and control their center-of-mass motion using applied laser and magnetic fields. As an illustration we demonstrate a nonlinear atom-optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on gap solitons.

  9. On the azimuthal brightness variations of Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, F. A.; Colombo, G.

    1978-01-01

    A simple semiquantitative explanation is presented which accounts both for the presence of the azimuthal brightness variations in Saturn's ring A and for their absence in ring B. This explanation avoids any ad hoc reliance on albedo variations and/or synchronous rotation of ring particles. Instead, it requires only some degree of self-gravitation between nearby orbiting bodies. A bias in the particle distribution and corresponding photometric effects are thereby produced the latter corresponding very closely to the variations observed in ring A. Their absence in ring B is primarily a consequence of the higher optical thickness and decreasing importance of self-gravitation in that ring.

  10. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...... evidence for variation at known and candidate periods is seen for Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, and GX 17+2. We set upper limits for variation at other frequencies in those three sources, GX 5-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  11. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Golam Ali Sekh

    2013-08-01

    Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and (ii) a linear and a nonlinear optical lattice. Effective potentials are found for the solitons in both bichromatic lattices and a comparative study is done on the dynamics of solitons with respect to the effective potentials. The effects of dispersion on solitons in bichromatic lattices are studied and it is found that the dispersive spreading can be minimized by appropriate combinations of lattice and interaction parameters. Stability of nondispersive matter-wave solitons is checked from phase portrait analysis.

  12. Continuous variable quantum communication with bright entangled optical beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chang-de; ZHANG Jing; PAN Qing; JIA Xiao-jun; PENG Kun-chi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we briefly introduce the basic concepts and protocols of continuous variable quantum communication,and then summarize the experimental researches accomplished by our group in this field.The main features of quantum communication systems used in our experiments are:(1) The bright entangled optical beams with the anticorrelated amplitude quadratures and the correlated phase quadratures that serve as the entanglement resources and (2) The Bell-state direct detection systems are utilized in the measurements of quantum entanglement and transmitted signals instead of the usually balanced homodyne detectors.

  13. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    OpenAIRE

    Offringa, A. R.; et al, .; Leeuwen, van; Wise, M.

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionization (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted H i signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness...

  14. Enhanced brightness from all solution processable biopolymer LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, C.; Namboothiry, M. A. G.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Biopolymer light emitting diodes were fabricated by using all solution processable polymers incorporating biomaterials such as deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex as an electron blocking layer. Light emission is from a blend of fluorene based copolymers. The devices with electron blocking layer exhibited higher brightness and luminous efficiency. The increased luminance of the multilayer polymer LED is attributed to the contribution from DNA:CTMA as electron blocking layer and PFN, a derivative of polyfluorene, as electron injection layer. Our results show four fold increase in luminance values when DNA is used as electron blocking layer.

  15. Formation of Solar Calcium H and K Bright Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Mats; Stein, Robert F.

    1997-05-01

    We have simulated the generation of Ca II H2V bright grains by acoustic shocks. We employ a one-dimensional, non-LTE radiation-hydrodynamic code, with six-level model atoms for hydrogen and singly ionized calcium. We drive acoustic waves through a stratified radiative equilibrium atmosphere by a piston, whose velocity is chosen to match the Doppler shift observed in the Fe I 396.68 nm line in the H line wing, formed at about 260 km above τ500 = 1. The simulations closely match the observed behavior of Ca II H2V bright grains down to the level of individual grains. The bright grains are produced by shocks near 1 Mm above τ500 = 1. Shocks in the mid-chromosphere produce a large source function (and therefore high emissivity) because the density is high enough for collisions to couple the Ca II populations to the local conditions. The asymmetry of the line profile is due to velocity gradients near 1 Mm. Material motion Doppler-shifts the frequency at which atoms emit and absorb photons, so the maximum opacity is located at--and the absorption profile is symmetric about--the local fluid velocity, which is shifted to the blue behind shocks. The optical depth depends upon the velocity structure higher up. Shocks propagate generally into downflowing material, so there is little matter above to absorb the Doppler-shifted radiation. The corresponding red peak is absent because of small opacity at the source function maximum and large optical depth due to overlying material. The bright grains are produced primarily by waves from the photosphere that are slightly above the acoustic cutoff frequency. The precise time and strength of a grain depend upon the interference between these waves near the acoustic cutoff frequency and higher frequency waves. When waves near the acoustic cutoff frequency are weak, then higher frequency waves may produce grains. The ``5 minute'' trapped p-mode oscillations are not the source of the grains, although they can slightly modify the

  16. Generation of bright soliton through the interaction of black solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Losano, L; Bazeia, D

    2001-01-01

    We report on the possibility of having two black solitons interacting inside a silica fiber that presents normal group-velocity dispersion, to generate a pair of solitons, a vector soliton of the black-bright type. The model obeys a pair of coupled nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equations, that follows in accordance with a Ginzburg-Landau equation describing the anisotropic XY model. We solve the coupled equations using a trial-orbit method, which plays a significant role when the Schr\\"odinger equations are reduced to first order differential equations.

  17. Generation of high brightness ion beam from insulated anode PED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation and focusing of a high density ion beam with high brightness from a organic center part of anode of a PED was reported previously. Mass, charge and energy distribution of this beam were analyzed. Three kind of anode were tried. Many highly ionized medium mass ions (up to C4+, O6+) accelarated to several times of voltage difference between anode and cathode were observed. In the case of all insulator anode the current carried by the medium mass ions is about half of that carried by protons. (author)

  18. A Complete Sample of Long Bright Swift GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Salvaterra, R; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Melandi, A; Tagliaferri, G; Nava, L; Vergani, S

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the Swift sample we define a complete sub-sample of 58 bright long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), 55 of them (95%) with a redshift determination, in order to characterize their properties. Our sample (BAT6) allows us to study the properties of the long GRB population and their evolution with cosmic time. We focus in particular on the GRB luminosity function, on the spectral-energy correlations of their prompt emission, on the nature of dark bursts, on possible correlations between the prompt and the X-ray afterglow properties, and on the dust extinction.

  19. A Complete Sample of Long Bright Swift GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; S. Covino(INAF - Oss. Astronomico di Brera); D'Avanzo, P.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandi, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Nava, L.; Vergani, S.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the Swift sample we define a complete sub-sample of 58 bright long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), 55 of them (95%) with a redshift determination, in order to characterize their properties. Our sample (BAT6) allows us to study the properties of the long GRB population and their evolution with cosmic time. We focus in particular on the GRB luminosity function, on the spectral-energy correlations of their prompt emission, on the nature of dark bursts, on possible correlations between the ...

  20. Three low surface brightness dwarfs discovered around NGC 4631

    OpenAIRE

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Bautzmann, Dirk; Neyer, Fabian; Polzl, Robert; Riepe, Peter; Zilch, Thorsten; Mattern, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of three low surface brightness companions to the spiral galaxy NGC 4631, made with small amateur telescopes. Assuming their distances to be 7.4 Mpc, the same as that of NGC 4631, the absolute magnitudes and linear diameters of the dwarfs are ranged within [-12.5, -9.6] mag and [4.7 - 1.3] kpc, respectively. These new three dwarfs, together with the discovered by us diffuse structure called "bridge", look like parts of a tidal filament directed towards NGC 4656 at tota...

  1. Preparation of Reactive Bright Blue Rare Earth Dyestuffs and Their Spectra Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaozhen; Sang Wenbin

    2004-01-01

    Reactive bright blue rare earth dyestuffs were prepared by using reactive bright blue and lanthanum oxide,praseodymium oxide, neodymium oxide, samarium oxide, europium oxide, gadolinium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, lutetium oxide, yttrium oxide respectively for dyeing silk cloth.The degree of dyeing of reactive bright blue praseodymium and the degree of fixation of reactive bright blue gadolinium are the biggest, and 22.9% and 7 %are increased with that of reactive bright blue respectively.The spectra of reactive bright blue rare earth and reactive bright blue were studied by UV-VIS.In 200.00 ~ 800.00 nm, reactive bright blue has four absorption peaks, reactive bright blue rare earth has three absorption peaks; in 420.00 ~ 760.00 nm, reactive bright blue has two absorption peaks at 661.50 nm and 625.50 nm, respectively, and λmax is 661.50 nm; reactive bright blue rare earth has one absorption peak at 620.50, 618.00, 622.00, 623.00, 622.50, 619.50, 619.00, 621.00, 624.00, 620.00 nm adding La3+ ,Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Dy3+, Er3+, Lu3+, Y3+respectively.

  2. The properties of a large volume-limited sample of face-on low surface brightness disk galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Hu Zhong; Yan-Chun Liang; Feng-Shan Liu; Francois Hammer; Karen Disseau; Li-Cai Deng

    2012-01-01

    We select a large volume-limited sample of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs,2021) to investigate in detail their statistical properties and their differences from high surface brightness galaxies (HSBGs,3639).The distributions of stellar masses of LSBGs and HSBGs are nearly the same and they have the same median values.Thus this volume-limited sample has good completeness and is further removed from the effect of stellar masses on their other properties when we compare LSBGs to HSBGs.We found that LSBGs tend to have lower stellar metallicities and lower effective dust attenuations,indicating that they have lower dust than HSBGs.The LSBGs have relatively higher stellar mass-to-light ratios,higher gas fractions,lower star forming rates (SFRs),and lower specific SFRs than HSBGs.Moreover,with the decreasing surface brightness,gas fraction increases,but the SFRs and specific SFRs decrease rapidly for the sample galaxies.This could mean that the star formation histories between LSBGs and HSBGs are different,and HSBGs may have stronger star forming activities than LSBGs.

  3. The bright knots at the tops of soft X-ray flare loops: Quantitative results from Yohkoh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, G. A.; Strong, K. T.; Tsuneta, S.

    1995-01-01

    Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) observations from the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft have shown that confined bright regions are common features at the tops of flare loops throughout most of the duration of the flares. In this paper we present quantitative results for these flare knots, in relation to other flare regions, for four relatively 'simple' flares. Emission measure distributions, electron temperatures, and electron densities are derived from SXT and Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) observations. The four flares selected are dominated by what appear to be single-loop structures, with bright knots at the loop tops. The flares are neither long-duration nor impulsive events. The spatial distributions of brightness and emission measure in the flares are found to be quite similar for all four events, even though there are significant differences in dynamical behavior between at least two of the events. Temperatures and densities calculated for these flares are consistent with previous results from many solar experiments. An investigation of intensity correlations between adjacent pixels at the tops of the loops suggests the existence of local disturbances in the magnetic loops that occur on spatial scales less than the radii of the loops.

  4. Properties of Galaxies in the Disc Central Surface Brightness Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Sorce, Jenny G; Libeskind, Noam I

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the S4G survey, complete down to M_B=-16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10% probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbors), the mass and mu_0 are correlated at 2.5 (2) sigma more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is sma...

  5. Properties of galaxies in the disc central surface brightness gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Creasey, Peter; Libeskind, Noam I.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies survey, complete down to MB = -16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10 per cent probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbours), the mass and μ0 are correlated at 2.5 (2)σ more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is smaller than where HSBs and LSBs live, a result at more than 50 per cent significance. ISBs may exist as an unstable transition state between LSBs and HSBs, the low flow activity environment maximally encouraging their formation. Interaction events altering the central baryon fraction could happen at a lower rate in these less dense environment, whilst in the higher density environments the LSBs are primarily satellite galaxies, whose accretion is sufficiently constrained that it fails to promote them to HSBs.

  6. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  7. Statistical Properties of Bright Galaxies in the SDSS Photometric System

    CERN Document Server

    Shimasaku, K; Doi, M; Hamabe, M; Ichikawa, T; Okamura, S; Sekiguchi, M; Yasuda, N

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the photometric properties of 456 bright galaxies using imaging data recorded during the commissioning phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Morphological classification is carried out by correlating results of several human classifiers. Our purpose is to examine the statistical properties of color indices, scale lengths, and concentration indices as functions of morphology for the SDSS photometric system. We find that $u'-g'$, $g'-r'$, and $r'-i'$ colors of SDSS galaxies match well with those expected from the synthetic calculation of spectroscopic energy distribution of template galaxies and with those transformed from $UBVR_CI_C$ color data of nearby galaxies. The agreement is somewhat poor, however, for $i'-z'$ color band with a discrepancy of $0.1-0.2$ mag. With the aid of the relation between surface brightness and radius obtained by Kent (1985), we estimate the averages of the effective radius of early type galaxies and the scale length of exponential disks both to be 2.6 kpc for...

  8. Bright light treatment of depression for older adults [ISRCTN55452501

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knickerbocker Nancy C

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of insomnia and depression in the elder population is significant. It is hoped that use of light treatment for this group could provide safe, economic, and effective rapid recovery. Methods In this home-based trial we treated depressed elderly subjects with bright white (8,500 Lux and dim red ( Results Eighty-one volunteers, between 60 and 79 years old, completed the study. Both treatment and placebo groups experienced mood improvement. Average GDS scores improved 5 points, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS 17 scores (extracted from the self-rated SIGH-SAD-SR improved 6 points. There were no significant treatment effects or time-by-treatment interactions. No significant adverse reactions were observed in either treatment group. The assays of urine and saliva showed no significant differences between the treatment and placebo groups. The healthy control group was active earlier and slept earlier but received less light than the depressed group at baseline. Conclusion Antidepressant response to bright light treatment in this age group was not statistically superior to placebo. Both treatment and placebo groups experienced a clinically significant overall improvement of 16%.

  9. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Ciardi, B.; Iliev, I. T.; Harker, G. J. A.; Mellema, G.; Bernardi, G.; Zarka, P.; Ghosh, A.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bîrzan, L.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Hassall, T. E.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; McKean, J. P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Rafferty, D.; Reich, W.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, S. ter; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-10-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionization (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted H I signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of the power law implies that the current LOFAR EoR observations should be severely RFI limited if the strength of RFI sources remains strong after time integration. This is in contrast with actual observations, which almost reach the thermal noise and are thought not to be limited by RFI. Therefore, we conclude that it is unlikely that there are undetected RFI sources that will become visible in long observations. Consequently, there is no indication that RFI will prevent an EoR detection with LOFAR.

  10. Surface Brightness Profiles of Dwarf Galaxies: I. Profiles and Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Kimberly A; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    Radial surface brightness profiles of spiral galaxies are classified into three types: (I) single exponential, or the light falls off with one exponential to a break before falling off (II) more steeply, or (III) less steeply. Profile breaks are also found in dwarf disks, but some dwarf Type IIs are flat or increasing out to a break before falling off. Here we re-examine the stellar disk profiles of 141 dwarfs: 96 dwarf irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 19 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). We fit single, double, or even triple exponential profiles in up to 11 passbands: GALEX FUV and NUV, ground-based UBV JHK and H{\\alpha}, and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m. We find that more luminous galaxies have brighter centers, larger inner and outer scale lengths, and break at larger radii; dwarf trends with M_B extend to spirals. However, the V-band break surface brightness is independent of break type, M_B, and Hubble type. Dwarf Type II and III profiles fall off similarly beyond the breaks but have diff...

  11. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  12. Jet opening angles and gamma-ray brightness of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Pushkarev, A B; Lister, M L; Savolainen, T

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the differences in apparent opening angles between the parsec-scale jets of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first three months of operations and those of non-LAT-detected AGN. We used 15.4 GHz VLBA observations of sources from the 2 cm VLBA MOJAVE program, a subset of which comprise the statistically complete flux density limited MOJAVE sample. We determined the apparent opening angles by analyzing transverse jet profiles from the data in the image plane and by applying a model fitting technique to the data in the (u,v) plane. Both methods provided comparable opening angle estimates. The apparent opening angles of gamma-ray bright blazars are preferentially larger than those of gamma-ray weak sources. At the same time, we have found the two groups to have similar intrinsic opening angle distributions. This suggests that the jets in gamma-ray bright AGN are oriented at preferentially smaller angles to the line of sight resulting ...

  13. Bright low mass eclipsing binary candidates observed by STEREO

    CERN Document Server

    Wraight, K T; White, Glenn J; Norton, A J; Bewsher, D

    2012-01-01

    Observations from the Heliospheric Imagers (HI-1) on both the STEREO spacecraft have been analysed to search for bright low mass eclipsing binaries (EBs) and potential brown dwarf transits and to determine the radii of the companions. A total of 9 EB candidates have been found, ranging in brightness from V=6.59 mag to V=11.3 mag, where the radius of the companion appears to be less than 0.4 Rsol, with a diverse range of host temperatures, from 4074 K to 6925 K. Both components of one candidate, BD-07 3648, appear to be less than 0.4 Rsol and this represents a particularly interesting system for further study. The shapes of the eclipses in some cases are not clear enough to be certain they are total and the corresponding radii found should therefore be considered as lower limits. The EBs reported in this paper have either been newly found by the present analysis, or previously reported to be eclipsing by our earlier STEREO/HI-1 results. One of the new objects has subsequently been confirmed using archival Supe...

  14. Ultra Low Surface Brightness Imaging with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Roberto G

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, a robotic imaging system optimized for the detection of extended ultra low surface brightness structures. The array consists of eight Canon 400mm f/2.8 telephoto lenses coupled to eight science-grade commercial CCD cameras. The lenses are mounted on a common framework and are co-aligned to image simultaneously the same position on the sky. The system provides an imaging capability equivalent to a 0.4m aperture f/1.0 refractor with a 2.6 deg X 1.9 deg field of view. The system has no obstructions in the light path, optimized baffling, and internal optical surfaces coated with a new generation of anti-reflection coatings based on sub-wavelength nanostructures. As a result, the array's point spread function has a factor of ~10 less scattered light at large radii than well-baffled reflecting telescopes. The Dragonfly Telephoto Array is capable of imaging extended structures to surface brightness levels below 30 mag/arcsec^2 in 10h integrations (without binning or foregro...

  15. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.

  16. Highly Bright White Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KO; C.; W.

    2001-01-01

    A highly bright white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was realized by using a highly bright blue emitting layer, 1,7-diphenyl-4-biphenyl-3,5-dimethyl-l,7-dihydrodipyrazolo[3,4-b;4',3'-e]pyridine (PAP-Ph), together with a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped Alq [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum (Ⅲ)] layer to provide the blue, red and green emission for color mixing. With appropriate thickness control, the white-light OLED has a performance that reaches 24700 cd/m2 at 15 V, 1.93 lm/W at 6.5 V, and >300 cd/m2 at 7.7 mA/em2. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the emitted light vary in a very small range, from (0.35, 0.34) to (0.34, 0.35), when forward voltages change from 6 to 12 V.  ……

  17. Bright PanSTARRS Nuclear Transients – what are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smartt S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an initial analysis of 49 bright transients occurring in the nuclei of galaxies with no previous known Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN. They have been discovered as part of the PanSTARRs 3π survey, and followed up with the Liverpool Telescope. Based on colours, light curve shape, and a small number with optical spectra, these transients seem to fall into three groups. Red/fast transients are nuclear supernovae of various types. Some bright nuclear transients are blue and decay on a timescale of a few months; these may be candidates for tidal disruption events. However most of the events we have found are blue and are either still rising or decaying slowly, on a timescale of years; the few spectra we have show AGN at z ∼ 1. We argue that these transients are background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies by a factor 10–100. Monitoring such events gives us very promising prospects for measuring the structure of AGN and so testing current theories.

  18. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M. [CDS, Observatoire Astronomique, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch. [LSIIT, Universite de Strasbourg, 7, Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Van Driel, W. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Sabatini, S. [INAF/IASF-Roma, via Fosso de Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); MacArthur, L. A., E-mail: Bernd.Vollmer@astro.unistra.fr [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings-typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg{sup 2} in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered {approx}20% more mock LSB galaxies and {approx}40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of

  19. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Pacaud, F; Giles, P A; Adami, C; Sadibekova, T; Pierre, M; Maughan, B J; Lieu, M; Fèvre, J -P Le; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Ardila, F; Baldry, I; Benoist, C; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Démoclès, J; Eckert, D; Evrard, A E; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Guennou, L; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Brun, V Le; Lidman, C; Liske, J; Maurogordato, S; Menanteau, F; Owers, M; Poggianti, B; Pomarède, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T J; Rapetti, D; Reiprich, T H; Smith, G P; Tuffs, R; Valageas, P; Valtchanov, I; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\\times 10^{-14}\\,\\mathrm{erg \\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On th...

  20. Micro Coronal Bright Points Observed in the Quiet Magnetic Network by SOHO/EIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    When one looks at SOHO/EIT Fe XII images of quiet regions, one can see the conventional coronal bright points (> 10 arcsec in diameter), but one will also notice many smaller faint enhancements in brightness (Figure 1). Do these micro coronal bright points belong to the same family as the conventional bright points? To investigate this question we compared SOHO/EIT Fe XII images with Kitt Peak magnetograms to determine whether the micro bright points are in the magnetic network and mark magnetic bipoles within the network. To identify the coronal bright points, we applied a picture frame filter to the Fe XII images; this brings out the Fe XII network and bright points (Figure 2) and allows us to study the bright points down to the resolution limit of the SOHO/EIT instrument. This picture frame filter is a square smoothing function (hlargelyalf a network cell wide) with a central square (quarter of a network cell wide) removed so that a bright point's intensity does not effect its own background. This smoothing function is applied to the full disk image. Then we divide the original image by the smoothed image to obtain our filtered image. A bright point is defined as any contiguous set of pixels (including diagonally) which have enhancements of 30% or more above the background; a micro bright point is any bright point 16 pixels or smaller in size. We then analyzed the bright points that were fully within quiet regions (0.6 x 0.6 solar radius) centered on disk center on six different days.