WorldWideScience

Sample records for bright galaxy counts

  1. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  2. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies. Th

  3. Galaxy selection and the surface brightness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, S S; Schombert, J M

    1995-01-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney (1976) suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman (1970) was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (\\ie approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity ...

  4. Dark matter in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; Persic, M; Salucci, P

    1997-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that LSB galaxie

  5. Dark Matter in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that L

  6. Evolution of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X.; Hammer, F.; Yang, Y. B.; Liang, Y. C.

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology, and stellar population of bulgeless low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and M r LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics, including mergers rather than by their large-scale environment.

  7. The radio properties of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M.; Bertotti, G. (Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica e la Cosmologia (Italy) Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics (Italy))

    1990-03-01

    The radio properties of a sample of 69 bright spectroscopically selected Seyfert galaxies, which suffers from little bias toward Markarian galaxies with strong UV excess. At variance with most of the earlier results, generally based on galaxy samples which are strongly biased toward the inclusion of Markarian objects, there is no clear evidence of a significant difference in the major radio properties (radio power, radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, radio spectral index and radio size) of type 1 and type 2 Seyferts. The resulting observational scenario appears now to be more consistent than before with the idea that Seyfert 2 galaxies are simply Seyfert 1 obscured objects. 70 refs.

  8. Counting pairs of faint galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, D; Richer, H B; Woods, David; Fahlman, Gregory G; Richer, Harvey B

    1995-01-01

    The number of close pairs of galaxies observed to faint magnitude limits, when compared to nearby samples, determines the interaction or merger rate as a function of redshift. The prevalence of mergers at intermediate redshifts is fundamental to understanding how galaxies evolve and the relative population of galaxy types. Mergers have been used to explain the excess of galaxies in faint blue counts above the numbers expected from no-evolution models. Using deep CFHT (I\\leq24) imaging of a ``blank'' field we find a pair fraction which is consistent with the galaxies in our sample being randomly distributed with no significant excess of ``physical'' close pairs. This is contrary to the pair fraction of 34\\%\\pm9\\% found by Burkey {\\it et al.} for similar magnitude limits and using an identical approach to the pair analysis. Various reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Colors and morphologies of our close pairs are consistent with the bulk of them being random superpositions although, as indicators of int...

  9. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  10. Galaxy evolution at low redshift?; 1, optical counts

    CERN Document Server

    Dennefeld, M

    1996-01-01

    We present bright galaxy number counts in the blue (16bright galaxies implying a ``high'' normalization of the local luminosity function. Our counts and colour distributions exhibit no large departure from what standard no-evolution models predict, removing the need for evolution of the galaxy population in the optical, out to Bj=21. This result disagrees with that of Maddox et al. (1990) on the APM catalog. We show that the APM and similar catalogs may be affected by a systematic magnitude scale error which would explain this discrepancy.

  11. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  12. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  13. Surface photometry of bulge dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM

    1999-01-01

    We present results of broad band BVRI observations of a sample of galaxies with a low surface brightness (LSB) disk and a bulge. These galaxies are well described as exponential disks and exponential bulges with no preferred value for either scale length or central surface brightness. The median B b

  14. THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION FOR LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, M.A.; VAN DER HULST, JM; DE BLOK, WJG; MCGAUGH, SS

    1995-01-01

    We present the B-band Tully-Fisher relation for low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. These LSB galaxies follow the same Tully-Fisher relation as normal spiral galaxies. This implies that the mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of LSB galaxies is typically a factor of 2 larger than that of normal galaxies of

  15. Interpreting Central Surface Brightness and Color Profiles in Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David R.; Wise, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope imagery has revealed dust features in the central regions of many (50%--80%) nearby bright elliptical galaxies. If these features are an indication of an underlying smooth diffuse dust distribution, then the interpretation of central surface brightness and color profiles in elliptical galaxies becomes significantly more difficult. In this Letter, diagnostics for constraining the presence of such an underlying central dust distribution are presented. We show that easily detectable central color gradients and flattened central surface brightness profiles can be induced by even small amounts of smoothly distributed dust (~100 M⊙). Conversely, combinations of flat surface brightness profiles and flat color gradients or steep surface brightness profiles and steep color gradients are unlikely to be caused by dust. Taken as a whole, these results provide a simple observational tautology for constraining the existence of smooth diffuse dust distributions in the central regions of elliptical galaxies.

  16. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies detected around nearby spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Riepe, P.; Zilch, T.; Blauensteiner, M.; Elvov, M.; Hochleitner, P.; Hubl, B.; Kerschhuber, G.; Küppers, S.; Neyer, F.; Pölzl, R.; Remmel, P.; Schneider, O.; Sparenberg, R.; Trulson, U.; Willems, G.; Ziegler, H.

    2015-10-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26ṃ1/□″. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC891 and NGC2683.

  17. New Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies Detected Around Nearby Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D; Zilch, T; Blauensteiner, M; Elvov, M; Hochleitner, P; Hubl, B; Kerschhuber, G; Küppers, S; Neyer, F; Pölzl, R; Remmel, P; Schneider, O; Sparenberg, R; Trulson, U; Willems, G; Ziegler, H

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC,672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC,2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M_B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26.1 mag/sq arcsec. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC,891 and NGC,2683.

  18. Do Baryons Alter the Halos of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    de Naray, Rachel Kuzio

    2011-01-01

    High-quality observations of dark matter-dominated low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies indicate that, in contrast to the triaxial, centrally-concentrated cuspy halos formed in collisionless simulations of halo assembly, these galaxies reside in round, roughly constant density cored halos. In order to reconcile these data with galaxy formation in the context of LCDM, processes that alter the shape and density structure of the inner halo are required. We compile observational properties of LSB galaxies to evaluate the plausibility that a previously higher baryonic mass content and feedback from star formation can modify the dark matter halos of these galaxies. We also compare the properties of bulgeless disk galaxies formed in recent simulations to the LSB galaxy sample. We find that observational constraints on LSB galaxy star formation histories, structure, and kinematics make it difficult for baryonic physics to sphericalize and decrease the central density of the dark matter halos of LSB galaxies.

  19. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Das

    2013-03-01

    Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but low in star formation and hence low in surface brightness. They often have bright bulges that are similar to those found in early type galaxies. The bulges can host low luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that have relatively low mass black holes. GLSB galaxies are usually isolated systems and are rarely found to be interacting with other galaxies. In fact many GLSB galaxies are found under dense regions close to the edges of voids. These galaxies have very massive dark matter halos that also contribute to their stability and lack of evolution. In this paper we briefly review the properties of this unique class of galaxies and conclude that both their isolation and their massive dark matter halos have led to the low star formation rates and the slower rate of evolution in these galaxies.

  20. The Morphology of Low Surface Brightness Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, S.; Schombert, J.; Bothun, G.

    1994-01-01

    Images of a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies are presented. These galaxies are generally late types; however, they are not dwarfs, being intrinsically large and luminous. The morphology of LSB galaxies is discussed in terms of the physical interpretation of the Hubble sequence, the stages of which are found to be nonlinear in the sense that smaller physical differences separate mid to early type spirals than late types.

  1. Variations in the Bivariate Brightness Distribution with different galaxy types

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, N; Lemon, D; Liske, J; Cross, Nicholas; Driver, Simon; Lemon, David; Liske, Jochen

    2002-01-01

    We present Bivariate Brightness Distributions (BBDs) for four spectral types discriminated by the 2dFGRS. We discuss the photometry and completeness of the 2dFGRS using a deep, wide-field CCD imaging survey. We find that there is a strong luminosity-surface brightness correlation amongst galaxies with medium to strong emission features, with gradient $\\beta_{\\mu}=0.25\\pm0.05$ and width $\\sigma_{\\mu}=0.56\\pm0.01$. Strong absorption line galaxies, show a bimodal distribution, with no correlation between luminosity and surface brightness.

  2. Do low surface brightness galaxies have dense disks?

    CERN Document Server

    Saburova, A S

    2010-01-01

    The disk masses of four low surface brightness galaxies (LSB) were estimated using marginal gravitational stability criterion and the stellar velocity dispersion data which were taken from Pizzella et al., 2008 [1]. The constructed mass models appear to be close to the models of maximal disk. The results show that the disks of LSB galaxies may be significantly more massive than it is usually accepted from their brightnesses. In this case their surface densities and masses appear to be rather typical for normal spirals. Otherwise, unlike the disks of many spiral galaxies, the LSB disks are dynamically overheated.

  3. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of simil

  4. Normal Globular Cluster Systems in Massive Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas, Daniela; Jordán, Andrés; Goudfrooij, Paul; Zwaan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the globular cluster systems of 6 massive spiral galaxies, originally cataloged as low surface brightness galaxies but here shown to span a wide range of central surface brightness values, including two intermediate to low surface brightness galaxies. We used the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board HST to obtain photometry in the F475W and F775W bands and select sources with photometric and morphological properties consistent with those of globular clusters. A total of 206 candidates were identified in our target galaxies. From a direct comparison with the Galactic globular cluster system we derive specific frequency values for each galaxy that are in the expected range for late-type galaxies. We show that the globular cluster candidates in all galaxies have properties consistent with globular cluster systems of previously studied galaxies in terms of luminosity, sizes and color. We establish the presence of globular clusters in the two intermediate to low surface brightn...

  5. Galaxy Number Counts in the Subaru Deep Field Multi-band Analysis in a Hierarchical Galaxy Formation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nagashima, M; Totani, T; Gouda, N

    2002-01-01

    Number counts of galaxies are re-analyzed using a semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation based on the hierarchical clustering scenario. Faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) are compared with our model galaxies. We have determined the astrophysical parameters in the SAM that reproduce observations of nearby galaxies, and used them to predict the number counts and redshifts of faint galaxies for three cosmological models, the standard cold dark matter (CDM) universe, a flat lambda-CDM, and an open CDM. The novelty of our SAM analysis is the inclusion of selection effects arising from the cosmological dimming of surface brightness of high-z galaxies, and from the absorption of visible light by internal dust and intergalactic HI clouds. As was found in our previous work, in which the UV/optical HDF galaxies were compared with our model galaxies, we find that our SAM reproduces counts of near-IR SDF galaxies in low-density models, and that the standard CDM universe i...

  6. The Circum-Galactic Environment of Bright IRAS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krongold, Y

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies systematically, for the first time, the circumgalactic environment of bright IRAS galaxies as defined by Soifer et al. (1989). While the role of gravitational interaction for luminous and ultraluminous IRAS galaxies has been well established by various studies, the situation is by far more obscure in the IR luminosity range of the bright IRAS sample, 10^{10}Lsol 30^{o}. A control sample, selected from the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey catalogue, includes 90 objects matching the Bright IRAS sample for distribution of isophotal diameter, redshift, and morphological type. From a search of nearby companion galaxies within 250 Kpc on the second-generation Digitized Sky Survey (DSS-II), we found that the circumgalactic environment of the Bright IRAS galaxies contains more large companions than the galaxies in the optically selected control sample, and is similar to that of Seyfert 2 galaxies. We found a weak correlation over a wide range of far IR luminosity (10^9 Lsol < Lfir < 1...

  7. The Millennium Galaxy Catalogue 16 < B_MGC < 24 galaxy counts and the calibration of the local galaxy luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Liske, J; Driver, S P; Cross, N J G; Couch, W J

    2003-01-01

    The Millennium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC) is a 37.5 deg^2, medium-deep, B-band imaging survey along the celestial equator, taken with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. The survey region is contained within the regions of both the Two Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS-EDR). The survey has a uniform isophotal detection limit of 26 mag arcsec^-2 and it provides a robust, well-defined catalogue of stars and galaxies in the range 16 < B_MGC < 24 mag. Here we describe the survey strategy, the photometric and astrometric calibration, source detection and analysis, and present the galaxy number counts which connect the bright and faint galaxy populations within a single survey. We argue that these counts represent the state of the art and use them to constrain the normalisations (phi*) of a number of recent estimates of the local galaxy luminosity function. We find that the 2dFGRS, SDSS-EDR, SSRS2, Durham/UKST, ESO Slice Project...

  8. Extinction in the Galaxy from surface brightnesses of ESO-LV galaxies : Testing "standard" extinction maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choloniewski, J.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the extinction in the Galaxy is proposed. The method uses surface brightnesses of external galaxies in the B and R-bands. The observational data have been taken from the ESO-LV galaxy catalog. As a first application of our model we derive the ratio of R-band to

  9. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. To this end, we use a Halo Model framework complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD), and we work in full-sky. We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions, as the Gaussian part of the covariance can in fact become subdominant in certain configurations. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias, and demonstrating interesting mathematical properties. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeable better constraints, in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales....

  10. Expected Number Counts of Radio Galaxy Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies may contain radio sources if they still experience successive mergers at present. This has been confirmed by radio observations that about 30% of nearby clusters possess radio halos. We present a theoretical prediction of radio cluster counts using a semi-analytic approach which incorporates the empirical correlation between radio power and dynamical mass of clusters, and the cluster mass function described by the Press-Schechter formalism. The total population of radio clusters over the whole sky and their redshift distribution are given.

  11. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  12. Hubble space telescope counts of elliptical galaxies constraints on cosmological models?

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P; Phillipps, S; Bristow, P D; Driver, Simon P; Windhorst, Rogier A; Phillipps, Steven; Bristow, Paul D

    1995-01-01

    The interpretation of galaxy number counts in terms of cosmological models is fraught with difficulty due to uncertainties in the overall galaxy population (mix of morphological types, luminosity functions etc.) and in the observations (loss of low surface brightness images, image blending etc.). Many of these can be overcome if we use deep high resolution imaging of a single class of high surface brightness galaxies, whose evolution is thought to be fairly well understood. This is now possible by selecting elliptical and S0 galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope images from the Medium Deep Survey and other ultradeep WFPC2 images. In the present paper, we examine whether such data can be used to discriminate between open and closed universes, or between conventional cosmological models and those dominated by a cosmological constant. We find, based on the currently available data, that unless elliptical galaxies undergo very strong merging since z \\sim 1 (and/or very large errors exist in the morphological clas...

  13. GMRT H I study of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A.; Kantharia, N. G.; Das, M.; Omar, A.; Srivastava, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present H I observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. We include H I results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. H I is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, H I is detected along a broken disc encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) the peak H I surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 1021 cm-2. The H I mass is between 0.3 and 4 × 1010 M⊙; dynamical mass ranges from a few times 1011 M⊙ to a few times 1012 M⊙. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s-1. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears to be located in rings around the galaxy centre. We suggest that this could be due to a stochastic burst of star formation at one location in the galaxy being propagated along a ring over a rotation period. (4) The H I is correlated with recent star formation in five of the seven GLSB galaxies.

  14. GMRT HI study of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alka; Kantharia, N. G.; Das, M.; Omar, A.; Srivastava, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present HI observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We include HI results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. HI is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, HI is detected along a broken disk encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) The peak HI surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 1021 cm-2. The HI mass is between 0.3 - 4 × 1010 M⊙, dynamical mass ranges from a few times 1011 M⊙ to a few times 1012 M⊙. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s-1. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears to be located in rings around the galaxy centre. We suggest that this could be due to a stochastic burst of star formation at one location in the galaxy being propagated along a ring over a rotation period. (4) The HI is correlated with recent star formation in five of the seven GLSB galaxies.

  15. A new sample of bright galaxy pairs in UZC

    CERN Document Server

    Focardi, P; Marinoni, S; Zitelli, V

    2006-01-01

    We present a new sample of bright galaxy pairs extracted applying an objective selection code to UZC catalog.The sample is volume limited to M$_{zw}$ = -18.9 +5 log ${\\it h}$ and contains 89 galaxy pairs.We analyze the kinematical, morphological and photometrical properties of galaxies belonging to this sample. We show that velocity separation, $| \\Delta v_{r} |$, between pair members is significantly lower in spiral type (S+S) pairs than in early-type (E+E) and mixed (E+S) pairs.This indicates that truly isolated galaxy pairs are more likely to be found among S+S pairs. We show that ellipticals are rare and underluminous in B and that late spirals (T $\\ge$ 4) are overluminous. We confirm that the formation of bright ellipticals is a phenomenon linked to group/cluster environment, while galaxy-galaxy interaction may enhance blue luminosity of disk galaxies through SF phenomena. This last statement is supported by the presence of strong FIR emission from early spirals in this sample and by the high frequency o...

  16. Star Formation Rates in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    The low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies found in recent surveys (e.g.,\\ Schombert et al. 1992, AJ, 103, 1107) tend to be blue and gas rich. These properties along with their low mean surface luminosity and H i densities imply an inefficient mode of star formation. The Hα images that we presen

  17. STAR-FORMATION THRESHOLDS IN LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHULST, JM; SKILLMAN, ED; SMITH, TR; BOTHUN, GD; MCGAUGH, SS; DEBLOK, WJG

    1993-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies appear to have low star formation rates despite their often quite normal H I contents as judged from global H I properties such as M(H I)/L and M(H I)/M(T) ratios. H I imaging with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (the NRAO is ope

  18. The HI dominated Low Surface Brightness Galaxy KKR17

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Man I; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Du, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Nan

    2014-01-01

    We present new narrow-band (H$\\alpha$ and [OIII]) imagings and optical spectrophotometry of HII regions for a gas-rich low surface brightness irregular galaxy, KKR 17. The central surface brightness of the galaxy is $\\mu_0(B)$ = 24.15 $\\pm$0.03 mag~sec$^{-2}$. The galaxy was detected by \\emph{Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey} (ALFALFA), and its mass is dominated by neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. In contrast, both the stellar masses of the bright HII and diffuse stellar regions are small. In addition, the fit to the spectral energy distribution to each region shows the stellar populations of HII and diffuse regions are different. The bright HII region contains a large fraction of O-type stars, revealing the recent strong star formation, whereas the diffuse region is dominated by median age stars, which has a typical age of $\\sim$ 600 Myrs. Using the McGaugh's abundance model, we found that the average metallicity of KKR 17 is 12 + (O/H) = 8.0 $\\pm$ 0.1. The star formation rate of KKR 17 is 0.21$\\pm$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$...

  19. X-ray bright groups and their galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Helsdon, S F; Helsdon, Stephen F.; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2002-01-01

    Combining X-ray data from the ROSAT PSPC and optical data drawn from the literature, we examine in detail the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties of X-ray bright galaxy groups. We find a relationship between optical luminosity and X-ray temperature consistent with that expected from self-similar scaling of galaxy systems, L_B \\propto T^{1.6 +/- 0.2}. The self-similar form and continuity of the L_B : T relation from clusters to groups and the limited scatter seen in this relation, implies that the star formation efficiency is rather similar in all these systems. We find that the bright extended X-ray components associated with many central galaxies in groups appear to be more closely related to the group than the galaxy itself, and we suggest that these are group cooling flows rather than galaxy halos. In addition we find that the optical light in these groups appears to be more centrally concentrated than the light in clusters. We also use the optical and X-ray data to investigate whether ea...

  20. On the origin of low surface-brightness galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Antonuccio-Delogu, V

    1994-01-01

    We reconsider the problem of the origin of Low-Surface-Brightness (LSB) galaxies within the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmological model (\\Omega =1, h=0.5). Taking into account the effect of substructure on the collapse times of low overdensity peaks, we show that the abundance of these peaks is larger than previously expected because of the dragging caused by dynamical friction induced by the presence of small-scale substructure. The number density of these shallow, low-density peaks turns out to be in good agreement with the observed overdensity of the blue LSB galaxies found during recent surveys.

  1. GMRT HI study of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Alka; Das, M; Omar, A; Srivastava, D C

    2016-01-01

    We present HI observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We include HI results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. HI is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, HI is detected along a broken disk encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) The peak HI surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 10^21 cm^{-2} . The HI mass is between 0.3 - 4 x 10^10 M_Sun/yr, dynamical mass ranges from a few times 10^11 M_Sun/yr to a few times 10^12 M_Sun/yr. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s^{-1}. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears ...

  2. The Environment of Sy1, Sy2 & Bright IRAS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koulouridis, E; Plionis, M; Dultzin, D; Krongold, Y; Goudis, C; Chatzichristou, E

    2008-01-01

    We present a 3-dimensional study of the local (< 100 kpc) environment of Sy1, Sy2 and Bright IRAS Galaxies. For this purpose we use three galaxy samples (Sy1, Sy2, BIRG) located at high galactic latitudes as well as three control sample of non-active galaxies having the same morphological, redshift and diameter size distributions as the corresponding Seyfert or BIRG sample. Using the CfA2 and SSRS galaxy catalogues as well as our own spectroscopic observations, we find that the fraction of BIRGs with a close neighbor is significantly higher than that of their control sample. We also find that Sy2 galaxies demonstrate the same behaviour with BIRG galaxies but not with Sy1s which do not show any excess of companions with respect to their control sample galaxies. An additional analysis of the relation between FIR colors and activity type of the BIRG's shows a significant difference between the colors of strongly-interacting and non-interacting starbursts and a resemblance between the colors of non-interacting...

  3. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  4. Properties of galaxies in the disc central surface brightness gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Creasey, Peter; Libeskind, Noam I.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies survey, complete down to MB = -16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10 per cent probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbours), the mass and μ0 are correlated at 2.5 (2)σ more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is smaller than where HSBs and LSBs live, a result at more than 50 per cent significance. ISBs may exist as an unstable transition state between LSBs and HSBs, the low flow activity environment maximally encouraging their formation. Interaction events altering the central baryon fraction could happen at a lower rate in these less dense environment, whilst in the higher density environments the LSBs are primarily satellite galaxies, whose accretion is sufficiently constrained that it fails to promote them to HSBs.

  5. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Spera, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct N-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a 106 M⊙ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds ˜108 M⊙. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region (≲5 pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a `wave' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  6. Low surface brightness galaxies in the local universe .1. The catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Impey, CD; Sprayberry, D; Irwin, MJ; Bothun, GD

    1996-01-01

    Data are presented for 693 galaxies identified in a large new survey for low surface brightness galaxies in the nearby universe (z less than or similar to 0.1). The survey covers 786 square degrees centered on the equator, and it extends significantly the surface brightness range of galaxy surveys i

  7. The dark and visible matter content of low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: We present mass models of a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies and compare the properties of their constituent mass components with those of a sample of high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies.We find that LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated. Their halo parameters are onl

  8. The dark and visible matter content of low surface brightness disc galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1997-01-01

    We present mass models of a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies and compare the properties of their constituent mass components with those of a sample of high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies. We find that LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, Their halo parameters are only slightl

  9. The influence of galaxy surface brightness on the mass-metallicity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R Brent; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of surface brightness on the mass-metallicity relation using nearby galaxies whose gas content and metallicity profiles are available. Previous studies using fiber spectra indicated that lower surface brightness galaxies have systematically lower metallicity for their stellar mass, but the results were uncertain because of aperture effect. With stellar masses and surface brightnesses measured at WISE W1 and W2 bands, we re-investigate the surface brightness dependence with spatially-resolved metallicity profiles and find the similar result. We further demonstrate that the systematical difference cannot be explained by the gas content of galaxies. For two galaxies with similar stellar and gas masses, the one with lower surface brightness tends to have lower metallicity. Using chemical evolution models, we investigate the inflow and outflow properties of galaxies of different masses and surface brightnesses. We find that, on average, high mass galaxies have lower inflow and outflow rates rel...

  10. Low and High Surface Brightness Galaxies at Void Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, L; Lambas, D G; Galaz, G; Padilla, N D

    2012-01-01

    We study the relative fraction of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs and HSBGs) at void walls in the SDSS DR7. We focus on galaxies in equal local density environments. We assume that the host dark-matter halo mass (for which we use SDSS group masses) is a good indicator of local density. This analysis allows to examine the behavior of the abundance of LSBG and HSBG galaxies at a fixed local density and distinguish the large-scale environment defined by the void geometry. We compare galaxies in the field, and in the void walls; the latter are defined as the volume of void shells of radius equal to that of the void. We find a significant decrement, a factor $\\sim 4$, of the relative fraction of blue, active star-forming LSBGs in equal mass groups at the void walls and the field. This decrement is consistent with an increase of the fraction of blue, active star-forming HSBGs. By contrast, red LSBGs and HSBGs show negligible changes. We argue that these results are consistent with a scenario where L...

  11. The outer disks of early-type galaxies. I. Surface-brightness profiles of barred galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erwin, Peter; Pohlen, Michael; Beckman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of 66 barred, early-type (S0-Sb) disk galaxies, focused on the disk surface brightness profile outside the bar region, with the aim of throwing light on the nature of Freeman type I and II profiles, their origins, and their possible relation to disk truncations. This paper discuss

  12. Properties of Galaxies in the Disc Central Surface Brightness Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Sorce, Jenny G; Libeskind, Noam I

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the S4G survey, complete down to M_B=-16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10% probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbors), the mass and mu_0 are correlated at 2.5 (2) sigma more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is sma...

  13. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  14. Are radio galaxies and quiescent galaxies different? Results from the analysis of HST brightness profiles

    CERN Document Server

    De Ruiter, H R; Capetti, A; Fanti, R; Morganti, R; Santantonio, L

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the optical brightness profiles of early type galaxies, using a number of samples of radio galaxies and optically selected elliptical galaxies. For the radio galaxy samples--B2 of Fanaroff-Riley type I and 3C of Fanaroff-Riley type II-- we determined a number of parameters that describe a "Nuker-law" profile, which were compared with those already known for the optically selected objects. We find that radio active galaxies are always of the "core" type (i.e. an inner Nuker law slope gamma 0.5). This difference is not due to any effect with absolute magnitude, since in a region of overlap in magnitude the dichotomy between radio active and radio quiescent galaxies remains. We speculate that core-type objects represent the galaxies that have been, are, or may become, radio active at some stage in their lives; active and non-active core-type galaxies are therefore identical in all respects except their eventual radio-activity: on HST scales we do not find any relationship between boxiness ...

  15. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel; Spera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a $10^6$ M$_\\odot$ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds $\\sim 10^8$ M$_\\odot$. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region ($\\lesssim 5$ pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a ``wave'' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  16. Extinction in the Galaxy from Surface Brightnesses of ESO-LV Galaxies : Determination of A_R/A_B ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choloniewski, J.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the extinction in the Galaxy is proposed. The method uses surface brightnesses of external galaxies in the B and R-bands. The observational data have been taken from the ESO-LV galaxy catalog. As a first application of our model we derive the ratio of R-band to

  17. Testing the dark matter hypothesis with low surface brightness galaxies and other evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGaugh, SS; de Blok, WJG

    1998-01-01

    The severity of the mass discrepancy in spiral galaxies is strongly correlated with the central surface brightness of their disks. Progressively lower surface brightness galaxies have ever larger mass discrepancies. No other parameter (luminosity, size, velocity, morphology) is so well correlated wi

  18. Optical Surface Brightness Fluctuations of shell galaxies towards 100 Mpc

    CERN Document Server

    Biscardi, I; Cantiello, M; Brocato, E

    2008-01-01

    We measure F814W Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBF) for a sample of distant shell galaxies with radial velocities ranging from 4000 to 8000 km/s. The distance at galaxies is then evaluated by using the SBF method. For this purpose, theoretical SBF magnitudes for the ACS@HST filters are computed for single burst stellar populations covering a wide range of ages (t=1.5-14 Gyr) and metallicities (Z=0.008-0.04). Using these stellar population models we provide the first $\\bar{M}_{F814W}$ versus $(F475W-F814W)_0$ calibration and we extend the previous I-band versus $(B-I)_0$ color relation to colors $(B-I)_{0}\\leq 2.0$ mag. Coupling our SBF measurements with the theoretical calibration we derive distances with a statistical uncertainty of $\\sim 8%$, and systematic error of $\\sim 6 %$. The procedure developed to analyze data ensures that the indetermination due to possible unmasked residual shells is well below $\\sim 12 %$. The results suggest that \\emph{optical} SBFs can be measured at $d \\geq 100 Mpc$ with ACS...

  19. Galaxy Counts at 24 Microns in the SWIRE Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shupe, David L; Lonsdale, Carol J; Masci, Frank; Evans, Tracey; Fang, Fan; Oliver, Sebastian; Vaccari, Mattia; Rodighiero, Giulia; Padgett, Deborah; Surace, Jason A; Xu, C Kevin; Berta, Stefano; Pozzi, Francesca; Franceschini, Alberto; Babbedge, Thomas; Gonzales-Solares, Eduardo; Siana, Brian D; Farrah, Duncan; Frayer, David T; Smith, H E; Polletta, Maria; Owen, Frazer; Perez-Fournon, Ismael

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents galaxy source counts at 24 microns in the six Spitzer Wide-field InfraRed Extragalactic (SWIRE) fields. The source counts are compared to counts in other fields, and to model predictions that have been updated since the launch of Spitzer. This analysis confirms a very steep rise in the Euclidean-normalized differential number counts between 2 mJy and 0.3 mJy. Variations in the counts between fields show the effects of sample variance in the flux range 0.5-10 mJy, up to 100% larger than Poisson errors. Nonetheless, a "shoulder" in the normalized counts persists at around 3 mJy. The peak of the normalized counts at 0.3 mJy is higher and narrower than most models predict. In the ELAIS N1 field, the 24 micron data are combined with Spitzer-IRAC data and five-band optical imaging, and these bandmerged data are fit with photometric redshift templates. Above 1 mJy the counts are dominated by galaxies at z less than 0.3. By 300 microJy, about 25% are between z ~ 0.3-0.8, and a significant fraction...

  20. Environment, morphology and stellar populations of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, X; Yang, Y B; Hammer, F; Puech, M; Rodrigues, M; Liang, Y C; Deng, L C

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology and stellar population of bulgeless low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and $M_r$ $\\leq$ $-18.8$. The local density parameter $\\Sigma_5$ is used to trace their environments. We find that, for bulgeless galaxies, the surface brightness does not depend on the environment. The stellar populations are compared for bulgeless LSB galaxies in different environments and for bulgeless LSB galaxies with different morphologies. The stellar populations of LSB galaxies in low density regions are similar to those of LSB galaxies in high density regions. Irregular LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics including mergers rather than by their large scale environment.

  1. Environment, morphology, and stellar populations of bulgeless low surface-brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X.; Disseau, K.; Yang, Y. B.; Hammer, F.; Puech, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Liang, Y. C.; Deng, L. C.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology, and stellar population of bulgeless low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and Mr≤-18.8. The local density parameter Σ5 is used to trace their environments. We find that, for bulgeless galaxies, the surface brightness does not depend on the environment. The stellar populations are compared for bulgeless LSB galaxies in different environments and for bulgeless LSB galaxies with different morphologies. The stellar populations of LSB galaxies in low-density regions are similar to those of LSB galaxies in high-density regions. Irregular LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics, including mergers rather than by their large-scale environment.

  2. Where are the nearby gas-rich low surface brightness galaxies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The Fisher-Tully (F-T) ''10 Mpc Catalog of Late-Type Galaxies'' is remarkably complete. Despite the considerable effort that has been spent searching for and cataloging low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, almost no new HI-rich galaxies have been added to the volume to which the F-T observations w

  3. Faint Submillimter Galaxy Counts at 450 micron

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Barger, Amy J; Casey, Caitlin M; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B; Wang, Wei-Hao; Williams, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of SCUBA2 observations at 450 micron and 850 micron of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area > 100 arcmin2 and 1 sigma sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy/beam at 450 and 850 micron respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 micron and 26 sources at 850 micron with a signal-to-noise ratio > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 micron number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that ~47-61% of the 450 micron extragalactic background light (EBL) resolved into individual sources with 450 micron fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 micron sources in the 4 sigma sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcseconds, while brighter sources (signal-to-noise > 6 sigma) are good to 1.4 arcseconds. Using the deep radio map (1 sigma ~ 6 uJy) we find tha...

  4. Galaxy number counts and implications for strong lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassnacht, C. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Wong, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    We compare galaxy number counts in Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) fields containing moderate-redshift (0.2

  5. The discovery of seven extremely low surface brightness galaxies in the field of the nearby spiral galaxy M101

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are a key probe of dark matter and of galaxy formation on small scales and of the dark matter halo masses of their central galaxies. They have very low surface brightness, which makes it difficult to identify and study them outside of the Local Group. We used a low surface brightness-optimized telescope, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to search for dwarf galaxies in the field of the massive spiral galaxy M101. We identify seven large, low surface brightness objects in this field, with effective radii of \\(10 - 30\\) arcseconds and central surface brightnesses of \\(\\mu_{g} \\sim 25.5 - 27.5\\) mag arcsec\\(^{-2}\\). Given their large apparent sizes and low surface brightnesses, these objects would likely be missed by standard galaxy searches in deep fields. Assuming the galaxies are dwarf satellites of M101, their absolute magnitudes are in the range \\(-11.6 \\lesssim M_{V} \\lesssim -9.3\\) and their effective radii are \\(350\\) pc \\(-\\) \\(1.3\\) kpc. Their radial surface brightness profiles ar...

  6. MOIRCS Deep Survey V: A Universal Relation for Stellar Mass and Surface Brightness of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Yamada, Toru; Akiyama, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Onodera, Masato; Konishi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We present a universal linear correlation between the stellar mass and surface brightness (SB) of galaxies at 0.30) and the massive galaxies (M_*>10^(10)M_sun) shows stronger brightening, (1+z)^(-1.5+-0.1). Based on the comparison with galaxy evolution models, we find that the phenomena are well explained by the pure luminosity evolution of galaxies out to z~3.

  7. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  8. Unveiling the nature of bright z ~ 7 galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, R A A; McLure, R J; McLeod, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging of 25 extremely luminous (-23.2 600A). We find that irregular, multiple-component morphologies suggestive of clumpy or merging systems are common (f_multi > 0.4) in bright z ~ 7 galaxies, and ubiquitous at the very bright end (M_UV 1000 similarly bright galaxies at z ~ 7. Our new HST imaging suggests that the vast majority of these galaxies will be spatially resolved by Euclid, mitigating concerns over dwarf star contamination.

  9. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...

  10. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA resolves the bright-end of the sub-millimeter number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, James; Swinbank, Mark; Chapman, Scott; Geach, James; Ivison, Rob; Thomson, Alasdair; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Cowley, Will; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, Kristen; Dunlop, Jim; Edge, Alastair; Farrah, Duncan; Ibar, Edo; Karim, Alex; Knudsen, Kirsten; Meijerink, Rowin; Michalowski, Michal; Scott, Douglas; Spanns, Marco; van der Werf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution 870-um ALMA continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1-square degrees 850-um maps from the SCUBA--2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the brightest sources in the field (median SCUBA2 flux S_850=8.7+/-0.4 mJy). We detect 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) at >4-sigma significance in our 30 ALMA maps. In 61+/-17% of the ALMA maps the single-dish source comprises a blend of >=2 SMGs, where the secondary SMGs are Ultra--Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with L_IR>10^12 Lo. The brightest SMG contributes on average 80+/-4% of the single-dish flux density, and in the ALMA maps containing >=2 SMGs the secondary SMG contributes 25+/-3% of the integrated ALMA flux. We construct source counts and show that multiplicity boosts the apparent single-dish cumulative counts by 20% at S_870>7.5mJy, and by 60% at S_870>12mJy. We combine our sample with previous ALMA studies of fainter SMGs and show that the cou...

  11. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmardi, B.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Henkel, C.; Crawford, K.; Teuwen, K.; Gabany, R. J.; Hanson, M.; Chonis, T. S.; Neyer, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M 104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M 101), and NGC 7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims to use the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images, fields of the target spiral galaxies are explored for extended LSB objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of nine already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates have effective surface brightnesses in the range 25.3 ≲ μe ≲ 28.8 mag arcsec-2 and are fit with Sersic profiles with indices n ≲ 1. Assuming that they are in the vicinity of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their r-band absolute magnitudes, their effective radii, and their luminosities are in the ranges -15.6 ≲ Mr ≲ -7.8, 160 pc ≲ Re ≲ 4.1 kpc, and 0.1 × 106 ≲ (L/L⊙)r ≲ 127 × 106, respectively. To determine whether these LSB galaxies are indeed satellites of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their distances need to be determined via further observations. Conclusions: Using small telescopes, we are readily able to detect LSB galaxies with similar properties to the known dwarf galaxies of the Local Group.

  12. THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF OUR GALAXY AND OTHER SPIRALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERKRUIT, PC

    1990-01-01

    In this review I discuss some aspects of the luminosity distributions in our Galaxy and external spiral galaxies. The major conclusions are the following: (1) the radial scale length of the luminosity distribution in the disk of our Galaxy is 5.0 +/- 0.5 kpc, (2) on this basis the Hubble constant ne

  13. Surface Brightness Profiles for a sample of LMC, SMC and Fornax galaxy Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Noyola, Eva

    2007-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope archival images to measure central surface brightness profiles of globular clusters around satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. We report results for 21 clusters around the LMC, 5 around the SMC, and 4 around the Fornax dwarf galaxy. The profiles are obtained using a recently developed technique based on measuring integrated light, which is tested on an extensive simulated dataset. Our results show that for 70% of the sample, the central photometric points of our profiles are brighter than previous measurements using star counts with deviations as large as 2 mag/arcsec^2. About 40% of the objects have central profiles deviating from a flat central core, with central logarithmic slopes continuously distributed between -0.2 and -1.2. These results are compared with those found for a sample of Galactic clusters using the same method. We confirm the known correlation in which younger clusters tend to have smaller core radii, and we find that they also have brighter central surface br...

  14. The HI Content and Extent of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies - Could LSB Galaxies be Responsible for Damped Ly-alpha Absorption?

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, K

    2001-01-01

    Low surface brightness galaxies, those galaxies with a central surface brightness at least one magnitude fainter than the night sky, are often not included in discussions of extragalactic gas at z < 0.1. In this paper we review many of the properties of low surface brightness galaxies, including recent studies which indicate low surface brightness systems may contribute far more to the local HI luminosity function than previously thought. Additionally, we use the known (HI) gas properties of low surface brightness galaxies to consider their possible contribution to nearby damped Lyman-alpha absorbers.

  15. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Javanmardi, B; Kroupa, P; Henkel, C; Crawford, K; Teuwen, K; Gabany, R J; Hanson, M; Neyer, F

    2015-01-01

    Context: We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M101), and NGC7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims at using the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images centred on the target, its field is explored for extended low surface brightness objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of 9 already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates...

  16. AXIAL RATIO OF EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES AS A TEST FOR BRIGHT RADIO HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H. [Physics Department, University of Richmond 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Kogut, A., E-mail: jsingal@richmond.edu [Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo. (letters)

  17. Stellar systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44. I. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Escudero, C. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims: In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (μeffg' ≃ 27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods: We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also searched for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results: We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associations. In that case, their sizes would be rather larger than those displayed by the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We have detected a few unresolved sources in the sky zone occupied by these galaxies showing colors and brightnesses typical of blue globular clusters. Conclusions: From the comparison of the properties of the galaxies presented in this work with those of similar objects reported in the literature, we have found that LSB galaxies display sizes covering a quite extended continous range (reff 0.3-4.5 kpc), in contrast to "normal" early-type galaxies, which show reff 1.0 kpc with a low dispersion. This fact might point to different formation processes for both types of galaxies.

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): detection of low-surface-brightness galaxies from SDSS data

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, R P; Kelvin, L S; James, P A; Driver, S P; Prescott, M; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Davies, L J M; Holwerda, B W; Liske, J; Norberg, P; Moffett, A J; Wright, A H

    2016-01-01

    We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the GAMA equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS photo, combining gri images weighted to maximise the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their $g-i$ and $J-K$ colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The ...

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxies and QSOs FIR size and surface brightness (Lutz+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Contursi, A.; Forster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Tadaki, K.; Veilleux, S.

    2016-08-01

    We use 70, 100, and 160um images from scan maps obtained with PACS on board Herschel, collecting archival data from various projects. In order to cover a wide range of galaxy properties, we first obtain an IR-selected local sample ranging from normal galaxies up to (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies. For that purpose, we searched the Herschel archive for all cz>=2000km/s objects from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS, Sanders et al., 2003, Cat. J/AJ/126/1607). (1 data file).

  20. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Steven L; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljevic, Milos; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L N; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G; Ferguson, Henry C; Koekemoer, Anton M; Salmon, Brett W; Willner, S P

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately M*_UV ~ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 190 bright, M_UV < -21 galaxies at z=4 to 7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that M*_UV galaxies at z=4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/Msol)=9.8-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z=4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z=2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation. We match the abundances of these bright z=4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi Lambda-CDM simulation to estimate the halo masses. We find that the typical halo masses in ~M*_UV galaxie...

  1. On the Classification of UGC 1382 as a Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Lea M. Z.; Seibert, Mark; Hagen, Alex; Nyland, Kristina; Neill, James D.; Treyer, Marie; Young, Lisa M.; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Madore, Barry F.

    2016-08-01

    We provide evidence that UGC 1382, long believed to be a passive elliptical galaxy, is actually a giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxy that rivals the archetypical GLSB Malin 1 in size. Like other GLSB galaxies, it has two components: a high surface brightness disk galaxy surrounded by an extended low surface brightness (LSB) disk. For UGC 1382, the central component is a lenticular system with an effective radius of 6 kpc. Beyond this, the LSB disk has an effective radius of ˜38 kpc and an extrapolated central surface brightness of ˜26 mag arcsec-2. Both components have a combined stellar mass of ˜8 × 1010 M ⊙, and are embedded in a massive (1010 M ⊙) low-density (LSB and HI disks. We model the spectral energy distributions and find that the LSB disk is likely older than the lenticular component. UGC 1382 has UV-optical colors typical of galaxies transitioning through the green valley. Within the LSB disk are spiral arms forming stars at extremely low efficiencies. The gas depletion timescale of ˜1011 years suggests that UGC 1382 may be a very-long-term resident of the green valley. We find that the formation and evolution of the LSB disk in UGC 1382 is best explained by the accretion of gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies.

  2. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schombert, James [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); McGaugh, Stacy [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  3. Bright Planetary Nebulae and their Progenitors in Galaxies Without Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    We present chemical abundances for planetary nebulae in M32, NGC 185, and NGC 205 based upon spectroscopy obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope using the Multi-Object Spectrograph. From these and similar data compiled from the literature for other Local Group galaxies, we consider the origin and evolution of the stellar progenitors of bright planetary nebulae in galaxies where star formation ceased long ago. The ratio of neon to oxygen abundances in bright planetary nebulae is either identical to that measured in the interstellar medium of star-forming dwarf galaxies or at most changed by a few percent, indicating that neither abundance is significantly altered as a result of the evolution of their stellar progenitors. Several planetary nebulae appear to have dredged up oxygen, but these are the exception, not the rule. The progenitors of bright planetary nebulae typically enhance their original helium abundances by less than 50%. In contrast, nitrogen enhancements can reach factors of 100. However, ...

  4. The Effect of Nearby Voids on Galaxy Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucklein, Brian K; Hintz, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    The size, shape and degree of emptiness of void interiors sheds light on the details of galaxy formation. A particularly interesting question is whether void interiors are completely empty or contain a dwarf population. However the nearby voids that are most conducive for dwarf searches have large angular diameters, on the order of a steradian, making it difficult to redshift-map a statistically significant portion of their volume to the magnitude limit of dwarf galaxies. As part of addressing this problem, we investigate here the usefulness of number counts in establishing the best locations to search inside nearby (d < 300 Mpc) galaxy voids, utilizing Wolf plots of log(n < m) vs. m as the basic diagnostic. To illustrate expected signatures, we consider the signature of three void profiles, "cut out", "built up", and "universal profile" carved into Monte-Carlo Schechter function models. We then investigate the signatures of voids in the Millennium Run dark matter simulation and the Sloan Digital Sky Su...

  5. On the Classification of UGC1382 as a Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Lea M Z; Hagen, Alex; Nyland, Kristina; Neill, James D; Treyer, Marie; Young, Lisa M; Rich, Jeffrey A; Madore, Barry F

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence that UGC1382, long believed to be a passive elliptical galaxy, is actually a giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxy which rivals the archetypical GLSB Malin 1 in size. Like other GLSB galaxies, it has two components: a high surface brightness disk galaxy surrounded by an extended low surface brightness (LSB) disk. For UGC1382, the central component is a lenticular system with an effective radius of 6 kpc. Beyond this, the LSB disk has an effective radius of ~38 kpc and an extrapolated central surface brightness of ~26 mag/arcsec^2. Both components have a combined stellar mass of ~8x10^10 M_sun, and are embedded in a massive (10^10 M_sun) low-density (<3 M_sun/pc^2) HI disk with a radius of 110 kpc, making this one of the largest isolated disk galaxies known. The system resides in a massive dark matter halo of at least 2x10^12 M_sun. Although possibly part of a small group, its low density environment likely plays a role in the formation and retention of the giant LSB and HI disks. W...

  6. Near-infrared imaging of barred halo-dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, M.; Das, M.; Ninan, J. P.; Manoj, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a near-infrared (NIR) imaging study of barred low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies using the TIFR1 NIR Spectrometer and Imager. LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, late-type spirals that have low-luminosity stellar discs but large neutral hydrogen (H I) gas discs. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey images of a very large sample of LSB galaxies derived from the literature, we found that the barred fraction is only 8.3 per cent. We imaged 25 barred LSB galaxies in the J, H, KS wavebands and 29 in the KS band. Most of the bars are much brighter than their stellar discs, which appear to be very diffuse. Our image analysis gives deprojected mean bar sizes of Rb/R25 = 0.40 and ellipticities e ≈ 0.45, which are similar to bars in high surface brightness galaxies. Thus, although bars are rare in LSB galaxies, they appear to be just as strong as bars found in normal galaxies. There is no correlation of Rb/R25 or e with the relative H I or stellar masses of the galaxies. In the (J - KS) colour images most of the bars have no significant colour gradient which indicates that their stellar population is uniformly distributed and confirms that they have low dust content.

  7. A BRIGHT RING OF STAR BIRTH AROUND A GALAXY'S CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    n image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals clusters of infant stars that formed in a ring around the core of the barred-spiral galaxy NGC 4314. This stellar nursery, whose inhabitants were created within the past 5 million years, is the only place in the entire galaxy where new stars are being born. The Hubble image is being presented today (June 11) at the American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, Calif. This close-up view by Hubble also shows other interesting details in the galaxy's core: dust lanes, a smaller bar of stars, dust and gas embedded in the stellar ring, and an extra pair of spiral arms packed with young stars. These details make the center resemble a miniature version of a spiral galaxy. While it is not unusual to have dust lanes and rings of gas in the centers of galaxies, it is uncommon to have spiral arms full of young stars in the cores. NGC 4314 is one of the nearest (only 40 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices) examples of a galaxy with a ring of infant stars close to the core. This stellar ring - whose radius is 1,000 light-years - is a great laboratory to study star formation in galaxies. The left-hand image, taken in February 1996 by the 30-inch telescope Prime Focus Camera at the McDonald Observatory in Texas, shows the entire galaxy, including the bar of stars bisecting the core and the outer spiral arms, which begin near the ends of this bar. The box around the galaxy's core pinpoints the focus of the Hubble image. The right-hand image shows Hubble's close-up view of the galaxy's core, taken in December 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The bluish-purple clumps that form the ring are the clusters of infant stars. Two dark, wispy lanes of dust and a pair of blue spiral arms are just outside the star-forming ring. The lanes of dust are being shepherded into the ring by the longer, primary stellar bar seen in the ground-based (left-hand) image. The gas is trapped inside the ring

  8. The SWIFT AGN and Cluster Survey I: Number Counts of AGN and Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S; Nugent, Jenna M; Bregman, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift XRT serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding gamma-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4e-15 erg/s/cm^2) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here we present a catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources and examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. We use Wise mid-infrared (MIR) colors to classify the sources. For AGN we can roughly separate the point sources into MIR-red and MIR-blue AGN, finding roughly equal numbers of each type in the soft X-ray band (0.5-2 keV), but fewer MIR-blue sources in the hard X-ray band (2-8 keV). The cluster number counts, with 5% uncertainties from cosmic variance, are also consistent with p...

  9. Near-Infrared Imaging of Barred Halo Dominated Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Honey, M; Ninan, J P; Purvankara, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a near-infrared (NIR) imaging study of barred low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies using the TIFR near-infrared Spectrometer and Imager (TIRSPEC). LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, late type spirals that have low luminosity stellar disks but large neutral hydrogen (HI) gas disks. Using SDSS images of a very large sample of LSB galaxies derived from the literature, we found that the barred fraction is only 8.3%. We imaged twenty five barred LSB galaxies in the J, H, K$_S$ wavebands and twenty nine in the K$_S$ band. Most of the bars are much brighter than their stellar disks, which appear to be very diffuse. Our image analysis gives deprojected mean bar sizes of $R_{b}/R_{25}$ = 0.40 and ellipticities $e$ $\\approx$ 0.45, which are similar to bars in high surface brightness galaxies. Thus, although bars are rare in LSB galaxies, they appear to be just as strong as bars found in normal galaxies. There is no correlation of $R_{b}/R_{25}$ or $e$ with the relative HI or stellar masses of the galax...

  10. Testing the hypothesis of modified dynamics with low surface brightness galaxies and other evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGaugh, SS; de Blok, WJG

    1998-01-01

    The rotation curves of low surface brightness galaxies provide a unique data set with which to test alternative theories of gravitation over a large dynamic range in size, mass, surface density, and acceleration. Many clearly fail, including any in which the mass discrepancy appears at a particular

  11. The evolution of the stellar populations in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoek, LB; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM; de Jong, T

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies by modelling their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties using a galactic chemical and photometric evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity dependent set of stell

  12. The evolution of the stellar populations in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; Hulst, J. M. van der; Jong, T. de

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies by modelling their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties using a galactic chemical and photometric evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity depen dent s

  13. The outer regions of galaxy clusters: Chandra constraints on the X-ray surface brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Ettori, S

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged version) We study the properties of the X-ray surface brightness profiles in a sample of galaxy clusters that are observed with Chandra and have emission detectable with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 2 at a radius beyond R500 ~ 0.7 R200. Our study aims at measuring the slopes of the X-ray surface brightness and of the gas density profiles in the outskirts of massive clusters. These constraints are then compared to similar results obtained from observations and numerical simulations of the temperature and dark matter density profiles with the intention to present a consistent picture of the outer regions of galaxy clusters. We extract the surface brightness profiles S_b(r) from X-ray exposures obtained with Chandra of 52 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z>0.3. We estimate R200 both using a beta-model to reproduce the surface brightness profile and scaling relations from the literature, showing that the two methods converge to comparable values. We evaluate then the radius, R_S2N, at which the ...

  14. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-12-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a `slow' bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of R ≡ R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self-gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation, there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon-dominated inner and dark matter-dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on the same relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  15. The Distribution of Star Formation and Metals in the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Wang, Sharon X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Program (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially-resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with mo...

  16. Stellar Systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44 - I. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, C G

    2016-01-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims. In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (mueff_g'~27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods. We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also search for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results. We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associati...

  17. The distribution of star formation and metals in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon X.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Programme (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with more metal-rich regions near the edges of the galactic disc. Based on the emission-line diagnostics alone, the current mode of star formation, slow and concentrated in the outer disc, appears to have dominated for quite some time, although there are clear signs of a much older stellar population formed in a more standard inside-out fashion.

  18. Towards an Understanding of the Mid-Infrared Surface Brightness of Normal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Silbermann, N A; Contursi, A; Malhotra, S; Rubin, R H; Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Contursi, Alessandra; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rubin, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    We report a mid-infrared color and surface brightness analysis of IC 10, NGC 1313, and NGC 6946, three of the nearby galaxies studied under the Infrared Space Observatory Key Project on Normal Galaxies. Images with < 9 arcsecond (170 pc) resolution of these nearly face-on, late-type galaxies were obtained using the LW2 (6.75 mu) and LW3 (15 mu) ISOCAM filters. Though their global I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) flux ratios are similar and typical of normal galaxies, they show distinct trends of this color ratio with mid-infrared surface brightness. We find that I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) ~< 1 only occurs for regions of intense heating activity where the continuum rises at 15 micron and where PAH destruction can play an important role. The shape of the color-surface brightness trend also appears to depend, to the second-order, on the hardness of the ionizing radiation. We discuss these findings in the context of a two-component model for the phases of the interstellar medium and suggest that star formation inte...

  19. Investigating the AGN activity and black hole masses in low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Smitha; Sethuram, Ramya; Das, Mousumi; George, Koshy; Thirupathi, Sivarani; Prabhu, Tushar P.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of the optical nuclear spectra from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) in a sample of giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies. GLSB galaxies are extreme late type spirals that are large, isolated and poorly evolved compared to regular spiral galaxies. Earlier studies have indicated that their nuclei have relatively low mass black holes. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we selected a sample of 30 GLSB galaxies that showed broad Hα emission lines in their AGN spectra. In some galaxies such as UGC 6284, the broad component of Hα is more related to outflows rather than the black hole. One galaxy (UGC 6614) showed two broad components in Hα, one associated with the black hole and the other associated with an outflow event. We derived the nuclear black hole (BH) masses of 29 galaxies from their broad Hα parameters. We find that the nuclear BH masses lie in the range 105 - 107 M⊙. The bulge stellar velocity dispersion σ e was determined from the underlying stellar spectra. We compared our results with the existing BH mass - velocity dispersion (M BH-σ e ) correlations and found that the majority of our sample lie in the low BH mass regime and below the M BH-σ e correlation. The effects of galaxy orientation in the measurement of σ e and the increase of σ e due to the effects of bar are probable reasons for the observed offset for some galaxies, but in many galaxies the offset is real. A possible explanation for the M BH-σ e offset could be lack of mergers and accretion events in the history of these galaxies which leads to a lack of BH-bulge co-evolution.

  20. AN EXPONENTIAL DECLINE AT THE BRIGHT END OF THE z = 6 GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Rd, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); McLure, Ross J.; Bruce, Victoria A. [SUPA Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hibon, Pascale [Gemini Observatory, Gemini South, AURA/Chile, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Bielby, Richard [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); McCracken, Henry J. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite Aix-Marseille, 38 Rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bonfield, David G.; Jarvis, Matt J., E-mail: chris.willott@nrc.ca [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for the most luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 6 based on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey data. We identify a sample of 40 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) brighter than magnitude z' = 25.3 across an area of almost 4 deg{sup 2}. Sensitive spectroscopic observations of seven galaxies provide redshifts for four, of which only two have moderate to strong Ly{alpha} emission lines. All four have clear continuum breaks in their spectra. Approximately half of the LBGs are spatially resolved in 0.7 arcsec seeing images, indicating larger sizes than lower luminosity galaxies discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope, possibly due to ongoing mergers. The stacked optical and infrared photometry is consistent with a galaxy model with stellar mass {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. There is strong evidence for substantial dust reddening with a best-fit A{sub V} = 0.75 and A{sub V} > 0.48 at 2{sigma} confidence, in contrast to the typical dust-free galaxies of lower luminosity at this epoch. The spatial extent and spectral energy distribution suggest that the most luminous z Almost-Equal-To 6 galaxies are undergoing merger-induced starbursts. The luminosity function of z = 5.9 star-forming galaxies is derived. This agrees well with previous work and shows strong evidence for an exponential decline at the bright end, indicating that the feedback processes that govern the shape of the bright end are occurring effectively at this epoch.

  1. Discovery of A Very Bright, Strongly-Lensed z=2 Galaxy in the SDSS DR5

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Huan; Allam, Sahar S; Tucker, Douglas L; Diehl, H Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa

    2008-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a very bright z = 2.00 star-forming galaxy that is strongly lensed by a foreground z=0.422 luminous red galaxy (LRG). This system was found in a systematic search for bright arcs lensed by LRGs and brightest cluster galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. Follow-up observations on the Subaru 8.2m telescope on Mauna Kea and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A simple lens model for the system, assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass distribution, yields an Einstein radius of 3.82 +/- 0.03 arcsec or 14.8 +/- 0.1 kpc/h at the lens redshift. The total projected mass enclosed within the Einstein radius is 2.10 +/- 0.03 x 10^12 M_sun/h, and the magnification factor for the source galaxy is 27 +/- 1. Combining the lens model with our gVriz photometry, we find an (unlensed) star formation rate for the source galaxy of 32 M_sun/h / yr, adopting a fiducial constant star ...

  2. Probing the Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxy Population of the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, J I; Keenan, O C

    2015-01-01

    We have used public data from the Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) to investigate the dwarf galaxy population of the Virgo cluster beyond what has previously been discovered. We initially mask and smooth the data, and then use the object detection algorithm Sextractor to make our initial dwarf galaxy selection. All candidates are then visually inspected to remove artefacts and duplicates. We derive Sextractor parameters to best select low surface brightness galaxies using g band central surface brightness values of 22.5 to 26.0 mag sq arc sec and exponential scale lengths of 3.0 - 10.0 arc sec to identify 443 cluster dwarf galaxies - 303 of which are new detections. These new detections have a surface density that decreases with radius from the cluster centre. We also apply our selection algorithm to 'background', non-cluster, fields and find zero detections. In combination, this leads us to believe that we have isolated a cluster dwarf galaxy population. The range of objects we are able to detect is limit...

  3. The spectacular 200 kpc-wide disk of the Malin 1 giant low surface brightness galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissier, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    Malin 1 is the best example among giant low surface brightness galaxies. New observations of this object in 6 broad-bands allow us for the first time to perform a pan-chromatic study of the stellar population in its 200 kpc wide disk. We observe a spiral structure revealing a star forming disk. The colors indicate a long history with a low efficiency of star formation. It is well reproduced by a model of disk galaxy making it similar to the disk of the Milky Way or other nearby spirals, except for its extremely large angular momentum.

  4. Investigating the AGN activity and black hole masses in Low Surface brightness galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian., Smitha; Das., Mousumi; George., Koshy; Sivarani, T; Prabhu, T P

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the optical nuclear spectra from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) in a sample of giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies. GLSB galaxies are extreme late type spirals that are large, isolated and poorly evolved compared to regular spiral galaxies. Earlier studies have indicated that their nuclei have relatively low mass black holes. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we selected a sample of 30 GLSB galaxies that showed broad H$\\alpha$ emission lines in their AGN spectra. In some galaxies such as UGC 6284, the broad component of H$\\alpha$ is more related to outflows rather than the black hole. One galaxy (UGC 6614) showed two broad components in H$\\alpha$, one associated with the black hole and the other associated with an outflow event. We derived the nuclear black hole (BH) masses of 29 galaxies from their broad H$\\alpha$ parameters. We find that the nuclear BH masses lie in the range $10^{5}-10^{7} M_{\\odot}$. The bulge stellar velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{e}$...

  5. Supernovae without host galaxies? The low surface brightness host of SN 2009Z

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, P -C; Braithwaite, J; Gallazzi, A; Grunden, P; Bomans, D J; Morrell, N I; Bach, U

    2011-01-01

    A remarkable fraction of supernovae (SNe) have no obvious host galaxy. Two possible explanations are that (i) the host galaxy is simply not detected within the sensitivity of the available data or that (ii) the progenitor is a hypervelocity star that has escaped its parent galaxy. We use the Type IIb SN 2009Z as a prototype of case (i), an example of how a very faint (here Low Surface Brightness; LSB) galaxy can be discovered via the observation of a seemingly host-less SN. By identifying and studying LSB galaxies that host SNe related to the death of massive stars, we can place constraints on the stellar population and environment of LSB galaxies, which at present are poorly understood. From an HI spectrum, a redshift of z = 0.02513+-0.00001 and an HI mass of (2.96+-0.12) 10^9 M_sun are computed. This redshift is consistent with that obtained from optical emission lines of SN 2009Z. Furthermore, a gas mass fraction of f_g = 0.87+-0.04 is obtained, one of the highest fractions ever measured. The host galaxy s...

  6. Inside-Out or Outside-In? Metallicity Gradients in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies in the MUSCEL Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Xuesong Wang, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    We present the metallicity profiles of three low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies as clues to the formation of these galaxies. This easily overlooked class of galaxy comprises up to half of the galaxy population with masses spanning that of the Milky Way, making them cosmologically significant baryon repositories. LSB galaxies are also very different from the more familiar archetypal galaxies in that they have unusually high gas fractions, up to 95%. Yet, they do not represent a distinct class of galaxy, but are simply on the low surface brightness end of a continuum.We have observed a sample of low surface brightness galaxies with the VIRUS-P integral field spectrograph as part of the MUSCEL program (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry, and Evolution of LSB galaxies). Our program aims to fully characterize the formation histories of these galaxies by using these data in tandem with Spitzer, Galex, and Swift observations.Optical emission lines contained within the VIRUS-P spectra have allowed us to determined the metallicities of HII regions within these galaxies via emission-line ratio diagnostics. Because ISM metallicities are directly linked to the competing effects of star formation and gas accretion, the distribution of metals is a significant clue to the formation of these galaxies.

  7. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M. [CDS, Observatoire Astronomique, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch. [LSIIT, Universite de Strasbourg, 7, Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Van Driel, W. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Sabatini, S. [INAF/IASF-Roma, via Fosso de Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); MacArthur, L. A., E-mail: Bernd.Vollmer@astro.unistra.fr [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings-typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg{sup 2} in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered {approx}20% more mock LSB galaxies and {approx}40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of

  8. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S; Russell, H R; Walker, S A; Blundell, K M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with AGN feedback, the Perseus cluster and M87, and a merging system, A3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compar...

  9. Discovery of A Very Bright, Strongly-Lensed z=2 Galaxy in the SDSS DR5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huan; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; /Fermilab; Allam, Sahar S.; /Fermilab /Wyoming U.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Diehl, H.Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago; Oguri, Masamune; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN

    2008-09-30

    We report on the discovery of a very bright z = 2.00 star-forming galaxy that is strongly lensed by a foreground z = 0.422 luminous red galaxy (LRG). This system was found in a systematic search for bright arcs lensed by LRGs and brightest cluster galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. Follow-up observations on the Subaru 8.2m telescope on Mauna Kea and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A simple lens model for the system, assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass distribution, yields an Einstein radius of {theta}{sub Ein} = 3.82 {+-} 0.03{double_prime} or 14.8 {+-} 0.1h{sup -1} kpc at the lens redshift. The total projected mass enclosed within the Einstein radius is 2.10 {+-} 0.03 x 10{sup 12}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}, and the magnification factor for the source galaxy is 27 {+-} 1. Combining the lens model with our gVriz photometry, we find an (unlensed) star formation rate for the source galaxy of 32 h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} hr{sup -1}, adopting a fiducial constant star formation rate model with an age of 100 Myr and E(B-V) = 0.25. With an apparent magnitude of r = 19.9, this system is among the very brightest lensed z {ge} 2 galaxies, and provides an excellent opportunity to pursue detailed studies of the physical properties of an individual high-redshift star-forming galaxy.

  10. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey . I. Selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viironen, K.; Marín-Franch, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Chaves-Montero, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Molino, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Vilella-Rojo, G.; Ascaso, B.; Cenarro, A. J.; Cerviño, M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Oteo, I.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, J. F.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so-called dropout technique or Ly-α selection. However, the availability of multifilter data now allows the dropout selections to be replaced by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims: Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing to the study of the brightest, least frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods: The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results: Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z = 2.5,3.0,3.5,4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at mUV(AB) = 24, where mUV refers to the first ALHAMBRA filter redwards of the Ly-α line. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute to the study of the brightest ends of these counts, accurately sampling the surface densities down to mUV(AB) = 21-22. Conclusions: We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a very clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that it is better to do statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination issues in a

  11. The Bright End of the Luminosity Function of Red Sequence Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Y S; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We study the bright end of the luminosity distribution of galaxies in fields with Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099 square degree of SDSS imaging data, we search for luminous (> L*) early-type galaxies within 1.0 Mpc/h of a volume-limited sample of 12,608 spectroscopic LRG in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. Most of these objects lie in rich environments, with the LRG being the brightest object within 1.0 Mpc/h. The luminosity gap, M12, between the first and second-rank galaxies within 1.0 Mpc/h is large (~0.8 mag), substantially larger than can be explained with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of galaxies. The brightest member is less luminous (by 0.1 to 0.2 mag), and shows a larger gap in LRG selected groups than in cluster-like environments. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshift to z = 0.4, ruling out the scenario that these LRG selected brightest cluster or group galaxies grow by recent cannibalism of cluster mem...

  12. Suppression of gravitational instabilities by dominant dark matter halo in low surface brightness galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Soumavo

    2014-01-01

    The low surface brightness galaxies are gas-rich and yet have a low star formation rate, this is a well-known puzzle. The spiral features in these galaxies are weak and difficult to trace, although this aspect has not been studied much. These galaxies are known to be dominated by the dark matter halo from the innermost regions. Here we do a stability analysis for the galactic disc of UGC 7321, a low surface brightness, superthin galaxy, for which the various observational input parameters are available. We show that the disc is stable against local, linear axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric perturbations. The Toomre Q parameter values are found to be large (>> 1) mainly due to the low disc surface density and the high rotation velocity resulting due to the dominant dark matter halo, which could explain the observed low star formation rate. For the stars-alone case, the disc shows finite swing amplification but the addition of dark matter halo suppresses that amplification almost completely. Even the inclusion ...

  13. Source Plane Reconstruction of The Bright Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    CERN Document Server

    Sharon, Keren; Rigby, Jane R; Wuyts, Eva; Koester, Benjamin P; Bayliss, Matthew B; Barrientos, L Felipe

    2012-01-01

    We present new HST/WFC3 imaging data of RCSGA 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z=1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100-pc scale structures in a high-redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially-resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.

  14. SOURCE-PLANE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE BRIGHT LENSED GALAXY RCSGA 032727-132609

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Wuyts, Eva; Bayliss, Matthew B. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rigby, Jane R. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Barrientos, L. Felipe, E-mail: kerens@kicp.uchicago.edu [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Avda. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2012-02-20

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging data of RCSGA 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z = 1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100 pc scale structures in a high-redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.

  15. Source Plane Reconstruction of the Bright Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Wuyts, Eva; Koester, Benjamin P.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Barrientos, L. Felipe

    2011-01-01

    We present new HST/WFC3 imaging data of RCS2 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z=1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100-pc scale structures in a high redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially-resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.

  16. The Role of Clustering of Sub-Clumps in Bright Elliptical Galaxy Formation from a Low-Spin Seed Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, D

    2001-01-01

    We reveal the role of clustering of sub-clumps, which is expected in the cold dark matter (CDM) universe, in forming a bright elliptical galaxy (BEG) from a low-spin seed galaxy. This can be done by comparing the evolution of a low-spin seed galaxy including small-scale density fluctuations expected in the CDM universe (Model 1) with that of a completely uniform one (Model 2), using numerical experiments. We show that Model 2 cannot reproduce the properties of BEGs and forms a disk which is too compact and too bright due to the conservation of the initial-small angular momentum. In Model 1 clustering of the sub-clumps caused by initial small-scale density fluctuations leads to angular momentum transfer from the baryon component to the dark matter and consequently a nearly spherical system supported by random motions is formed. Moreover the collisionless property of the stars formed in the sub-clumps prevents the dissipative contraction of the system, leading to a large measured half-light radius. As a result,...

  17. The local space density of Sb-Sdm galaxies as function of their scalesize, surface brightness and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    De Jong, R S; Jong, Roelof S. de; Lacey, Cedric

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the local space density of spiral galaxies on luminosity, scalesize and surface brightness. We derive bivariate space density distributions in these quantities from a sample of about 1000 Sb-Sdm spiral galaxies, corrected for selection effects in luminosity and surface brightness. The structural parameters of the galaxies were corrected for internal extinction using a description depending on galaxy surface brightness. We find that the bivariate space density distribution of spiral galaxies in the (luminosity, scalesize)-plane is well described by a Schechter luminosity function in the luminosity dimension and a log-normal scale size distribution at a given luminosity. This parameterization of the scalesize distribution was motivated by a simple model for the formation of disks within dark matter halos, with halos acquiring their angular momenta through tidal torques from neighboring objects, and the disk specific angular momentum being proportional to that of the parent halo....

  18. Long-slit Spectroscopy of Edge-on Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wu, Hong; Zhu, Yinan; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2017-03-01

    We present long-slit optical spectra of 12 edge-on low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) positioned along their major axes. After performing reddening corrections for the emission-line fluxes measured from the extracted integrated spectra, we measured the gas-phase metallicities of our LSBG sample using both the [N ii]/Hα and the R 23 diagnostics. Both sets of oxygen abundances show good agreement with each other, giving a median value of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.26 dex. In the luminosity–metallicity plot, our LSBG sample is consistent with the behavior of normal galaxies. In the mass–metallicity diagram, our LSBG sample has lower metallicities for lower stellar mass, similar to normal galaxies. The stellar masses estimated from z-band luminosities are comparable to those of prominent spirals. In a plot of the gas mass fraction versus metallicity, our LSBG sample generally agrees with other samples in the high gas mass fraction space. Additionally, we have studied stellar populations of three LSBGs, which have relatively reliable spectral continua and high signal-to-noise ratios, and qualitatively conclude that they have a potential dearth of stars with ages ages >1 Gyr. Regarding the chemical evolution of our sample, the LSBG data appear to allow for up to 30% metal loss, but we cannot completely rule out the closed-box model. Additionally, we find evidence that our galaxies retain up to about three times as much of their metals compared with dwarfs, consistent with metal retention being related to galaxy mass. In conclusion, our data support the view that LSBGs are probably just normal disk galaxies continuously extending to the low end of surface brightness.

  19. HerMES: A DEFICIT IN THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DUE TO GALAXY CLUSTER GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Bock, J.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blain, A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Bethermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A.; Glenn, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conversi, L. [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Griffin, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Halpern, M.; Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Richard, J., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); and others

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I{sub 250{mu}m}>0.69{sub -0.03}{sup +0.03}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.11}(sys.) MJy sr{sup -1}, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.

  20. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  1. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies in the SDSS: the link between environment, star-forming properties and AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Galaz, Gaspar; Garcia-Lambas, Diego; Padilla, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 4 (DR 4), we investigate the spatial distribution of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBs and HSBs, respectively). In particular, we focus our attention on the influence of interactions between galaxies on the star formation strength in the redshift range $0.01 < z < 0.1$. With cylinder counts and projected distance to the first and fifth-nearest neighbor as environment tracers, we found that LSBs tend to have a lack of companions compared to HSBs at small scales ($<2$ Mpc). Regarding the interactions, we have evidence that the fraction of LSBs with strong star formation activity increases when the neighbor is closer than $r_{p}/r_{90} \\sim 4$. The intensity of the effect of the interaction on the star formation strength, measured by the average value of the birthrate parameter $b$, seems to be stronger for HSBs than for LSBs. The analysis of our population of LSBs and HSBs hosting an AGN show that, regardless of the mass range, the fra...

  2. Probing the IGM/Galaxy Connection IV: The LCO/WFCCD Galaxy Survey of 20 Fields Surrounding UV Bright Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Chen, H -W; Cooksey, K L; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    We publish the survey for galaxies in 20 fields containing ultraviolet bright quasars (with z_em 0.1 to 0.5) that can be used to study the association between galaxies and absorption systems from the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM). The survey is magnitude limited (R~19.5 mag) and highly complete out to 10' from the quasar in each field. It was designed to detect dwarf galaxies (L ~ 0.1 L*) at an impact parameter rho 1Mpc (z=0.1) from a quasar. The complete sample (all 20 fields) includes R-band photometry for 84718 sources and confirmed redshifts for 2800 sources. This includes 1198 galaxies with 0.005 < z < (z_em - 0.01) at a median redshift of 0.18, which may associated with IGM absorption lines. All of the imaging was acquired with cameras on the Swope 40" telescope and the spectra were obtained via slitmask observations using the WFCCD spectrograph on the Dupont 100" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO). This paper describes the data reduction, imaging analysis, photometry, and spectral ana...

  3. ISO Far-IR Spectroscopy of IR-Bright Galaxies and ULIRGs

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, J; Satyapal, S; Greenhouse, M A; Stacey, G J; Bradford, C M; Lord, S D; Brauher, J R; Unger, S J; Clegg, P E; Smith, H A; Melnick, G J; Colbert, J W; Malkan, M A; Spinoglio, L; Cox, P; Harvey, V; Suter, J P; Strelnitski, V S

    1999-01-01

    Based on far-infrared spectroscopy of a small sample of nearby infrared-bright and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with the ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer, we find a dramatic progression in ionic/atomic fine-structure emission line and molecular/atomic absorption line characteristics in these galaxies extending from strong [O III]52,88 and [N III]57 micron line emission to detection of only faint [C II]158 micron line emission from gas in photodissociation regions in the ULIRGs. The molecular absorption spectra show varying excitation as well, extending from galaxies in which the molecular population mainly occupies the ground state to galaxies in which there is significant population in higher levels. In the case of the prototypical ULIRG, the merger galaxy Arp 220, the spectrum is dominated by absorption lines of OH, H2O, CH, and [O I]. Low [O III]88 micron line flux relative to the integrated far-infrared flux correlates with low excitation and does not appear to be due to far-infrared extinctio...

  4. A distortion of very-high-redshift galaxy number counts by gravitational lensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Yan, Haojing; Windhorst, Rogier A; Mao, Shude

    2011-01-13

    The observed number counts of high-redshift galaxy candidates have been used to build up a statistical description of star-forming activity at redshift z ≳ 7, when galaxies reionized the Universe. Standard models predict that a high incidence of gravitational lensing will probably distort measurements of flux and number of these earliest galaxies. The raw probability of this happening has been estimated to be ∼0.5 per cent (refs 11, 12), but can be larger owing to observational biases. Here we report that gravitational lensing is likely to dominate the observed properties of galaxies with redshifts of z ≳ 12, when the instrumental limiting magnitude is expected to be brighter than the characteristic magnitude of the galaxy sample. The number counts could be modified by an order of magnitude, with most galaxies being part of multiply imaged systems, located less than 1 arcsec from brighter foreground galaxies at z ≈ 2. This lens-induced association of high-redshift and foreground galaxies has perhaps already been observed among a sample of galaxy candidates identified at z ≈ 10.6. Future surveys will need to be designed to account for a significant gravitational lensing bias in high-redshift galaxy samples.

  5. NICMOS observations of high redshift radio galaxies witnessing the formation of bright elliptical galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Röttgering, H J A; Miley, G K; Van Breugel, W; Fosbury, R A E

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a near infrared imaging program of a sample of 19 radio galaxies with redshift between 1.7 and 3.2, using the NICMOS Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxies were observed in H-band which, for 18 of the 19 targets, samples the rest-frame optical emission longwards of the 4000 A break. The images show a wide range of morphologies, from unresolved to compact systems, to systems with substructures such as multiple emission peaks, to systems comprised of several components spread over large areas. The morphologies of 5 of the lowest redshift targets are well represented by a de Vaucouleurs profile, consistent with them being elliptical galaxies. Their average effective radius is a factor of 2 smaller than that of z=1 3CR radio galaxies at similar restframe wavelengths. The near infrared continuum light is generally well aligned with the radio axis and the aligned light has typical V-H colors of around 3.5-4. For several galaxies where WFPC2 images were available, we computed ...

  6. Surface Brightness Profiles of Dwarf Galaxies: II. Color Trends and Mass Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Kimberly A; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    In this second paper of a series, we explore the B-V, U-B, and FUV-NUV radial color trends from a multi-wavelength sample of 141 dwarf disk galaxies. Like spirals, dwarf galaxies have three types of radial surface brightness profiles: (I) single exponential throughout the observed extent (the minority), (II) down-bending (the majority), and (III) up-bending. We find that colors of (1) Type I dwarfs generally become redder with increasing radius unlike spirals that have a blueing trend that flattens beyond ~1.5 disk scale lengths, (2) Type II dwarfs come in six different "flavors," one of which mimics the "U" shape of spirals, and (3) Type III dwarfs have a stretched "S" shape where central colors are flattish, become steeply redder to the surface brightness break, then remain roughly constant beyond, similar to spiral TypeIII color profiles, but without the central outward bluing. Faint (-9 > M_B > -14) Type II dwarfs tend to have continuously red or "U" shaped colors and steeper color slopes than bright (-14...

  7. A New Constraint on the Ly$\\alpha$ Fraction of UV Very Bright Galaxies at Redshift 7

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Dunlop, James S; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Naito, Yoshiaki; Furusawa, Junko; Ouchi, Masami; Nakata, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Naoki; Okura, Yuki; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Toru; Kajisawa, Masaru; Fynbo, Johan P U; Fevre, Olivier Le

    2016-01-01

    We study the extent to which very bright (-23.0 50 Angstrom, which we estimate to be < 0.23. This result may indicate a weak trend where the fraction of strong Lya emitters ceases to rise, and possibly falls between z~6 and z~7. Our results also leave open the possibility that strong Lya may still be more prevalent in the brightest galaxies in the reionization era than their fainter counterparts. A larger spectroscopic sample of galaxies is required to derive a more reliable constraint on the neutral hydrogen fraction at z~7 based on the Lya fraction in the bright galaxies.

  8. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Chequers, Matthew H; Widrow, Lawrence M; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a "slow" bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of $\\mathcal{R} \\equiv R_c/a_b \\sim 2$. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon dominated inner and dark matter dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter do...

  9. Simultaneous multi-band detection of Low Surface Brightness galaxies with Markovian modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Petremand, M; Lavigne, F; Collet, Ch; van Driel, W; Bonnarel, F; Louys, M; Sabatini, S; MacArthur, L A

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the detection of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings - typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B and I band images (covering 1.3 square degrees in total) of the Virgo cluster. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (i) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (ii) Virgo...

  10. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the nature of bright submm galaxies from 2 deg2 of 850-um imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Koprowski, M P; Cirasuolo, M; Geach, J E; Bowler, R A A; Mortlock, A; Caputi, K I; Aretxaga, I; Arumugam, V; Chen, Chian-Chou; McLure, R J; Birkinshaw, M; Bourne, N; Farrah, D; Ibar, E; van der Werf, P; Zemcov, M

    2016-01-01

    We present physical properties [redshifts (z), star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar)] of nearly 2000 bright (S850 > 4 mJy) submm galaxies in the ~2 deg2 COSMOS and UDS fields selected with SCUBA-2 on the JCMT, representing the largest homogeneous sample of 850-um-selected sources to date. We check the reliability of our identifications, and the robustness of the SCUBA-2 fluxes by revisiting the recent ALMA follow-up. Considering > 4 mJy ALMA sources, our identification method has a completeness of ~86 per cent with a reliability of ~92 per cent, and only ~15-20 per cent of sources are significantly affected by multiplicity (when a secondary component is brighter than a third of the primary one). The impact of source blending on the 850-um source counts as determined with SCUBA-2 is modest; scaling the single-dish fluxes by ~0.9 reproduces the ALMA source counts. We find median values of z = 2.40+0.10-0.04, SFR = 287+-6 Mo yr-1, and log(Mstar/Mo) = 11.12+-0.02. These properties clearly locate ...

  11. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, A; Roche, P F; Hernan-Caballero, A; Aretxaga, I; Martinez-Paredes, M; Almeida, C Ramos; Pereira-Santaella, M; Diaz-Santos, T; Levenson, N A; Packham, C; Colina, L; Esquej, P; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Ichikawa, K; Imanishi, M; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Telesco, C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies ($\\log L_{\\rm IR}\\ge 11.4\\,L_\\odot$) and quasars. We use high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 0.3-0.4 arcsec $\\sim$ few hundred parsecs) $8-13\\,\\mu$m ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear $11.3\\,\\mu$m PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or...

  12. UV surface brightness of galaxies from the local Universe to z ~ 5

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Eric J; Scarpa, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The Tolman test for surface brightness dimming was originally proposed as a test for the expansion of the Universe. The test, which is independent of the details of the assumed cosmology,is based on comparisons of the surface brightness (SB) of identical objects at different cosmological distances. Claims have been made that the Tolman test provides compelling evidence against a static model for the Universe. In this paper we reconsider this subject by adopting a static Euclidean Universe with a linear Hubble relation at all z (which is not the standard Einstein- de Sitter model),resulting in a relation between flux and luminosity that is virtually indistinguishable from the one used for LCDM models. Based on the analysis of the UV surface brightness of luminous disk galaxies from HUDF and GALEX datasets, reaching from the local Universe to z ~ 5 we show that the surface brightness remains constant as expected in a SEU. A re-analysis of previously-published data used for the Tolman test at lower redshift, whe...

  13. AGN Activity and Black Hole Masses in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ramya, S; Das, M

    2011-01-01

    We present medium resolution optical spectroscopy of a sample of nine Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies. For those that show clear signatures of AGN emission, we have disentangled the AGN component from stellar light and any Fe I and Fe II contribution. We have decomposed the H_alpha line into narrow and broad components and determined the velocities of the broad components; typical values lie between 900--2500 km/s. Of the galaxies in our study, UGC 6614, UGC 1922, UGC 6968 and LSBC F568-6 (Malin~2) show clear signatures of AGN activity. We have calculated the approximate black hole masses for these galaxies from the H_alpha line emission using the virial approximation. The black hole masses are ~3x10^{5} M_sun for three galaxies and lie in the intermediate mass black holes domain rather than the supermassive range. UGC 6614 harbors a BH of mass 3.8x10^{6} M_sun; it also shows an interesting feature blueward of H_alpha and H_beta implying outflow of gas or a one-sided jet streaming towards us. We have al...

  14. Stellar population gradients in bright cluster galaxies at z=0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Davidge, T J; Davidge, T J; Grinder, M

    1995-01-01

    Slit spectra, covering the rest frame near-ultraviolet and blue wavelength regions, are combined with moderately deep g and R images to investigate radial population gradients in the brightest components of six z=0.2 galaxy clusters selected by x-ray brightness. We conclude that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of the EMSS0440+02, EMSS0906+11 and EMSS1231+15 clusters have global stellar contents resembling nearby elliptical galaxies. The BCGs in the clusters EMSS0839+29, EMSS1455+22 and Abell2390 are complicated by ionized gas, which is detected over large portions of all three systems. Radial color variations are detected in the majority of galaxies and, for those systems not showing extended [OII] emission, the weakening of D4000 (which measures the 4000 Angstrom break in magnitudes) with radius falls in the upper range of what is seen among nearby ellipticals. However, there is no correlation between local D4000 values and (g-r), suggesting that these quantities are sensitive to different parameters. ...

  15. Extinction in the Galaxy from surface brightnesses of ESO-LV galaxies: testing 'standard' extinction maps

    OpenAIRE

    Choloniewski, Jacek; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2003-01-01

    The relative extinction in the Galaxy computed with our new method (Choloniewski and Valentijn 2003, CV) is compared with three patterns: Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis (1998, SFD), Burstein and Heiles (1978, BH) and the cosecans law. It is shown that extinction of SFD is more reliable then that of BH since it stronger correlates with our new extinction. The smallest correlation coeffcient have been obtained for the cosecans law. Linear regression analysis show that SFD overestimate the extin...

  16. Colors and K-Band Counts of Extremely Faint Field Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, L A; Graham, J R; Silk, J; Peterson, B A; Yoshii, Y; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Davis, Marc; Graham, James R.; Silk, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    We combine deep K-band (Keck) with V- and I-band (NTT) observations of two high-Galactic latitude fields, surveying a total of ~2 sq. arcmin. The K-band galaxy counts continue to rise above K=22, reaching surface densities of few x 10^5 per sq. degree. The slope for the counts is (d log(N) per mag per sq. degree) = 0.23 +/- 0.02 between K=18-23, consistent with other deep K surveys. The numbers of galaxies in each mag bin is about two times greater than the galaxy counts of Djorgovski et al. (1995). The optical and near infrared magnitudes of all objects detected in the V+I+K image are discussed in the context of grids of isochrone synthesis galaxy evolutionary models (Bruzual & Charlot 1993, 1995). The colors of most of the observed galaxies are consistent with a population drawn from a broad redshift distribution. A few galaxies at K=19-20 are red in both colors (V-I>3; I-K>2), consistent with being early-type galaxies having undergone a burst of star formation at z>5 and viewed at z~1. At K>20, we find...

  17. Near Infrared Faint Galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field Comparing the Theory with Observations for Galaxy Counts, Colors, and Size Distributions to K=24.5

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, T; Iwamuro, F; Maihara, T; Motohara, K

    2001-01-01

    Galaxy counts in the K band, (J-K)-colors, and apparent size distributions of faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) down to K~24.5 were studied in detail. Special attention has been paid to take into account various selection effects including the cosmological dimming of surface brightness, to avoid any systematic bias which may be the origin of controversy in previously published results. We also tried to be very careful about systematic model uncertainties; we present a comprehensive surveys of these systematic uncertainties and dependence on various parameters. We found that the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model is well consistent with all the SDF data down to K~22.5, without any evidence for number or size evolution in a low-density, Lambda-dominated flat universe which is now favored by various cosmological observations. If the popular Lambda-dominated universe is taken for granted, our result then gives a strong constraint on the number evolution of giant elliptical or early-type galaxies to...

  18. High Density Molecular Gas in the IR-bright Galaxy System VV114

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, D; Yun, M S; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Sakamoto, K

    2004-01-01

    New high resolution CO(3-2) interferometric map of the IR-bright interacting galaxy system VV114 observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) reveal a substantial amount of warm and dense gas in the IR-bright but optically obscured galaxy, VV114E, and the overlap region connecting the two nuclei. A 1.8 x 1.4 kpc concentration of CO(3-2) emitting gas with a total mass of 4 x 10^9 Msun coincides with the peaks of NIR, MIR, and radio continuum emission found previously by others, identifying the dense fuel for the AGN and/or the starburst activity there. Extensive CO(2-1) emission is also detected, revealing detailed distribution and kinematics that are consistent with the earlier CO(1-0) results. The widely distributed molecular gas traced in CO(2-1) and the distributed discrete peaks of CO(3-2) emission suggest that a spatially extended intense starbursts may contribute significantly to its large IR luminosity. These new observations further support the notion that VV114 is approaching its final stage of merger...

  19. Higher order relativistic galaxy number counts: dominating terms

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jeppe Trøst

    2016-01-01

    We review the number counts to second order concentrating on the terms which dominate on sub horizon scales. We re-derive the result for these terms and compare it with the different versions found in the literature. We generalize our derivation to higher order terms, especially the third order number counts which are needed to compute the 1-loop contribution to the power spectrum.

  20. A near/mid infrared search for ultra-bright submillimetre galaxies: Searching for Cosmic Eyelash Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Groth, S.; Díaz-Sánchez, A.; Rebolo, R.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2017-01-01

    We present results from a near/mid IR search for submillimetre galaxies over a region of 6230 sq deg. of the southern sky. We used a cross-correlation of the VISTA Hemispheric Survey (VHS) and the WISE database to identify bright galaxies (Ks ≤ 18.2) with near/mid IR colours similar to those of the high redshift lensed sub-mm galaxy SMM J2135-0102. We find 7 galaxies which fulfill all five adopted near/mid IR colour (NMIRQC) criteria and resemble the SED of the reference galaxy at these wavelengths. For these galaxies, which are broadly distributed in the sky, we determined photometric redshifts in the range z=1.6-3.2. We searched the VHS for clusters of galaxies, which may be acting as gravitational lenses, and found that 6 out of the 7 galaxies are located within 3.5 arcmin of a cluster/group of galaxies. Using the J-Ks vs J sequences we determine photometric redshifts for these clusters/groups in the range z=0.2-0.9. We propose the newly identified sources are ultra-bright high redshift lensed SMG candidates. Follow-up observations in the sub-mm and mm are key to determine the ultimate nature of these objects.

  1. The portrait of Malin 2: a case study of a giant low surface brightness galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kasparova, A; Katkov, I; Chilingarian, I; Bizyaev, D

    2013-01-01

    The low surface brightness disc galaxy Malin2 challenges the standard theory of galaxy evolution by its enormous total mass ~2 10^12 Ms which must have been formed without recent major merger events. The aim of our work is to create a coherent picture of this exotic object by using the new optical multicolor photometric and spectroscopic observations at Apache Point Observatory as well as archival datasets from Gemini and wide-field surveys. We performed the Malin2 mass modelling, estimated the contribution of the host dark halo and found that it had acquired its low central density and the huge isothermal sphere core radius before the disc subsystem was formed. Our spectroscopic data analysis reveals complex kinematics of stars and gas in the very inner region. We measured the oxygen abundance in several clumps and concluded that the gas metallicity decreases from the solar value in the centre to a half of that at 20-30 kpc. We found a small satellite and measured its mass (1/500 of the host galaxy) and gas ...

  2. Observations of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope II: The IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Armus, L; Bernard-Salas, J; Spoon, H W W; Marshall, J A; Higdon, S J U; Desai, V; Teplitz, H I; Hao, L; Devost, D; Brandl, B R; Wu, Y; Sloan, G C; Soifer, B T; Houck, J R; Herter, T L

    2006-01-01

    We present spectra taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer covering the 5-38 micron region of the ten Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) found in the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample. Among the BGS ULIRGs, we find a factor of 50 spread in the rest-frame mid to far-infrared spectral slope. The 9.7 micron silicate optical depths range from less than 0.4 more than 4.2, implying line of sight extinctions of A(V) ~ 8 - 78 mag. There is evidence for water ice and hydrocarbon absorption and C2H2 and HCN absorption features in four and possibly six of the 10 BGS ULIRGs, indicating shielded molecular clouds and a warm, dense ISM. We have detected [NeV] emission in three of the ten BGS ULIRGs, at flux levels of 5-18E-14 erg/cm^2/sec and [NeV] 14.3/[NeII] 12.8 line flux ratios of 0.12-0.85. The remaining BGS ULIRGs have limits on their [NeV]/[NeII] line flux ratios which range from less than 0.15 to less than 0.01. Among the BGS ULIRGs, the AGN fractions implied by either the [NeV]/[NeII] or [OIV]/[NeII] line flu...

  3. HerMES: A Deficit in the Surface Brightness of the Cosmic Infrared Background Due to Galaxy Cluster Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zemcov, M; Cooray, A; Bethermin, M; Bock, J; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Dowell, C D; Farrah, D; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Jullo, E; Kneib, J -P; Marsden, G; Nguyen, H T; Richard, S J Oliver J; Roseboom, I G; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Wardlow, J

    2013-01-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after subtracting sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I(250 microns) > 0.69_(-0.03)^(+0.03) (stat.)_(-0.06)^(+0.11) (sys.) MJy/sr, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe th...

  4. Galaxy Modelling - II. Multi-Wavelength Faint Counts from a Semi-Analytic Model of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Devriendt, J E G

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) This paper predicts self-consistent faint galaxy counts from the UV to the submm wavelength range. The STARDUST spectral energy distributions described in Devriendt et al. (1999) are embedded within the explicit cosmological framework of a simple semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution. We build a class of models which capture the luminosity budget of the universe through faint galaxy counts and redshift distributions in the whole wavelength range spanned by our spectra. In contrast with a rather stable behaviour in the optical and even in the far-IR, the submm counts are dramatically sensitive to variations in the cosmological parameters and changes in the star formation history. Faint submm counts are more easily accommodated within an open universe with a low value of $\\Omega_0$, or a flat universe with a non-zero cosmological constant. This study illustrates the implementation of multi-wavelength spectra into a semi-analytic model. In spite of its simplicity, it already provides f...

  5. A portrait of Malin 2: a case study of a giant low surface brightness galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparova, Anastasia V.; Saburova, Anna S.; Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Bizyaev, Dmitry V.

    2014-02-01

    The low surface brightness (LSB) disc galaxy Malin 2 challenges the standard theory of galaxy evolution because of its enormous total mass ˜2 × 1012 M⊙, which must have been formed without recent major merger events. The aim of our work is to create a coherent picture of this exotic object by using new optical multicolour photometric and spectroscopic observations at the Apache Point Observatory as well as archival data sets from Gemini and wide-field surveys. We have performed Malin 2 mass modelling, we have estimated the contribution of the host dark halo and we have found that it acquired its low central density ρ0 ≃ 0.003 M⊙ pc-3 and huge isothermal sphere core radius rc = 27.3 kpc before the disc subsystem was formed. Our spectroscopic data analysis reveals complex kinematics of stars and gas in the very inner region (r = 5-7 kpc). We have measured the oxygen abundance in several clumps and we have concluded that the gas metallicity decreases from the solar value in the centre to a half of that at 20-30 kpc. We have found a small satellite projected on to the galaxy disc at 14 kpc from the centre and we have measured its mass (1/500 of the host galaxy) and gas metallicity (similar to that of the Malin 2 disc at the same distance). One of the unique properties of Malin 2 turned out to be the apparent imbalance of the interstellar media: the molecular gas is in excess with respect to the atomic gas for given values of the gas equilibrium turbulent pressure. We explain this imbalance by the presence of a significant portion of the dark gas not observable in CO and the H I 21-cm lines. We also show that the depletion time of the observed molecular gas traced by CO is nearly the same as in normal galaxies. Our modelling of the ultraviolet-to-optical spectral energy distribution favours the exponentially declined star formation history over a single-burst scenario. We argue that the massive and rarefied dark halo which formed before the disc component

  6. A Bridge from Optical to Infrared Galaxies Explaining Local Properties, Predicting Galaxy Counts and the Cosmic Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, T; Totani, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2002-01-01

    We give an explanation for the origin of various properties observed in local infrared galaxies, and make predictions for galaxy counts and cosmic background radiation (CBR), by a new model extended from that for optical/near-infrared galaxies. Important new characteristics of this study are that (1) mass scale dependence of dust extinction is introduced based on the size-luminosity relation of optical galaxies, and that (2) the big grain dust temperature T_dust is calculated based on a physical consideration for energy balance, rather than using the empirical relation between T_dust and total infrared luminosity L_IR found in local galaxies, which has been employed in most of previous works. Consequently, the local properties of infrared galaxies, i.e., optical/infrared luminosity ratios, L_IR-T_dust correlation, and infrared luminosity function are outputs predicted by the model. Our model indeed reproduces these local properties reasonably well. We then found considerably different results for MIR-submm co...

  7. XMM-Newton observation of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, MCG+8-11-11

    CERN Document Server

    Matt, G; De Rosa, A; Grandi, P; Perola, G C

    2005-01-01

    We report on the XMM-Newton observation of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, MCG+8-11-11. Data from the EPIC/p-n camera, the Reflection Gratings Spectrometers (RGS) and the Optical Monitor (OM) have been analyzed. The p-n spectrum is well fitted by a power law, a spectrally unresolved Fe Kalpha line, a Compton reflection component (whose large value, when compared to the iron line equivalent width, suggests iron underabundance), and absorption by warm material. Absorption lines are apparent in the RGS spectra, but their identification is uncertain and would require large matter velocities. The UV fluxes measured by the OM are well above the extrapolation of the X-ray spectrum, indicating the presence of a UV bump.

  8. GALEX observations of the UV surface brightness and color profiles of the Local Group elliptical galaxy M32 (NGC221)

    CERN Document Server

    De Paz, A G; Sohn, Y J; Lee, Y W; Seibert, M; Rich, R M; Bianchi, L; Barlow, T A; Byun, Y I; Donas, J; Forster, K; Friedman, P G; Heckman, T M; Jelinsky, P N; Malina, R F; Martin, D C; Milliard, B; Morrissey, P F; Neff, S G; Schiminovich, D; Siegmund, O H W; Small, T; Szalay, A S; Welsh, B Y; Wyder, T K

    2004-01-01

    M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.

  9. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kurono, Yasutaka, E-mail: ono@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile)

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ∼ 30-300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ≲ 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ≲ 7 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ≳ 6.

  10. XMM-Newton Spectroscopy of Bright ULX Sources in the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/4039)

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, J M; Fabbiano, G; Schweizer, F

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of spectral fits to bright ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/4039) obtained through a 41 ksec observation with XMM-Newton. Although emission regions are not resolved as well as in prior Chandra observations, at least four ULXs (X-11, X-16, X-37, and X-44 in the Zezas & Fabbiano scheme) are sufficiently bright and well-separated with XMM-Newton that reliable extractions and spectral analyses are possible. Fits to the source spectra with only the multi-color disk blackbody model give high disk color temperatures (kT = 1.0-1.7 keV); however, none of the spectra are acceptably fit by this model. Source X-37 is not well-fitted by any single component model. Fits with a model consisting of multi-color disk blackbody and power-law components may reveal a cool accretion disk (kT = 0.13 +/- 0.02 keV). Interestingly, when the multi-color disk blackbody plus power-law model is fit to all four ULXs, low temperatures are obtained for each (kT = 0.11-0.21 keV);...

  11. On the nature of faint Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, C; Ulmer, M P; Cuillandre, J C; Durret, F; Mazure, A; Picat, J P; Scheidegger, R

    2008-01-01

    This project is the continuation of our study of faint Low Surface Brightness Galaxies (fLSBs) in one of the densest nearby galaxy regions known, the Coma cluster. Our goal is to improve our understanding of the nature of these objects by comparing the broad band spectral energy distribution with population synthesis models. The data were obtained with the MEGACAM and CFH12K cameras at the CFHT. We used the resulting photometry in 5 broad band filters (u*, B, V, R, and I), that included new u*-band data, to fit spectral models. With these spectral fits we inferred a cluster membership criterium, as well as the ages, dust extinctions, and photometric types of these fLSBs. We show that about half of the Coma cluster fLSBs have a spectral energy distribution well represented in our template library while the other half present a flux deficit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Among the well represented, ~80% are probably part of the Coma cluster based on their spectral energy distribution. They are relatively young (yo...

  12. Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxies at z~7 Behind Abell 1703

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, L D; Zitrin, A; Smit, R; Coe, D; Ford, H C; Zheng, W; Illingworth, G D; Benítez, N; Broadhurst, T J

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight strongly lensed Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of Abell 1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26 sigma) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 magnitudes brighter than the z_850-band dropout recently found behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 magnitudes brighter than the previously brightest known z~7.5 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of 9.0, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H_160 = 26.4 AB, a strong J_125 - H_160 break of 1.7 magnitudes, and a photometric redshift of z~6.7. Additionally, we find seven other bright LBG candidates with H_160-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z~6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications mu~3-40. Stellar population fits to the ACS, WFC3/IR, and \\Spitzer/IRAC data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) x 10^{9} M_sun, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star-for...

  13. The cosmological significance of Low Surface Brightness galaxies found in a deep blind neutral-hydrogen survey

    CERN Document Server

    Minchin, R F; Parker, Q A; Boyce, P J; De Blok, W J G; Banks, G D; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; García, D A; Gibson, B K; Grossi, M; Haynes, R F; Knezek, P M; Lang, R H; Malin, D F; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Stewart, I M; Wright, A E

    2004-01-01

    We have placed limits on the cosmological significance of gas-rich low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies as a proportion of the total population of gas-rich galaxies by carrying out a very deep survey (HIDEEP) for neutral hydrogen (HI) with the Parkes multibeam system. Such a survey avoids the surface-brightness selection effects that limit the usefulness of optical surveys for finding LSB galaxies. To complement the HIDEEP survey we have digitally stacked eight 1-hour R-band Tech Pan films from the UK Schmidt Telescope covering 36 square degrees of the survey area to reach a very deep isophotal limit of 26.5 R mag/sq. arcsec. At this level, we find that all of the 129 HI sources within this area have optical counterparts and that 107 of them can be identified with individual galaxies. We have used the properties of the galaxies identified as the optical counterparts of the HI sources to estimate the significance of LSB galaxies (defined to be those at least 1.5 magnitudes dimmer in effective surface-brightne...

  14. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies - II. Deep CO observations of low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM

    1998-01-01

    We present deep, pointed (CO)-C-12(J = 2 - 1) observations of three late-type LSB galaxies. The beam-size was small enough that we could probe different environments (HI maximum, HI mininum, star forming region) in these galaxies. No CO was found at any of the positions observed. We argue that the i

  15. Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxy Candidates at z ~ 7 behind A1703

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, L. D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Zitrin, A.; Smit, R.; Coe, D.; Ford, H. C.; Zheng, W.; Illingworth, G. D.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z ~ 7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of A1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26σ) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 mag brighter than the z 850-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 mag brighter than the previously brightest known z ~ 7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of ~9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H 160 = 26.4 AB, a strong z 850 - J 125 break of 1.7 mag, and a photometric redshift of z ~ 6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H 160-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z ~ 6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications μ ~ 3-40. Stellar population fits to the Advanced Camera for Surveys, WFC3/IR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) × 109 M ⊙, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star formation rates ~7.8 M ⊙ yr-1, and low reddening with AV <= 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning ~4 kpc in the z ~ 6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r ~ 0.4 kpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  16. Spatial periodicity of galaxy number counts from Fourier analysis of the large scale surveys of galaxies in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G

    2007-01-01

    A Fourier analysis has been carried out on the galaxy number count as a function of redshift, the $N$-$z$ relation, calculated from redshift data of both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF GRS). Regardless of the interpretation of those redshifts, the results indicate that galaxies have preferred periodic redshifts. This is the \\textit{picket-fence} structure observed by some. Application of the Hubble law, at low redshift, results in galaxies preferentially located on concentric shells with periodic spacings. This analysis finds significant redshift spacings of $\\Delta z =$ 0.0102, 0.0246, and 0.0448 in the SDSS and strong agreement with the results from 2dF GRS. The combined results from both surveys indicate regular real space spacings of $44.0 \\pm 2.5$ $Mpc$, $102 \\pm 8$ $Mpc$ and $176 \\pm 29$ $Mpc$, for an assumed Hubble's constant $H_0 = 72 km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}$. These results indicate that it is a real effect and not some observational artifact. The effect is sign...

  17. A 3-Dimensional study of the Local Environment of Bright IRAS Galaxies: The AGN/Starburst connection

    CERN Document Server

    Koulouridis, E; Plionis, M; Krongold, Y; Dultzin-Hacyan, D; Koulouridis, Elias; Chavushyan, Vahram; Plionis, Manolis; Krongold, Yair; Dultzin-Hacyan, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    We present a 3-dimensional study of the local ($\\leq 100 h^{-1}$ kpc) and the large scale ($\\leq$ 1 $h^{-1}$ Mpc) environment of Bright IRAS Galaxies (BIRGs). For this purpose we use 87 BIRGs located at high galactic latitudes (with 0.008$\\leq z \\leq$0.018) as well as a control sample of non-active galaxies having the same morphological, redshift and diameter size distributions as the corresponding BIRG sample. Using the Center for Astrophysics (CfA2) and Southern Sky Redshift Survey (SSRS) galaxy catalogues ($m_b\\lesssim 15.5$)as well as our own spectroscopic observations ($m_b\\lesssim19.0$) for a subsample of the original BIRG sample, we find that the fraction of BIRGs with a close neighbor is significantly higher than that of their control sample. Comparing with a related analysis of Sy1 and Sy2 galaxies of Koulouridis et al. (2006) we find that BIRGs have a similar environment as Sy2s, although the fraction of BIRGs with a bright close neighbor is even higher than that of Sy2 galaxies. An additional analy...

  18. A study of active galactic nuclei in low surface brightness galaxies with Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Mei; Wei-Min Yuan; Xiao-Bo Dong

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) have received little attention in previous studies. We present a detailed spectral analysis of 194 LSBGs from the Impey et al. (1996) APM LSBG sample which has been observed spec-troscopically by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). Our elaborate spectral analysis enables us to carry out, for the first time, reliable spectral classification of nuclear processes in LSBGs based on the standard emission line diagnostic diagrams in a rigorous way. Star-forming galaxies are common, as found in about 52% of LSBGs. We find that, contrary to some previous claims, the fraction of galaxies that contain AGNs is significantly lower than that found in nearby normal galaxies of high surface brightness. This is qualitatively in line with the finding of Impey et al. This result holds true even within each morphological type from Sa to Sc. LSBGs that have larger central stellar ve-locity dispersions or larger physical sizes tend to have a higher chance of harboring an AGN. For three AGNs with broad emission lines, the black hole masses estimated from the emission lines are broadly consistent with the well known M-σ* relation established for normal galaxies and AGNs.

  19. Herschel-ATLAS Galaxy Counts and High Redshift Luminosity Functions: The Formation of Massive Early Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lapi, A; Fan, L; Bressan, A; De Zotti, G; Danese, L; Negrello, M; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Maddox, S; Auld, R; Baes, M; Bonfield, D G; Buttiglione, S; Cava, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Dariush, A; Dye, S; Fritz, J; Herranz, D; Hopwood, R; Ibar, E; Ivison, R; Jarvis, M J; Kaviraj, S; Lopez-Caniego, M; Massardi, M; Michalowski, M J; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Rigby, E; Rodighiero, G; Serjeant, S; Smith, D J B; Temi, P; Wardlow, J; van der Werf, P

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) survey data, we have determined the luminosity functions (LFs) at rest-frame wavelengths of 100 and 250 micron and at several redshifts z>1, for bright sub-mm galaxies with star formation rates (SFR) >100 M_sun/yr. We find that the evolution of the comoving LF is strong up to z~2.5, and slows down at higher redshifts. From the LFs and the information on halo masses inferred from clustering analysis, we derived an average relation between SFR and halo mass (and its scatter). We also infer that the timescale of the main episode of dust-enshrouded star formation in massive halos (M_H>3*10^12 M_sun) amounts to ~7*10^8 yr. Given the SFRs, which are in the range 10^2-10^3 M_sun/yr, this timescale implies final stellar masses of order of 10^11-10^12 M_sun. The corresponding stellar mass function matches the observed mass function of passively evolving galaxies at z>1. The comparison of the statistics for sub-mm and UV selected galaxies suggests that the...

  20. Surface brightness and color distributions in blue compact dwarf galaxies. I - Haro 2, an extreme example of a star-forming young elliptical galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, Hans-Hermann; Thuan, Trinh X.

    1986-01-01

    The first results of a large-scale program to study the morphology and structure of blue compact dwarf galaxies from CCD observations are presented. The observations and reduction procedures are described, and surface brightness and color profiles are shown. The results are used to discuss the morphological type of Haro 2 and its stellar populations. It is found that Haro 2 appears to be an extreme example of an elliptical galaxy undergoing intense star formation in its central regions, and that the oldest stars it contains were made only about four million yr ago. The 'missing' mass problem of Haro 2 is also discussed.

  1. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lubinski, P; Gibaud, L; Paltani, S; Papadakis, I E; Ricci, C; Soldi, S; Türler, M; Walter, R; Zdziarski, A A

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analyzed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48(-14,+57) keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centered at ~0.8 and a narrow peak at ~1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption mo...

  2. Discovery of an Extremely Bright Sub-Millimeter Galaxy at z=3.93

    CERN Document Server

    Lestrade, J -F; Salomé, P; Omont, A; Bertoldi, F; André, P; Schneider, N

    2010-01-01

    We have discovered serendipitously a rare, bright Sub-Millimeter Galaxy (SMG) of 30+/-2 mJy at lambda=1.2mm at the IRAM 30-meter radiotelescope. It is the brightest SMG at 1.2mm in the Northern Hemisphere, and among the brightest when the large South Pole Telescope survey at lambda=1.4mm is also considered. This SMG, MM18423+5938, has no known optical counterpart. We have found that its redshift is z=3.92960 +/- 0.00013 by searching for CO lines with the IRAM Eight MIxer Receiver (EMIR). In addition, by collecting all available photometric data in the far-infrared and radio to constrain its spectral energy distribution, we have found the exceptionnally high FIR luminosity 4.8 10^{14}/m Lo and mass 4.0 10^9/m Mo for its dust, even allowing for a magnification factor m of a probable gravitational lens. The corresponding star formation rate is extreme, 8.3 10^{4}/m Mo/yr, unless drastically reduced by m. The detection of 3 lines of the CO rotational ladder, and a significant upper limit for a fourth CO line, all...

  3. DETECTION OF AN ULTRA-BRIGHT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY BEHIND THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo; Habe, Asao [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Oogi, Taira [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ezawa, Hajime; Komugi, Shinya; Mizuno, Norikazu; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Oshima, Tai [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Scott, Kimberly S. [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Austermann, Jason E. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, 599-8531 Osaka (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsuo, Hiroshi [Advanced Technology Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), 72000 Puebla (Mexico); and others

    2013-09-10

    We report the discovery of a new ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG) behind the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This SMG is detected as a 43.3 {+-} 8.4 mJy point source (MM J01071-7302, hereafter MMJ0107) in the 1.1 mm continuum survey of the SMC by AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. MMJ0107 is also detected in the radio (843 MHz), Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m, all IRAC bands, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and near-infrared (J, H, K{sub S} ). We find an optical (U, B, V) source, which might be the lensing object, at a distance of 1.''4 from near-infrared and IRAC sources. Photometric redshift estimates for the SMG using representative spectral energy distribution templates show the redshifts of 1.4-3.9. We estimate total far-infrared luminosity of (0.3-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} and a star formation rate of 5600-39, 000 {mu}{sup -1} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, where {mu} is the gravitational magnification factor. This apparent extreme star formation activity is likely explained by a highly magnified gravitational lens system.

  4. Populations of Bright X-ray Sources in the Starburst Galaxies NGC 4038/4039

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Wei Liu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-01-01

    Assuming a naive star formation history,we construct synthetic X-ray source populations.using a population synthesis code,for comparison with the observed X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039.We have included highand intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.young rotation-powered pulsars and fallback disk-fed black holes in modeling the bright X-ray sources detected.We find that the majority of the X-ray sources are likely to be intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.but for typical binary evolution parameters.the predicted XLF seems to be steeper than observed.We note that the shape of the XLFs depends critically on the existence of XLF break for young populations.and suggest super-Eddington accretion luminosities or the existence of intermediate-mass black holes to account for the high luminosity end and the slope of the XLF in NGC 4038/4039.

  5. Spitzer/IRAC Imaging of Exceptionally Bright Cluster-Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Rawle, Timothy; Clement, Benjamin; Walth, Gregory; Pereira, Maria; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, discoveries of exceptionally bright (e.g., observed S_peak > 100 mJy in the Herschel/SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have generated great excitement. This is because these gravitationally lensed SMGs are so bright that they enable us to perform a variety of follow-up observations using a suite of observing facilities in the submillimeter, millimeter, and radio now available on the ground. Using Herschel, our team has been conducting a survey of such bright lensed galaxies in the fields of massive galaxy clusters: ``The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)'' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). This large Herschel program targets a total of 581 X-ray/SZ-selected massive clusters, and is currently 80% complete. Cluster lenses are often more powerful than galaxy lenses, producing larger magnifications. For example, typical magnification factors for galaxy-lensed Herschel sources are x10 or less while cluster-lensed systems can often produce magnification factors of x20-30 and even above x100. Cluster lenses will therefore allow us to detect and study intrinsically less-luminous and/or more distant sources with the ability to provide a view of finer-scale (i.e., sub-kpc) structures. Here, we propose to conduct Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 56 bright lensed SMG candidates we have identified in the ~470 HLS cluster fields observed so far. The main scientific goal is twofold: (1) to locate the underlying stellar component, and (2) to study its properties (e.g., stellar mass, specific star-formation rate) by constraining the rest-frame near-infrared SED and comparing with the Herschel and other submillimeter/millimeter data (e.g., SMA, PdB, ALMA, etc.). These rare bright lensed SMGs will allow us to probe the population of heavily dust-obscured vigorously star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z>1), which is thought to play an important role in the cosmic star-formation history of the Universe and yet has been difficult to study due to the

  6. The properties of a large volume-limited sample of face-on low surface brightness disk galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Hu Zhong; Yan-Chun Liang; Feng-Shan Liu; Francois Hammer; Karen Disseau; Li-Cai Deng

    2012-01-01

    We select a large volume-limited sample of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs,2021) to investigate in detail their statistical properties and their differences from high surface brightness galaxies (HSBGs,3639).The distributions of stellar masses of LSBGs and HSBGs are nearly the same and they have the same median values.Thus this volume-limited sample has good completeness and is further removed from the effect of stellar masses on their other properties when we compare LSBGs to HSBGs.We found that LSBGs tend to have lower stellar metallicities and lower effective dust attenuations,indicating that they have lower dust than HSBGs.The LSBGs have relatively higher stellar mass-to-light ratios,higher gas fractions,lower star forming rates (SFRs),and lower specific SFRs than HSBGs.Moreover,with the decreasing surface brightness,gas fraction increases,but the SFRs and specific SFRs decrease rapidly for the sample galaxies.This could mean that the star formation histories between LSBGs and HSBGs are different,and HSBGs may have stronger star forming activities than LSBGs.

  7. Another look at the size of the low-surface brightness galaxy VCC 1661 in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R Michael; Longstaff, Francis A; Collins, Michelle L M; Janz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We present new wide-field images of the low-surface brightness Virgo Cluster dwarf galaxy VCC 1661. The extant literature lists a broad range of radii for this object, covering a factor of more than four, depending on the filters used and the details of the analyses. While some studies find a radius typical of other Virgo dwarfs and note the normality of this object, any larger spatial extent, taken at face value, would render this galaxy the largest dwarf in the Virgo Cluster samples. Confirmation of a large extent of dwarf galaxies has often led to the discovery of tidal tails and would then, also in VCC 1661, indicate a severe state of tidal disruption. Given the importance of galactic sizes for assessing tidal interactions of the satellites with their hosts, we thus combine our surface brightness profile with data from the literature to investigate further the nature of this galaxy. However, our new characteristic radius for VCC 1661 of $r_e=24.1$"$\\pm7.7$" and the previously noted smooth appearance of it...

  8. Counting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许有国

    2005-01-01

    Most people began to count in tens because they had ten fingers on their hands. But in some countries, people counted on one hand and used the three parts of their four fingers. So they counted in twelves, not in tens.

  9. BRIGHT Lights, BIG City: Massive Galaxies, Giant Ly-A Nebulae, and Proto-Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breugel, W; Reuland, M; de Vries, W; Stanford, A; Dey, A; Kurk, J; Venemans, B; Rottgering, H; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; Dopita, M; Sutherland, R; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2002-08-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. They report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-{alpha} nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. They discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  10. High redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey: I. selection method and number counts based on redshift PDFs

    CERN Document Server

    Viironen, K; López-Sanjuan, C; Varela, J; Chaves-Montero, J; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D; Molino, A; Fernández-Soto, A; Ascaso, B; Cenarro, A J; Cerviño, M; Cepa, J; Ederoclite, A; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Moles, M; Oteo, I; Pović, M; Aguerri, J A L; Alfaro, E; Aparicio-Villegas, T; Benítez, N; Broadhurst, T; Cabrera-Caño, J; Castander, J F; Del Olmo, A; Delgado, R M González; Husillos, C; Infante, L; Martínez, V J; Perea, J; Prada, F; Quintana, J M

    2015-01-01

    Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so called dropout technique or Ly-alpha selection. However, the availability of multifilter data allows now replacing the dropout selections by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims. Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing in the study of the brightest, less frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods. The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reach...

  11. Predictions for Ultra-Deep Radio Counts of Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mancuso, Claudia; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Negrello, Mattia; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Bressan, Alessandro; Bonato, Matteo; Perrotta, Francesca; Danese, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We have worked out predictions for the radio counts of star-forming galaxies down to nJy levels, along with redshift distributions down to the detection limits of the phase 1 Square Kilometer Array MID telescope (SKA1-MID) and of its precursors. Such predictions were obtained by coupling epoch dependent star formation rate (SFR) functions with relations between SFR and radio (synchrotron and free-free) emission. The SFR functions were derived taking into account both the dust obscured and the unobscured star-formation, by combining far-infrared (FIR), ultra-violet (UV) and H_alpha luminosity functions up to high redshifts. We have also revisited the South Pole Telescope (SPT) counts of dusty galaxies at 95\\,GHz performing a detailed analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). Our results show that the deepest SKA1-MID surveys will detect high-z galaxies with SFRs two orders of magnitude lower compared to Herschel surveys. The highest redshift tails of the distributions at the detection limits of pla...

  12. Emission Features and Source Counts of Galaxies in Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, C; Fang, F; Shupe, D L; Lonsdale, C J; Lu, N Y; Helou, G; Stacey, G J; Ashby, M L N; Xu, Cong; Hacking, Perry B.; Fang, Fan; Shupe, David L.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lu, Nanyao Y.; Helou, George; Stacey, Gordon J.; Ashby, Matthew L.N.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we incorporate the newest ISO results on the mid-infrared spectral-energy-distributions (MIR SEDs) of galaxies into models for the number counts and redshift distributions of MIR surveys. A three-component model, with empirically determined MIR SED templates of (1) a cirrus/PDR component (2) a starburst component and (3) an AGN component, is developed for infrared (3--120\\micron) SEDs of galaxies. The model includes a complete IRAS 25\\micron selected sample of 1406 local galaxies ($z \\leq 0.1$; Shupe et al. 1998a). Results based on these 1406 spectra show that the MIR emission features cause significant effects on the redshift dependence of the K-corrections for fluxes in the WIRE 25\\micron band and ISOCAM 15\\micron band. This in turn will affect deep counts and redshift distributions in these two bands, as shown by the predictions of two evolution models (a luminosity evolution model with $L\\propto (1+z)^3$ and a density evolution model with $\\rho\\propto (1+z)^4$). The dips-and-bumps on curves o...

  13. Extremely-bright submillimeter galaxies beyond the Lupus-I star-forming region

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Y; Shimajiri, Y; Tsukagoshi, T; Nakajima, Y; Oasa, Y; Wilner, D J; Chandler, C J; Saigo, K; Tomida, K; Yun, M S; Taniguchi, A; Kohno, K; Hatsukade, B; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Dickman, R; Ezawa, H; Goss, W M; Hayashi, M; Hughes, D H; Hiramatsu, M; Inutsuka, S; Ogasawara, R; Ohashi, N; Oshima, T; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W

    2015-01-01

    We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4$-$344318 and MM J154132.7$-$350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 $\\mu$m and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are $z_{\\rm photo} \\simeq$ 4-5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-$z$ ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at $S_{\\rm 1.1mm} \\ge 25$ mJy, combined with other two 1.1-mm brightest sources, are $0.70 ^{+0.56}_{-0.34}$ deg$^{-2}$, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for ...

  14. Extra-galactic background light measurements from the far-UV to the far-IR from deep ground and space-based galaxy counts

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, Simon P; Davies, Luke J; Robotham, Aaron S G; Wright, Angus H; Windhorst, Rogier A; Cohen, Seth; Emig, Kim; Jansen, Rolf A; Dunne, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    We combine wide and deep galaxy number-count data from GAMA, COSMOS/G10, HST ERS, HST UVUDF and various near-, mid- and far- IR datasets from ESO, Spitzer and Herschel. The combined data range from the far-UV (0.15microns) to far-IR (500microns), and in all cases the contribution to the integrated galaxy light (IGL) of successively fainter galaxies converges. Using a simple spline fit, we derive the IGL and the extrapolated-IGL in all bands. We argue undetected low surface brightness galaxies and intra-cluster/group light is modest, and that our extrapolated-IGL measurements are an accurate representation of the extra-galactic background light. Our data agree with most earlier IGL estimates and with direct measurements in the far-IR, but disagree strongly with direct estimates in the optical. Close agreement between our results and recent very high-energy experiments (H.E.S.S. and MAGIC), suggest that there may be an additional foreground affecting the direct estimates. The most likely culprit could be the ad...

  15. J=1-0 HCN toward bright far-infrared sources in the outer Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogov, L.

    1999-08-01

    Results of the J=1-0 HCN observations toward 34 bright far-infrared sources selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog are reported. Together with 17 sources observed in this line earlier (Pirogov et al., 1996) they form a complete sample of the sources with flux densities S(100 mu m)>500 Jy and delta > 0degr in the outer Galaxy. The HCN data are compared with the HCO(+) , NH_3, CS and CO data taken from literature. Prominent correlations with nearly similar slopes of ~ 1 are revealed between line integrated intensities of the molecules known to be high density tracers (HCN, HCO(+) , NH_3 and CS). The correlations become higher after adding the data for dark clouds, small globules and cirrus cores implying similar excitation and formation mechanisms of the considered molecules. Collisional excitation in regions with different densities as well as different molecular abundances and velocity dispersions in different types of cores seem to be important in producing these correlations. The following relations hold on the average over ~ 3 orders of magnitude of integrated intensities: I(HCN)>~ I(HCO(+) ~ ) I(CS) > I(NH_3) where ammonia integrated intensities are several times lower than HCN ones. Correlations are also found between HCN and CO integrated intensities for the sample sources as well as between HCN line widths and those of other species. The HCN lines have the same widths as the HCO(+) ones and are larger than CS and especially NH_3 line widths. Weak correlations are found between HCN line widths and luminosities of IRAS sources as well as between HCN integrated intensities, IRAS flux densities at 100mu m and luminosities of IRAS sources divided by distance squared. The sources with most intense HCN lines have associated water masers and molecular outflows while the lack of associated maser and outflow implies weak or no HCN emission. In order to reproduce the anomalies of the J=1-0 HCN hyperfine structure (R12 factor.

  16. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiński, P.; Beckmann, V.; Gibaud, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I. E.; Ricci, C.; Soldi, S.; Türler, M.; Walter, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analysed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48_{-14}^{+57} keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centred at ≈0.8 and a narrow peak at ≈1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption model, reducing the fitted strength of Compton reflection by a factor of about 2. Modest reflection (median R ≈ 0.32) together with a high ratio of Comptonized to seed photon fluxes point towards a geometry with a compact hard X-ray emitting region well separated from the accretion disc. Our results imply that the template Seyferts spectra used in the population synthesis models of active galactic nuclei (AGN) should be revised.

  17. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies; 1, Oxygen abundances and abundance gradients in low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; Hulst, J. M. van der

    1998-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: We present measurements of the oxygen abundances in 64 HII regions in 12 LSB galaxies. We find that oxygen abundances are low. No regions with solar abundance have been found, and most have oxygen abundances $sim 0.5$ to 0.1 solar. The oxygen abundance appe

  18. An Extraordinary Group of 3.6micron Galaxies with Extremely Bright, Extended Far-IR Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin

    2013-08-01

    Based on WISE, Spitzer and recent Herschel far-IR data, we have discovered W0010+32, a remarkable object with extremely bright (detected by IRAS) and extended far-IR emission, coinciding with a group of 3.6micron sources with very faint optical magnitudes. The bright 70micron emission was resolved into two peaks, separated by 10arcseconds. The photo-z estimates based on optical and IR data are largely uncertain, ranging from 0.7 to >2. The bright far-IR emission from W0010+32 could either be magnified by the gravitational lensing of a foreground cluster of galaxies or is a rare case of a cluster of intrinsically luminous hyperLIRGs. Either case offers a rare window on the rapid transformation of galaxies and clusters during a short episode of the most energetic activity. To unravel the mystery of W0010+32, we request 0.5 nights of Keck I time to obtain J, H & K-band multi-object near-IR spectra using MOSFIRE. The proposed near-IR spectra will detect emission lines ! from galaxies with SFR as low as 0.4-3.4Msun/yr at z 1-2.3. This data will enable the following critical measurements: (1) redshifts of galaxies, and determine if it is indeed a group/cluster, (2) metallicities and AGN content based on emission line ratios and widths, (3) unobscured SFR based on Halpha line fluxes as well as dust extinctions based on spectral lines and continuum slopes, (4) kinematic velocity measurements with spatially and spectrally resolved emission lines (gas outflows) commonly seen among extreme starbursts.

  19. zCOSMOS-10k-bright spectroscopic sample. The bimodality in the galaxy stellar mass function : Exploring its evolution with redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Lilly, S.; Renzini, A.; Moresco, M.; Mignoli, M.; Cassata, P.; Tasca, L.; Lamareille, F.; Maier, C.; Meneux, B.; Halliday, C.; Oesch, P.; Vergani, D.; Caputi, K.; Kovac, K.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Iovino, A.; Peng, Y.; Carollo, M.; Contini, T.; P. Kneib, J.; Le F'evre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Coppa, G.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; F. Le Borgne, J.; Le Brun, V.; Pell`o, R.; Perez Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; D. Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; M. Koekemoer, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; J. McCracken, H.; Memeo, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.

    2010-01-01

    We present the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) to redshift z similar or equal to 1, based on the analysis of about 8500 galaxies with I <22.5 (AB mag) over 1.4 deg(2), which are part of the zCOSMOS-bright 10k spectroscopic sample. We investigate the total GSMF, as well as the contributions of ea

  20. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies III. Why they are blue, thin and poor in molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, JPE; de Blok, WJG

    1999-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies and their Interstellar Medium to investigate the cause for their low star formation rates (SFR). Due to their massive halos, stellar disks of LSB galaxies are very stable and thin. Lack of dust makes the projected edge-on surface

  1. From major merger to radio galaxy : low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to the giant HI ring around B2 0648+27

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Morganti, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Brogt, E.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of a low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to an enormous (190 kpc) ring of neutral hydrogen (HI) gas that surrounds the nearby radio galaxy B2 0648+27. This system is currently in an evolutionary stage between major merger and (radio-loud) early-type galaxy. In a previ

  2. Blending bias impacts the host halo masses derived from a cross-correlation analysis of bright sub-millimetre galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cowley, William I; Baugh, Carlton M; Cole, Shaun; Wilkinson, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Placing bright sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) within the broader context of galaxy formation and evolution requires accurate measurements of their clustering, which can constrain the masses of their host dark matter halos. Recent work has shown that the clustering measurements of these galaxies may be affected by a `blending bias,' which results in the angular correlation function of the sources extracted from single-dish imaging surveys being boosted relative to that of the underlying galaxies. This is due to confusion introduced by the coarse angular resolution of the single-dish telescope and could lead to the inferred halo masses being significantly overestimated. We investigate the extent to which this bias affects the measurement of the correlation function of SMGs when it is derived via a cross-correlation with a more abundant galaxy population. We find that the blending bias is essentially the same as in the auto-correlation case and conclude that the best way to reduce its effects is to calculate the...

  3. Investigating AGN black hole masses and the MBH-σe relation for low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S.; Ramya, S.; Das, M.; George, K.; Sivarani, T.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the optical nuclear spectra from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) in a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we derived the virial black hole (BH) masses of 24 galaxies from their broad Hα parameters. We find that our estimates of nuclear BH masses lie in the range 105-107 M⊙, with a median mass of 5.62 × 106 M⊙. The bulge stellar velocity dispersion σe was determined from the underlying stellar spectra. We compared our results with the existing BH mass-velocity dispersion (MBH-σe) correlations and found that the majority of our sample lie in the low BH mass regime and below the MBH-σe correlation. We analysed the effects of any systematic bias in the MBH estimates, the effects of galaxy orientation in the measurement of σe and the increase of σe due to the presence of bars and found that these effects are insufficient to explain the observed offset in MBH-σe correlation. Thus, the LSB galaxies tend to have low-mass BHs which probably are not in co-evolution with the host galaxy bulges. A detailed study of the nature of the bulges and the role of dark matter in the growth of the BHs is needed to further understand the BH-bulge co-evolution in these poorly evolved and dark matter dominated systems.

  4. Galaxy halo truncation and Giant Arc Surface Brightness Reconstruction in the Cluster MACSJ1206.2-0847

    CERN Document Server

    Eichner, Thomas; Suyu, Sherry H; Halkola, Aleksi; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zitrin, Adi; Coe, Dan; Monna, Anna; Rosati, Piero; Grillo, Claudio; Balestra, Italo; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Zheng, Wei; H\\ost, Ole; Lemze, Doron; Broadhurst, Tom; Moustakas, Leonidas; Bradley, Larry; Molino, Alberto; Nonino, Mario; Mercurio, Amata; Scodeggio, Marco; Bartelmann, Matthias; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Donahue, Megan; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Lahav, Ofer; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Merten, Julian; Riess, Adam

    2013-01-01

    In this work we analyze the mass distribution of MACSJ1206.2-0847, especially focusing on the halo properties of its cluster members. The cluster appears relaxed in its X-ray emission, but has significant amounts of intracluster light which is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that galaxy-scale interactions are still ongoing despite the overall relaxed state. The cluster lenses 12 background galaxies into multiple images and one galaxy at $z=1.033$ into a giant arc and its counterimage. The multiple image positions and the surface brightness distribution (SFB) of the arc which is bent around several cluster members are sensitive to the cluster galaxy halo properties. We model the cluster mass distribution with a NFW profile and the galaxy halos with two parameters for the mass normalization and extent of a reference halo assuming scalings with their observed NIR--light. We match the multiple image positions at an r.m.s. level of $0.85\\arcsec$ and can reconstruct the SFB distribution of the arc in several...

  5. A bright, spatially extended lensed galaxy at z = 1.7 behind the cluster RCS2 032727-132623

    CERN Document Server

    Wuyts, Eva; Gladders, Michael D; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B; Carrasco, Mauricio; Gilbank, David; Yee, H K C; Koester, Benjamin P; Muñoz, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of an extremely bright and extended lensed source from the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). RCSGA 032727-132609 is spectroscopically confirmed as a giant arc and counter-image of a background galaxy at $z=1.701$, strongly-lensed by the foreground galaxy cluster RCS2 032727-132623 at $z=0.564$. The giant arc extends over $\\sim 38$\\,\\arcsec and has an integrated $g$-band magnitude of 19.15, making it $\\sim 20$ times larger and $\\sim 4$ times brighter than the prototypical lensed galaxy MS1512-cB58. This is the brightest distant lensed galaxy in the Universe known to date. Its location in the `redshift desert' provides unique opportunities to connect between the large samples of galaxies known at $z\\sim3$ and $z\\sim1$. We have collected photometry in 9 bands, ranging from $u$ to $K_s$, which densely sample the rest-frame UV and optical light, including the age-sensitive 4000\\AA\\ break. A lens model is constructed for the system, and results in a robust total magnification of $2...

  6. Sleeping Giants? - X-ray search for low-luminosity AGN candidates in nearby optically bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kalcheva, Ivayla E

    2014-01-01

    In this Master's project, the X-ray nuclear properties of a sample of bright nearby galaxies are explored. This is done by matching their comprehensive optical spectroscopic classification to the latest available XMM-Newton catalogue - 3XMM-DR4. The good coverage (approx. 38 per cent) ensures that a statistically representative sample is investigated. All nuclear and morphological subsets found within the original sample of 486 galaxies are encompassed, but early-type galaxies and galaxies with optical features characteristic for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are favoured. The results from the investigation of the properties of our cross-matched sample are overall consistent with the presence of a large fraction of X-ray - detected low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN). The X-ray - detected galaxies within our HII and transition-LINER subsets are of particular interest, as they could harbour LLAGN missed by optical spectroscopic selection. The properties of these nuclei are explored by X-ray spectral fitting of available...

  7. GALAXY HALO TRUNCATION AND GIANT ARC SURFACE BRIGHTNESS RECONSTRUCTION IN THE CLUSTER MACSJ1206.2-0847

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichner, Thomas; Seitz, Stella; Monna, Anna [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Suyu, Sherry H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Halkola, Aleksi [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160 23562 Luebeck (Germany); Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Zitrin, Adi [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, ZAH, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Coe, Dan; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Rosati, Piero [ESO-European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Grillo, Claudio; Host, Ole [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Balestra, Italo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zheng, Wei; Lemze, Doron [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Broadhurst, Tom [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Moustakas, Leonidas [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Molino, Alberto [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huetor 24, Granada E-18008 (Spain); and others

    2013-09-10

    In this work, we analyze the mass distribution of MACSJ1206.2-0847, particularly focusing on the halo properties of its cluster members. The cluster appears relaxed in its X-ray emission, but has a significant amount of intracluster light that is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that galaxy-scale interactions are still ongoing despite the overall relaxed state. The cluster lenses 12 background galaxies into multiple images and one galaxy at z = 1.033 into a giant arc and its counterimage. The multiple image positions and the surface brightness (SFB) distribution of the arc, which is bent around several cluster members, are sensitive to the cluster galaxy halo properties. We model the cluster mass distribution with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and the galaxy halos with two parameters for the mass normalization and the extent of a reference halo assuming scalings with their observed near-infrared light. We match the multiple image positions at an rms level of 0.''85 and can reconstruct the SFB distribution of the arc in several filters to a remarkable accuracy based on this cluster model. The length scale where the enclosed galaxy halo mass is best constrained is about 5 effective radii-a scale in between those accessible to dynamical and field strong-lensing mass estimates on the one hand and galaxy-galaxy weak-lensing results on the other hand. The velocity dispersion and halo size of a galaxy with m{sub 160W,AB} = 19.2 and M{sub B,Vega} = -20.7 are {sigma} = 150 km s{sup -1} and r Almost-Equal-To 26 {+-} 6 kpc, respectively, indicating that the halos of the cluster galaxies are tidally stripped. We also reconstruct the unlensed source, which is smaller by a factor of {approx}5.8 in area, demonstrating the increase in morphological information due to lensing. We conclude that this galaxy likely has star-forming spiral arms with a red (older) central component.

  8. Structure and dynamics of galaxies with a low surface-brightness disc - II. Stellar populations of bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, L; Pizzella, A; Bontà, E Dalla; Coccato, L; Méndez-Abreu, J; Cesetti, M

    2012-01-01

    The radial profiles of the Hb, Mg, and Fe line-strength indices are presented for a sample of eight spiral galaxies with a low surface-brightness stellar disc and a bulge. The correlations between the central values of the line-strength indices and velocity dispersion are consistent to those known for early-type galaxies and bulges of high surface-brightness galaxies. The age, metallicity, and alpha/Fe enhancement of the stellar populations in the bulge-dominated region are obtained using stellar population models with variable element abundance ratios. Almost all the sample bulges are characterized by a young stellar population, on-going star formation, and a solar alpha/Fe enhancement. Their metallicity spans from high to sub-solar values. No significant gradient in age and alpha/Fe enhancement is measured, whereas only in a few cases a negative metallicity gradient is found. These properties suggest that a pure dissipative collapse is not able to explain formation of all the sample bulges and that other ph...

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The Bright Void Galaxy Population in the Optical and Mid-IR

    CERN Document Server

    Penny, S J; Pimbblet, K A; Cluver, M E; Croton, D J; Owers, M S; Lange, R; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Driver, S P; Holwerda, B W; Hopkins, A M; Jarrett, T H; Jones, D Heath; Kelvin, L S; Lara-Lopez, M A; Liske, J; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Loveday, J; Meyer, M; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    We examine the properties of galaxies in the Galaxies and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey located in voids with radii $>10~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Utilising the GAMA equatorial survey, 592 void galaxies are identified out to z~0.1 brighter than $M_{r} = -18.4$, our magnitude completeness limit. Using the $W_{\\rm{H\\alpha}}$ vs. [NII]/H$\\alpha$ (WHAN) line strength diagnostic diagram, we classify their spectra as star forming, AGN, or dominated by old stellar populations. For objects more massive than $5\\times10^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$, we identify a sample of 26 void galaxies with old stellar populations classed as passive and retired galaxies in the WHAN diagnostic diagram, else they lack any emission lines in their spectra. When matched to WISE mid-IR photometry, these passive and retired galaxies exhibit a range of mid-IR colour, with a number of void galaxies exhibiting [4.6]-[12] colours inconsistent with completely quenched stellar populations, with a similar spread in colour seen for a randomly drawn non-void comparison samp...

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dwarf galaxies surface brightness profiles. II. (Herrmann+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2016-07-01

    Our galaxy sample (see Table1) is derived from the survey of nearby (>30Mpc) late-type galaxies conducted by Hunter & Elmegreen 2006 (cat. J/ApJS/162/49). The full survey includes 94 dwarf Irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 20 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms). The 141 dwarf sample presented in the first paper of the present series (Paper I; Herrmann et al. 2013, Cat. J/AJ/146/104) contains one fewer Sm galaxy and two additional dIm systems than the original survey. A multi-wavelength data set has been assembled for these galaxies. The data include Hα images (129 galaxies with detections) to trace star formation over the past 10Myr (Hunter & Elmegreen 2004, Cat. J/AJ/128/2170) and satellite UV images (61 galaxies observed) obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) to trace star formation over the past ~200Myr. The GALEX data include images from two passbands with effective wavelengths of 1516Å (FUV) and 2267Å (NUV) and resolutions of 4'' and 5.6'', respectively. Three of the galaxies in our sample with NUV data do not have FUV data. To trace older stars we have UBV images, which are sensitive to stars formed over the past 1Gyr for on-going star formation, and images in at least one band of JHK for 40 galaxies in the sample, which integrates the star formation over the galaxy's lifetime. Note that nine dwarfs are missing UB data and three more are missing U-band data. In addition we made use of 3.6μm images (39 galaxies) obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) in the Spitzer archives also to probe old stars. (3 data files).

  11. The behaviour of dark matter associated with 4 bright cluster galaxies in the 10kpc core of Abell 3827

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Richard; Smit, Renske; Swinbank, Mark; Kitching, Thomas; Harvey, David; Jauzac, Mathilde; Israel, Holger; Clowe, Douglas; Edge, Alastair; Hilton, Matt; Jullo, Eric; Leonard, Adrienne; Liesenborgs, Jori; Merten, Julian; Mohammed, Irshad; Nagai, Daisuke; Richard, Johan; Robertson, Andrew; Saha, Prasenjit; Santana, Rebecca; Stott, John; Tittley, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy cluster Abell 3827 hosts the stellar remnants of four almost equally bright elliptical galaxies within a core of radius 10kpc. Such corrugation of the stellar distribution is very rare, and suggests recent formation by several simultaneous mergers. We map the distribution of associated dark matter, using new Hubble Space Telescope imaging and VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed system threaded through the cluster core. We find that each of the central galaxies retains a dark matter halo, but that (at least) one of these is spatially offset from its stars. The best-constrained offset is 1.62+/-0.48kpc, where the 68% confidence limit includes both statistical error and systematic biases in mass modelling. Such offsets are not seen in field galaxies, but are predicted during the long infall to a cluster, if dark matter self-interactions generate an extra drag force. With such a small physical separation, it is difficult to definitively rule out astrophysical effects operating ...

  12. VIMOS-VLT Integral Field Kinematics of the Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxy ESO 323-G064

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, L; Rubin, V C; D'Odorico, S; McGaugh, S S

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We have studied the bulge and the disk kinematics of the giant low surface brightness galaxy ESO 323-G064 in order to investigate its dynamical properties and the radial mass profile of the dark matter (DM) halo. Methods:We observed the galaxy with integral field spectroscopy (VLT/VIMOS, in IFU configuration), measured the positions of the ionized gas by fitting Gaussian functions to the O[III] and Hbeta emission lines, and fit stellar templates to the galaxy spectra to determine velocity and velocity dispersions. We modeled the stellar kinematics in the bulge with spherical isotropic Jeans models and explored the implications of self consistent and dark matter scenarios for NFW and pseudo isothermal halos. Results:In the bulge-dominated region, r<5", the emission lines show multi-peaked profiles. The disk dominated region of the galaxy, 13"

  13. Herschel and SCUBA-2 imaging and spectroscopy of a bright, lensed submillimetre galaxy at z = 2.3

    CERN Document Server

    Ivison, R J; Swinyard, B; Smail, Ian; Pearson, C P; Rigopoulou, D; Polehampton, E; Baluteau, J -P; Barlow, M J; Blain, A W; Bock, J; Clements, D L; Coppin, K; Cooray, A; Danielson, A; Dwek, E; Edge, A C; Franceschini, A; Fulton, T; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Isaak, K; Leeks, S; Lim, T; Naylor, D; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Perez-Fournon, I; Rowan-Robinson, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Valtchanov, I; Vigroux, L; Wright, G S

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the far-IR properties of the bright, lensed, z = 2.3, SMG, SMM J2135-0102, using new observations with Herschel, SCUBA-2 and the VLA. These data allow us to constrain the galaxy's SED and show that it has an intrinsic rest-frame 8-1000um luminosity, L(bol), of (2.3 +/- 0.2) x 10^12 L(sun) and a likely SFR of ~400 M(sun)/yr. The galaxy sits on the far-IR/radio correlation for far-IR-selected galaxies. At ~>70um, the SED can be described adequately by dust components with T(d) ~ 30 and 60K. Using SPIRE's Fourier Transform Spectrometer we report a detection of the [CII] 158um cooling line. If the [CII], CO and far-IR continuum arise in photo-dissociation regions, we derive a characteristic gas density, n ~ 10^3 cm^-3, and a far-UV radiation field, G_0, 10^3x stronger than the Milky Way. L([CII])/L(bol) is significantly higher than in local ULIRGs but similar to the values found in local star-forming galaxies and starburst nuclei. This is consistent with SMM J2135-0102 being powe...

  14. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies selected from the 40% sky area of the ALFALFA HI survey.I.Sample and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Wei; Lam, Man I; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The population of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies is crucial for understanding the extremes of galaxy formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (HI), the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample is absolutely one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local Universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galaxy images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended low surface brightness outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images in the alpha.40-SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model for each galaxy image. Basing on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, mu_{0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined ...

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1415MHz Survey of Bright Galaxies (Hummel, 1980)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, E.

    2003-11-01

    The radio continuum radiation at 1415MHz of 450 galaxies was observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. 190 galaxies were detected. The survey provides data on the total intensity and on the structure of the radiation. The detection limit for point sources is 10mJy and the resolution is about 23" on average. (2 data files).

  16. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: blank-field number counts of 450um-selected galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Halpern, M; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P; Serjeant, S; Farrah, D; Roseboom, I; Targett, T; Arumugam, V; Asboth, V; Blain, A; Chrysostomou, A; Clarke, C; Ivison, R J; Jones, S L; Karim, A; Mackenzie, T; Meijerink, R; Michalowski, M J; Scott, D; Simpson, J; Swinbank, A M; Alexander, D; Almaini, O; Aretxaga, I; Best, P; Chapman, S; Clements, D L; Conselice, C; Danielson, A L R; Eales, S; Edge, A C; Gibb, A; Hughes, D; Jenness, T; Knudsen, K K; Lacey, C; Marsden, G; McMahon, R; Oliver, S; Page, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Spaans, M; Stevens, J; Webb, T M A; Willott, C; Wilson, C D; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    The first deep blank-field 450um map (1-sigma~1.3mJy) from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), conducted with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is presented. Our map covers 140 arcmin^2 of the COSMOS field, in the footprint of the HST CANDELS area. Using 60 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at >3.75-sigma, we evaluate the number counts of 450um-selected galaxies with flux densities S_450>5mJy. The 8-arcsec JCMT beam and high sensitivity of SCUBA-2 now make it possible to directly resolve a larger fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB, peaking at ~200um) into the individual galaxies responsible for its emission than has previously been possible at this wavelength. At S_450>5mJy we resolve (7.4[+/-]0.7)x10^-2 MJy/sr of the CIB at 450um (equivalent to 16[+/-]7% of the absolute brightness measured by COBE at this wavelength) into point sources. A further ~40% of the CIB can be recovered through a statistical stack of 24um emitters in this field, indicating that the majority (~60%) o...

  17. AGN and starburst in bright Seyfert galaxies: from IR photometry to IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Malkan, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    Infrared photometry and later infrared spectroscopy provided powerful diagnostics to distinguish between the main emission mechanisms in galaxies: AGN and Starburst. After the pioneering work on infrared photometry with IRAS in the far-IR and the S.Pedro Martir and ESO ground-based work in the near-IR, ISO photometry extended up to 200um the coverage of the galaxies energy distributions. Then Spitzer collected accurate mid-infrared spectroscopy on different samples of galaxies. We will review the work done on the 12um galaxy sample since the times of IRAS photometry to the new Spitzer spectroscopy. The main results on the multifrequency data of 12um selected Seyfert galaxies are presented and discussed in the light of unification and evolution models. The spectroscopic work of Spitzer will soon be complemented at longer wavelengths by the Herschel spectrometers and in the future by SPICA at higher redshift.

  18. Evolution and constrains in the star formation histories of IR-bright star forming galaxies at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklias, Panos; Schaerer, Daniel; Elbaz, David

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and constraining the early cosmic star formation history of the Universe is a key question of galaxy evolution. A large fraction of star formation is dust obscured, so it is crucial to have access to the IR emission of galaxies to properly study them.Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometry from GOODS-Herschel, we perform SED fitting with different variable star formation histories (SFHs), which we constrain thanks to the observed IR luminosities, on a large sample of individually IR-detected sources from z~1 to 4. We explore how (and to which extent) constraining dust attenuation thanks to the IR luminosities allows to reduce the scatter (expected when using variable SFHs, in contrast to IR+UV standard calibrations) in physical properties and relations such as mass-SFR and the so-called star-forming Main Sequence (MS).Although limited at the high-z end, our analysis shows a change of trends in SFHs between low and high z, that follows the established cosmic SFR density, with galaxies found to prefer rising SFRs at z~3-4, and declining SFRs at z≤1. We show that a fraction of galaxies (~20%), mainly at z≤2, can have lower SFRs than IR-inferred, but still being compatible with the observations, indicative of being post-starbursts/undergoing quenching while bright in the IR, in agreement with theoretical work. The IR-constrained stellar population models we obtain also indicate that the two main modes of star formation - MS and starburst - evolve differently with time, with the former being mostly slow evolving and lying on the MS for long lasting periods, and the latter being very recent, rapidly increasing bursts (or on the decline, when belonging to the aforementioned "quenched" category). Finally, we illustrate how spectroscopic observation of nebular emission lines further enables as to constrain effectively the SFHs of galaxies.

  19. A Search for Low Surface Brightness Structure Around Compact Narrow Emission Line Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Bershady, M A; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    As the most extreme members of the rapidly evolving faint blue galaxy population at intermediate redshift, the compact narrow emission line galaxies (CNELGs) are intrinsically luminous (-22 -18). Conversely, 15 are not blue enough to fade to low-luminosity dwarfs (M_B > -15.2). The majority of the CNELGs are consistent with progenitors of intermediate-luminosity dwarfs and low-luminosity spiral galaxies with small disks. CNELGs are a heterogeneous progenitor population with significant fractions (up to 44%) capable of fading into today's faint dwarfs (M_B > -15.2), while 15 to 85% may only experience an apparently extremely compact CNELG phase at intermediate redshift but remain more luminous galaxies at the present epoch.

  20. The Formation of Submillimetre-Bright Galaxies from Gas Infall over a Billion Years

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Desika; Feldmann, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Hopkins, Philip; Thompson, Robert; Hayward, Christopher; Ball, David; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    Submillimetre-luminous galaxies at high-redshift are the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe, and are characterised by prodigious emission in the far-infrared at 850 microns (S850 > 5 mJy). They reside in halos ~ 10^13Msun, have low gas fractions compared to main sequence disks at a comparable redshift, trace complex environments, and are not easily observable at optical wavelengths. Their physical origin remains unclear. Simulations have been able to form galaxies with the requisite luminosities, but have otherwise been unable to simultaneously match the stellar masses, star formation rates, gas fractions and environments. Here we report a cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation that is able to form a submillimetre galaxy which simultaneously satisfies the broad range of observed physical constraints. We find that groups of galaxies residing in massive dark matter halos have rising star formation histories that peak at collective rates ~ 500-1000 Msun/yr at z=2-3, by wh...

  1. Clustering of Infrared-bright Dust-obscured Galaxies Revealed by the Hyper Suprime-Cam and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Yoshiki; Nagao, Tohru; Kajisawa, Masaru; Oogi, Taira; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Coupon, Jean; Strauss, Michael A.; Wang, Wei-Hao; Tanaka, Masayuki; Niida, Mana; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Terashima, Yuichi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Harikane, Yuichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Noboriguchi, Akatoki; Usuda, Tomonori

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of the clustering properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining 125 deg2 of wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, we have discovered 4367 IR-bright DOGs with {(i-[22])}{AB}> 7.0 and flux density at 22 μ {{m}}> 1.0 mJy. We calculate the angular autocorrelation function (ACF) for a uniform subsample of 1411 DOGs with 3.0 mJy r 0 = 12.0 ± 2.0 and 10.3 ± 1.7 {h}-1 Mpc, respectively. IR-bright DOGs reside in massive dark matter halos with a mass of {log}[ /({h}-1 {M}ȯ )]={13.57}-0.55+0.50 and {13.65}-0.52+0.45 in the two cases, respectively.

  2. Investigating AGN Black Hole Masses and the M-$\\sigma_e$ relation for Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, Smitha; Das, Mousumi; George, Koshy; T, Sivarani; Prabhu, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the optical nuclear spectra from the active galactic nuclei (AGN) in a sample of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we derived the virial black hole (BH) masses of 24 galaxies from their broad H$\\alpha$ parameters. We find that our estimates of nuclear BH masses lie in the range $10^{5}-10^{7}~M_{\\odot}$, with a median mass of 5.62 x 10$^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. The bulge stellar velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{e}$ was determined from the underlying stellar spectra. We compared our results with the existing BH mass - velocity dispersion ($M_{BH}-\\sigma_{e}$) correlations and found that the majority of our sample lie in the low BH mass regime and below the $M_{BH}-\\sigma_{e}$ correlation. We analysed the effects of any systematic bias in the M$_{BH}$ estimates, the effects of galaxy orientation in the measurement of $\\sigma_e$ and the increase of $\\sigma_e$ due to the presence of bars and found that these effects are insufficient to explain...

  3. The Intrinsic Shapes of Low-Surface-Brightness Dwarf Irregular Galaxies and Comparison to Other Types of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, E C; Ryden, S; Patterson, J; Chun, M S; Kim, H I; Lee, W B; Sung, Eon-Chang; Han, Cheongho; Chun, Moon-Suk; Kim, Ho-Il; Lee, Woo-Baik

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we measure the ellipticities of 30 LSB dI galaxies and compare the ellipticity distribution with that of 80 dEs (Ryden & Terndrup 1994; Ryden et al. 1998) and 62 BCDs (Sung et al. 1998). We find that the ellipticity distribution of LSB dIs is very similar to that of BCDs, and marginally different from that of dEs. We then determine the distribution of intrinsic shapes of dI galaxies and compare to those of other type dwarf galaxies under various assumptions. First, we assume that LSB dIs are either all oblate or all prolate, and use non-parametric analysis to find the best-fitting distribution of intrinsic shapes. With this assumption, we find that the scarcity of nearly circular LSB dIs implies, at the 99% confidence level, that they cannot be a population of randomly oriented oblate or prolate objects. Next, we assume that dIs are triaxial, and use parametric analysis to find permissible distributions of intrinsic shapes. We find that if the intrinsic axis ratios, $\\beta$ and parameters f...

  4. The Millennium Galaxy Catalogue: Star counts and the Structure of the Galactic Stellar Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Lemon, D; Liske, J; Driver, S; Horne, K; Lemon, David; Wyse, Rosemary F.G.; Liske, Jochen; Driver, Simon; Horne, Keith

    2004-01-01

    We derive a star catalogue generated from the images taken as part of the 37.5 sq. deg Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. These data, alone and together with colours gained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release, allow the analysis of faint star counts (B(MGC) < 20) at high Galactic latitude (41 < b < 63), as a function of Galactic longitude (239 < l < 353). We focus here on the inner stellar halo, providing robust limits on the amplitude of substructure and on the large-scale flattening. In line with previous results, the thick disk, an old, intermediate-metallicity population, is clearly seen in the colour-magnitude diagram. We find that the Galactic stellar halo within ~10 kpc (the bulk of the stellar mass) is significantly flattened, with an axial ratio of (c/a) =0.56 +/- 0.01, again consistent with previous results. Our analysis using counts-in-cells, angular correlation functions and the Lee 2D statistic, confirms tidal debris from the Sagittarius dwarf but finds little evidence f...

  5. A Stellar Population Synthesis Model for the Study of Ultraviolet Star Counts of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Ananta C; Robin, A C; Ghosh, S K; Vickers, John J

    2014-01-01

    GALEX, the first all sky imaging UV satellite, has imaged a large part of the sky providing an excellent opportunity for studying UV star counts. The aim of our study is to investigate in detail the observed UV star counts obtained by GALEX vis-a-vis the model simulated catalogs produced by the Besancon model of stellar population synthesis in various Galactic directions, and to explore the potential for studying the structure of our Galaxy from images in multiple NUV and FUV filters of the forthcoming Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) to be flown onboard ASTROSAT. We have upgraded the Besancon model of stellar population synthesis to include the UV bands of GALEX and UVIT. Depending on the availability of contiguous GALEX, SDSS, WISE and 2MASS overlapping regions, we have chosen a set of 19 GALEX fields which spread over a range of Galactic directions. We cross-matched GALEX sources with the WISE+2MASS and SDSS catalogs and UV stars in the GALEX catalog are identified by choosing a suitable IR colour, J -...

  6. Bright stars and recent star formation in the irregular magellanic galaxy NGC2366

    CERN Document Server

    Aparicio, A; Gallart, C; Castaneda, H O; Chiosi, C; Bertelli, G; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Telles, E; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Díaz, A I; García-Vargas, M L; Garzón, F; González-Delgado, R M; Mas-Hesse, J M; Pérez, E; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J M; Terlevich, E; Terlevich, R J; Varela, A M; Vílchez, J M; Cepa, J; Gallart, C; Castaneda, H; Chiosi, C; Bertelli, G; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Telles, Eduardo; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Diaz, A I; Garcia-Vargas, M L; Garzon, F; Gonzalez-Delgado, R Ma; Mas-Hesse, M; Perez, E; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J M; Terlevich, E; Terlevich, R J; Varela, A M; Vilchez, J M

    1995-01-01

    The stellar content of the Im galaxy NGC 2366 is discussed on the basis of CCD BVR photometry. The three brightest blue and red stars have been used to estimate its distance, obtaining a balue of 2.9 Mpc. The spatial distribution of the young stellar population is discussed in the light of the integrated color indices and the color-magnitude diagrams of different zones of the galaxy. A generalized star formation burst seems to have taken place about 50 Myr ago. The youngest stars are preferentially formed in the South-West part of the bar, where the giant HII complex NGC 2363 is located, being younger and bluer. The bar seems to play a role favouring star formation in one of its extremes. Self-propagation however, does not seem to be triggering star formation at large scale. A small region, populated by very young stars has also been found at the East of the galaxy.

  7. The extraordinarily bright optical afterglow of GRB 991208 and its host galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Sokolov, V.V.; Gorosabel, J.;

    2001-01-01

    a massive star origin. The absolute magnitude of the galaxy is M-B = -18.2, well below the knee of the galaxy luminosity function and we derive a star-forming rate of (11.5 +/- 7.1) M-circle dot yr(-1), which is much larger than the present-day rate in our Galaxy. The quasi simultaneous broad......-band photometric spectral energy distribution of the afterglow was determined similar to3.5 day after the burst (Dec. 12.0) implying a cooling frequency ve below the optical band, i.e. supporting a jet model with p = -2.30 as the index of the power-law electron distribution....

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dwarf galaxies surface brightness profiles. I. (Herrmann+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, K. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2014-07-01

    Our galaxy sample (see Table 1) is from the survey of Hunter & Elmegreen (2004, Cat. J/AJ/128/2170), which includes 94 dwarf Irregulars (dIms), 26 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs), and 20 Magellanic-type spirals (Sms).4 (The Sm F567-2 is missing from this study and two dIms, F473-V1 and F620-V3, have been added.) UBV images from 27 observing runs are given by Hunter & Elmegreen (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/162/49) for 136 dwarfs and images from at least one band of JHK are presented for 41 (26 dIm, 12 BCD, and 3 Sm) from an additional 9 observing runs. The remaining 5 out of 141 galaxies (DDO 125, Mrk 67, NGC 1705, NGC 2101, and NGC 3109) were observed earlier with a different detector and so were not included in Hunter & Elmegreen (2006). Most of the UBV and JHK images were obtained with the Lowell Observatory 1.1m or 1.8m telescopes. Satellite UV images were also obtained with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). GALEX produced images in two passbands: FUV, with a bandpass of 1350-1750Å, an effective wavelength of 1516Å, and a resolution of 4" and NUV with a bandpass of 1750-2800Å, an effective wavelength of 2267Å, and a resolution of 5.6". The FUV and NUV data are on the AB magnitude system whereas the data in all other broad bands are on the Johnson/Cousin system. Hunter et al. (2010AJ....139..447H) analyzed surface photometry and derived SF rates from archival GALEX images of 44 galaxies. (Note that NUV data were available for DDO 88, DDO 165, and DDO 180 but FUV images were not.) Hunter et al. (2011AJ....142..121H) obtained deep GALEX UV images of an additional four galaxies and a deeper image of DDO 53. The LITTLE THINGS team obtained data on another 12 galaxies (Zhang et al., 2012AJ....143...47Z). We obtained mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5{micro}m) images with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) from the Spitzer archives. Hunter et al. (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/162/49) analyzed data on 21 galaxies in our sample. Other data were taken by several Spitzer Legacy projects: The Local

  9. Dynamical stability and environmental influences in low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihos, C.; McGaugh, S. S.; Blok, E. de

    1997-01-01

    Using analytic stability criteria we demonstrate that, because of their low surface mass density and large dark matter content, low surface brightness (LSB) disks are quite stable against the growth of global nonaxisymmetric modes such as bars. However, depending on their (poorly constrained) stella

  10. The luminosity function and surface brightness distribution of HI selected galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH; Sprayberry, D

    2001-01-01

    We measure the z = 0 B-band optical luminosity function (LF) for galaxies selected in a blind Hi survey. The total LF of the Hi selected sample is flat, with Schechter parameters M*= -19.38+(+1.02)(-0.62) + 5 log h(100) mag and alpha = -1.03(-0.15)(+0.25), in good agreement with LFs of optically sel

  11. Determination of the abundance of cosmic matter via the cell count moments of the galaxy distribution (1)

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Julien

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate and precise information about the matter content of the universe can be retrieved via a simple cell count analysis of the 3D spatial distribution of galaxies. A new clustering statistic, the {\\it galaxy clustering ratio} $\\eta$, is the key in this process. This is defined as the ratio between one- and two-point second-order moments of the smoothed galaxy density distribution. The distinguishing feature of this statistic is its universality: on large cosmic scales both galaxies (in redshift space) and mass (in real space) display the same $\\eta$ amplitude. This quantity, in addition, does not evolve as a function of redshift. As a consequence, the $\\eta$ statistic provides insight into characteristic parameters of the real-space power spectrum of mass density fluctuations without the need to specify the galaxy biasing function, a model for galaxy redshift distortions nor the growing mode of density ripples. We demonstrate the method with the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample extract...

  12. The Sloan Bright Arcs Survey : Discovery of Seven New Strongly Lensed Galaxies from $\\rm{z}=0.66-2.94$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H.Thomas; Drabek, Emily; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hao, Jiangang; Kubik, Donna; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2010-10-01

    We report the discovery of seven new, very bright gravitational lens systems from our ongoing gravitational lens search, the Sloan Bright Arcs Survey (SBAS). Two of the systems are confirmed to have high source redshifts z = 2.19 and z = 2.94. Three other systems lie at intermediate redshift with z = 1.33, 1.82, 1.93 and two systems are at low redshift z = 0.66, 0.86. The lensed source galaxies in all of these systems are bright, with i-band magnitudes ranging from 19.73-22.06. We present the spectrum of each of the source galaxies in these systems along with estimates of the Einstein radius for each system. The foreground lens in most systems is identified by a red sequence based cluster finder as a galaxy group; one system is identified as a moderately rich cluster. In total the SBAS has now discovered nineteen strong lens systems in the SDSS imaging data, eight of which are among the highest surface brightness z {approx_equal} 2-3 galaxies known.

  13. Towards a more realistic population of bright spiral galaxies in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; White, Simon D. M.; Naab, Thorsten; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2013-10-01

    We present an update to the multiphase smoothed particle hydrodynamics galaxy formation code by Scannapieco et al. We include a more elaborate treatment of the production of metals, cooling rates based on individual element abundances and a scheme for the turbulent diffusion of metals. Our supernova feedback model now transfers energy to the interstellar medium (ISM) in kinetic and thermal form, and we include a prescription for the effects of radiation pressure from massive young stars on the ISM. We calibrate our new code on the well-studied Aquarius haloes and then use it to simulate a sample of 16 galaxies with halo masses between 1 × 1011 and 3 × 1012 M⊙. In general, the stellar masses of the sample agree well with the stellar mass to halo mass relation inferred from abundance matching techniques for redshifts z = 0-4. There is however a tendency to overproduce stars at z > 4 and to underproduce them at z metallicities at z = 0-3. Remaining discrepancies can be connected to deviations from predictions for star formation histories from abundance matching. At z = 0, the model galaxies show realistic morphologies, stellar surface density profiles, circular velocity curves and stellar metallicities, but overly flat metallicity gradients. 15 out of 16 of our galaxies contain disc components with kinematic disc fraction ranging between 15 and 65 per cent. The disc fraction depends on the time of the last destructive merger or misaligned infall event. Considering the remaining shortcomings of our simulations we conclude that even higher kinematic disc fractions may be possible for Λ cold dark matter haloes with quiet merger histories, such as the Aquarius haloes.

  14. Satellite abundances around bright isolated galaxies II: radial distribution and environmental effects

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wenting; Henriques, Bruno M B; White, Simon D M

    2014-01-01

    We use the SDSS/DR8 galaxy sample to study the radial distribution of satellite galaxies around isolated primaries, comparing to semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on the Millennium and Millennium-II simulations. SDSS satellites behave differently around high- and low-mass primaries: those orbiting objects with $M_*>10^{11}M_\\odot$ are mostly red and are less concentrated towards their host than the inferred dark matter halo, an effect that is very pronounced for the few blue satellites. On the other hand, less massive primaries have steeper satellite profiles that agree quite well with the expected dark matter distribution and are dominated by blue satellites, even in the inner regions where strong environmental effects are expected. In fact, such effects appear to be strong only for primaries with $M_* > 10^{11}M_\\odot$. This behaviour is not reproduced by current semi-analytic simulations, where satellite profiles always parallel those of the dark matter and satellite populations are predominan...

  15. The Toomre Sequence Revisited with HST/NICMOS: Nuclear Brightness Profiles and Colors of Interacting and Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rossa, Joern; van der Marel, Roeland P; Mihos, J Christopher; Hibbard, John E; Boeker, Torsten; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the near-infrared properties of the nuclei in the 11 merging galaxies of the Toomre sequence, based on high spatial resolution J, H, and K imaging data using NICMOS onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The observations are less affected by dust extinction than our previous HST/WFPC2 observations and offer higher spatial resolution than existing ground-based near-IR data. We see a marginal trend for the nuclei to become bluer with advancing merger stage, which we attribute to a dispersal of dust at late times in the merging process. Our data also indicate a statistically significant trend for the nuclei in the sequence to become more luminous, within an aperture of fixed physical size and after correcting for dust extinction, with advancing merger stage. We derive K-band surface brightness profiles for those nuclei for which the morphology allows a meaningful isophotal analysis, and fit the profiles with a ``Nuker law'' for comparison with other samples of galaxies observed with HST. The majori...

  16. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  17. A Survey of Bright (Y_AB<27.0) z~7 Galaxies in GOODS-South

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, Stephen M; Ellis, Richard S; Stark, Daniel; Stanway, Elizabeth R; Chiu, Kuenley; Lorenzoni, Silvio; Jarvis, Matt J

    2009-01-01

    We analyse recently acquired near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the GOODS-South field to search for star forming galaxies at z~7.0. By comparing WFC 3 0.98 micron Y-band images with ACS z-band (0.85 micron) images, we identify objects with colours consistent with Lyman break galaxies at z~6.4-7.4. This new data covers an area five times larger than that previously reported in the WFC3 imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and affords a valuable constraint on the bright end of the luminosity function. Using additional imaging of the region in the ACS B, V and i-bands from GOODS v2.0 and the WFC3 J-band we attempt to remove any low-redshift interlopers. Our selection criteria yields 6 candidates brighter than Y_AB = 27.0, of which all except one are detected in the ACS z-band imaging and are thus unlikely to be transients. Assuming all 6 candidates are at z~7 this implies a surface density of objects brighter than Y_AB = 27.0 of 0.30\\pm0.12 arcmin-2, a value significantly smaller than the predict...

  18. Wide and deep near-UV (360nm) galaxy counts and the extragalactic background light with the Large Binocular Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Grazian, A; Giallongo, E; Gallozzi, S; Fontanot, F; Fontana, A; Testa, V; Ragazzoni, R; Baruffolo, A; Beccari, G; Diolaiti, E; Di Paola, A; Farinato, J; Gasparo, F; Gentile, G; Green, R; Hill, J; Kuhn, O; Pasian, F; Pedichini, F; Radovich, M; Smareglia, R; Speziali, R; Thompson, D; Wagner, R M

    2009-01-01

    Deep multicolour surveys are the main tool to explore the formation and evolution of the faint galaxies which are beyond the spectroscopic limit with the present technology. The photometric properties of these faint galaxies are usually compared with current renditions of semianalytical models to provide constraints on the fundamental physical processes involved in galaxy formation and evolution, namely the mass assembly and the star formation. Galaxy counts over large sky areas in the near-UV band are important because they are difficult to obtain given the low efficiency of near-UV instrumentation, even at 8m class telescopes. A large instrumental field of view helps in minimizing the biases due to the cosmic variance. We have obtained deep images in the 360nm U band provided by the blue channel of the Large Binocular Camera at the prime focus of the Large Binocular Telescope. We have derived over an area of ~0.4 sq. deg. the galaxy number counts down to U=27 in the Vega system (corresponding to U=27.86 in ...

  19. GALAXYCOUNT: a JAVA calculator of galaxy counts and variances in multiband wide-field surveys to 28 AB mag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S. C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2007-05-01

    We provide a consistent framework for estimating galaxy counts and variances in wide-field images for a range of photometric bands. The variances include both Poissonian noise and variations due to large-scale structure. We demonstrate that our statistical theory is consistent with the counts in the deepest multiband surveys available. The statistical estimates depend on several observational parameters (e.g. seeing, signal-to-noise ratio), and include a sophisticated treatment of detection completeness. The JAVA calculator is freely available1 and offers the user the option to adopt our consistent framework or a different scheme. We also provide a summary table of statistical measures in the different bands for a range of different fields of view. Reliable estimation of the background counts has profound consequences in many areas of observational astronomy. We provide two such examples. One is from a recent study of the Sculptor galaxy NGC300 where stellar photometry has been used to demonstrate that the outer disc extends to 10 effective radii, far beyond what was thought possible for a normal low-luminosity spiral. We confirm this finding by a re-analysis of the background counts. Secondly, we determine the luminosity function of the galaxy cluster Abell 2734, both through spectroscopically determined cluster membership, and through statistical subtraction of the background galaxies using the calculator and offset fields. We demonstrate very good agreement, suggesting that expensive spectroscopic follow-up, or off-source observations, may often be bypassed via determination of the galaxy background with GALAXYCOUNT.

  20. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING). III. The Dependence of Atomic and Molecular Gas Surface Densities on Galaxy Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Tony; Bolatto, Alberto D; Leroy, Adam K; Blitz, Leo; Rosolowsky, Erik; Bigiel, Frank; Fisher, David B; Ott, Jürgen; Rahman, Nurur; Vogel, Stuart N; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the correlation between CO and HI emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the HI column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee & Krumholz, which balances H_2 formation and dissociation. The observed HI column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe HI column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse HI component that did not contribute to H_2 shielding. We also find that the H_2 column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stella...

  1. A major merger origin for the high fraction of galaxies at 2bright clumps in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, B; Cassata, P; Garilli, B; Lemaux, B C; Maccagni, D; Schaerer, D; Tasca, L A M; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E; Amorín, R; Bardelli, S; Hathi, N P; Koekemoer, A; Pforr, J

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged) The properties of stellar clumps in star forming galaxies and their evolution over the redshift range $2\\lesssim z \\lesssim 6$ are presented and discussed in the context of the build-up of massive galaxies at early cosmic times. We use HST/ACS images of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) to identify clumps within a 20 kpc radius. We find that the population of galaxies with more than one clump is dominated by galaxies with two clumps, representing $\\sim21-25$\\% of the population, while the fraction of galaxies with 3, or 4 and more, clumps is 8-11 and 7-9\\%, respectively. The fraction of clumpy galaxies is in the range $\\sim35-55\\%$ over $2galaxies remains high up to the highest redshifts. The large and bright clumps (M$_{\\star}\\sim10^9$ up to $\\sim10^{10}$M$_\\odot$) are found to reside predominantly in galaxies with two clumps. Smaller and lower luminosity clumps ($\\log...

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  3. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin' ya [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Finke, Justin [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  4. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Pian, E. [INAF, Trieste Astronomical Observatory, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2 Liverpool Science Park 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cano, Z. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pe' er, A. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Misra, K., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital-263 002 (India)

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  5. The trace of a substantial assembly of massive E-S0 galaxies at 0.8galaxy number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    K-band galaxy number counts (GNCs) exhibit a slope change at K~17.5 mag not present in optical bands. To unveil the nature of this feature, we have derived the contribution of different galaxy types to the total K-band GNCs at 0.32 cannot predict the slope change, whereas those imposing a relatively late assembly on them (z<1.5) can reproduce it. The K-band GNCs by redshift bins and morphological types point to a progressively definitive build-up of ~50% of this galaxy population at 0.8

  6. The Detection of a Population of Submillimeter-Bright, Strongly-Lensed Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Negrello, Mattia; De Zotti, G; Cooray, A; Verma, A; Bock, J; Frayer, D T; Gurwell, M A; Omont, A; Neri, R; Dannerbauer, H; Leeuw, L L; Barton, E; Cooke, J; Kim, S; da Cunha, E; Rodighiero, G; Cox, P; Bonfield, D G; Jarvis, M J; Serjeant, S; Ivison, R J; Dye, S; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Ibar, E; Bertoldi, F; Valtchanov, I; Eales, S; Dunne, L; Driver, S P; Auld, R; Buttiglione, S; Cava, A; Grady, C A; Clements, D L; Dariush, A; Fritz, J; Hill, D; Hornbeck, J B; Kelvin, L; Lagache, G; Lopez-Caniego, M; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Maddox, S; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Rigby, E E; Robotham, A; Simpson, C; Smith, D J B; Temi, P; Thompson, M A; Woodgate, B E; York, D G; Aguirre, J E; Beelen, A; Blain, A; Baker, A J; Birkinshaw, M; Blundell, R; Bradford, C M; Burgarella, D; Danese, L; Dunlop, J S; Fleuren, S; Glenn, J; Harris, A I; Kamenetzky, J; Lupu, R E; Maddalena, R J; Madore, B F; Maloney, P R; Matsuhara, H; Michalowski, M J; Murphy, E J; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H; Popescu, C; Rawlings, S; Rigopoulou, D; Scott, D; Scott, K S; Seibert, M; Smail, I; Tuffs, R J; Vieira, J D; van der Werf, P P; Zmuidzinas, J; 10.1126/science.1193420

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational lensing is a powerful astrophysical and cosmological probe and is particularly valuable at submillimeter wavelengths for the study of the statistical and individual properties of dusty starforming galaxies. However the identification of gravitational lenses is often time-intensive, involving the sifting of large volumes of imaging or spectroscopic data to find few candidates. We used early data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey to demonstrate that wide-area submillimeter surveys can simply and easily detect strong gravitational lensing events, with close to 100% efficiency.

  7. Towards a more realistic population of bright spiral galaxies in cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Aumer, Michael; Naab, Thorsten; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    We present an update to the multiphase SPH galaxy formation code by Scannapieco et al. We include a more elaborate treatment of the production of metals, cooling rates based on individual element abundances, and a scheme for the turbulent diffusion of metals. Our SN feedback model now transfers energy to the ISM in kinetic and thermal form, and we include a prescription for the effects of radiation pressure from massive young stars on the ISM. We calibrate our new code on the well studied Aquarius haloes and then use it to simulate a sample of 16 galaxies with halo masses between 1x10^11 and 3x10^12 M_sun. In general, the stellar masses of the sample agree well with the stellar mass to halo mass relation inferred from abundance matching techniques for redshifts z=0-4. There is however a tendency to overproduce stars at z>4 and to underproduce them at z<0.5 in the least massive haloes. Overly high SFRs at z<1 for the most massive haloes are likely connected to the lack of AGN feedback in our model. The s...

  8. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Selected from the 40% Sky Area of the ALFALFA H I Survey. I. Sample and Statistical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man I.; Zhu, Yinan; Lei, Fengjie; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-06-01

    The population of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, which are objects with central surface brightnesses at least one magnitude fainter than the night sky, is crucial for understanding the extremes of galactic formation and evolution of the universe. As LSB galaxies are mostly rich in gas (H i), the α.40 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) sample is one of the best survey combinations to select a sample of them in the local universe. Since the sky backgrounds are systematically overestimated for galactic images by the SDSS photometric pipeline, particularly for luminous galaxies or galaxies with extended LSB outskirts, in this paper, we above all estimated the sky backgrounds of SDSS images accurately in both the g and r bands for each galaxy in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample, using a precise method of sky subtraction. Once subtracting the sky background, we did surface photometry with the Kron elliptical aperture using the SExtractor software and fitted geometric parameters with an exponential profile model using the Galfit software for each galactic image in the α.40 SDSS DR7 sample. Based on the photometric and geometric results, we further calculated the B-band central surface brightness, {{μ }0}(B), for each galaxy and ultimately defined a sample of LSB galaxies consisting of 1129 galaxies with {{μ }0}(B) > 22.5 mag arcsec-2 and the axis ratio b/a > 0.3 from the 12,423 α.40 SDSS DR7 galaxies. This H i-selected sample of LSB galaxies is a relatively unbiased sample of gas-rich and disk-dominated LSB galaxies, which is complete both in H i observation and the optical magnitude within the limit of the SDSS DR7 photometric survey. This LSB galactic sample spans from 22.5 to 28.3 in {{μ }0}(B) with a fraction of 4% fainter than 25.0 mag arcsec-2 in B-band central surface brightness and distributes from -27.0 to -12.3 mag in absolute magnitude in the B band (M(B)), including the 43 faintest galaxies (M(B) > -17.3 mag). This sample is a blue LSB

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy survey around 20 UV-bright quasars (Prochaska+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, J. X.; Weiner, B.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooksey, K. L.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    We selected 20 fields accessible from Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) (DEC<25°) surrounding UV-bright quasars. These quasars and their UV spectroscopic data sets are summarized in Table 1. All of the fields in our survey were imaged with the Swope 40" telescope using a direct imaging camera in B and R filter. The data were obtained in a series of dithered exposures intended to map at least a 20'x20' FOV, between 2000 Oct 26 and 2003 Apr 8. We performed multi-slit spectroscopy on each field with the WFCCD spectrometer using the blue grism and the Tek 5 CCD, between 2001 Apr 17 and 2003 Jun 6. (21 data files).

  10. Constraining the Bright-end of the UV Luminosity Function for z ~ 7 - 9 Galaxies: results from CANDELS/GOODS-South

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzoni, Silvio; Wilkins, Stephen M; Caruana, Joseph; Stanway, Elizabeth R; Jarvis, Matt J

    2012-01-01

    The recent Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared imaging with the Wide-Field Camera #3 (WFC3) of the GOODS-South field in the CANDELS program covering nearly 100arcmin^2, along with already existing Advanced Camera for Surveys optical data, makes possible the search for bright galaxy candidates at redshift z ~ 7 - 9 using the Lyman-break technique. We present the first analysis of z'-drop z ~ 7 candidate galaxies in this area, finding 19 objects. We also analyse Y-drops at z ~ 8, trebling the number of bright (H_AB < 27 mag) Y-drops from our previous work, and compare our results with those of other groups based on the same data. The bright high redshift galaxy candidates we find serve to better constrain the bright end of the luminosity function at those redshift, and may also be more amenable to spectroscopic confirmation than the fainter ones presented in various previous work on the smaller fields (the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and the WFC 3 Early Release Science observations). We also look at the agreeme...

  11. Non-parametric Deprojection of Surface Brightness Profiles of Galaxies in Generalised Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Dalia

    2009-01-01

    We present a new Bayesian non-parametric deprojection algorithm DOPING (Deprojection of Observed Photometry using and INverse Gambit), that is designed to extract 3-D luminosity density distributions $\\rho$ from observed surface brightness maps $I$, in generalised geometries, while taking into account changes in intrinsic shape with radius, using a penalised likelihood approach and an MCMC optimiser. We provide the most likely solution to the integral equation that represents deprojection of the measured $I$ to $\\rho$. In order to keep the solution modular, we choose to express $\\rho$ as a function of the line-of-sight (LOS) coordinate $z$. We calculate the extent of the system along the ${\\bf z}$-axis, for a given point on the image that lies within an identified isophotal annulus. The extent along the LOS is binned and density is held a constant over each such $z$-bin. The code begins with a seed density and at the beginning of an iterative step, the trial $\\rho$ is updated. Comparison of the projection of ...

  12. Spectropolarimetry with the Allen Telescope Array: Faraday Rotation toward Bright Polarized Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Law, C J; Bower, G C; Backer, D C; Bauermeister, A; Croft, S; Forster, R; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C; Harvey-Smith, L; Heiles, C; Hull, C; Keating, G; MacMahon, D; Whysong, D; Williams, P K G; Wright, M

    2010-01-01

    We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with 2 to 4 100-MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ~40 mJy), when observing with a RM resolution of roughly 100 rad/m2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad/m2 ; more general...

  13. From major merger to radio galaxy: low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to the giant HI ring around B2 0648+27

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Van Gorkom, J H; Oosterloo, T A; Brogt, E; Tadhunter, C N

    2008-01-01

    We present the detection of a low surface-brightness stellar counterpart to an enormous (190 kpc) ring of neutral hydrogen (HI) gas that surrounds the nearby radio galaxy B2 0648+27. This system is currently in an evolutionary stage between major merger and (radio-loud) early-type galaxy. In a previous paper we investigated in detail the timescales between merger, starburst and AGN activity in B2 0648+27, based on its unusual multi-wavelength properties (large-scale HI ring, dominating post-starburst stellar population and infra-red luminosity). In this Research Note we present deep optical B- and V-band imaging that provides further evidence for the merger origin of B2 0648+27. The host galaxy shows a distorted optical morphology and a broad tidal arm is clearly present. A low surface-brightness stellar tail or partial ring curls around more than half the host galaxy at a distance of up to 55 kpc from the centre of the galaxy, following the large-scale, ring-like HI structure that we detected previously arou...

  14. Searching for the inverse-Compton emission from bright cluster-centre radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J

    2010-01-01

    We use deep archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of three of the brightest cluster-centre radio galaxies in the sky, Cygnus A, Hercules A and Hydra A, to search for inverse-Compton emission from the population of electrons responsible for the low-frequency radio emission. Using simulated observations, we derive robust estimates for the uncertainties on the normalization of an inverse-Compton component in the presence of the variations in background thermal temperature actually seen in our target objects. Using these, together with the pressures external to the lobes, we are able to place interesting upper limits on the fraction of the energy density in the lobes of Hydra A and Her A that can be provided by a population of relativistic electrons with standard properties, assuming that the magnetic field is not dominant; these limits are consistent with the long-standing idea that the energy density in these lobes is dominated by a non-radiating particle population. In Cygnus A, we find evidence in the ...

  15. 12CO, 13CO and C18O observations along the major axes of nearby bright infrared galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Hua Tan; Yu Gao; Zhi-Yu Zhang; Xiao-Yang Xia

    2011-01-01

    We present simultaneous observations of 12CO, 13CO and C18O J=1-0 emission in 11 nearby (cz < 1000km s-1) bright infrared galaxies. Both 12CO and 13CO are detected in the centers of all the galaxies, except for 13CO in NGC 3031.We have also detected C18O, CSJ=2-1 and HCO+J=1-0 emission in the nuclear regions of M82 and M51. These are the first systematical extragalactic detections of 12CO and its isotopes from the PMO 14 m telescope. We have conducted half-beam-spaced mapping of M82 over an area of 4′ × 2.5′ and major axis mapping of NGC 3627, NGC 3628, NGC 4631 and M51. The radial distributions of 12CO and 13CO in NGC 3627, NGC 3628 and M51 can be well fitted by an exponential profile.The 12CO/13CO intensity ratio, R, decreases monotonically with the galactocentric radius in all mapped sources. The average R in the center and disk of the galaxies are 9.9±3.0 and 5.6± 1.9, respectively, much lower than the peculiar R(~24) found in the center of M82. The intensity ratios of 13CO/C18O, 13CO/HCO+ and 13CO/CS (either our or literature data) show little variation with galactocentric radius, in sharp contrast with the greatly varied R. This supports the notion that the observed gradient in R could be the result of the variations of the physical conditions across the disks. The H2 column density derived from C18O shows that the Galactic standard conversion factor (X-factor) overestimates the amount of the molecular gas in M82 by a factor of ~2.5. These observations suggest that the X-factor in active star-forming regions (i.e., nuclear regions) should be lower than that in normal star-forming disks and the gradient in R can be used to trace the variations of the X-factor.

  16. Galaxies in X-ray Selected Clusters and Groups in Dark Energy Survey Data: Stellar Mass Growth of Bright Central Galaxies Since z~1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Mckay, T; Rooney, P; Evrard, A E; Romer, A K; Perfecto, R; Song, J; Desai, S; Mohr, J; Wilcox, H; Bermeo, A; Jeltema, T; Hollowood, D; Bacon, D; Capozzi, D; Collins, C; Das, R; Gerdes, D; Hennig, C; Hilton, M; Hoyle, B; Kay, S; Liddle, A; Mann, R G; Mehrtens, N; Nichol, R C; Papovich, C; Sahlén, M; Soares-Santos, M; Stott, J; Viana, P T; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Castander, F J; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Da Costa, L N

    2015-01-01

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) for a new sample of 106 X-Ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of Bright Central Galaxies (BCGs) since redshift 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, $m_{*}\\propto(\\frac{M_{200}}{1.5\\times 10^{14}M_{\\odot}})^{0.24\\pm 0.08}(1+z)^{-0.19\\pm0.34}$, and compare the observed relation to the simulation prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of $M_{200, z}=10^{13.8}M_{\\odot}$, at $z=1.0$: $m_{*, BCG}$ appears to have grown by $0.13\\pm0.11$ dex, in tension at $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ significance level with the 0.4 dex growth rate expected in the simulation. We show that...

  17. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) II: Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time Across the Blue Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B; Vogel, Stuart N; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A; Ott, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\\Shtwo\\gtrsim$20 \\msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\

  18. The detection of ultra-faint low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: a Probe of Dark Matter and Baryonic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Grazian, A; Fassbender, R; Fontana, A; Paris, D; Pentericci, L

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint ($r\\lesssim 22.1$) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness $23\\lesssim \\mu_r\\lesssim 26$) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just $576$ arcmin$^2$ obtained by the Large Binocular Camera (LBC) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness - total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range $-13\\lesssim M_r\\lesssim -9$ and $250\\lesssim r_s\\lesssim 850$ pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of $10^{-11}$ yr$^{-1}$, i.e. 10 times lower than that of main sequence star forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of...

  19. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks. IV. Radial extinction profiles from counts of distant galaxies seen through foreground disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    2005-01-01

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. and Holwerda et al. developed the Synthetic Field Method (SFM), which analyzes synthetic

  20. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ∼ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ∼ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ∼ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ∼Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  1. Structure in the First Quadrant of the Galaxy an Analysis of "TMGS" Star Counts using the "SKY" Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hammersley, P L; Garzón, F; Mahoney, T J; López-Corredoira, M

    1999-01-01

    We analyse the stellar content of almost 300 deg^2 of the sky close to the Galactic plane by directly comparing the predictions of the SKY model (Cohen 1994,1995; Wainscoat et al. 1992) with star counts taken from the Two Micron Galactic plane Survey (TMGS: Garzon et al. 1993). Through these comparisons we can examine discrepancies between counts and model and thereby elicit an understanding of Galactic structure. Over the vast majority of areas in which we have compared the TMGS data with SKY's predictions we find very good accord; so good that we are able to remove the disc source counts to highlight structure in the plane. The exponential disc is usually dominant, but by relying on SKY's predicted disc counts we have been able to probe the molecular ring, spiral arms, and parts of the bulge. The latter is clearly triaxial. We recognize a number of off-plane dust clouds not readily included in models. However, we find that, whilst the simple exponential extinction function works well in the outer Galaxy, cl...

  2. The optical spectra of Spitzer 24 micron galaxies in the COSMOS field: II. Faint infrared sources in the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Caputi, K I; Aussel, H; Le Floc'h, E; Sanders, D; Maier, C; Frayer, D; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; Le Fèvre, O; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Scoville, N; Zamorani, G; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Kartaltepe, J; Knobel, C; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Mignoli, M; Peng, Y; Pérez-Montero, E; Ricciardelli, E; Salvato, M; Silverman, Joseph; Surace, J; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Capak, P; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Cimatti, A; Elvis, M; Hasinger, G; Koekemoer, A M; Leauthaud, A; MacCagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Pellò, R; Porciani, C; Pozzetti, L; Scaramella, R; Scarlata, C; Schiminovich, D; Taniguchi, Y; Zamojski, M

    2009-01-01

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24-micron-selected galaxies with 0.06< S(24um)< 0.50 mJy and I(AB)<22.5, over 1.5 deg^2 of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2galaxies at 0.2galaxies suggest that they might be star-formation/nuclear-activity composite systems. At 0.5galaxy metallicities for 301 galaxies: at least 12% of them are securely below the upper-branch mass-me...

  3. MOIRCS Deep Survey. I: DRG Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Kajisawa, M; Suzuki, R; Tokoku, C; Uchimoto, Y K; Yoshikawa, T; Akiyama, M; Ichikawa, T; Ouchi, M; Omata, K; Tanaka, I; Nishimura, T; Yamada, T; Kajisawa, Masaru; Konishi, Masahiro; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Takashi; Ouchi, Masami; Omata, Koji; Tanaka, Ichi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Toru

    2006-01-01

    We use very deep near-infrared imaging data taken with Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) on the Subaru Telescope to investigate the number counts of Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs). We have observed a 4x7 arcmin^2 field in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North (GOODS-N), and our data reach J=24.6 and K=23.2 (5sigma, Vega magnitude). The surface density of DRGs selected by J-K>2.3 is 2.35+-0.31 arcmin^-2 at K22 is smaller than that expected from the number counts at the brighter magnitude. The result indicates that while there are many bright galaxies at 222 suggest that the mass-dependent color distribution, where most of low-mass galaxies are blue while more massive galaxies tend to have redder colors, had already been established at that epoch.

  4. An Empirically Based Model for Predicting Infrared Luminosity Functions, Deep Infrared Galaxy Counts and the Diffuse Infrared Background

    CERN Document Server

    Malkan, M A

    2001-01-01

    We predict luminosity functions and number counts for extragalactic infrared sources at various wavelengths using our empirically based model. This is the same model which we used successfully to predict the spectral energy distribution of the diffuse infrared background. Comparisons of galaxy count results with existing data indicate that either galaxy luminosity evolution is not stronger that Q=3.1 (where L is proportional to (1+z)^{Q}) or that this evolution does not continue beyond a redshift of 2. However, measurements of the far infrared background from COBE-DIRBE seem to suggest a stronger evolution for far infrared emission with Q > 4 in the redshift range beteen 0 and 1. We discuss several interpretations of these results and also discuss how future observations can reconcile this apparent conflict. We also make predictions of the redshift distributions of extragalactic infrared sources at selected flux levels which can be tested by planned detectors. Finally, we predict the fluxes at which various f...

  5. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING). II. Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time across the Blue Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A.; Ott, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({\\Sigma _H_2}\\gtrsim 20 M ⊙ pc-2) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N mol ~ 0.96 ± 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, τmol dep ~ 2.30 ± 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between τmol dep and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M * ~ 109.7-1011.5 M ⊙). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  6. New insights to the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from deep Near-Infrared studies I. Observations, surface photometry and decomposition of surface brightness profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    (shortened) We analyze deep Near Infrared (NIR) broad band images for a sample of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the quantitative study of their extended stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. NIR surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts agree at large galactocentric radii with those from optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal for more than half of our sample a significant flattening of the exponential SBP of the LSB host. Such SBPs ("type V" SBPs, Binggeli & Cameron 1991) have rarely been detected in LSB hosts of BCDs at optical wavelengths, where the relative flux contribution of the starburst is stronger than in the NIR and can hide such central intensity depressions of the LSB host. The structural properties, frequency and physical origin of type V LSB SBPs in BCDs and other dwarf galaxies have not yet been systematically studied. Nevertheless, their occurrence in a significant fraction of BCDs would impose important new ...

  7. An ALMA survey of submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: High resolution 870um source counts

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Alexander; Hodge, Jackie; Smail, Ian; Walter, Fabian; Biggs, Andy; Simpson, James; Danielson, Alice; Alexander, David; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Coppin, Kristen; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Edge, Alastair; Greve, Thomas; Ivison, Rob; Knudsen, Kirsten; Menten, Karl; Schinnerer, Eva; Wardlow, Julie; Weiß, Axel; van der Werf, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We report the first counts of faint submillimetre galaxies (SMG) in the 870-um band derived from arcsecond resolution observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). We have used ALMA to map a sample of 122 870-um-selected submillimetre sources drawn from the (0.5x0.5)deg^2 LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South Submillimetre Survey (LESS). These ALMA maps have an average depth of sigma(870um)~0.4mJy, some ~3x deeper than the original LABOCA survey and critically the angular resolution is more than an order of magnitude higher, FWHM of ~1.5" compared to ~19" for the LABOCA discovery map. This combination of sensitivity and resolution allows us to precisely pin-point the SMGs contributing to the submillimetre sources from the LABOCA map, free from the effects of confusion. We show that our ALMA-derived SMG counts broadly agree with the submillimetre source counts from previous, lower-resolution single-dish surveys, demonstrating that the bulk of the submillimetre sources are not caused by blendi...

  8. Early galaxy evolution from deep wide field star counts; 1, The spheroid density law and mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Robin, A C

    2000-01-01

    As part of a global analysis of deep star counts to constrain scenarii of galaxy formation and evolution, we investigate possible links between the galactic spheroid and the dark matter halo. A wide set of deep star counts at high and intermediate galactic latitudes is used to determine the large scale density law of the spheroid. Assuming a power density law, the exponent, flattening, local density and IMF slope of this population are estimated. The estimation is checked for robustness against contamination of star counts by the thick disc population. Contamination effects are derived from a model of population synthesis under a broad variety of thick disc parameters. The parameter fit is based on a maximum likelihood criterion. The best fit spheroid density law has a flattening of 0.76, a power index of 2.44. There is a significant degeneracy between these two parameters. The data are also compatible with a slightly less flattened spheroid (c/a = 0.85), in combination with a larger power index (2.75). A fla...

  9. Bright galaxies at z=9-11 from pure-parallel HST observations: Building a unique sample for JWST with Spitzer/IRAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stephanie; Trenti, Michele; Bouwens, Rychard

    2016-08-01

    The combination of observations taken by Hubble and Spitzer revealed the unexpected presence of sources as bright as our own Milky Way as early as 400 Myr after the Big Bang, potentially highlighting a new highly efficient regime for star formation in L>L* galaxies at very early times. Yet, the sample of high-quality z>8 galaxies that have both HST and Spitzer/IRAC imaging is still very small, particularly at high luminosities. We propose here to remedy this situation and efficiently follow-up with Spitzer/IRAC the most promising z>8 sources from our Hubble Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which covers a footprint on the sky similar to CANDELS, provides a deeper search than ground-based surveys like UltraVISTA, and is robust against cosmic variance because of its 180 independent lines of sight. The proposed new 3.6 micron observations will continue the Spitzer cycle 12 BORG911 program and target 15 additional fields, leveraging over 300 new HST orbits (350 sqarcmin) to identify a final sample of about 5 to 10 bright galaxies at z >= 8.5. For optimal time use (just over 22 hours), our goal is to readily discriminate between z>8 sources (undetected or marginally detected in IRAC) and z~2 interlopers (strongly detected in IRAC) with just 1-2 hours per pointing. The high-quality candidates that we will identify with IRAC will be ideal targets for further studies to investigate the reionization state of the inter-galactic medium through near-IR Keck/VLT spectroscopy. They will also be uniquely suited to measurement of the redshift and stellar population properties through JWST/NIRSPEC observations, with the potential to elucidate how the first generations of stars are assembled in the earliest stages of the epoch of reionization.

  10. Studies of Virgo cluster early-type dwarf galaxies with the SDSS: I. On the possible disk nature of bright early-type dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Lisker, T; Grebel, E K; Binggeli, Bruno; Grebel, Eva K.; Lisker, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic search for disks in 476 Virgo cluster early-type dwarf (dE) galaxies. Disk features (spiral arms, edge-on disks, or bars) were identified by applying unsharp masks to a combined image from three bands (g, r, i), as well as by subtracting the axisymmetric light distribution of each galaxy from that image. 14 objects are unambiguous identifications of disks, 10 objects show 'probable disk' features, and 17 objects show 'possible disk' features. The number fraction of these galaxies, for which we introduce the term dEdi, reaches more than 50% at the bright end of the dE population, and decreases to less than 5% for magnitudes B>16. The luminosity function of our full dE sample can be explained by a superposition of dEdis and ordinary dEs, strongly suggesting that dEdis are a distinct type of galaxy. This is supported by the projected spatial distribution: dEdis show basically no clustering and roughly follow the spatial distribution of spirals and irregulars, whereas ordinary dEs are dist...

  11. zCOSMOS - 10k-bright spectroscopic sample. The bimodality in the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function: exploring its evolution with redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzetti, L; Zucca, E; Zamorani, G; Lilly, S; Renzini, A; Moresco, M; Mignoli, M; Cassata, P; Tasca, L; Lamareille, E; Maier, C; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Vergani, D; Caputi, K; Kovac, K; Cimatti, A; Cucciati, O; Iovino, A; Peng, Y; Carollo, M; Contini, T; Kneib, J P; Le Fèvre, O; Mainieri, V; Scodeggio, M; Bardelli, S; Bongiorno, A; Coppa, G; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Pellò, R; Montero, E Perez; Ricciardelli, E; Silverman, Joseph; Tanaka, M; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Cappi, A; Guzzo, L; Halliday, C; Leauthaud, A; Koekemoer, A; MacCagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H; Memeo, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Scarlata, C; Scoville, N

    2009-01-01

    We present the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function (GSMF) up to z~1 from the zCOSMOS-bright 10k spectroscopic sample. We investigate the total MF and the contribution of ETGs and LTGs, defined by broad-band SED, morphology, spectral properties or star formation activities. We unveil a galaxy bimodality in the global MF, at least up to the z~0.55, better represented by 2 Schechter functions dominated by ETGs and LTGs, respectively. For the global population we confirm that low-mass galaxies number density increases later and faster than for massive galaxies. We find that the MF evolution at intermediate-low Mstar (logM<10.6) is mostly explained by a growth in stellar mass driven by smooth and decreasing SFHs. The low/negligible evolution at higher Mstar sets a limit of 30-15%, decreasing with redshift, to the fraction of major merging. We find that ETGs increase in number density with cosmic time faster for decreasing Mstar, with a median "building redshift" increasing with mass, in contrast with hierarchical mode...

  12. zCOSMOS 10k-bright spectroscopic sample: exploring mass and environment dependence in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moresco, M; Cimatti, A; Zamorani, G; Mignoli, M; Di Cesare, S; Bolzonella, M; Zucca, E; Lilly, S; Kovac, K; Scodeggio, M; Cassata, P; Tasca, L; Vergani, D; Halliday, C; Carollo, M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; Le Fèvre, O; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Bardelli, S; Bongiorno, A; Caputi, K; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Knobel, C; Lamareille, F; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Maier, C; Pello, R; Peng, Y; Montero, E Perez; Ricciardelli, E; Silverman, J D; Tanaka, M; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Cappi, A; Guzzo, L; Koekemoer, A M; Leauthaud, A; Maccagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H J; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Nair, P; Oesch, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Scarlata, C; Scoville, N

    2010-01-01

    We present the analysis of the U-V rest-frame color distribution and some spectral features as a function of mass and environment for two sample of early-type galaxies up to z=1 extracted from the zCOSMOS spectroscopic survey. The first sample ("red galaxies") is defined with a photometric classification, while the second ("ETGs") by combining morphological, photometric, and spectroscopic properties to obtain a more reliable sample. We find that the color distribution of red galaxies is not strongly dependent on environment for all mass bins, with galaxies in overdense regions redder than galaxies in underdense regions with a difference of 0.027\\pm0.008 mag. The dependence on mass is far more significant, with average colors of massive galaxies redder by 0.093\\pm0.007 mag than low-mass galaxies throughout the entire redshift range. We study the color-mass relation, finding a mean slope 0.12\\pm0.005, while the color-environment relation is flatter, with a slope always smaller than 0.04. The spectral analysis t...

  13. The LBT Bootes Field Survey: I. The Rest-frame UV and Luminosity Functions and Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dave, Romeel

    2013-01-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U-band imaging survey (9 deg2) covering the NOAO Bootes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z~3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by >3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of $z\\sim3$ quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z~3 LBGs based on the R-band and IRAC [4.5 micro m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z~7 and z~3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR),which fo...

  14. THE HIGH-VELOCITY SYSTEM: INFALL OF A GIANT LOW-SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS GALAXY TOWARD THE CENTER OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Alice P.-Y.; Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Jeffrey C.-C. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Ohyama, Youichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    The high-velocity system (HVS) lies just north-west of the center and is moving at a speed of 3000 km s{sup −1} toward NGC 1275, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Perseus cluster. We report imaging spectroscopy of the HVS in Hα and [N ii] that resolves both the nature of this galaxy and its physical relationship with NGC 1275. The HVS exhibits a distorted disk having a projected rotational velocity that rises steadily to ∼200 km s{sup −1} at a radius of ∼12 kpc, the same maximal extent detectable in neutral gas and dust. We discover highly blueshifted emission at relative velocities of up to ∼800 km s{sup −1} distributed throughout and confined almost entirely within the projected area of the disk, tracing gas stripped by ram pressure. The distribution of the stripped gas implies that the HVS is moving essentially along our sightline closely toward the center of NGC 1275. We show that the speed of the HVS is consistent with it having fallen from rest at the virial radius of the Perseus cluster and reached ∼100 kpc from the cluster center. Despite having an overall metallicity (inferred from [N ii]/Hα) significantly lower than that of star-forming disk galaxies, the HVS exhibits a current star formation rate of ∼3.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} and numerous young star clusters projected against giant H ii regions. The evidence assembled implicates a progenitor giant low-surface-brightness galaxy that, because of galaxy harassment and/or the cluster tidal field, has developed two prominent spiral arms along which star formation is strongly elevated.

  15. The bimodality of the 10k zCOSMOS-bright galaxies up to z ~ 1: a new statistical and portable classification based on the global optical galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Coppa, G; Zamorani, G; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Pozzetti, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E; Cimatti, A; Lilly, S J; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Le Fèvre, O; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Mainieri, V; Bongiorno, A; Caputi, K; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Memeo, P; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Kneib, J -P; Knobel, C; Koekemoer, A M; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Maier, C; Pellò, R; Peng, Y; Perez-Montero, E; Ricciardelli, E; Scarlata, C; Silverman, J D; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Capak, P; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Fumana, M; Guzzo, L; Leauthaud, A; Maccagni, D; Marinoni, C; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Scoville, N

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a new and reliable statistical method to classify galaxies from large surveys. We probe the reliability of the method by comparing it with a three-dimensional classification cube (Mignoli et al.~2009), using the same set of spectral, photometric and morphological parameters.We applied two different methods of classification to a sample of galaxies extracted from the zCOSMOS redshift survey, in the redshift range 0.5 0.5$, while galaxies with lower masses - of the order of $10^{10}$ Msun - are in transition at later epochs; galaxies with $M 5\\cdot 10^{10}$ Msun) mostly completed their transition before $z\\sim 1$.

  16. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Revealed by Multifield Deep ALMA Observations: Number Counts, Spatial Clustering, and Dark Submillimeter Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Kurono, Yasutaka; Momose, Rieko

    2014-01-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of submillimeter/millimeter emitters (SMEs) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band 6 and Band 7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR_IR ~ 30-300 Msun/yr) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of 1 mJy) SMGs, but comparable with abundant high-z star-forming populations such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detections of SMEs with continuum counterparts neither in our 1.2 mm-band nor multi-wavelength images including ultra de...

  17. The Detection of Ultra-faint Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: A Probe of Dark Matter and Baryonic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μr ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin2 obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range -13 ≲ Mr ≲ -9 and 250 ≲ rs ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10-11 yr-1, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to Mr ˜ -9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ˜ 107 M⊙), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ -1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  18. THE DETECTION OF ULTRA-FAINT LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER: A PROBE OF DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μ{sub r} ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin{sup 2} obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range −13 ≲ M{sub r} ≲ −9 and 250 ≲ r{sub s} ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10{sup −11} yr{sup −1}, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to M{sub r} ∼ −9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ∼ 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ −1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  19. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). II. MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW AND DEPLETION TIME ACROSS THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Xue Rui; Wong, Tony [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British-Columbia, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>20 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N{sub mol} {approx} 0.96 {+-} 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} {approx} 2.30 {+-} 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.7}-10{sup 11.5} M{sub Sun }). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor.

  20. Evidence for Ubiquitous, High-EW Nebular Emission in z~7 Galaxies: Towards a Clean Measurement of the Specific Star Formation Rate using a Sample of Bright, Magnified Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, R; Labbe, I; Zheng, W; Bradley, L; Donahue, M; Lemze, D; Moustakas, J; Umetsu, K; Zitrin, A; Coe, D; Postman, M; Gonzalez, V; Bartelmann, M; Benitez, N; Broadhurst, T; Ford, H; Grillo, C; Infante, L; Jimenez-Teja, Y; Jouvel, S; Kelson, D D; Lahav, O; Maoz, D; Medezinski, E; Melchior, P; Meneghetti, M; Merten, J; Molino, A; Moustakas, L; Nonino, M; Rosati, P; Seitz, S

    2013-01-01

    Growing observational evidence now indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z~5-7 galaxies observed with Spitzer. This line emission makes z~5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star formation rates. However, corrections for this line emission have been very difficult to perform reliably due to huge uncertainties on the overall strength of such emission at z>~5.5. Here, we present the most direct observational evidence yet for ubiquitous high-EW [OIII]+Hbeta line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z~7, while also presenting a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z~7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z~6.6-7.0 where the IRAC 4.5 micron flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light. Observed 4.5 micron fluxes in this window contrast with the 3.6 micron fluxes which are contaminated by the prominent [OIII]+Hbeta lines. To ensure a high S/N for our I...

  1. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Continuum Number Counts, Resolved 1.2 mm Extragalactic Background, and Properties of the Faintest Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, M.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Da Cunha, E.; Bauer, F. E.; Carilli, C. L.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Weiss, A.; Anguita, T.; Assef, R. J.; Bell, E.; Bertoldi, F.; Bacon, R.; Bouwens, R.; Cortes, P.; Cox, P.; Gónzalez-López, J.; Hodge, J.; Ibar, E.; Inami, H.; Infante, L.; Karim, A.; Le Le Fèvre, O.; Magnelli, B.; Ota, K.; Popping, G.; Sheth, K.; van der Werf, P.; Wagg, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present an analysis of a deep (1σ = 13 μJy) cosmological 1.2 mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin2 covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at \\gt 3.5σ significance at 1.2 mm. Our ALMA-selected sample has a median redshift of z=1.6+/- 0.4, with only one galaxy detected at z > 2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cutoff and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates (SFRs) similar to that of main-sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and SFRs of 4.0× {10}10 {M}⊙ and ˜ 40 {M}⊙ yr-1, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the interstellar medium (ISM) mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from ˜0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than those using CO-based ISM estimates by a factor of ˜2. The 1 mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover 55% ± 4% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover 80% ± 7% of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at z˜ 1{--}2, with stellar masses of (1-3) × 1010 M {}⊙ . For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.

  2. Evidence for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width nebular emission in z ∼ 7 galaxies: toward a clean measurement of the specific star-formation rate using a sample of bright, magnified galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, R.; Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zheng, W.; Lemze, D.; Ford, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Donahue, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Moustakas, J. [Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States); Umetsu, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Zitrin, A.; Bartelmann, M. [Institut fur Theoretische Astrophysik, ZAH, Albert-Ueberle-Straß e 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gonzalez, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Benítez, N.; Jimenez-Teja, Y. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huetor 24, Granada 18008 (Spain); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P. O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grillo, C. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Infante, L. [Departamento de Astronoia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, V. Mackenna 4860, Santiago 22 (Chile); and others

    2014-03-20

    Growing observational evidence indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z ∼ 5-7 galaxies. This line emission makes z ∼ 5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star-formation rates (sSFRs). However, corrections for this line emission have been difficult to perform reliably because of huge uncertainties on the strength of such emission at z ≳ 5.5. In this paper, we present the most direct observational evidence thus far for ubiquitous high-equivalent-width (EW) [O III] + Hβ line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 7, and we present a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z ∼ 7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z ∼ 6.6-7.0 where the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 4.5 μm flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light, in contrast with the 3.6 μm flux, which is contaminated by the prominent [O III] + Hβ lines. To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H {sub 160} < 26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified behind galaxy clusters. It is remarkable that the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5] = –0.9 ± 0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [O III] + Hβ is greater than 637 Å for the average source. The four bluest sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Å. We can also set a robust lower limit of ≳ 4 Gyr{sup –1} on the sSFR of our sample based on the mean spectral energy distribution.

  3. Deep R-band counts of z~3 Lyman break galaxy candidates with the LBT

    CERN Document Server

    Boutsia, K; Giallongo, E; Castellano, M; Pentericci, L; Fontana, A; Fiore, F; Gallozzi, S; Cusano, F; Paris, D; Speziali, R; Testa, V

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We present a deep multiwavelength imaging survey (UGR) in 3 different fields, Q0933, Q1623, and COSMOS, for a total area of ~1500arcmin^2. The data were obtained with the Large Binocular Camera on the Large Binocular Telescope. Methods. To select our Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates, we adopted the well established and widely used color-selection criterion (U-G vs. G-R). One of the main advantages of our survey is that it has a wider dynamic color range for U-dropout selection than in previous studies. This allows us to fully exploit the depth of our R-band images, obtaining a robust sample with few interlopers. In addition, for 2 of our fields we have spectroscopic redshift information that is needed to better estimate the completeness of our sample and interloper fraction. Results. Our limiting magnitudes reach 27.0(AB) in the R band (5\\sigma) and 28.6(AB) in the U band (1\\sigma). This dataset was used to derive LBG candidates at z~3. We obtained a catalog with a total of 12264 sources down to the ...

  4. Subaru high-$z$ exploration of low-luminosity quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-$z$ Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multi-band imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg$^2$ of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes ($z_{\\rm AB} < 23.5$ mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-$z$ quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-br...

  5. Bright [CII] and dust emission in three z>6.6 quasar host galaxies observed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Zschaechner, L; Decarli, R; De Rosa, G; Findlay, J R; McMahon, R G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA detections of the [CII] 158 micron emission line and the underlying far-infrared continuum of three quasars at 6.6~6 quasar hosts correlate with the quasar's bolometric luminosity. In one quasar, the [CII] line is significantly redshifted by ~1700 km/s with respect to the MgII broad emission line. Comparing to values in the literature, we find that, on average, the MgII is blueshifted by 480 km/s (with a standard deviation of 630 km/s) with respect to the host galaxy redshift, i.e. one of our quasars is an extreme outlier. Through modeling we can rule out a flat rotation curve for our brightest [CII] emitter. Finally, we find that the ratio of black hole mass to host galaxy (dynamical) mass is higher by a factor 3-4 (with significant scatter) than local relations.

  6. Bright [CII] 158$\\mu$m emission in a quasar host galaxy at $z=6.54$

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Walter, F; Venemans, B P; Farina, E P; Fan, X

    2015-01-01

    The [CII] 158$\\mu$m fine-structure line is known to trace regions of active star formation and is the main coolant of the cold, neutral atomic medium. In this \\textit{Letter}, we report a strong detection of the [CII] line in the host galaxy of the brightest quasar known at $z>6.5$, the Pan-STARRS1 selected quasar PSO J036.5078+03.0498 (hereafter P036+03), using the IRAM NOEMA millimeter interferometer. Its [CII] and total far-infrared luminosities are $(5.8 \\pm 0.7) \\times 10^9 \\,L_\\odot$ and $(7.6\\pm1.5) \\times 10^{12}\\,L_\\odot$, respectively. This results in a $L_{[CII]} /L_{TIR}$ ratio of $\\sim 0.8\\times 10^{-3}$, which is at the high end for those found for active galaxies, though it is lower than the average found in typical main sequence galaxies at $z\\sim 0$. We also report a tentative additional line which we identify as a blended emission from the $3_{22} - 3_{13}$ and $5_{23} - 4_{32}$ H$_2$O transitions. If confirmed, this would be the most distant detection of water emission to date. P036+03 riva...

  7. Discovery of Megaparsec-Scale, Low Surface Brightness Nonthermal Emission in Merging Galaxy Clusters using the Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Farnsworth, Damon; Brown, Shea; Brunetti, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    We present results on 12 X-ray bright clusters observed at 1.4 GHz with the Green Bank Telescope. After subtraction of point sources, we reach a median (best) 1-sigma noise level of 0.01 (0.006) microJy/sq. arcsec, and find a significant excess of diffuse, low surface brightness emission in 11 of 12 clusters. We present initial 1.4 GHz Very Large Array results on Abell 2319. We find: (a) four new detections tentatively classified as two halos (A2065, A2069) and two relics (A2067, A2073); (b) the first detection of the radio halo in A2061 at 1.4 GHz, making it a possible ultra-steep spectrum halo (alpha ~ 1.8); (c) a ~2 Mpc radio halo in the sloshing, minor-merger cluster A2142; (d) a >2x increase of the giant radio halo extent and luminosity in A2319; (e) a ~7x increase to the integrated radio flux and >4x increase to the observed extent of the peripheral, polarized radio relic in A1367 to ~600 kpc; (f) significant excess emission of ambiguous nature in three clusters. Our radio halo detections agree with the...

  8. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING): Molecular Gas Star Formation Law in NGC4254

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Rosolowsky, Erik; West, Andrew A; Bigiel, Frank; Ott, Juergen; Xue, Rui; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Jameson, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Vogel, Stuart N

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effects of different assumptions and systematics on the determination of the local, spatially resolved star formation law. Using four star formation rate (SFR) tracers ($H\\alpha$ with azimuthally averaged extinction correction, mid-infrared 24 micron, combined $H\\alpha$ and mid-infrared 24 micron, and combined far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared 24 micron), several fitting procedures, and different sampling strategies we probe the relation between SFR and molecular gas at various spatial resolutions and surface densities within the central 6.5 kpc in the disk of NGC4254. We find that in the high surface brightness regions of NGC4254 the form of the molecular gas star formation law is robustly determined and approximately linear and independent of the assumed fraction of diffuse emission and the SFR tracer employed. When the low surface brightness regions are included, the slope of the star formation law depends primarily on the assumed fraction of diffuse emission. In such case, results r...

  9. Rapid and multi-band variability of the TeV-bright active nucleus of the galaxy IC 310

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; Mendez, C Delgado; De Lotto, B; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Knoetig, M L; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López-Coto, R; López, M; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Masbou, J; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Dauser, T; Fortin, P; Kadler, M; Krauß, F; Wilbert, S; Wilms, J; Dr-Karl-Remeis-Observatory,; Physics, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle; Bamberg, 96049; Germany,; Observatory, Fred Lawrence Whipple; Astrophysics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for; Amado,; 85645, AZ; USA),

    2013-01-01

    Context. The galaxy IC 310 has recently been identified as a $\\gamma$-ray emitter by the Fermi-LAT and at very high energies by the MAGIC telescopes. Originally classified as a head-tail radio galaxy, the nature of this object is subject of controversy because its nucleus shows blazar-like behavior. Aims. In order to understand the nature of IC 310 and the origin of the VHE emission we studied the spectral and flux variability of IC 310 from the X-ray band to the VHE regime. Methods. The daily light curve of IC 310 above 300 GeV has been measured with MAGIC from 2009 October to 2010 February. Contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data (2008-2011) in the 10-500 GeV energy range were also analyzed. In X-ray, archival observations from 2003 to 2007 with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift-XRT in the 0.5-10 keV band were studied. Results. Several flares with similar amplitude can be seen in the MAGIC light curve. Day to day flux variability is clearly present. The photon index between 120 GeV and 8 TeV is measured to be $\\Gamma=2...

  10. Galaxies and Cosmology with DENIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A; Bonin, W; Banchet, V

    1997-01-01

    The DENIS survey is currently imaging 21334 deg^2 of the mainly southern sky in the IJK and the observations are expected to go on until mid 2000. The expectations for extragalactic and cosmological research are outlined, including a quantitative assessment of the effects of recent star formation on the measured fluxes of galaxies. The galaxy extraction is much improved with the modeling of the PSF across the 12'x12' frames and the reliability of star/galaxy separation (currently based upon a combination of classical and neural-network based methods) is measured from visual inspection to be >90% at I = 16. The I band counts follow the high bright-end normalization and the J differential counts follow N(J) \\simeq 11 \\times dex [0.6 (J-14)] deg^{-2} mag^{-1} and are expected to be complete, reliable and photometrically accurate

  11. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used Chandra data of the XBOOTES field ($\\sim9\\,\\mathrm{deg^2}$) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of $\\sim3\\,$arcsec $-$ $\\sim17\\,$arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the AGN shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter halos. However, at larger angular scales we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of $-0.8\\pm0.1$ and its amplitude is much ...

  12. Detection of an ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC/ASTE

    CERN Document Server

    Ikarashi, S; Aguirre, J E; Aretxaga, I; Arumugam, V; Austermann, J E; Bock, J J; Bradford, C M; Cirasuolo, M; Earle, L; Ezawa, H; Furusawa, H; Furusawa, J; Glenn, J; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Iono, D; Ivison, R J; Johnson, S; Kamenetzky, J; Kawabe, R; Lupu, R; Maloney, P; Matsuhara, H; Mauskopf, P D; Motohara, K; Murphy, E J; Nakajima, K; Nakanishi, K; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Perera, T A; Scott, K S; Takagi, T; Takata, T; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, K; Tsukagoshi, T; Wilner, D J; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of an extremely bright ($\\sim$34 mJy at 1100 $\\mu$m and $\\sim$73 mJy at 880 $\\mu$m) submillimeter galaxy (SMG), AzTEC-ASTE-SXDF1100.001 (hereafter referred to as SXDF1100.001), discovered in 1100 $\\mu$m observations of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC on ASTE. Subsequent CARMA 1300 $\\mu$m and SMA 880 $\\mu$m observations successfully pinpoint the location of SXDF1100.001 and suggest that it has two components, extended (FWHM of $\\sim$4^{\\prime\\prime}) and compact (unresolved) ones. Z-Spec on CSO has also been used to obtain a wide band spectrum from 190 to 308 GHz, although no significant emission/absorption lines are found. The derived upper limit to the line-to-continuum flux ratio is 0.1--0.3 (2 $\\sigma$) across the Z-Spec band. Based on the analysis of the derived spectral energy distribution from optical to radio wavelengths of possible counterparts near the SMA/CARMA peak position, we suggest that SXDF1100.001 is a lensed, optically dark SMG lying at $z \\sim 3.4$ behin...

  13. Star/Galaxy Separation in Hyper Suprime-Cam and Mapping the Milky Way with Star Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmilla, Jose Antonio

    We study the problem of separating stars and galaxies in the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) multi-band imaging data at high galactic latitudes. We show that the current separation technique implemented in the HSC pipeline is unable to produce samples of stars with i 24 without a significant contamination from galaxies (> 50%). We study various methods for measuring extendedness in HSC with simulated and real data and find that there are a number of available techniques that give nearly optimal results; the extendedness measure HSC is currently using is among these. We develop a star/galaxy separation method for HSC based on the Extreme Deconvolution (XD) algorithm that uses colors and extendedness simultaneously, and show that with it we can generate samples of faint stars keeping contamination from galaxies under control to i ≤ 25. We apply our star/galaxy separation method to carry out a preliminary study of the structure of the Milky Way (MW) with main sequence (MS) stars using photometric parallax relations derived for the HSC photometric system. We show that it will be possible to generate a tomography of the MW stellar halo to galactocentric radii ˜ 100 kpc with ˜ 106 MS stars in the HSC Wide layer once the survey has been completed. We report two potential detections of the Sagittarius tidal stream with MS stars in the XMM and GAMA15 fields at ≈ 20 kpc and ≈ 40 kpc respectively.

  14. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since Z similar to 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J; Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Vikram, V.

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z similar to 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m(*) proportional to (M-200/1.5 x 10(14)M(circle dot))(0.24 +/- 0.08)(1+z)(-0.19 +/- 0.34), and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M-200,M-z = 10(13.8)M(circle dot); at z = 1.0: m(*, BCG) appears to have grown by 0.13 +/- 0.11 dex, in tension at the similar to 2.5 sigma significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  15. The opacity of Spiral Disks IV : Radial Extinction Profiles from Counts of Distant Galaxies seen through Foreground Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, B. W.; González, R. A.; Allen, R. J.; Kruit, P.C. van der

    2004-01-01

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. (1998) and Holwerda et al. (2005a) developed the ``Synthetic Field Method'' (SFM), which

  16. A Galaxy Cluster Near NGC 720

    CERN Document Server

    Arp, H

    2005-01-01

    The galaxy cluster RXJ 0152.7-1357 is emitting X-rays at the high rate of 148 counts $ks^{-1}$. It would be one of the most luminous X-ray clusters known if it is at its redshift distance of z = .8325. It is conspicuously elongated, however, toward the bright, X-ray active galaxy NGC 720 about 14 arcmin away. At the same distance on the other side of NGC 720, and almost perfectly aligned, is an X-ray BSO of 5.8 cts/ks. It is reported here that the redshift of this quasar is z = .8312.

  17. Are LGRBs biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II: star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    CERN Document Server

    Japelj, J; Salvaterra, R; D'Avanzo, P; Mannucci, F; Fernandez-Soto, A; Boissier, S; Hunt, L K; Atek, H; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L; Scodeggio, M; Cristiani, S; Floc'h, E Le; Flores, H; Gallego, J; Ghirlanda, G; Gomboc, A; Hammer, F; Perley, D A; Pescalli, A; Petitjean, P; Puech, M; Rafelski, M; Tagliaferri, G

    2016-01-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparin...

  18. H0LiCOW III. Quantifying the effect of mass along the line of sight to the gravitational lens HE 0435-1223 through weighted galaxy counts

    CERN Document Server

    Rusu, Cristian E; Sluse, Dominique; Hilbert, Stefan; Wong, Kenneth C; Huang, Kuang-Han; Suyu, Sherry H; Collett, Thomas E; Marshall, Philip J; Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Leon V E

    2016-01-01

    Based on spectroscopy and multiband wide-field observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar HE 0435-1223, we determine the probability distribution function of the external convergence $\\kappa_\\mathrm{ext}$ for this system. We measure the under/overdensity of the line of sight towards the lens system and compare it to the average line of sight throughout the universe, determined by using the CFHTLenS as a control field. Aiming to constrain $\\kappa_\\mathrm{ext}$ as tightly as possible, we determine under/overdensities using various combinations of relevant informative weighing schemes for the galaxy counts, such as projected distance to the lens, redshift, and stellar mass. We then convert the measured under/overdensities into a $\\kappa_\\mathrm{ext}$ distribution, using ray-tracing through the Millennium Simulation. We explore several limiting magnitudes and apertures, and account for systematic and statistical uncertainties relevant to the quality of the observational data, which we further test through ...

  19. HerMES: A search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - Catalogue, number counts and early results

    CERN Document Server

    Asboth, V; Sayers, J; Bethermin, M; Chapman, S C; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Dannerbauer, H; Farrah, D; Glenn, J; Golwala, S R; Halpern, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Maloney, P R; Marques-Chaves, R; Martinez-Navajas, P I; Oliver, S J; Perez-Fournon, I; Riechers, D A; Rowan-Robinson, M; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S R; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Wang, L; Wardlow, J; Wheeler, J

    2016-01-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/SPIRE maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg$^2$ of the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities $S_{500} > S_{350} >S_{250}$ and a 5 \\sigma cut-off $S_{500}$ > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these "red" sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We examine the 500 $...

  20. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Bradley S.; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar H i disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in ga

  1. Constraints on photoionization feedback from number counts of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies in the Frontier Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Ferrara, A; Merlin, E; Fontana, A; Amorín, R; Grazian, A; Mármol-Queralto, E; Michałowski, M J; Mortlock, A; Paris, D; Parsa, S; Pilo, S; Santini, P

    2016-01-01

    We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified HST $H_{160}$ magnitude $>30$) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function (LF) in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including 7 HST bands and deep $K_s$ and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-$z$ galaxies constrain the cut-off halo circular velocity below which star-formation is suppressed by photo-ionization feedback to $v_c^{\\rm cut} < 50$ km s$^{-1}$. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of $\\approx5.6\\times10^9~M_\\odot$ and $\\a...

  2. The early-type dwarf galaxy population of the Centaurus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Misgeld, I; Mieske, S

    2009-01-01

    We present a photometric study of the early-type dwarf galaxy population of the Centaurus cluster, aiming at investigating the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and galaxy scaling relations down to the regime of galaxies with M_V~-10 mag. On deep VLT/FORS1 V- and I-band images of the central part of the cluster, we identify cluster dwarf-galaxy candidates using both morphological and surface brightness selection criteria. Photometric and structural parameters of the candidates are derived from analysis of their surface brightness profiles. Fundamental scaling relations, such as the colour-magnitude and the magnitude-surface brightness relation, are used to distinguish the cluster from the background. We find a flat LF with a slope of \\alpha = -1.14 \\pm 0.12 for M_V>-14 mag, when fitting a power law to the completeness-corrected galaxy number counts. When plotting the central surface brightness of a Sersic model vs. the galaxy magnitude, we find a continuous relation for magnitudes -20

  3. Discovery of a Very Bright and Intrinsically Very Luminous, Strongly Lensed Lyα Emitting Galaxy at z = 2.82 in the BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Chaves, Rui; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Shu, Yiping; Martínez-Navajas, Paloma I.; Bolton, Adam S.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Oguri, Masamune; Zheng, Zheng; Mao, Shude; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Brownstein, Joel R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very bright (r = 20.16), highly magnified, and yet intrinsically very luminous Lyα emitter (LAE) at z=2.82. This system comprises four images in the observer plane with a maximum separation of ∼ 6\\prime\\prime and it is lensed by a z=0.55 massive early-type galaxy. It was initially identified in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey for GALaxy-Lyα EmitteR sYstems survey, and follow-up imaging and spectroscopic observations using the Gran Telescopio Canarias and William Herschel Telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A lens model using a singular isothermal ellipsoid in an external shear field reproduces the main features of the system quite well, yielding an Einstein radius of 2.″95 ± 0.″10, and a total magnification factor for the LAE of 8.8 ± 0.4. This LAE is one of the brightest and most luminous galaxy–galaxy strong lenses known. We present initial imaging and spectroscopy showing the basic physical and morphological properties of this lensed system. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and William Herschel Telescope (WHT), in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC, under Directors Discretionary Time (DDT programs IDs: GTC2016-054 and DDT2016-077).

  4. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Bradley S; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar HI disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in galaxies. Our new WSRT data reveal two faint, S-shaped radio lobes extending out to $\\sim$10 kpc from the galaxy centre. Remarkably, we find that the inner HI disc warps back towards the stellar mid-plane in a way that mirrors the warping of the radio lobes. We suggest that the polar HI disc was accreted through a minor merger, and that the torques causing it to warp in the inner regions are also responsible for feeding the AGN. The "S" shape of the radio lobes would then be due to the radio jets adapting to the changing angular momentum of the accreted gas. The extended radio jets are likely poorly collimated, which would explain their quick fading and, therefore, their rarity in galaxies similar to NGC 3998. The fue...

  5. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies keystones of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Gallagher, S; Wyse, F G

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  6. Measuring Structural Parameters Through Stacking Galaxy Images

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yubin; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Peng; Wen, ZhangZheng; Guo, Kexin; An, FangXia

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to detect the low surface brightness structures of faint high-z galaxies, which is key to understanding the structural evolution of galaxies. The technique of image stacking allows us to measure the averaged light profile beneath the detection limit and probe the extended structure of a group of galaxies. We carry out simulations to examine the recovery of the averaged surface brightness profile through stacking model HST/ACS images of a set of galaxies as functions of Sersic index (n), effective radius (Re) and axis ratio (AR). The Sersic profile best fitting the radial profile of the stacked image is taken as the recovered profile, in comparison with the intrinsic mean profile of the model galaxies. Our results show that, in general, the structural parameters of the mean profile can be properly determined through stacking, although systematic biases need to be corrected when spreads of Re and AR are counted. We find that Sersic index is slightly overestimated and Re is underestimated ...

  7. The zCOSMOS-Bright survey : the clustering of early and late galaxy morphological types since z similar or equal to 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Torre, S.; Le Fevre, O.; Porciani, C.; Guzzo, L.; Meneux, B.; Abbas, U.; Tasca, L.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J. -P.; Lilly, S. J.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Halliday, C.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Oesch, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Scaramella, R.

    2011-01-01

    We measure the spatial clustering of galaxies as a function of their morphological type at z similar or equal to 0.8, for the first time in a deep redshift survey with full morphological information. This is obtained by combining high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Very Large Telescop

  8. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bradley S.; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar H i disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in galaxies. Our new WSRT data reveal two faint, S-shaped radio lobes extending out to ~10 kpc from the galaxy centre. Remarkably, we find that the inner H i disc warps back towards the stellar mid-plane in a way that mirrors the warping of the radio lobes. We suggest that the polar H i disc was accreted through a minor merger, and that the torques causing it to warp in the inner regions are also responsible for feeding the AGN. The "S" shape of the radio lobes would then be due to the radio jets adapting to the changing angular momentum of the accreted gas. The extended radio jets are likely poorly collimated, which would explain their quick fading and, therefore, their rarity in galaxies similar to NGC 3998. The fuelling of the central super-massive black hole is likely occurring via "discrete events", suggested by the observed variability of the radio core and the extremely high core dominance, which we attribute to the formation and ejection of a new jet resulting from a recent fuelling event. The reduced radiocontinuum image and HI datacube (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A94

  9. Measuring Structural Parameters Through Stacking Galaxy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Peng; Wen, Zhang Zheng; Guo, Kexin; An, Fang Xia

    2016-12-01

    It remains challenging to detect the low surface brightness structures of faint high-z galaxies, which are key to understanding the structural evolution of galaxies. The technique of image stacking allows us to measure the averaged light profile beneath the detection limit and probe the extended structure of a group of galaxies. We carry out simulations to examine the recovery of the averaged surface brightness profile through stacking model Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys images of a set of galaxies as functions of the Sérsic index (n), effective radius (R e) and axis ratio (AR). The Sérsic profile best fitting the radial profile of the stacked image is taken as the recovered profile, in comparison with the intrinsic mean profile of the model galaxies. Our results show that, in general, the structural parameters of the mean profile can be properly determined through stacking, though systematic biases need to be corrected when spreads of R e and AR are counted. We find that the Sérsic index is slightly overestimated and R e is underestimated at {AR}\\lt 0.5 because the stacked image appears to be more compact due to the presence of inclined galaxies; the spread of R e biases the stacked profile to have a higher Sérsic index. We stress that the measurements of structural parameters through stacking should take these biases into account. We estimate the biases in the recovered structural parameters from stacks of galaxies when the samples have distributions of {R}{{e}}, AR and n seen in local galaxies.

  10. Galactic Extinction and Reddening from the South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey: u-band Galaxy Number Counts and u ‑ r  Color Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Shen, Shiyin; Hou, Jinliang; Yuan, Fangting; Zhong, Jing; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Jiang, Zhaoji; Peng, Xiyan; Fan, Dongwei; Fan, Xiaohui; Fan, Zhou; He, Boliang; Jing, Yipeng; Lesser, Michael; Li, Cheng; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jundan; Wang, Jiali; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    We study the integral Galactic extinction and reddening based on the galaxy catalog of the South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS), where u-band galaxy number counts and u ‑ r color distribution are used to derive the Galactic extinction and reddening respectively. We compare these independent statistical measurements with the reddening map of Schlegel et al. (SFD) and find that both the extinction and reddening from the number counts and color distribution are in good agreement with the SFD results at low extinction regions (E{(B-V)}{SFD}extinction regions (E{(B-V)}{SFD}> 0.12 mag), the SFD map overestimates the Galactic reddening systematically, which can be approximated by a linear relation {{Δ }}E{(B-V)=0.43[E(B-V)}{SFD}-0.12]. By combining the results from galaxy number counts and color distribution, we find that the shape of the Galactic extinction curve is in good agreement with the standard RV = 3.1 extinction law of O’Donnell.

  11. The LBT Boötes Field Survey. I. The Rest-frame Ultraviolet and Near-infrared Luminosity Functions and Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies at Z ~ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fuyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard F.; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Davé, Romeel

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U spec-band imaging survey (9 deg2) covering the NOAO Boötes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by >=3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z ~ 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z ~ 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 μm]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z ~ 7 and z ~ 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University

  12. Beyond 31 mag/arcsec^2: the low surface brightness frontier with the largest optical telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Trujillo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The detection of optical surface brightness structures in the sky with magnitudes fainter than 30 mag/arcsec^2 (3sigma in 10x10 arcsec boxes; r-band) has remained elusive in current photometric deep surveys. Here we show how present-day 10 meter class telescopes can provide broadband imaging 1.5-2 mag deeper than most previous results within a reasonable amount of time (i.e. <10h on source integration). In particular, we illustrate the ability of the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC) telescope to produce imaging with a limiting surface brightness of 31.5 mag/arcsec^2 (3sigma in 10x10 arcsec boxes; r-band) using 8.1 hours on source. We apply this power to explore the stellar halo of the galaxy UGC00180, a galaxy analogous to M31 located at ~150 Mpc, by obtaining a surface brightness radial profile down to mu_r~33 mag/arcsec^2. This depth is similar to that obtained using star counts techniques of Local Group galaxies, but is achieved at a distance where this technique is unfeasible. We find that the ...

  13. Surface Brightness Profiles of Composite Images of Compact Galaxies at Z approximately equal 4-6 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-07

    significant number of low luminosity dwarf galaxies were present at these times, and were the main contributor to finish the process of reionization of the...z 6 has implications for the reionization of the Universe. From observations of the appearance of complete Gunn–Peterson troughs in the spectra of...z 5.8 quasars (Fan et al. 2006), we know that the epoch of reionization had ended by z 6. From the steep (α = −1.8) faint-end slope of the

  14. SPIDER - VII. The Central Dark Matter Content of Bright Early-Type Galaxies: Benchmark Correlations with Mass, Structural Parameters and Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, C; Napolitano, N R; de Carvalho, R R; Romanowsky, A J

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the central dark-matter (DM) content of $\\sim 4,500$ massive ($M_\\star \\gsim 10^{10} \\, M_\\odot$), low-redshift ($z<0.1$), early-type galaxies (ETGs), with high-quality $ugrizYJHK$ photometry and optical spectroscopy from SDSS and UKIDSS. We estimate the "central" fraction of DM within the $K$-band effective radius, \\Re. The main results of the present work are the following: (1) DM fractions increase systematically with both structural parameters (i.e. \\Re, and S\\'ersic index, $n$) and mass proxies (central velocity dispersion, stellar and dynamical mass), as in previous studies, and decrease with central stellar density. 2) All correlations involving DM fractions are caused by two fundamental ones with galaxy effective radius and central velocity dispersion. These correlations are independent of each other, so that ETGs populate a central-DM plane (DMP), i.e. a correlation among fraction of total-to-stellar mass, effective radius, and velocity dispersion, whose scatter along the total-to-stell...

  15. Powerful Activity in the Bright Ages. I. A Visible/IR Survey of High Redshift 3C Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Bryan; Kotyla, JohnPaul; Tremblay, Grant R; Stanghellini, Carlo; Sparks, William B; Baum, Stefi A; Capetti, Alessandro; Macchetto, F Duccio; Miley, George K; O'Dea, Christopher P; Perlman, Eric S; Quillen, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    We present new rest frame UV and visible observations of 22 high-redshift (1 < z < 2.5) 3C radio galaxies and QSOs obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. Using a custom data reduction strategy in order to assure the removal of cosmic rays, persistence signal, and other data artifacts, we have produced high-quality science-ready images of the targets and their local environments. We observe targets with regions of UV emission suggestive of active star formation. In addition, several targets exhibit highly distorted host galaxy morphologies in the rest frame visible images. Photometric analyses reveals that brighter QSOs tend to be generally redder than their dimmer counterparts. Using emission line fluxes from the literature, we estimate that emission line contamination is relatively small in the rest frame UV images for the QSOs. Using archival VLA data, we have also created radio map overlays for each of our targets, allowing for analysis of the optical ...

  16. X-ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters III: New insights into the triggering mechanisms of cluster AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Ehlert, S; Brandt, W N; Canning, R E A; Luo, B; Mantz, A; Morris, R G; von der Linden, A; Xue, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a new analysis of the X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) population in the vicinity of 135 of the most massive galaxy clusters in the redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.9 observed with Chandra. With a sample of more than 11,000 X-ray point sources, we are able to measure, for the first time, evidence for evolution in the cluster AGN population beyond the expected evolution of field AGN. Our analysis shows that overall number density of cluster AGN scales with the cluster mass as $\\sim M_{500}^{-1.2}$. There is no evidence for the overall number density of cluster member X-ray AGN depending on the cluster redshift in a manner different than field AGN, nor there is any evidence that the spatial distribution of cluster AGN (given in units of the cluster overdensity radius r_500) strongly depends on the cluster mass or redshift. The $M^{-1.2 \\pm 0.7}$ scaling relation we measure is consistent with theoretical predictions of the galaxy merger rate in clusters, which is expected ...

  17. Distinct core and halo stellar populations and the formation history of the bright Coma cluster early-type galaxy NGC 4889

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, Lodovico; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2010-01-01

    We study the stellar population far into the halo of one of the two brightest galaxies in the Coma cluster, NGC 4889, based on deep medium resolution spectroscopy with FOCAS at the Subaru 8.2m telescope. We fit single stellar population models to the measured line-strength (Lick) indices (Hbeta, Mgb, [MgFe]' and ). Combining with literature data, we construct radial profiles of metallicity, [alpha/Fe] element abundance ratio and age for NGC 4889, from the center out to ~60 kpc (~4Re). We find evidence for different chemical and star formation histories for stars inside and outside 1.2Re = 18 kpc radius. The inner regions are characterized by a steep [Z/H] gradient and high [alpha/Fe] at ~2.5 times solar value. In the halo, between 18 and 60 kpc, the [Z/H] is near-solar with a shallow gradient, while [alpha/Fe] shows a strong negative gradient, reaching solar values at ~60 kpc. We interpret these data in terms of different formation histories for both components. The data for the inner galaxy are consistent wi...

  18. Submillimeter Number Counts From Statistical Analysis of BLAST Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Patanchon, Guillaume; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2009-01-01

    We describe the application of a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts from the confusion limited observations of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). Our method is based on a maximum likelihood fit to the pixel histogram, sometimes called 'P(D)', an approach which has been used before to probe faint counts, the difference being that here we advocate its use even for sources with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios. This method has an advantage over standard techniques of source extraction in providing an unbiased estimate of the counts from the bright end down to flux densities well below the confusion limit. We specifically analyse BLAST observations of a roughly 10 sq. deg map centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South field. We provide estimates of number counts at the three BLAST wavelengths, 250, 350, and 500 microns, instead of counting sources in flux bins we estimate the counts at several flux density nodes connected with ...

  19. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof......-the-art cosmological simulation, Illustris, follow a tight relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. This relation agrees well with the observed relation at a redshift of z = 0 and z = 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ' 2 the normalisation is lower than in real observations. This is highlighted...... of GRB host galaxies is affected by the fact that GRBs appear mainly to happen in low-metallicity galaxies. Solving this problem will make it possible to derive the total cosmic star formation rate more reliably from number counts of GRBs....

  20. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies at z>1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Haojing; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, Steven; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew; Dave, Romeel; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha

    2013-01-01

    Optical counterpart identification is a critical link in maximizing the science returns of the Herschel very wide-field survey data. Currently, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas. However a large number of very bright FIR sources are not detected in the SDSS, and their true nature remains to be determined. Using the public HerMES data, we studied seven such sources that are within the CANDELS fields. To deal with the source blending problem, we used the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors and decomposed these FIR sources. This new appraoch is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the position priors are derived from the mid-IR data that still suffer from the source blending problem in the first place, and can be applied to the regions where the mid-IR data are not available. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that may or may not b...

  1. Star Formation in MUSCEL Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary star-formation histories for a subset of the low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the MUSCEL (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry, and Evolution of LSB galaxies) program. These histories are fitted against ground-based IFU spectra in tandem with space-based UV and IR photometry. MUSCEL aims to use these histories along with kinematic analyses to determine the physical processes that have caused the evolution of LSB galaxies to diverge from their high surface brightness counterparts.

  2. Most Luminous z=9-10 Galaxies: A First Determination of the Bright End of the z~9 and z~10 UV Luminosity Functions using all five CANDELS Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwens, R J; Labbe, I; Illingworth, G D; Fazio, G; Coe, D; Holwerda, B; Smit, R; Stefanon, M; van Dokkum, P G; Trenti, M; Ashby, M; Huang, J; Spitler, L; Straatman, C; Bradley, L; Magee, D

    2015-01-01

    The deep, wide-area (900 arcmin**2) near-IR/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS program represents a significant resource for constraining the bright end of the z~9 and z~10 luminosity functions (LFs) in the UV. We recently reported the discovery of 6 luminous z~9-10 candidates over the GOODS-North+South fields, but extending this search to the full CANDELS program was limited due to the lack of HST-depth 1.05-micron observations in the other 3 CANDELS fields. Here we attempt to significantly realize the potential of CANDELS for z=9-10 science by combining a search over all 5 fields with results from a new HST program (B9-CANDELS) designed to follow up the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns. The targeted z~9-10 candidates are preselected by taking advantage of the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-IR observations. With our follow-up program now 91% complete, we identify 4 new high-prob...

  3. The Quest for Dusty Primeval Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, C.; Lapi, A.; Danese, L.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit the continuity equation approach and the 'main sequence' star-formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses ? a few >10^10 M_⊙ at redshift z >? 4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) ψ >? 10^2 M_⊙ yr^-1 in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for zdensity at z 30 M_⊙ yr^-1 cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z ? 8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.

  4. Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kruit, P C

    2011-01-01

    The formation and evolution of galactic disks is particularly important for understanding how galaxies form and evolve, and the cause of the variety in which they appear to us. Ongoing large surveys, made possible by new instrumentation at wavelengths from the ultraviolet (GALEX), via optical (HST and large groundbased telescopes) and infrared (Spitzer) to the radio are providing much new information about disk galaxies over a wide range of redshift. Although progress has been made, the dynamics and structure of stellar disks, including their truncations, are still not well understood. We do now have plausible estimates of disk mass-to-light ratios, and estimates of Toomre's $Q$ parameter show that they are just locally stable. Disks are mostly very flat and sometimes very thin, and have a range in surface brightness from canonical disks with a central surface brightness of about 21.5 $B$-mag arcsec$^{-2}$ down to very low surface brightnesses. It appears that galaxy disks are not maximal, except possibly in ...

  5. The Diverse Properties of the Most Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies Discovered by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Hoopes, C G; Salim, S; Seibert, M; Tremonti, C A; Schiminovich, D; Rich, R M; Martin, D C; Charlot, S; Kauffmann, G; Forster, K; Friedman, P G; Morrissey, P; Neff, S G; Small, T; Wyder, T K; Bianchi, L; Donas, J; Lee, Y W; Madore, B F; Milliard, B; Szalay, A S; Welsh, B Y; Yi, S K; Hoopes, Charles G.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Salim, Samir; Seibert, Mark; Tremonti, Christy A.; Schiminovich, David; Charlot, Stephane; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K.; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alex S.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the properties of a sample of ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs) selected by matching the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Surveys with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. Out of 25362 galaxies between 0.02x10^10 L_solar at 1530 Angstroms (observed wavelength). The properties of this population are well correlated with ultraviolet surface brightness. We find that the galaxies with low UV surface brightness are primarily large spiral systems with a mixture of old and young stellar populations, while the high surface brightness galaxies consist primarily of compact starburst systems. In terms of the behavior of surface brightness with luminosity, size with luminosity, the mass-metallicity relation, and other parameters, the compact UVLGs clearly depart from the trends established by the full sample of galaxies. The subset of compact UVLGs with the highest surface brightness (``supercompact UVLGs'') have characteristics that are remarkably similar to Lyman Break Galaxies at higher r...

  6. The galaxy ancestor problem

    CERN Document Server

    Disney, Mike

    2011-01-01

    HST finds galaxies whose Tolman dimming should exceed 10 mag. Could evolution alone explain these as our ancestor galaxies? Or could they be representatives of quite a different dynasty whose descendants are no longer prominent today? We explore this latter hypothesis and argue that Surface Brightness Selection Effects naturally bring into focus quite different dynasties from different redshifts. Thus the HST z=7 galaxies could be examples of galaxies whose descendants are both too small and too choked with dust to be recognizable in our neighborhood easily today. Conversely the ancestors of the Milky Way and its obvious neighbors will have completely sunk below the sky at z>1.2 although their diffuse light could account for the missing Reionization flux. This Succeeding Prominent Dynasties Hypothesis (SPDH) fits the existing observations both naturally and well,including the bizarre distributions of galaxy surface brightnesses found in deep fields, the angular size ~ inverse (1+z) law,'Downsizing' which turn...

  7. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  8. Platelet Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their spleen removed surgically Use of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) Some conditions may cause a temporary (transitory) increased ... increased platelet counts include estrogen and birth control pills (oral contraceptives). Mildly decreased platelet counts may be seen in ...

  9. Seal Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of seal counts from aerial photography. Counts by image, site, species, and date are stored in the database along with information on entanglements and...

  10. ALMA spectroscopic survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Continuum number counts, resolved 1.2-mm extragalactic background, and properties of the faintest dusty star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, Manuel; Walter, Fabian; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Bauer, Franz E; Carilli, Christopher; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Ivison, R J; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian R; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Assef, Roberto J; Bell, Eric; Bertoldi, Frank; Bacon, Roland; Bouwens, Rychard; Cortes, Paulo; Cox, Pierre; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Hodge, Jacqueline; Ibar, Eduardo; Inami, Hanae; Infante, Leopoldo; Karim, Alexander; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kauzuaki; Popping, Gergö; Sheth, Kartik; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of a deep (1$\\sigma$=13 $\\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\\times10^{10}\\ M_\\odot$ and $\\sim40~M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values ar...

  11. The SDSS DR6 Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D

    2008-01-01

    We present number counts, luminosity functions (LFs) and luminosity densities of galaxies obtained using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sixth Data Release in all SDSS photometric bands. Thanks to the SDSS DR6, galaxy statistics have increased by a factor of ~9 in the u-band and by a factor of ~4-5 in the rest of the SDSS bands with respect to the previous work of Blanton et al. (2003b). In addition, we have achieved a high redshift completeness in our galaxy samples. Firstly, by making use of the survey masks, provided by the NYU-VAGC DR6, we have been able to define an area on the sky of high angular redshift completeness. Secondly, we guarantee that brightness-dependent redshift incompleteness is small within the magnitude ranges that define our galaxy samples. With these advances, we have estimated very accurate SDSS DR6 LFs in both the bright and the faint end. In the {0.1}^r-band, our SDSS DR6 luminosity function is well fitted by a Schechter LF with parameters Phi_{*}=0.90 +/- 0.07$, M_{*}-5log_{10}h=-20....

  12. The cosmic assembly of stellar haloes in massive Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Fernando; Trujillo, Ignacio; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Montes, Mireia; Cooper, Andrew P.; Bruce, Victoria A.; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Using the exquisite depth of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF12 programme) dataset, we explore the ongoing assembly of the outermost regions of the most massive galaxies (M_stellar≥5× 1010 M⊙) at z ≤ 1. The outskirts of massive objects, particularly Early-Types Galaxies (ETGs), are expected to suffer a dramatic transformation across cosmic time due to continuous accretion of small galaxies. HUDF imaging allows us to study this process at intermediate redshifts in 6 massive galaxies, exploring the individual surface brightness profiles out to ˜25 effective radii. We find that 5-20% of the total stellar mass for the galaxies in our sample is contained within 10 values are in close agreement with numerical simulations, and higher than those reported for local late-type galaxies (≲5%). The fraction of stellar mass stored in the outer envelopes/haloes of Massive Early-Type Galaxies increases with decreasing redshift, being 28.7% at = 0.1, 15.1% at = 0.65 and 3.5% at = 2. The fraction of mass in diffuse features linked with ongoing minor merger events is > 1-2%, very similar to predictions based on observed close pair counts. Therefore, the results for our small albeit meaningful sample suggest that the size and mass growth of the most massive galaxies have been solely driven by minor and major merging from z = 1 to today.

  13. Star-forming galaxies in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    The infrared properties from IRAS of galaxy samples previously observed in the optical and ultraviolet are summarized in order to predict quantitatively the infrared fluxes corresponding to galaxies of given fluxes in other wavebands. An infrared luminosity function of galaxies is presented and used to predict galaxy counts and redshift ranges at the flux limits expected for SIRTF. Depending on the precise limit and whether or not galaxies evolve, SIRTF will see as many as 2200 galaxies/sq deg at 30 microns.

  14. Deep near-IR observations of the Chandra Deep Field and of the HDF-South - Color and Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A; Iovino, A; Poli, F; Vanzella, E

    2001-01-01

    We present near-IR (J and Ks) number counts and colors of galaxies detected in deep VLT-ISAAC images centered on the Chandra Deep Field and Hubble Deep Field-South for a total area of 13.6 arcmin$^2$. The limiting surface brightness obtained is Ks$\\simeq$22.8 mag/arcsec$^2$ and J$\\simeq$24.5 (1$\\sigma$) on both fields. A d$log$N/dm relation with a slope of $\\sim0.34$ in J and $\\sim0.28$ in Ks is found in both fields with no evidence of decline near the magnitude limit. The median J-Ks color of galaxies becomes bluer at magnitudes fainter than Ks$\\sim18$, in agreement with the different number counts slope observed in the two bands. We find a fraction ($\\le5%$ of the total sample) of sources with color redder than J-Ks=2.3 at magnitudes Ks$>20$. Most of them appear as isolated sources, possibly elliptical or dusty starburst galaxies at redshift $z>2$. The comparison of the observed number counts with models shows that our J-band and Ks-band counts are consistent with the prediction of a model based on a small ...

  15. The AGN Population in Nearby Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filho, Mercedes; Barthel, Peter; Ho, Luis

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the incidence of black hole accretion-driven nuclear activity in nearby galaxies, we have compiled radio data for the LINERs, composite LINER,/Hn and Seyfert galaxies from a complete magnitude-limited sample of bright nearby galaxies (Palomar sample). Our results show an overal

  16. Applying galactic archeology to massive galaxies using deep imaging surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2014-01-01

    Various programs aimed at exploring the still largely unknown low surface brightness Universe with deep imaging optical surveys have recently started. They open a new window for studies of galaxy evolution, pushing the technique of galactic archeology outside the Local Group (LG). The method, based on the detection and analysis of the diffuse light emitted by collisional debris or extended stellar halos (rather than on stellar counts as done for LG systems), faces however a number of technical difficulties, like the contamination of the images by reflection halos and Galactic cirrus. I review here the on-going efforts to address them and highlight the preliminary promising results obtained with a systematic survey with MegaCam on the CFHT of nearby massive early-type galaxies done as part of the Atlas3D, NGVS and MATLAS collaborations.

  17. Interpreting debris from satellite disruption in external galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnston, KV; Sackett, PD; Bullock, JS

    2001-01-01

    We examine the detectability and interpretation of debris trails caused by satellite disruption in external galaxies using semianalytic approximations for the dependence of streamer length, width, and surface brightness on satellite and primary galaxy characteristics. The semianalytic method is test

  18. Multiplicity Counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  19. Star Counts and Galactic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Cui-Hua; ZHOU Xu; MA Jun; CHEN Jian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We use a model of the Galactic stellar distribution to analyse the BATC star count data toward two high Galactic latitude fields. Since star counts at high Galactic latitudes are not strongly related to the radial distribution,they are very suitable for the study of the vertical distribution of the Galaxy. The vertical density distribution of the stars shows the contribution of the thin disc, the thick disc and the stellar halo of the Galaxy. We give quantitative descriptions of these components in terms of exponential discs and a de Vaucouleurs halo. We find that the observed counts support an axial ratio of c/a ~ 0.5, implying a more flattened halo. We consider that it is possible that the halo has two subpopulations, i.e. a flattened inner halo and a spherical outer halo in the Milky Way.

  20. BLAST Observations of the South Ecliptic Pole field: Number Counts and Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Valiante, Elisabetta; Bock, James; Braglia, Filiberto; Chapin, Edward; Devlin, Mark Joseph; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter; Hughes, David; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Semisch, Christopher; Stabenau, Hans; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a survey carried out by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) on a 9 deg^2 field near the South Ecliptic Pole at 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m. The median 1{\\sigma} depths of the maps are 36.0, 26.4 and 18.4 mJy, respectively. We apply a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts and find that they are in agreement with other measurements made with the same instrument and with the more recent results from Herschel/SPIRE. Thanks to the large field observed, the new measurements give additional constraints on the bright end of the counts. We identify 132, 89 and 61 sources with S/N>4 at 250, 350, 500 {\\mu}m, respectively and provide a multi-wavelength combined catalog of 232 sources. The new BLAST maps and catalogs are available publicly at http://blastexperiment.info.

  1. Discovery of an ultra-diffuse galaxy in the Pisces-Perseus supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Sharina, Margarita; Toloba, Elisa; Fliri, Jurgen; Beaton, Rachael; Valls-Gabaud, David; Karachentsev, Igor D; Chonis, Taylor S; Grebel, Eva K; Forbes, Duncan A; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Gallego-Laborda, J; Teuwen, Karel; Gomez-Flechoso, M A; Wang, Jie; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaisin, Serafim; Ho, Nhung

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of DGSAT I, an ultra-diffuse, quenched galaxy located 10.4 degrees in projection from the Andromeda galaxy (M31). This low-surface brightness galaxy (mu_V = 24.8 mag/arcsec), found with a small amateur telescope, appears unresolved in sub-arcsecond archival Subaru/Suprime-Cam images, and hence has been missed by optical surveys relying on resolved star counts, in spite of its relatively large effective radius (R_e(V) = 12 arcsec) and proximity (15 arcmin) to the well-known dwarf spheroidal galaxy And II. Its red color (V-I = 1.0), shallow Sersic index (n_V=0.68), and the absence of detectable H-alpha emission are typical properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and suggest that it is mainly composed of old stars. Initially interpreted as an interesting case of an isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the local universe, our radial velocity measurement obtained with the BTA 6-meter telescope (V_h=5450 +/- 40 km/s) shows that this system is an M31-background galaxy associated with the filam...

  2. Reticulocyte count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation therapy, or infection) Cirrhosis of the liver Anemia caused by low iron levels, or low levels of vitamin B12 or folate Chronic kidney disease Reticulocyte count may be higher during pregnancy.

  3. Spatial Periodicity of Galaxy Number Counts, CMB Anisotropy, and SNIa Hubble Diagram Based on the Universe Accompanied by a Non-Minimally Coupled Scalar Field

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Koichi; Komiya, Zen

    2008-01-01

    We have succeeded in establishing a cosmological model with a non-minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ that can account not only for the spatial periodicity or the {\\it picket-fence structure} exhibited by the galaxy $N$-$z$ relation of the 2dF survey but also for the spatial power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) temperature anisotropy observed by the WMAP satellite. The Hubble diagram of our model also compares well with the observation of Type Ia supernovae. The scalar field of our model universe starts from an extremely small value at around the nucleosynthesis epoch, remains in that state for sufficiently long periods, allowing sufficient time for the CMB temperature anisotropy to form, and then starts to grow in magnitude at the redshift $z$ of $\\sim 1$, followed by a damping oscillation which is required to reproduce the observed picket-fence structure of the $N$-$z$ relation. To realize such behavior of the scalar field, we have found it necessary to introduce a new form of...

  4. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  5. IR Colors and Sizes of Faint Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Moorwood, A F M; Buzzoni, A; Cuby, J G; Lidman, C E

    1999-01-01

    We present J and Ks band galaxy counts down to J=24 and Ks=22.5 obtained with the new infrared imager/spectrometer, SOFI, at the ESO New Technology Telescope. The co-addition of short, dithered, images led to a total exposure time of 256 and 624 minutes respectively, over an area of $\\sim20$ arcmin$^2$ centered on the NTT Deep Field. The total number of sources with S/N$>5$ is 1569 in the J sample and 1025 in the Ks-selected sample. These are the largest samples currently available at these depths. A d$logN$/d$m$ relation with slope of $\\sim0.36$ in J and $\\sim0.38$ in Ks is found with no evident sign of a decline at the magnitude limit. The observed surface density of ``small'' sources is much lower than ``large'' ones at bright magnitudes and rises more steeply than the large sources to fainter magnitudes. Fainter than $J\\sim22.5$ and Ks$\\sim21.5$, small sources dominate the number counts. Galaxies get redder in J-K down to J$\\sim20$ and Ks$\\sim19$. At fainter magnitudes, the median color becomes bluer with...

  6. Globular cluster systems of six shell galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sikkema, G; Carter, D; Valentijn, E A; Balcells, M

    2006-01-01

    Shells in Elliptical Galaxies are faint, sharp-edged features, believed to provide evidence of a recent ($\\sim 0.5 - 2 \\times 10^9$ years ago) merger event. We analyse the Globular Cluster (GC) systems of six shell elliptical galaxies, to examine the effects of mergers upon the GC formation history. We examine the colour distributions, and investigate differences between red and blue globular cluster populations. We present luminosity functions, spatial distributions and specific frequencies ($S_N$) at 50 kpc radius for our sample. We present V and I magnitudes for cluster candidates measured with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Galaxy background light is modelled and removed, and magnitudes are measured in 8 pixel (0.4 arcsec) diameter apertures. Background contamination is removed using counts from HDFS. We find that the colour distributions for NGC 3923 and NGC 5982 have a bimodal form typical of bright ellipticals, with peaks near $V-I=0.92 \\pm 0.04$ and $V-I=1.18 \\pm 0.06$. In NGC 7626, we fin...

  7. The galaxy ancestor problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, M. J.; Lang, R. H.

    2012-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) findsgalaxies whose Tolman dimming exceeds 10 mag. Could evolution alone explain these as our ancestor galaxies or could they be representatives of quite a different dynasty whose descendants are no longer prominent today? We explore the latter hypothesis and argue that surface brightness selection effects naturally bring into focus quite different dynasties from different redshifts. Thus, the HST z = 7 galaxies could be examples of galaxies whose descendants are both too small and too choked with dust to be recognizable in our neighbourhood easily today. Conversely, the ancestors of the Milky Way and its obvious neighbours would have completely sunk below the sky at z > 1.2, unless they were more luminous in the past, although their diffused light could account for the missing re-ionization flux. This Succeeding Prominent Dynasties Hypothesis (SPDH) fits the existing observations both naturally and well even without evolution, including the bizarre distributions of galaxy surface brightness found in deep fields, the angular size ˜(1 + z)-1 law, 'downsizing' which turns out to be an 'illusion' in the sense that it does not imply evolution, 'infant mortality', that is, the discrepancy between stars born and stars seen, the existence of 'red nuggets', and finally the recently discovered and unexpected excess of quasar absorption line damped Lyα systems at high redshift. If galaxies were not significantly brighter in the past and the SPDH were true, then a large proportion of galaxies could remain sunk from sight, possibly at all redshifts, and these sunken galaxies could supply the missing re-ionization flux. We show that fishing these sunken galaxies out of the sky by their optical emissions alone is practically impossible, even when they are nearby. More ingenious methods are needed to detect them. It follows that disentangling galaxy evolution through studying ever higher redshift galaxies may be a forlorn hope because one could

  8. "Galaxy," Defined

    CERN Document Server

    Willman, Beth

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of low luminosity and low surface brightness astronomical objects challenge traditional notions of both galaxies and star clusters. To address this challenge, we propose a definition of galaxy that does not depend on a cold dark matter model of the universe: A galaxy is a gravitationally bound collection of stars whose properties cannot be explained by a combination of baryons and Newton's laws of gravity. We use this definition to critically examine the classification of ultra-faint dwarfs, globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, and tidal dwarfs. While kinematic studies provide an effective diagnostic of the definition in many regimes, they can be less useful for compact or very faint systems. To explore the utility of using the [Fe/H] spread as a diagnostic, we use published spectroscopic [Fe/H] measurements of 16 Milky Way dwarfs and 24 globular clusters to uniformly calculate their [Fe/H] spreads and associated uncertainties. Our principal results are: (i) no known, old star cluster wit...

  9. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRA-DIFFUSE GALAXY IN THE PISCES-PERSEUS SUPERCLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Grebel, Eva K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12–14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Läsker, Ronald [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Sharina, Margarita; Karachentsev, Igor D. [Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Toloba, Elisa; Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fliri, Jürgen [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beaton, Rachael [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institutions for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Valls-Gabaud, David [LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l’Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Chonis, Taylor S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Gallego-Laborda, J. [Fosca Nit Observatory, Montsec Astronomical Park, Ager (Spain); Teuwen, Karel [Remote Observatories Southern Alpes, Verclause (France); Gómez-Flechoso, M. A. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada (Biomatemática), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2016-04-15

    We report the discovery of DGSAT I, an ultra-diffuse, quenched galaxy located 10.°4 in projection from the Andromeda galaxy (M31). This low-surface brightness galaxy (μ{sub V} = 24.8 mag arcsec{sup −2}), found with a small amateur telescope, appears unresolved in sub-arcsecond archival Subaru/Suprime-Cam images, and hence has been missed by optical surveys relying on resolved star counts, in spite of its relatively large effective radius (R{sub e}(V) = 12″) and proximity (15′) to the well-known dwarf spheroidal galaxy And II. Its red color (V − I = 1.0), shallow Sérsic index (n{sub V} = 0.68), and the absence of detectable Hα emission are typical properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and suggest that it is mainly composed of old stars. Initially interpreted as an interesting case of an isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the local universe, our radial velocity measurement obtained with the BTA 6 m telescope (V{sub h} = 5450 ± 40 km s{sup −1}) shows that this system is an M31-background galaxy associated with the filament of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster. At the distance of this cluster (∼78 Mpc), DGSAT I would have an R{sub e} ∼ 4.7 kpc and M{sub V} ∼ −16.3. Its properties resemble those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) recently discovered in the Coma cluster. DGSAT I is the first case of these rare UDGs found in this galaxy cluster. Unlike the UDGs associated with the Coma and Virgo clusters, DGSAT I is found in a much lower density environment, which provides a fresh constraint on the formation mechanisms for this intriguing class of galaxy.

  10. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  11. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  12. Counting Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  13. Counting Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  14. Triple Scoop from Galaxy Hunter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3 Silver Dollar Galaxy: NGC 253 (figure 1) Located 10 million light-years away in the southern constellation Sculptor, the Silver Dollar galaxy, or NGC 253, is one of the brightest spiral galaxies in the night sky. In this edge-on view from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the wisps of blue represent relatively dustless areas of the galaxy that are actively forming stars. Areas of the galaxy with a soft golden glow indicate regions where the far-ultraviolet is heavily obscured by dust particles. Gravitational Dance: NGC 1512 and NGC 1510 (figure 2) In this image, the wide ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer show spiral galaxy NGC 1512 sitting slightly northwest of elliptical galaxy NGC 1510. The two galaxies are currently separated by a mere 68,000 light-years, leading many astronomers to suspect that a close encounter is currently in progress. The overlapping of two tightly wound spiral arm segments makes up the light blue inner ring of NGC 1512. Meanwhile, the galaxy's outer spiral arm is being distorted by strong gravitational interactions with NGC 1510. Galaxy Trio: NGC 5566, NGC 5560, and NGC 5569 (figure 3) NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a triplet of galaxies in the Virgo cluster: NGC 5560 (top galaxy), NGC 5566 (middle galaxy), and NGC 5569 (bottom galaxy). The inner ring in NGC 5566 is formed by two nearly overlapping bright arms, which themselves spring from the ends of a central bar. The bar is not visible in ultraviolet because it consists of older stars or low mass stars that do not emit energy at ultraviolet wavelengths. The outer disk of NGC 5566 appears warped, and the disk of NGC 5560 is clearly disturbed. Unlike its galactic neighbors, the disk of NGC 5569 does not appear to have been distorted by any passing galaxies.

  15. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  16. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    to the most massive galaxies belonging to clusters. "Most surprising is that in three of the four groups, the brightest galaxy also has a bright companion galaxy. These galaxy pairs are merging systems," says Tran. The brightest galaxy in each group can be ordered in a time sequence that shows how luminous galaxies continue to grow by merging until recently, that is, in the last 5 billion years. It appears that due to the most recent episode of this 'galactic cannibalism', the brightest galaxies became at least 50% more massive. This discovery provides unique and powerful validation of hierarchical formation as manifested in both galaxy and cluster assembly. "The stars in these galaxies are already old and so we must conclude that the recent merging did not produce a new generation of stars," concludes Tran. "Most of the stars in these galaxies were born at least 7 billion years ago." The team is composed of Kim-Vy H. Tran (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, Switzerland), John Moustakas (New York University, USA), Anthony H. Gonzalez and Stefan J. Kautsch (University of Florida, Gainesville, USA), and Lei Bai and Dennis Zaritsky (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, USA). The results presented here are published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters: "The Late Stellar Assembly Of Massive Cluster Galaxies Via Major Merging", by Tran et al.

  17. The first galaxies structure and stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, M

    2000-01-01

    The Hubble Deep Fields continue to be a valuable resource for studying the distant universe, particularly at z>2 where their comoving volume becomes large enough to encompass several hundred L* galaxies or their progenitors. Here I present recent results from a near-infrared imaging survey of the HDF-North with NICMOS, which provides structural and photometric information in the optical rest frame (4000-5500A) for hundreds of ordinary galaxies at 2>5. Lyman break galaxies at 212. The space density of UV-bright galaxies in the HDF appears to thin out toward larger redshifts, although surface brightness selection effects may play an important role.

  18. Amazing Andromeda Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The many 'personalities' of our great galactic neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, are exposed in this new composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The wide, ultraviolet eyes of Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveal Andromeda's 'fiery' nature -- hotter regions brimming with young and old stars. In contrast, Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes show Andromeda's relatively 'cool' side, which includes embryonic stars hidden in their dusty cocoons. Galaxy Evolution Explorer detected young, hot, high-mass stars, which are represented in blue, while populations of relatively older stars are shown as green dots. The bright yellow spot at the galaxy's center depicts a particularly dense population of old stars. Swaths of red in the galaxy's disk indicate areas where Spitzer found cool, dusty regions where stars are forming. These stars are still shrouded by the cosmic clouds of dust and gas that collapsed to form them. Together, Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Spitzer complete the picture of Andromeda's swirling spiral arms. Hints of pinkish purple depict regions where the galaxy's populations of hot, high-mass stars and cooler, dust-enshrouded stars co-exist. Located 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda is our largest nearby galactic neighbor. The galaxy's entire disk spans about 260,000 light-years, which means that a light beam would take 260,000 years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy's disk is about 100,000 light-years across. This image is a false color composite comprised of data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far-ultraviolet detector (blue), near-ultraviolet detector (green), and Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer at 24 microns (red).

  19. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  20. Long Gamma-Ray Bursts and Their Host Galaxies at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Lapi, A; Bosnjak, Z; Celotti, A; Bressan, A; Granato, G L; Danese, L

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the recent observational and theoretical evidence that long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are likely associated with low metallicity, rapidly rotating massive stars, we examine the cosmological star formation rate (SFR) below a critical metallicity Z_crit~Z_sun/10 - Z_sun/5, to estimate the event rate of high-redshift long GRB progenitors. To this purpose, we exploit a galaxy formation scenario already successfully tested on a wealth of observational data on (proto)spheroids, Lyman break galaxies, Lyman alpha emitters, submm galaxies, quasars, and local early-type galaxies. We find that the predicted rate of long GRBs amounts to about 300 events/yr/sr, of which about 30 per cent occur at z>~6. Correspondingly, the GRB number counts well agree with the bright SWIFT data, without the need for an intrinsic luminosity evolution. Moreover, the above framework enables us to predict properties of the GRB host galaxies. Most GRBs are associated with low mass galaxy halos M_H~10^12 M_sun have larger extinction ...

  1. Quantifying the Faint Structure of Galaxies: The Late-type Spiral NGC 2403

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Mike K; Irwin, Mike J; Arimoto, Nobuo; Jablonka, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based surveys have mapped the stellar outskirts of Local Group galaxies in unprecedented detail, but extending this work to other galaxies is necessary to overcome stochastic variations in evolutionary history and provide more stringent constraints on cosmological galaxy formation models. As part of our continuing program of ultra-deep imagery of galaxies beyond the Local Group, we present a wide-field analysis of the isolated late-type spiral NGC2403 using data obtained with Suprime-Cam on Subaru. The survey reaches a maximum projected radius of 30 kpc or deprojected radius of R_dp~60 kpc. The colour-magnitude diagram reaches 1.5 mag below the tip of the metal-poor red giant branch (RGB) at a completeness rate > 50% for R_dp >12 kpc. Using the combination of diffuse light photometry and resolved star counts, we are able to trace the radial surface brightness (SB) profile over a much larger range of radii and surface brightness than is possible with either technique alone. The exponential disc as trace...

  2. AGN physics - The Jet-driven Outflow in the Radio Galaxy 3C305 and the Use of Hardness Ratio Maps to Constrain Spectral Parameters of Low Brightness Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, D. E.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Massaro, F.; Baum, S. A.; Bianchi, S.; Chiaberge, M.; Morganti, R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2012-01-01

    From Chandra X-ray and VLA radio observations of the radio galaxy 3C305, we can make a self-consistent model in which the X-ray-emitting plasma is responsible for the depolarization of some regions of the radio emission from the jets and hotspots. On the assumption that the X-ray-emitting material,

  3. Galaxy Strategy for LIGO-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P

    2015-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO/Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce ~50% of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small and the error boxes large, and in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor 10 to 100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restri...

  4. The HSB/LSB Galaxies NGC 2403 and UGC 128

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, Marc; de Blok, Erwin

    1999-01-01

    We have decomposed the rotation curves of the high surface brightness (HSB) galaxy NGC2403 and the low surface brightness (LSB) system UGC128. Both galaxies have a similar baryon content and rotational velocities but have very different disk scale lengths and angular momentum contents. On a linear s

  5. Gas mass fractions and the evolution of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGaugh, SS; DeBlok, WJG

    1997-01-01

    We show that the gas mass fraction of spiral galaxies is strongly correlated with luminosity and surface brightness. It is not correlated with linear size. Gas fraction varies with luminosity and surface brightness at the same rate, indicating evolution at fixed size. Dim galaxies are clearly less e

  6. [Bright light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R; Cambron, L

    2007-01-01

    Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.

  7. Modeling the Color Magnitude Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Noelia; Castelli, Analia Smith; Bassino, Lilia P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The departure of galaxies in the bright end of the CMR with respect to the trend denoted by less luminous galaxies could be explained by the influence of minor mergers

  8. Early-type dwarf galaxies with multicomponent stellar structure: Are they remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by their environment?

    CERN Document Server

    Aguerri, J Alfonso L

    2016-01-01

    The surface brightness distribution of $\\sim$30-40$\\%$ of the early-type dwarf galaxies with $-18 \\leq M_{B} \\leq -15$ in the Virgo and the Coma clusters is fitted by models that include two structural components (S\\`ersic + exponential) as for bright disc galaxies.The goal of the present study is to determine whether early-type dwarf galaxies with a two-component stellar structure in the Virgo and the Coma clusters are low-luminosity copies of bright disc galaxies or are the remnants of bright galaxies strongly transformed by cluster environmental effects.I analysed the location of bright disc galaxies and early-type dwarfs in the $r_{b,e}/h$- $n$ plane. The location in this plane of the two-component dwarf galaxies was compared with the remnants of tidally disrupted disc galaxies reported by numerical simulations. Bright unbarred disc galaxies show a strong correlation in the $r_{b,e}/h$-$n$ plane. Galaxies with larger S\\`ersic shape parameters show a higher $r_{b,e}/h$ ratio. In contrast, two-component ear...

  9. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  10. Galaxy Strategy for Ligo-Virgo Gravitational Wave Counterpart Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Kanner, Jonah; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nissanke, Samaya; Singer, Leo P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we continue a line of inquiry begun in Kanner et al. which detailed a strategy for utilizing telescopes with narrow fields of view, such as the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), to localize gravity wave (GW) triggers from LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) / Virgo. If one considers the brightest galaxies that produce 50 percent of the light, then the number of galaxies inside typical GW error boxes will be several tens. We have found that this result applies both in the early years of Advanced LIGO when the range is small and the error boxes large, and in the later years when the error boxes will be small and the range large. This strategy has the beneficial property of reducing the number of telescope pointings by a factor 10 to 100 compared with tiling the entire error box. Additional galaxy count reduction will come from a GW rapid distance estimate which will restrict the radial slice in search volume. Combining the bright galaxy strategy with a convolution based on anticipated GW localizations, we find that the searches can be restricted to about 18 plus or minus 5 galaxies for 2015, about 23 plus or minus 4 for 2017, and about 11 plus or minus for 2020. This assumes a distance localization at the putative neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) merger range mu for each target year, and these totals are integrated out to the range. Integrating out to the horizon would roughly double the totals. For localizations with r (rotation) greatly less than mu the totals would decrease. The galaxy strategy we present in this work will enable numerous sensitive optical and X-ray telescopes with small fields of view to participate meaningfully in searches wherein the prospects for rapidly fading afterglow place a premium on a fast response time.

  11. The Spectroscopic Properties of Bright Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, M G

    2006-01-01

    The properties of bright extragalactic planetary nebulae are reviewed based upon the results of low and high resolution spectroscopy. It is argued that bright extragalactic planetary nebulae from galaxies (or subsystems) with and without star formation have different distributions of central star temperature and ionization structure. As regards the chemical compositions, oxygen and neon are generally found to be unchanged as a result of the evolution of the stellar progenitors. Nitrogen enrichment may occur as a result of the evolution of the progenitors of bright planetary nebulae in all stellar populations, though this enrichment may be (more) random in old stellar populations. Helium abundances appear to be influenced by the chemical evolution of the host galaxy, with planetary nebulae in dwarf spheroidals having systematically elevated abundances. Neither the age nor the metallicity of the progenitor stellar population has a strong effect upon the kinematics observed for nebular shells. Both the range of ...

  12. The high redshift galaxy population in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Kitzbichler, M G; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; White, Simon D. M.

    2006-01-01

    We compare observations of the high redshift galaxy population to the predictions of the galaxy formation model of Croton et al. (2006). This model, implemented on the Millennium Simulation of the concordance LCDM cosmogony, introduces "radio mode" feedback from the central galaxies of groups and clusters in order to obtain quantitative agreement with the luminosity, colour, morphology and clustering properties of the low redshift galaxy population. Here we compare the predictions of this same model to the observed counts and redshift distributions of faint galaxies, as well as to their inferred luminosity and mass functions out to redshift 5. With the exception of the mass functions, all these properties are sensitive to modelling of dust obscuration. A simple but plausible treatment gives moderately good agreement with most of the data, although the predicted abundance of relatively massive (~M*) galaxies appears systematically high at high redshift, suggesting that such galaxies assemble earlier in this mo...

  13. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    bright active galaxies, often referred to as Active Galactic Nuclei, or AGN. Many astronomers think that all galaxies have central, supermassive black holes, yet only a small percent show activity. What is needed to power the AGN is fuel in the form of a nearby reservoir of gas and dust. Galaxy clusters contain hundreds to thousands of galaxies. They are the largest known structures in the universe and serve as a microcosm for the mechanics of the Universe at large. The galaxies in clusters are often old, reddish elliptically shaped galaxies, distinct from blue, spiral galaxies like our own. These old galaxies also do not have many young stars. The theory now in question is that as galaxies enter into clusters at high speeds, they are stripped of their interstellar gas, much as a strong wind strips leaves from a tree. Galaxies may also collide with one another and use up all of their gas in one huge burst of star formation triggered by this interaction. These processes remove most, if not all, of the gas that isn't locked up in stars. As they no longer have the raw material to form new stars, the stellar population slowly gets old and the Galaxy appears red. No gas is left to fuel an AGN. Previous surveys of galaxy clusters with optical telescopes have found that about only one percent of the galaxies in a cluster have AGN. This latest Chandra observation if typical, however, bumps the count up to about 5 percent. The team found six red galaxies with high X-ray activity during a nearly 14-hour Chandra observation of a galaxy cluster named Abell 2104, over 700 million light years from Earth. Based on previous optical surveys, only one was expected. "If we relied on optical data alone, we would have missed these hidden monsters," said co-author Dr. John Mulchaey. Only one of the six AGN, in fact, had the optical spectral properties typical of AGN activity. "The presence of these AGN indicate that supermassive black holes have somehow retained a fuel source, despite the

  14. Joint Analysis of near-infrared properties and surface brightness fluctuations of LMC star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Raimondo, G

    2009-01-01

    Surface brightness fluctuations have been proved to be a very powerful technique to determine the distance and characterize the stellar content in extragalactic systems. Nevertheless, before facing the problem of stellar content in distant galaxies, we need to calibrate the method onto nearby well-known systems. In this paper we analyze the properties at $J$ and $K_s$ bands of a sample of 19 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), for which accurate near-infrared (NIR) resolved star photometry, and integrated photometry are available. For the same sample, we derive the SBF measurements in $J$ and $K_s$-bands. We use the multi-purpose stellar population code \\emph{SPoT (Stellar POpulations Tools)} to simulate the color-magnitude diagram, stellar counts, integrated magnitudes, colors, and surface brightness fluctuations of each cluster. The present procedure allows us to estimate the age and metallicity of the clusters in a consistent way, and provides a new calibration of the empirical $s$-parameter...

  15. Extragalactic millimeter-wave point-source catalog, number counts and statistics from 771 deg{sup 2} of the SPT-SZ survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocanu, L. M.; Crawford, T. M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vieira, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Aravena, M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Austermann, J. E.; Everett, W. B.; Halverson, N. W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Béthermin, M. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bothwell, M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); Cho, H.-M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); George, E. M., E-mail: lmocanu@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2013-12-10

    We present a point-source catalog from 771 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich survey at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. We detect 1545 sources above 4.5σ significance in at least one band. Based on their relative brightness between survey bands, we classify the sources into two populations, one dominated by synchrotron emission from active galactic nuclei, and one dominated by thermal emission from dust-enshrouded star-forming galaxies. We find 1238 synchrotron and 307 dusty sources. We cross-match all sources against external catalogs and find 189 unidentified synchrotron sources and 189 unidentified dusty sources. The dusty sources without counterparts are good candidates for high-redshift, strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies. We derive number counts for each population from 1 Jy down to roughly 11, 4, and 11 mJy at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. We compare these counts with galaxy population models and find that none of the models we consider for either population provide a good fit to the measured counts in all three bands. The disparities imply that these measurements will be an important input to the next generation of millimeter-wave extragalactic source population models.

  16. The Stability of Low Surface Brightness Disks Based on Multi-Wavelength Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    MacLachlan, John M; Wood, Kenneth; Gallagher, John S

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the structure and composition of the dusty interstellar medium (ISM) of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies, we have used multiwavelength photometry to construct spectral energy distributions for three low-mass, edge-on LSB galaxies. We use Monte Carlo radiation transfer codes that include the effects of transiently heated small grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules to model and interpret the data. We find that unlike the high surface brightness galaxies previously modeled, the dust disks appear to have scale heights equal to or exceeding their stellar scale heights. This result supports the findings of previous studies that low mass disk galaxies have dust scale heights comparable to their stellar scale heights and suggests that the cold ISM of low mass, LSB disk galaxies may be stable against fragmentation and gravitational collapse. This may help to explain the lack of observed dust lanes in edge-on LSB galaxies and their low current star formation rates.

  17. Planetary Nebulae as kinematic and dynamical tracers of galaxy halos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccato, Lodovico; Napolitano, Nicola; Arnaboldi, Magda; Cortesi, Arianna; Romanowsky, Aaron; Gerhard, Ortwin; Merrifield, Michael; Kuijken, Konrad; Freeman, Ken; Douglas, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The kinematics and dynamical properties of galaxy halos are difficult to measure, given the faint stellar surface brightness that characterizes those regions. Gas-rich systems such as spiral galaxies can be probed using the radio emission of their gas component. Early type galaxies contain less gas,

  18. The Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey. II. Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies near the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 5485

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Allison; van Dokkum, Pieter; Danieli, Shany; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai; Karachentsev, I. D.; Makarova, L. N.

    2016-12-01

    We present the unexpected discovery of four ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a group environment. We recently identified seven extremely low surface brightness galaxies in the vicinity of the spiral galaxy M101, using data from the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. The galaxies have effective radii of 10″-38″ and central surface brightnesses of 25.6-27.7 mag arcsec-2 in the g-band. We subsequently obtained follow-up observations with HST to constrain the distances to these galaxies. Four remain persistently unresolved even with the spatial resolution of HST/ACS, which implies distances of D\\gt 17.5 Mpc. We show that the galaxies are most likely associated with a background group at ˜27 Mpc containing the massive ellipticals NGC 5485 and NGC 5473. At this distance, the galaxies have sizes of 2.6-4.9 kpc, and are classified as UDGs, similar to the populations that have been revealed in clusters such as Coma, Virgo, and Fornax, yet even more diffuse. The discovery of four UDGs in a galaxy group demonstrates that the UDG phenomenon is not exclusive to cluster environments. Furthermore, their morphologies seem less regular than those of the cluster populations, which may suggest a different formation mechanism or be indicative of a threshold in surface density below which UDGs are unable to maintain stability.

  19. The Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey. II. Ultra diffuse galaxies near the elliptical galaxy NGC 5485

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Allison; Danieli, Shany; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai; Karachentsev, I D; Makarova, L N

    2016-01-01

    We present the unexpected discovery of four ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a group environment. We recently identified seven extremely low surface brightness galaxies in the vicinity of the spiral galaxy M101, using data from the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. The galaxies have effective radii of $10"-38"$ and central surface brightnesses of $25.6-27.7$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$ in g-band. We subsequently obtained follow-up observations with $HST$ to constrain the distances to these galaxies. Four remain persistently unresolved even with the spatial resolution of $HST$/ACS, which implies distances of $D > 17.5$ Mpc. We show that the galaxies are most likely associated with a background group at $\\sim 27$ Mpc containing the massive ellipticals NGC 5485 and NGC 5473. At this distance, the galaxies have sizes of $2.6-4.9$ kpc, and are classified as UDGs, similar to the populations that have been revealed in clusters such as Coma, Virgo and Fornax, yet even more diffuse. The discovery of four UDGs in a galaxy group demonst...

  20. Fanaroff-Riley I galaxies as the parent population of BL Lacertae objects. II - Optical constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padovani, P.; Urry, C.M. (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The hypothesis is investigated that BL Lacertae objects are a subset of Fanaroff-Riley (FR) I galaxies dominated by beamed emission from a relativistic jet aligned with the line of sight. It is found that FR I galaxies, although of low radio luminosity, are bright optical galaxies. If the beaming hypothesis is correct, the optical luminosity function of BL Lac objects, including the effect of the host galaxy, can be approximated by a double power law with a given differential index. New estimates of the number counts of BL Lac objects are made which constrain their local number density for L(B) greater than about 6 x 10 to the 43rd ergs/s to be in the range 110-720/cu Gpc. The corresponding ratio between the total number densities of BL Lac objects and FR I galaxies is 0.003 to 0.02. This limits the Lorentz factor of the optical emission to the range 8-20, larger than that of the X-ray emitting plasma and roughly of the same order as the radio Lorentz factor. 34 refs.

  1. Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in Clusters and the Field: Masses and Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowsky, Aaron; Laine, Seppo; Krick, Jessica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) were recognized only last year as a novel class of galaxies, with luminosities like dwarfs but sizes like giants. Although some UDGs appear to be just unusually extended dwarfs, others show evidence of being very different and unexpected: their dark matter halos are overmassive by factors of ~10, with one UDG even being arguably a 'failed Milky Way.' These exotic galaxies might be a byproduct of environmental processes within galaxy clusters, but UDGs have also now been found in the field. It is crucial for understanding their origins to test if UDGs have the same properties in cluster and field environments. Here we propose studying the stellar populations (ages and metallicities) of seven UDGs using Spitzer/IRAC 3.6- and 4.5-micron imaging combined with optical photometry, along with mass estimation of three of the UDGs using HST/ACS imaging to provide globular cluster number counts and colors (proxies for halo mass). This ultra low surface brightness photometry in the near infrared, on an important new class of galaxies, could become a legacy result from the Spitzer mission.

  2. Extragalactic archeology with the GHOSTS Survey I. - Age-resolved disk structure of nearby low-mass galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Streich, David; Bailin, Jeremy; Bell, Eric F; Holwerda, Benne W; Minchev, Ivan; Monachesi, Antonela; Radburn-Smith, David J

    2016-01-01

    We study the individual evolution histories of three nearby low-mass edge-on galaxies (IC 5052, NGC4244, and NGC5023). Using resolved stellar populations, we constructed star count density maps for populations of different ages and analyzed the change of structural parameters with stellar age within each galaxy. We do not detect a separate thick disk in any of the three galaxies, even though our observations cover a wider range in equivalent surface brightness than any integrated light study. While scale heights increase with age, each population can be well described by a single disk. Two of the galaxies contain a very weak additional component, which we identify as the faint halo. The mass of these faint halos is lower than 1% of the mass of the disk. The three galaxies show low vertical heating rates, which are much lower than the heating rate of the Milky Way. This indicates that heating agents, such as giant molecular clouds and spiral structure, are weak in low-mass galaxies. All populations in the thre...

  3. Chandra Survey of Nearby Highly-Inclined Disk Galaxies I: X-ray Measurements of Galactic Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiang-Tao

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematical analysis of the Chandra observations of 53 nearby highly-inclined (i>60 degree) disk galaxies to study the coronae around them. This sample covers a broad range of galaxy properties: e.g., about three orders of magnitude in the SFR and more than two orders of magnitude in the stellar mass. The Chandra observations of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from 20 of these galaxies are presented for the first time. The data are reduced in a uniform manner, including the excision/subtraction of both resolved and unresolved stellar contributions. Various coronal properties, such as the scale height and luminosity, are characterized for all the sample galaxies. For galaxies with high enough counting statistics, we also examine the thermal and chemical states of the coronal gas. We note on galaxies with distinct multi-wavelength characteristics which may affect the coronal properties. The uniformly processed images, spectra, and brightness profiles, as well as the inferred hot gas parameters, fo...

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buzzoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of H , Mg2, and Fei Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is brie y discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and e ectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  5. Spectroscopic Gradients in Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Battistini, C.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of Hβ, Mg_2, and FeI Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is briefly discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and effectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  6. The bias of the submillimetre galaxy population: SMGs are poor tracers of the most massive structures in the z ~ 2 Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Tim B; Chapman, Scott C; Behroozi, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    It is often claimed that overdensities of (or even individual bright) submillimetre-selected galaxies (SMGs) trace the assembly of the most-massive dark matter structures in the Universe. We test this claim by performing a counts-in-cells analysis of mock SMG catalogues derived from the Bolshoi cosmological simulation to investigate how well SMG associations trace the underlying dark matter structure. We find that SMGs exhibit a relatively complex bias: some regions of high SMG overdensity are underdense in terms of dark matter mass, and some regions of high dark matter overdensity contain no SMGs. Because of their rarity, Poisson noise causes scatter in the SMG overdensity at fixed dark matter overdensity. Consequently, rich associations of less-luminous, more-abundant galaxies (i.e. Lyman-break galaxy analogues) trace the highest dark matter overdensities much better than SMGs. Even on average, SMG associations are relatively poor tracers of the most significant dark matter overdensities because of `downsiz...

  7. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  8. The Bright Ages Survey. I. Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Rich, R M; Frogel, J A; Salim, S; Teplitz, H; Colbert, James W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Salim, Samir; Teplitz, Harry

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series presenting and analyzing data for a K-selected sample of galaxies collected in order to identify and study galaxies at moderate to high redshift in rest-wavelength optical light. The sample contains 842 objects over 6 separate fields covering 75.6 arcmin^2 down to K=20-20.5. We combine the K-band with UBVRIzJH multi-band imaging, reaching depths of R~26. Two of the fields studied also have deep HST WFPC2 imaging, totaling more than 60 hours in the F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W filters. Using artificial galaxy modeling and extraction we measure 85% completeness limits down to K=19.5-20, depending on the field examined. The derived K-band number counts are in good agreement with previous studies. We find a density for Extremely Red Objects(EROs; R-K>5) of 1.55+/-0.16 arcmin^{-2} for K<19.7, dominated by the 1714+5015 field (centered on 53w002), with an ERO number density more than 3 times that of the other sample fields. If we exclude the counts for 1714+5015, our density...

  9. Uv-bright Nearby Early-type Galaxies Observed in the Mid-infrared: Eidence for a Multi-stage Formation History by Way of WISE and GALEX Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, S. M.; Neill, J. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Blain, A. W.; Farrah, D. G.; Rich, R. M.; Tsai, C.-W.; Benford, D. J.; Bridge, C. R.; Lake, S. E.; Masci, F. J.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infrared (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by approx.1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 +/- 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 +/- 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed approx. 1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the approx. 0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early

  10. A Minimalist Feedback-Regulated Model for Galaxy Formation During the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, Steven; Mebane, Richard; Sun, Guochao

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared surveys have now determined the luminosity functions of galaxies at 610, but the bright galaxies accessible to observations decline much faster than the total. Deviations from our predictions would provide evidence for new astrophysics within the first generations of galaxies. We also provide predictions for galaxy measurements by future facilities, including JWST and WFIRST.

  11. CA BrightStor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CA推出的BrightStor系列存储管理解决方案已经成为企业电子商务体系架构管理战略中举足轻重的组成部分。BrightStor是一整套企业级的智能化存储管理解决方案,定位在存储硬件设备和上层应用之间,通过各种集成化的产品和工具为驻留在企业任何位置的数据提供全方位的、有效的存储管理和保护。

  12. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  13. The Bright SHARC Survey The Cluster Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Romer, A K; Holden, B P; Ulmer, M P; Pildis, R A; Merrelli, A J; Adami, C; Burke, D J; Collins, C A; Metevier, A J; Kron, Richard G; Commons, K

    1999-01-01

    We present the Bright SHARC (Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster) Survey, which is an objective search for serendipitously detected extended X-ray sources in 460 deep ROSAT PSPC pointings. The Bright SHARC Survey covers an area of 178.6 sq.deg and has yielded 374 extended sources. We discuss the X-ray data reduction, the candidate selection and present results from our on-going optical follow-up campaign. The optical follow-up concentrates on the brightest 94 of the 374 extended sources and is now 97% complete. We have identified thirty-seven clusters of galaxies, for which we present redshifts and luminosities. The clusters span a redshift range of 0.0696Bright SHARC clusters have not been listed in any previously ...

  14. Slowly cooking galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, F

    1999-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of IZw~18 have revealed homogeneous abundance throughout the galaxy and several observations of other starburst galaxies have shown no significant gradient or discontinuity in the abundance distributions within the HII regions. I thus concur with Tenorio-Tagle (1996) and Devost et al. (1997) that these observed abundance homogeneities cannot be produced by the material ejected from the stars formed in the current burst and result from a previous star formation episode. Metals ejected in the current burst of star formation remain most probably hidden in a hot phase and are undetectable using optical spectroscopy. Combining various observational facts, for instance the faint star formation rate observed in low surface brightness galaxies (van Zee et al., 1997), I propose that a low and continuous star formation rate occurring during quiescent phases between bursts is a non negligible source of new elements in the interstellar medium. Using a spectrophotometric and chemical evol...

  15. Galaxies in the Early Universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogager, Jens-Kristian

    analyses are biased towards the brightest galaxies at all times (as these are easier to observe and identify). A complementary method relies on the absorption imprint from neutral gas in galaxies, the so-called damped Ly absorbers (DLAs) seen towards distant bright objects. This thesis seeks to understand...... how the absorption selected galaxies relate to the emission selected galaxies by identifying the faint glow from the absorbing galaxies at redshift z 2. In Chapters 2 and 3, the emission properties of DLAs are studied in detail using state-of-the-art instrumentation. The specific DLA studied......), there might exist a bias against dusty foreground absorbers due to the reddening causing the background quasars to appear star-like in their optical colours. In Chapters 4 and 5, these hypothesized dusty absorbers are sought for through a combination of optical and near-infrared colour criteria. While a large...

  16. Measuring cosmic velocities with 21cm intensity mapping and galaxy redshift survey cross-correlation dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space cross-correlation function. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance ($\\lesssim 2\\sigma$) by combining the upcoming radio survey CHIME with the future redshift surveys of DESI and Euclid. More significant measurements ($\\lesssim~10\\sigma$) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the SKA with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement ($\\lesssim 100\\sigma$) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, non-linear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and...

  17. HerMES: deep number counts at 250, 350, and 500 microns in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields and the build-up of the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Béthermin, M; Ilbert, O; Conley, A; Lagache, G; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Berta, S; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Casey, C M; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Heinis, S; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Kartaltepe, J S; Levenson, L; Magdis, G; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Salvato, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Wang, L; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    ABRIGED Herschel/SPIRE has provided confusion limited maps of deep fields at 250, 350, and 500um, as part of the HerMES survey. Due to confusion, only a small fraction of the Cosmic Infrared Background can be resolved into individually-detected sources. Our goal is to produce deep galaxy number counts and redshift distributions below the confusion limit, which we then use to place strong constraints on the origins of the cosmic infrared background and on models of galaxy evolution. We individually extracted the bright SPIRE with a method using the positions, the flux densities, and the redshifts of the 24um sources as a prior, and derived the number counts and redshift distributions of the bright SPIRE sources. For fainter SPIRE sources, we reconstructed the number counts and the redshift distribution below the confusion limit using the deep 24um catalogs associated with photometric redshift and information provided by the stacking of these sources into the deep SPIRE maps. Finally, by integrating all these c...

  18. An Updated Ultraviolet Catalog of GALEX Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Yu; Liu, JiFeng; Wang, Song

    2015-01-01

    The ultraviolet catalog of nearby galaxies made by \\citet{Gil07} presents the integrated photometry and surface brightness profiles for 1034 nearby galaxies observed by \\textit{Galaxy Evolution Explorer} (\\textit{GALEX}). We provide an updated catalog of 4138 nearby galaxies based on the latest Genral Release (GR6/GR7) of \\textit{GALEX}. These galaxies are selected from HyperLeda with apparent diameter larger than 1{\\arcmin}. From the surface brightness profiles accurately measured with the deep NUV and FUV images, we have calculated asymptotic magnitudes, aperture (D25) magnitudes, colors, structural parameters (effective radii and concentration indices), luminosities, and effective surface brightness. Archival optical and infrared photometry from HyperLeda, 2MASS, and IRAS are also integrated into the catalog. Our parameter measurements and some analyses are consistent with those of \\citet{Gil07}. The (FUV $- K$) color provides a good criterion to distinguish early and late-type galaxies, which can be impro...

  19. Lopsidedness in dwarf irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, A B; Almoznino, E; Van Zee, L; Salzer, J J; Heller, Ana B.; Brosch, Noah; Almoznino, Elchanan; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We quantify the amplitude of the lopsidedness, the azimuthal angular asymmetry index, and the concentration of star forming regions, as represented by the distribution of the H$\\alpha$ emission, in a sample of 78 late-type irregular galaxies. We bin the observed galaxies in two groups representing blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and low surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBs). The light distribution is analysed with a novel algorithm, which allows detection of details in the light distribution pattern. We find that while the asymmetry of the underlying continuum light, representing the older stellar generations, is relatively small, the H$\\alpha$ emission is very asymmetric and is correlated in position angle with the continuum light. We test a model of random star formation over the extent of a galaxy by simulating HII regions in artificial dwarf galaxies. The implication is that random star formation over the full extent of a galaxy may be generated in LSB dwarf-irregular galaxies but not in BCD galaxies.

  20. Stochastic 2-D Models of Galaxy Disk Evolution. The Galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Mineikis, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a fast numerical 2-D model of galaxy disk evolution (resolved along the galaxy radius and azimuth) by adopting a scheme of parameterized stochastic self-propagating star formation. We explore the parameter space of the model and demonstrate its capability to reproduce 1-D radial profiles of the galaxy M33: gas surface density, surface brightness in the i and GALEX FUV passbands, and metallicity.

  1. A pseudo-spectrum analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Oguri, Masamune

    2016-10-01

    We present the application of the pseudo-spectrum method to galaxy-galaxy lensing. We derive explicit expressions for the pseudo-spectrum analysis of the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum, which is the Fourier space counterpart of the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profile. The pseudo-spectrum method corrects observational issues such as the survey geometry, masks of bright stars and their spikes, and inhomogeneous noise, which distort the spectrum and also mix the E-mode and the B-mode signals. Using ray-tracing simulations in N-body simulations including realistic masks, we confirm that the pseudo-spectrum method successfully recovers the input galaxy-shear cross-spectrum. We also show that the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum has an excess covariance relative to the Gaussian covariance at small scales (k ≳ 1h Mpc-1) where the shot noise is dominated in the Gaussian approximation. We find that the excess is consistent with the expectation from the halo sample variance (HSV), which originates from the matter fluctuations at scales larger than the survey area. We apply the pseudo-spectrum method to the observational data of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing survey shear catalogue and three different spectroscopic samples of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy, and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS and LOWZ galaxies. The galaxy-shear cross-spectra are significantly detected at the level of 7-10σ using the analytic covariance with the HSV contribution included. We also confirm that the observed spectra are consistent with the halo model predictions with the halo occupation distribution parameters estimated from previous work. This work demonstrates the viability of galaxy-galaxy lensing analysis in the Fourier space.

  2. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Kwang-Ho; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-01-01

    The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  3. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  4. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a

  5. The 1000 Brightest HIPASS Galaxies Newly Cataloged Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan-Weber, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Jerjen, H; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Ryder, S D; Barnes, D G; De Blok, W J G; Kilborn, V A

    2002-01-01

    The HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) is a blind 21-cm survey for extragalactic neutral hydrogen, covering the whole southern sky. The HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog (BGC; Koribalski et al. 2002) is a subset of HIPASS and contains the 1000 HI-brightest (peak flux density) galaxies. Here we present the 138 HIPASS BGC galaxies, which had no redshift measured prior to the Parkes multibeam HI surveys. Of the 138 galaxies, 87 are newly cataloged. Newly cataloged is defined as no optical (or infrared) counterpart in the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Using the Digitized Sky Survey we identify optical counterparts for almost half of the newly cataloged galaxies, which are typically of irregular or magellanic morphological type. Several HI sources appear to be associated with compact groups or pairs of galaxies rather than an individual galaxy. The majority (57) of the newly cataloged galaxies lie within ten degrees of the Galactic Plane and are missing from optical surveys due to confusion with stars or dust extinc...

  6. The faintest star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P

    2003-01-01

    I briefly report on the X-ray detection of 10 radio sub-mJy sources in the 2 Ms Chandra observation of the Hubble Deep Field North region. These sources follow the same radio/X-ray luminosities relation which holds for nearby galaxies. Making use of this relation, X-ray number counts from star forming galaxies are predicted from the deep radio Log N-Log S's.

  7. The Atlas3D project -- XXIX. The new look of early-type galaxies and surrounding fields disclosed by extremely deep optical images

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Karabal, Emin; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Galactic archeology based on star counts is instrumental to reconstruct the past mass assembly of Local Group galaxies. The development of new observing techniques and data-reduction, coupled with the use of sensitive large field of view cameras, now allows us to pursue this technique in more distant galaxies exploiting their diffuse low surface brightness (LSB) light. As part of the Atlas3D project, we have obtained with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope extremely deep, multi--band, images of nearby early-type galaxies. We present here a catalog of 92 galaxies from the Atlas3D sample, that are located in low to medium density environments. The observing strategy and data reduction pipeline, that achieve a gain of several magnitudes in the limiting surface brightness with respect to classical imaging surveys, are presented. The size and depth of the survey is compared to other recent deep imaging projects. The paper highlights the capability of LSB--optimized surveys at detecting new pr...

  8. Star-Forming Galaxies at z~2 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Kong; Wei Zhang; Min Wang

    2008-01-01

    Using a simple color selection based on B-, z- and K-band photometry, BzK =(z - K)AB - (B - z)AB -0.2, we picked out 52 star-forming galaxies at 1.4 ≤ z ≤ 2.5(sBzKs) from a K-band selected sample (KVega < 22.0) in an area of ~ 5.5 arcmin2 of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). We develop a new photometric redshift method, and the error in our photometric redshifts is less than 0.02(1 + z). From the photometric redshift distribution, we find the BzK color criterion can be used to select star-forming galaxies at 1.4 ≤ z ≤ 2.5 with KVega < 22.0. Down to KVega < 22.0, the number counts of sBzKs increase linearly with the K magnitude; the sBzKs are strongly clustered, and most of them have irregular morphologies on the ACS images. They have a median reddening of E(B -V) ~ 0.28, an average star formation rate of ~ 36 M⊙ yr-1 and a typical stellar mass of ~ 1010M⊙. The UV criterion for the galaxies at z~2 can select most of the faint sBzKs in the UDF, but it does not work well for bright, massive, highly-reddened, actively star-forming galaxies.

  9. The infrared compactness-temperature relation for quiescent and starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chanial, P; Guiderdoni, B; Elbaz, D; Hammer, F; Vigroux, L; Chanial, Pierre; Flores, Hector; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Elbaz, David; Hammer, Francois; Vigroux, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    IRAS observations show the existence of a correlation between the infrared luminosity Lir and dust temperature Td in star-forming galaxies, in which larger Lir leads to higher dust temperature. The Lir-Td relation is commonly seen as reflecting the increase in dust temperature in galaxies with higher star formation rate. Even though the correlation shows a significant amount of dispersion, a unique relation has been commonly used to construct spectral energy distributions of galaxies in distant universe studies, such as source number counting or photometric redshift determination. In this work, we introduce a new parameter, namely the size of the star-forming region Rir and lay out the empirical and modelled relation between the global parameters Lir, Td and Rir of IR-bright non-AGN galaxies. IRAS 60-to-100um color is used as a proxy for the dust temperature and the 1.4GHz radio contiuum emission for the infrared spatial distribution. The analysis has been carried out on two samples. The first one is made of ...

  10. A High Stellar Velocity Dispersion and ~100 Globular Clusters for the Ultra Diffuse Galaxy Dragonfly 44

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Danieli, Shany; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Romanowsky, Aaron; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    Recently a population of large, very low surface brightness, spheroidal galaxies was identified in the Coma cluster. The apparent survival of these Ultra Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in a rich cluster suggests that they have very high masses. Here we present the stellar kinematics of Dragonfly 44, one of the largest Coma UDGs, using a 33.5 hr integration with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope. We find a velocity dispersion of 47 km/s, which implies a dynamical mass of M_dyn=0.7x10^10 M_sun within its deprojected half-light radius of r_1/2=4.6 kpc. The mass-to-light ratio is M/L=48 M_sun/L_sun, and the dark matter fraction is 98 percent within the half-light radius. The high mass of Dragonfly 44 is accompanied by a large globular cluster population. From deep Gemini imaging taken in 0.4" seeing we infer that Dragonfly 44 has 94 globular clusters, similar to the counts for other galaxies in this mass range. Our results add to other recent evidence that many UDGs are "failed" galaxies, with the sizes, dark matter conte...

  11. Multiwavelength Number Counts of AGN in the GOODS Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, C. M.; Treister, E.; Chatzichristou, E. T.; Van Duyne, J.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Grogin, N. A.; Bergeron, J.; Stern, D.; Chary, R.-R.; Conselice, C. J.; Cristiani, S.

    2004-05-01

    We model the X-ray, optical, and far-infrared flux distributions of AGN in the GOODS fields, starting from hard X-ray luminosity functions and spectral energy distributions appropriate to the unified scheme for AGN. The deep optical counts measured from HST ACS images can be well explained by a unified scheme that postulates roughly 3 times as many obscured as unobscured AGN. This scenario is consistent with the observed spectroscopic and photometric redshift distributions of the GOODS AGN once selection effects are considered. The previously reported discrepancy between observed spectroscopic redshift distributions and the predictions of population synthesis models for the X-ray background (which include a similarly large number of obscured AGN) is explained by bias against the most heavily obscured AGN in both X-ray surveys and optical spectroscopic samples. We present the model predictions for the number counts of AGN in the Spitzer MIPS 24 micron and IRAC 3.6-8 micron bands. The GOODS Spitzer observations will verify whether large numbers of obscured AGN are indeed present in the early Universe; these will be very bright far-infrared sources, including some, missed by X-ray observations, that look like ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This work was supported by NASA grants HST-GO-09425(.01-A,.13-A,.26-A); NSF CAREER award AST 99-83783; NASA contract number 1224666 issued by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407; ASI grant I/R/088/02; and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship.

  12. The morphological evolution of field galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Richard S

    1994-01-01

    I review two observational programs which, together, promise to unravel the detailed astrophysical evolution of normal field galaxies over the last 5-7 Gyr. Systematic ground-based spectroscopy of faint galaxies have revealed an increasing faint end slope for the luminosity function with redshift. The trend is strongest for galaxies undergoing intense star-formation. Deep images taken with the repaired HST can be used to count galaxies as a function of morphological type. Regular `Hubble sequence' galaxies follow the no-evolution prediction, but irregular/peculiar sources have a steeper count slope and provide the excess population. Although the overlap between the spectral and HST samples is currently small, plans to merge similar datasets should reveal the physical explanation for the demise of star formation in faint blue galaxies since z\\simeq0.5-1.

  13. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog $-$ II. 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Stanek, K Z; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Prieto, J L; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J; Bishop, D W; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Godoy-Rivera, D; Goss, N; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Skowron, D M; Thompson, Todd A; Woźniak, P R; Avíla, C G; Bock, G; Carballo, J -L G; Conseil, E; Contreras, C; Cruz, I; andújar, J M F; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Koff, R A; Krannich, G; Madore, B F; Marples, P; Masi, G; Morrell, N; Monard, L A G; Munoz-Mateos, J C; Nicholls, B; Nicolas, J; Wagner, R M; Wiethoff, W S

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright ($m_V\\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  14. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog - II. 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Bishop, D. W.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A. B.; Falco, E.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Goss, N.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G. V.; Skowron, D. M.; Thompson, Todd A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Bock, G.; Carballo, J.-L. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Andújar, J. M. F.; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Madore, B. F.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.; Morrell, N.; Monard, L. A. G.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wagner, R. M.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  15. Hidden Galaxies in the Fornax Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Drinkwater, M J; Webster, R L; Barnes, D G; Gregg, M D; Phillipps, S; Jones, J B

    2000-01-01

    We are using the Multibeam 21cm receiver on the Parkes Telescope combined with the optical Two degree Field spectrograph (2dF) of the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain the first complete spectroscopic sample of the Fornax cluster. In the optical the survey is unique in that all objects (both ``stars'' and ``galaxies'') within our magnitude limits (Bj=16.5 to 19.7) are measured, producing the most complete survey of cluster members irrespective of surface brightness. We have detected two new classes of high surface brightness dwarf galaxy in the cluster. With 2dF we have discovered a population of very low luminosity (Mb approx -12) objects which are unresolved from the ground and may be the stripped nuclei of dwarf galaxies; they are unlike any known galaxies. In a survey of the brighter (Bj=16.5 to 18) galaxies with the FLAIR-II spectrograph we have found a number of new high surface brightness dwarf galaxies and show that the fraction of star-forming dwarf galaxies in the cluster is about 30 per cent, ab...

  16. No Time for Dead Time: Timing Analysis of Bright Black Hole Binaries with NuSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachetti, M.; Harrison, F.A.; Cook, R.; Tomsick, J.; Schmid, C.; Grefenstette, B.W.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S.E.; Christensen, F.E.; Craig, W.W.; Fabian, A.C.; Fürst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C.J.; Kara, E.; Maccarone, T.J.; Miller, J.M.; Pottschmidt, K.; Stern, D.; Uttley, P.; Walton, D.J.; Wilms, J.; Zhang, W.W.

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per

  17. The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. III. The Three-Component Structure of Nearby Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Song; Peng, Chien Y; Li, Zhao-Yu; Barth, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent developments in our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies, we explore the detailed photometric structure of a representative sample of 94 bright, nearby elliptical galaxies, using high-quality optical images from the Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey. The sample spans a range of environments and stellar masses, from M* = 10^{10.2} to 10^{12.0} solar mass. We exploit the unique capabilities of two-dimensional image decomposition to explore the possibility that local elliptical galaxies may contain photometrically distinct substructure that can shed light on their evolutionary history. Compared with the traditional one-dimensional approach, these two-dimensional models are capable of consistently recovering the surface brightness distribution and the systematic radial variation of geometric information at the same time. Contrary to conventional perception, we find that the global light distribution of the majority (>75%) of elliptical galaxies is not well described by ...

  18. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Preface; Conference prelims; The HI that barked in the night M. J. Disney; The detection of dark galaxies in blind HI surveys J. I. Davies; Red haloes of galaxies - reservoirs of baryonic dark matter? E. Zackrisson, N. Bergvall, C. Flynn, G. Ostlin, G. Micheva and B. Baldwell; Constraints on dark and visible mass in galaxies from strong gravitational lensing S. Dye and S. Warren; Lost baryons at low redshift S. Mathur, F. Nicastro and R. Williams; Observed properties of dark matter on small spatial scales R. Wyse and G. Gilmore; The mass distribution in spiral galaxies P. Salucci; Connecting lost baryons and dark galaxies via QSO absorption lines T. Tripp; ALFALFA: HI cosmology in the local universe R. Giovanelli; The ALFALFA search for (almost) dark galaxies across the HI mass function M. Haynes; HI clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey B. Kent; Cosmic variance in the HI mass function S. Schneider; The Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey - potential for finding dark galaxies and results so far R. Minchin et al.; Free-floating HI clouds in the M81 group E. Brinks, F. Walter and E. Skillman; Where are the stars in dark galaxies J. Rosenberg, J. Salzer and J. Cannon; The halo by halo missing baryon problem S. McGaugh; The local void is really empty R. Tully; Voids in the local volume: a limit on appearance of a galaxy in a dark matter halo A. Tikhonov and A. Klypin; Dim baryons in the cosmic web C. Impey; A census of baryons in galaxy clusters and groups A. Gonzalez, D. Zaritsky and A. Zabludo; Statistical properties of the intercluster light from SDSS image stacking S. Zibetti; QSO strong gravitational lensing and the detection of dark halos A. Maccio; Strong gravitational lensing: bright galaxies and lost dark-matter L. Koopmans; Mapping the distribution of luminous and dark matter in strong lensing galaxies I. Ferreras, P. Saha, L. Williams and S. Burles; Tidal debris posing as dark galaxies P. Duc, F. Bournaud and E. Brinks

  19. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  20. Brightness and color of the integrated starlight at celestial, ecliptic and galactic poles

    CERN Document Server

    Nawar, S; Mikhail, J S; Morcos, A B

    2010-01-01

    From photoelectric observations of night sky brightness carried out at Abu-Simbel, Asaad et al. (1979) have obtained values of integrated starlight brightness at different Galactic latitudes. These data have been used in the present work to obtain the brightness and color of the integrated starlight at North and South Celestial, Ecliptic and Galactic Poles. The present values of the brightness are expressed in S10 units and mag/arcsec2. Our results have been compared with that obtained by other investigators using photometric and star counts techniques. The B-V and B-R have been calculated and the results are compared with that obtained by other investigators.

  1. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  2. A pseudo-spectrum analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Hikage, Chiaki

    2016-01-01

    We present the application of the pseudo-spectrum method to galaxy-galaxy lensing. We derive explicit expressions for the pseudo-spectrum analysis of the galaxy-shear cross spectrum, which is the Fourier space counterpart of the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profile. The pseudo-spectrum method corrects observational issues such as the survey geometry, masks of bright stars and their spikes, and inhomogeneous noise, which distort the spectrum and also mix the E-mode and the B-mode signals. Using ray-tracing simulations in N-body simulations including realistic masks, we confirm that the pseudo-spectrum method successfully recovers the input galaxy-shear cross spectrum. We also investigate the covariance of the galaxy-shear cross spectrum using the ray-tracing simulations to show that there is an excess covariance relative to the Gaussian covariance at small scales where the shot noise is dominated in the Gaussian approximation. We find that the excess of the covariance is consistent with the expectation from t...

  3. Star formation in Kiso measle galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2012-05-01

    The Kiso sample of several thousand local ultraviolet-bright galaxies includes galaxies classified as irregular disk galaxies with large star-forming complexes (I,g). We selected a sample of all I,g galaxies with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey images and spectra. They contain up to several dozen giant clumps each, so we refer to them as measle galaxies. We determined ages and masses of the clumps based on a comparison of photometry with population synthesis models of cluster evolution. The spectra were used to determine global star formation rates. Several hundred clumps were measured in the sample, with masses ranging from 10^5 to several x10^8 solar masses, scaling with galaxy absolute g magnitude of -14 to -21 mag. The galaxies are starbursting, sitting above the Groth strip “main sequence” of star formation rate versus galaxy mass by an order of magnitude. These Kiso measle galaxies have 10x the star formation rates of the Kiso tadpole galaxies. We compare their clump luminosity distribution functions with normal disk galaxies.

  4. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    developed a new automated algorithm for matching supernovae to their host galaxies. Their work builds on currently existing algorithms and makes use of information about the nearby galaxies, accounts for the uncertainty of the match, and even includes a machine learning component to improve the matching accuracy.Gupta and collaborators test their matching algorithm on catalogs of galaxies and simulated supernova events to quantify how well the algorithm is able to accurately recover the true hosts.Successful MatchingThe matching algorithms accuracy (purity) as a function of the true supernova-host separation, the supernova redshift, the true hosts brightness, and the true hosts size. [Gupta et al. 2016]The authors find that when the basic algorithm is run on catalog data, it matches supernovae to their hosts with 91% accuracy. Including the machine learning component, which is run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy of the matching to 97%.The encouraging results of this work which was intended as a proof of concept suggest that methods similar to this could prove very practical for tackling future survey data. And the method explored here has use beyond matching just supernovae to their host galaxies: it could also be applied to other extragalactic transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events, or electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave detections.CitationRavi R. Gupta et al 2016 AJ 152 154. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/6/154

  5. Ring Around a Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  6. Slowly cooking galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, François

    2000-07-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of IZw 18 have revealed homogeneous abundance throughout the galaxy and several observations of other starburst galaxies have shown no significant gradient or discontinuity in the abundance distributions within the H II regions. I thus concur with Tenorio-Tagle G., 1996, AJ 111, 1641 and Devost D., Roy J.R., Drissen L., 1997, ApJ 482, 765, that these observed abundance homogeneities cannot be produced by the material ejected from the stars formed in the current burst and result from a previous star-formation episode. Metals ejected in the current burst of star formation remain most probably hidden in a hot phase and are undetectable using optical spectroscopy. Combining various observational facts, for instance, the faint star-formation rate observed in low surface brightness galaxies, Van Zee L., Haynes M.P., Salzer J.J., Broeils A.H., 1997c, AJ 113, 1618. I propose that a low and continuous star-formation rate, occurring during quiescent phases between bursts, is a non negligible source of new elements in the interstellar medium. Using a spectrophotometric and chemical evolution model for galaxies, I investigated the star formation history IZw 18. I demonstrate that the continuous star formation scenario reproduces all the observed parameters of IZw 18. I discuss the consequences of such a quiet star-formation regime.

  7. Rebuilding Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the ESA Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite and the NRAO Very Large Array. With the Very Large Telescope, observations were performed on Antu and Kueyen over a two-year period using the quasi-twin instruments FORS1 and FORS2 in the visible and ISAAC in the infrared. In both cases, it was essential to rely on the unique capabilities of the VLT to obtain high-quality spectra with the required resolution. A fleet of results ESO PR Photo 02a/05 ESO PR Photo 02a/05 Luminosity - Oxygen Abundance Relation for Galaxies [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 455 pix - 81k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 910 pix - 208k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 02a/05 shows the oxygen abundance (expressed in fraction of the solar value) as a function of the luminosity of the galaxies (in logarithm scale). This relation is fundamental in astrophysics. The relation for local galaxies is shown by the solid red line. The blue dots are the values derived from VLT spectra in a subset of the studied galaxies. They reveal for the first time that this relation is changing with time: for a given value of the luminosity, galaxies of different ages present different values of the oxygen abundance. From their extensive set of data, the astronomers could draw a number of important conclusions. First, based on the near-infrared luminosities of the galaxies, they infer that most of the galaxies they studied contain between 30,000 million and 300,000 million times the mass of the Sun in the form of stars. This is roughly a factor 0.2 to 2 the amount of mass locked in stars in our own Milky Way. Second, they discovered that contrary to the local Universe where so-called Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; [3]) are very rare objects, at a redshift from 0.4 to 1, that is, 4,000 to 8,000 million years ago, roughly one sixth of bright galaxies were LIRGs. Because this peculiar class of galaxies is believed to be going through a very active phase of star formation, with a doubling of the stellar mass

  8. The ATLAS3D project - XXIX. The new look of early-type galaxies and surrounding fields disclosed by extremely deep optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Karabal, Emin; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology based on star counts is instrumental to reconstruct the past mass assembly of Local Group galaxies. The development of new observing techniques and data reduction, coupled with the use of sensitive large field of view cameras, now allows us to pursue this technique in more distant galaxies exploiting their diffuse low surface brightness (LSB) light. As part of the ATLAS3D project, we have obtained with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope extremely deep, multiband images of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We present here a catalogue of 92 galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample, which are located in low- to medium-density environments. The observing strategy and data reduction pipeline, which achieve a gain of several magnitudes in the limiting surface brightness with respect to classical imaging surveys, are presented. The size and depth of the survey are compared to other recent deep imaging projects. The paper highlights the capability of LSB-optimized surveys at detecting new prominent structures that change the apparent morphology of galaxies. The intrinsic limitations of deep imaging observations are also discussed, among those, the contamination of the stellar haloes of galaxies by extended ghost reflections, and the cirrus emission from Galactic dust. The detection and systematic census of fine structures that trace the present and past mass assembly of ETGs are one of the prime goals of the project. We provide specific examples of each type of observed structures - tidal tails, stellar streams and shells - and explain how they were identified and classified. We give an overview of the initial results. The detailed statistical analysis will be presented in future papers.

  9. The intragroup medium in loose groups of galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Helsdon, S. F.; Ponman, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT PSPC to study the properties of a sample of 24 X-ray bright galaxy groups, representing the largest sample examined in detail to date. Hot plasma models are fitted to the spectral data to derive temperatures, and modified King models are used to characterise the surface brightness profiles. In agreement with previous work, we find evidence for the presence of two components in the surface brightness profiles. The extended component is generally found to be much flatter ...

  10. 50 KPC radio trails behind irregular galaxies in A1367

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, G.; Jaffe, W.

    1987-11-01

    The authors report the discovery of exceptionally bright and extended trails of radio emission behind three irregular galaxies in the periphery of the cluster A 1367, in the Coma Supercluster. Turbulent interaction with the intergalactic medium or a past catastrophic collision between galaxies could have produced the observed phenomenon.

  11. The Bright End of the UV Luminosity Function at z~8: New Constraints from CANDELS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Oesch, P A; Illingworth, G D; Gonzalez, V; Trenti, M; van Dokkum, P G; Franx, M; Labbe, I; Carollo, C M; Magee, D

    2012-01-01

    We present new z~8 galaxy candidates from a search over ~95 arcmin^2 of WFC3/IR data. These are used to determine the bright end of the UV luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies at z~8. Our analysis is based on newly acquired WFC3/IR imaging data obtained as part of the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury program over the GOODS South field, which allows us to triple the search area for bright z~8 galaxies in the GOODS South. These new data are combined with existing deep optical ACS imaging to search for relatively bright (M_UV<-19.5 mag) z~8 galaxy candidates using the Lyman Break technique. To minimize contamination from lower redshift galaxies, we make full use of all optical data and impose strict non-detection criteria based on an optical chi^2_opt flux measurement. In the whole search area we identify 11 candidate z~8 galaxies, spanning a magnitude range H_160,AB =25.8-27.5 mag. The new data show that the UV LF is a factor ~2 lower at M_UV < -19.5 mag than previously determined. Combining this...

  12. Galaxy destruction and diffuse light in clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Calcaneo-Roldan, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Malin, D; Sadler, E M; Calcaneo-Roldan, Carlos; Moore, Ben; Malin, David; Sadler, Elaine M.

    2000-01-01

    Deep images of the Centaurus and Coma clusters reveal two spectacular arcs of diffuse light that stretch for over 100 kpc, yet are just a few kpc wide. At a surface brightness of m_b \\sim 27-28th arcsec^-2, the Centaurus arc is the most striking example known of structure in the diffuse light component of a rich galaxy cluster. We use numerical simulations to show that this feature is most probably the tidal debris of a low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxy that has been disrupted by galaxy harassment, primarily by the gravitational potential of NGC 4709. High surface brightness disk galaxies are more stable to tidal shocks and lose less stellar mass, therefore their tidal debris is significantly fainter. Spheroidal galaxies can also produce features in the diffuse light component, yet these are even more diffuse and not as narrow. Only a luminous LSB galaxy on a fairly radial orbit, whose disk is co-rotating with its orbital path past pericentre can provide an acceptable reproduction of the extent, width ...

  13. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  14. The Galaxy Alignment Effect in Abell 1689

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-wei; Banados, E.; De Propris, R.; West, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    We examined alignments for galaxies in the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 (z = 0.18) based on archival Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 F606W and F814W images. The sources were extracted using SExtractor. We used distance from the color-magnitud relation (defined by the bright galaxies) as a proxy to select likely cluster members. We carried out a series of simulations with artificial galaxies in order to understand the limit of our position angle measurement. Based on the cluster member selection and the result of our simulations, we isolated a sample of galaxies lying on the red sequence with I 0.2 to study the alignment effect. By applying the Kuiper test, we find evidence of alignment among faint galaxies and galaxies in the inner 500 kpc of the cluster. The best mechanism to produce this alignment result is tidal torquing. Akin to the Earth-Moon system, tidal effects would (re)create alignments between galaxies. Under the presence of the tidal field, fainter galaxies, especially in the center, will align themselves more rapidly than brighter galaxies.

  15. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    OpenAIRE

    Xinguang Cao; Hiroyuki Ito

    2011-01-01

    Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours) for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of t...

  16. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  17. The Kinematics in the Cores of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Bershady, M. A.; Andersen, D. R.; Ryder, S. D.; Pisano, D. J.; Walker, M. A.; Freeman, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Systematic effects on HI and Hα long-slit observations make a measurement of the inner slope of the dark matter density distribution difficult to determine. Halos with constant density cores and ones with r-1 profiles both appear consistent with the data, although constant density cores generally pr

  18. Spectroscopy of superluminous supernova host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, G.; Kruehler, T.; Schulze, S

    2015-01-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both...... uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen...

  19. First results from the Dragonfly Telephoto Array: the apparent lack of a stellar halo in the massive spiral galaxy M101

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Merritt, Allison

    2014-01-01

    We use a new telescope concept, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to study the low surface brightness outskirts of the spiral galaxy M101. The radial surface brightness profile is measured down to mu_g ~ 32 mag/arcsec^2, a depth that approaches the sensitivity of star count studies in the Local Group. We convert surface brightness to surface mass density using the radial g-r color profile. The mass density profile shows no significant upturn at large radius and is well-approximated by a simple bulge + disk model out to R = 70 kpc, corresponding to 18 disk scale lengths. Fitting a bulge + disk + halo model we find that the best-fitting halo mass M_halo ~ 1.7 x 10^8 M_sun. The total stellar mass of M101 is M_tot,* ~ 5.3 x 10^10 Msun, and we infer that the halo mass fraction f_halo = M_halo / M_tot,* ~ 0.003. This mass fraction is lower than that of the Milky Way (f_halo ~ 0.02) and M31 (f_halo ~ 0.04). All three galaxies fall below the f_halo - M_tot,* relation predicted by recent cosmological simulations that tra...

  20. Galaxy collisions as a mechanism of formation of ultra diffuse galaxies (UDG)

    CERN Document Server

    Baushev, Anton N

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a possible mechanism of ultra diffuse galaxy formation: the UDGs may occur as a result of a central collision of galaxies. If the galaxies are young and contain a lot of gas, the collision may kick all the gas off the systems and thus strongly suppress any farther star formation. As a result, the galaxies now have a very low surface brightness and other properties typical of the ultra diffuse galaxies. We use the Coma cluster (where numerous UDGs were recently discovered) to test the efficiency of the process. The mechanism works very well and can transform a significant fraction of the cluster population into ultra diffuse galaxies. The UDGs formed by the process concentrate towards the center of the cluster, and their globular cluster systems remain undamaged, in accordance with observational results. The projected density of UDGs on the cluster images may help us to recognize the mechanism of the UDG formation that realizes in reality.

  1. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  2. A LABOCA survey of submillimeter galaxies behind galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Daniel; Horellou, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Context: Submillimeter galaxies are a population of dusty star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Measuring their properties will help relate them to other types of galaxies, both at high and low redshift. This is needed in order to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies. Aims: We use gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters to probe the faint and abundant submillimeter galaxy population down to a lower flux density level than what can be achieved in blank-field observations. Methods: We use the LABOCA bolometer camera on the APEX telescope to observe five cluster of galaxies at a wavelength of 870 micron. The final maps have an angular resolution of 27.5 arcsec and a point source noise level of 1.2-2.2 mJy. We model the mass distribution in the clusters as superpositions of spherical NFW halos and derive magnification maps that we use to calculate intrinsic flux densities as well as area-weighted number counts. We also use the positions of Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources in four of the fields for ...

  3. Very thin disc galaxies in the SDSS catalogue of edge-on galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Mosenkov, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    We study the properties of galaxies with very thin discs (VTDs) using a sample of 85 objects whose stellar disc radial-to-vertical scale ratio determined from photometric decomposition, exceeds 9. We present evidences of similarities between the VTD galaxies and low surface brightness (LSB) disc galaxies, and conclude that both small and giant LSB galaxies may reveal themselves as VTD, edge-on galaxies. Our VTD galaxies are mostly bulgeless, and those with large radial scalelength tend to have redder colours. We performed spectral observations of 22 VTD galaxies with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph on the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory. The spectra with good resolution (R ∼ 5000) allow us to determine the distance and the ionized gas rotation curve maximum for the galaxies. Our VTD galaxies have low dust content, in contrast to regular disc galaxies. Apparently, VTD galaxies reside in specific cosmological low-density environments and tend to have less connection with filaments. Comparing a toy model that assumes marginally low star formation in galactic discs with obtained gas kinematics data, we conclude that there is a threshold central surface density of about 88 M⊙ pc-2, which we observe in the case of very thin, rotationally supported galactic discs.

  4. The RASS--6dFGS catalogue: a sample of X-ray selected AGN from the 6dF Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Mahony, Elizabeth K; Boyle, Brian J; Edge, Alastair C; Mauch, Tom; Sadler, Elaine M

    2009-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 3405 X-ray sources from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) Bright Source Catalogue which fall within the area covered by the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). The catalogue is count-rate limited at 0.05 cts\\s in the X-ray and covers the area of sky with delta 10 deg. The RASS--6dFGS sample was one of the additional target catalogues of the 6dFGS and as a result we obtained optical spectra for 2224 (65%) RASS sources. Of these, 1715 (77%) have reliable redshifts with a median redshift of z=0.16 (excluding the Galactic sources). For the optically bright sources (b_J < 17.5) in the observed sample, over 90% have reliable redshifts. The catalogue mainly comprises QSOs and active galaxies but also includes 238 Galactic sources. Of the sources with reliable redshifts the majority are Type 1 AGN (69%), while 12% are Type 2 AGN, 6% absorption-line galaxies and 13% are stars. We also identify a small number of optically-faint, very low redshift, compact objects which fall outside the general trend i...

  5. The rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, Hrant M

    2015-01-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher of the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with $a/b>1.8$ and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy in which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60\\%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ~ 35%. The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not have merging with other clusters and groups of galaxies, in the result of which the rotation has been prevented.

  6. Dust reddening in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Ting; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Lu, HongLin; Dong, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    We present empirical relations between the global dust reddening and other physical galaxy properties including the Halpha luminosity, Halpha surface brightness, metallicity and axial ratio for star-forming disc galaxies. The study is based on a large sample of ~22 000 well-defined star-forming galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The reddening parameterized by color excess E(B-V) is derived from the Balmer decrement. Besides the dependency of reddening on Halpha luminosity / surface brightness and gas phase metallicity, it is also correlated with the galaxy inclination, in the sense that edge-on galaxies are more attenuated than face-on galaxies at a give intrinsic luminosity. In light of these correlations, we present the empirical formulae of E(B-V) as a function of these galaxy properties, with a scatter of only 0.07 mag. The empirical relation can be reproduced if most dust attenuation to the HII region is due to diffuse background dust distributing in a disc thicker than that of H...

  7. Discovery of intermediate redshift galaxy clusters in the ROSAT NEP field. [North Ecliptic Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Huchra, J.; Mackenty, J.; Mclean, B.; Geller, M.; Hasinger, G.; Marzke, R.; Schmidt, M.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    We report preliminary results from a program to identify optical counterparts of ROSAT sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region. The most striking X-ray feature reported by Hasinger et al. (1991) is an extended low surface brightness region of X-ray emission. Within the two X-ray contours of highest count rate we find a cluster of galaxies at a redshift of 0.09 and an early-type galaxy at a redshift of 0.03. X-ray emission from these objects may provide an explanation for the observed X-ray morphology. We also find evidence that other X-ray sources in this region are coincident with clusters or groups of galaxies at redshifts between 0.08 and 0.09. The presence of at least five X-ray detected clusters or groups in this narrow redshift band within a 1.5 deg radius field seems to indicate the existence of a moderate redshift supercluster. The existence of these clusters will have major implications for the study of large-scale structure through X-ray surveys such as ROSAT.

  8. Star forming galaxies in the AKARI Deep Field South: identifications and SEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Pollo, A; Bienias, P; Shirahata, M; Matsuura, S; Kawada, M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the nature and properties of far-infrared (FIR) sources from the AKARI Deep Field South (ADF-S), we performed an extensive search for the counterparts of 1000 ADF-S objects brighter than 0.0301 Jy in the WIDE-S (90 $\\mu$m) AKARI band in the public databases (NED and SIMBAD). We analyzed the properties of the resulting sample: statistic of the identified objects, number counts, redshift distribution and morphological types. We also made a crude analysis of the clustering properties of the sources and constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 47 selected objects with the best photometry. Among 1000 investigated ADF-S sources, 545 were identified at other wavelengths. From them, 518 are known galaxies, and 343 of them were not known previously as infra-red sources. We found redshifts of 48 extragalactic objects and morphological types of 77 galaxies. We conclude that the bright FIR point sources observed in the ADF-S are mostly nearby galaxies.Their properties are very similar to propert...

  9. The Quest for Dusty Star-forming Galaxies at High Redshift z ≳ 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, C.; Lapi, A.; Shi, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Aversa, R.; Danese, L.

    2016-06-01

    We exploit the continuity equation approach and “main-sequence” star formation timescales to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses ≳ a few 1010 M ⊙ at redshift z ≳ 4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) ψ ≳ 102 M ⊙ yr-1 in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z ≲ 3 in the far-IR band by the Herschel Space Observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z ˜ 10, determining that the number density at z ≲ 8 for SFRs ψ ≳ 30 M ⊙ yr-1 cannot be estimated relying on the UV luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from the AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2, and ALMA-SPT surveys are already addressing it. We demonstrate how an observational strategy based on color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)millimeter band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data from on-source observations with ALMA, can allow us to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z ≲ 8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)millimeter observations by ALMA and NIKA2 and/or radio observations by SKA and its precursors.

  10. A catalog of 203 galaxy clusters serendipitously detected in the ROSAT PSPC pointed observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; McNamara, B.R.; Forman, W.;

    1998-01-01

    We present a catalog of 203 clusters of galaxies serendipitously detected in 647 ROSAT PSPC high Galactic latitude pointings covering 158 deg(2). This is one of the largest X-ray-selected cluster samples, comparable in size only to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey sample of nearby clusters (Ebeling et al......), corresponding to very poor groups, to similar to 5 x 10(44) ergs s(-1), corresponding to rich clusters. The cluster redshifts range from z = 0.015 to z > 0.5. The catalog lists X-ray fluxes, core radii, and spectroscopic redshifts for 73 clusters and photometric redshifts for the remainder. Our detection method...... confirmed clusters. The number of false detections and their flux distribution are in perfect agreement with simulations. The log N-log S relation for clusters derived from our catalog shows excellent agreement with counts of bright clusters derived from the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey...

  11. Star-formation knots in IRAS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchings, J B

    1995-01-01

    Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

  12. Chemical and mass evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, B L

    2004-01-01

    An introduction is given to projects investigating galaxy evolution quantitatively by spectroscopic observations of very distant galaxies that have weak apparent brightnesses and small sizes as it is feasible with 10m-class telescopes like SALT. Such methods encompass scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher and Fundamental Plane relations that can be utilized to determine the luminosity evolution and mass assembly of galaxies. The stellar populations can be analyzed with respect to age, metallicity, and chemical enrichment by measureing absorption line strengths. Possible effects on galaxy evolution of the environment in rich clusters of galaxies compared to the field are also addressed. For each method, recent applications are presented like the evolution of the TFR determined with 77 field spirals up to z=1, a study of the internal kinematics of distant cluster spirals and a comparison of the stellar populations of ellipticals in the field and in rich clusters at z=0.4.

  13. The history of mass assembly of faint red galaxies in 28 galaxy clusters since z=1.3

    CERN Document Server

    Andreon, S

    2007-01-01

    We measure the relative evolution of the number of bright and faint (as faint as 0.05 L*) red galaxies in a sample of 28 clusters, of which 16 are at 0.50<= z<=1.27, all observed through a pair of filters bracketing the 4000 Angstrom break rest-frame. The abundance of red galaxies, relative to bright ones, is constant over all the studied redshift range, 0bright and faint red galaxies as large as claimed in some past works. Faint red galaxies are largely assembled and in place at z=1.3 and their deficit does not depend on cluster mass, parametrized by velocity dispersion or X-ray luminosity. Our analysis, with respect to previous one, samples a wider redshift range, minimizes systematics and put a more attention to statistical issues, keeping at the same time a large number of clusters.

  14. Rotation Curves of Giant LSB Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; Navarro, J. F.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present optical and H I rotation curves of a sample of giant, low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies including the prototype, Malin 1. The rotation curves of these diffuse systems are expected to more faithfully reflect the structure of their dark matter halos due to the reduced contribution of th

  15. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof......-the-art cosmological simulation, Illustris, follow a tight relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. This relation agrees well with the observed relation at a redshift of z = 0 and z = 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ' 2 the normalisation is lower than in real observations. This is highlighted...

  16. Wide HI profile galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, Noah; Zitrin, Adi

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the nature of objects in a complete sample of 28 galaxies selected from the first sky area fully covered by ALFALFA, being well-detected and having HI profiles wider than 550 km/s. The selection does not use brightness, morphology, or any other property derived from optical or other spectral bands. We investigate the degree of isolation, the morphology, and other properties gathered or derived from open data bases and show that some objects have wide HI profiles probably because they are disturbed or are interacting, or might be confused in the ALFALFA beam. We identify a sub-sample of 14 galaxies lacking immediate interacting neighbours and showing regular, symmetric, two-horned HI profiles that we propose as candidate high-mass disk systems (CHMDs). We measure the net-Halpha emission from the CHMDs and combine this with public multispectral data to model the global star formation (SF) properties of each galaxy. The Halpha observations show SFRs not higher than a few solar masses per year. Sim...

  17. Investigating Dwarf Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Sachithra; Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have proposed that dwarf elliptical / spheroidal galaxies form through the transformation of dwarf irregular galaxies. Early and late type dwarfs resemble each other in terms of their observed colors and light distributions (each can often be represented by exponential disks), providing reason to propose an evolutionary link between the two types. The existence of dwarf spirals has been largely debated. However, more and more recent studies are using the designation of dwarf spiral to describe their targets of interest. This project seeks to explore where dwarf spirals fit into the above mentioned evolutionary sequence, if at all. Optical colors will be compared between a sample of dwarf irregular, dwarf elliptical, and dwarf spiral galaxies. The dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical samples have previously been found to overlap in both optical color and surface brightness profile shape when limiting the samples to their fainter members. A preliminary comparison including the dwarf spiral sample will be presented here, along with a comparison of available ultraviolet and near-infrared data. Initial results indicate a potential evolutionary link that merits further investigation.

  18. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.

    2017-03-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e. galaxies with population. In 2014, we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ∼150 'blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here, we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43 population synthesis models and estimated to be in the range log (M*/M⊙) ≃ 5-9. Unlike other low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, BDDs are in agreement with the mass-metallicity relation at low masses, suggesting that they are not accreting large amounts of pristine gas relative to their stellar mass. BDD galaxies appear to be a population of actively star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies which fall within the class of low-surface-brightness dIrr galaxies. Their ongoing star formation and irregular morphology make them excellent analogues for galaxies in the early Universe.

  19. Arm Structure in Anemic Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, D M; Frogel, J A; Eskridge, P B; Pogge, R W; Gallagher, A; Iams, J; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Frogel, Jay A.; Eskridge, Paul B.; Pogge, Richard W.; Gallagher, Andrew; Iams, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Anemic galaxies have less prominent star formation than normal galaxies of the same Hubble type. Previous studies showed they are deficient in total atomic hydrogen but not in molecular hydrogen. Here we compare the combined surface densities of HI and H2 at mid-disk radii with the Kennicutt threshold for star formation. The anemic galaxies are below threshold, which explains their lack of prominent star formation, but they are not much different than other early type galaxies, which also tend to be below threshold. The spiral wave amplitudes of anemic and normal galaxies were also compared, using images in B and J passbands from the OSU Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. Anemic galaxies have normal spiral wave properties too, with the same amplitudes and radial dependencies as other galaxies of the same arm class. Because of the lack of gas, spiral waves in early type galaxies and anemics do not have a continuous supply of stars with low velocity dispersions to maintain a marginally stable disk. As a result, they ...

  20. Health Physics counting room

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    The Health Physics counting room, where the quantity of induced radioactivity in materials is determined. This information is used to evaluate possible radiation hazards from the material investigated.

  1. Planetary nebulae as kinematic tracers of galaxy stellar halos

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, Lodovico

    2016-01-01

    The kinematic and dynamical properties of galaxy stellar halos are difficult to measure because of the faint surface brightness that characterizes these regions. Spiral galaxies can be probed using the radio HI emission; on the contrary, early-type galaxies contain less gas, therefore alternative kinematic tracers need to be used. Planetary nebulae (PNe) can be easily detected far out in the halo thanks to their bright emission lines. It is therefore possible to map the halo kinematics also in early-type galaxies, typically out to 5 effective radii or beyond. Thanks to the recent spectroscopic surveys targeting extra-galactic PNe, we can now rely on a few tens of galaxies where the kinematics of the stellar halos are measured. Here, I will review the main results obtained in this field in the last decades.

  2. Outer Disk Star Formation in HI selected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Meurer, Gerhardt

    2016-01-01

    The HI in galaxies often extends past their conventionally defined optical extent. I report results from our team which has been probing low intensity star formation in outer disks using imaging in H-alpha and ultraviolet. Using a sample of hundreds of HI selected galaxies, we confirm that outer disk HII regions and extended UV disks are common. Hence outer disks are not dormant but are dimly forming stars. Although the ultraviolet light in galaxies is more centrally concentrated than the HI, the UV/HI ratio (the Star Formation Efficiency) is nearly constant, with a slight dependency on surface brightness. This result is well accounted for in a model where disks maintain a constant stability parameter Q. This model also accounts for how the ISM and star formation are distributed in the bright parts of galaxies, and how HI appears to trace the distribution of dark matter in galaxy outskirts.

  3. The Dwarf Galaxy Population in Nearby Groups. The data

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, E R; Infante, L; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Oliveira, Claudia M. de; Infante, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    We used V and I CCD photometry to search for low-surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBD) in the central ( 22.5 V mag/arcsec^2, h > 1.5 arcsec, and diameters larger than 1.2 h^-1 kpc. Twenty of the eighty galaxies are extended LSB galaxies that were detected only on smoothed images, after masking all high surface brightness objects. The completeness in the detection is ~80% for galaxies with V<=20 and 22.5brightnesses. In this last bin, the completeness increases to ~80% when we search for galaxies in smoothed images instead. The detected LSBD galaxies are highly concentrated towards the center of the four groups in the inner 250 h^-1 kpc. The best fit power-law slope of the surface density distribution is, on average, beta ~ -1.5 (R < 250 h^-1 kpc), in agreement with the values found for satellites dwarfs around isolated E/S0 galaxies and in X-ray groups. The LSBD galaxies in the Mv-mu0 plane does not show a clear c...

  4. The Hot Gas Halos of Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Mulchaey, John S

    2008-01-01

    We use Chandra observations of 13 nearby groups of galaxies to investigate the hot gas content of their member galaxies. We find that a large fraction of near-IR bright, early-type galaxies in groups have extended X-ray emission, indicating that they retain significant hot gas halos even in these dense environments. In particular, we detect hot gas halos in ~80% of L_K > L_star galaxies. We do not find a significant difference in the L_K-L_X relation for detected group and cluster early-type galaxies. However, we detect X-ray emission from a significantly higher fraction of galaxies brighter than L_star in groups compared to clusters, indicating that a larger fraction of galaxies in clusters experience significant stripping of their hot gas. In addition, group and cluster galaxies appear to be X-ray faint compared to field galaxies, though a Chandra based field sample is needed to confirm this result. The near-IR bright late-types galaxies in clusters and groups appear to follow the L_K-L_X relation for early...

  5. Molecular and atomic line surveys of galaxies I: the dense, star-forming phase as a beacon

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, James E

    2012-01-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the Universe, and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular and [CII] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses: (a) recently available HCN Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs, L_IR>10^11 L_sun), (b) a value for epsilon=SFR/M_dense(H_2) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium and (c) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the Universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [CII] as the most important of the far-inf...

  6. POSSIBLE SOURCES OF UV RADIATION IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have compiled a sample of 519 nearby (z < 0:13 elliptical galaxies, selected by matching the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX Medium Imaging Survey (MIS with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Fourth Data Release (DR4. Our galaxies are bright, with r < 16:8 and have FUV (far ultraviolet an NUV (near ultraviolet emission. We build a UV Color Magnitude Relation (CMR using GALEX and SDSS photometric bands, and analyze the evolution of this CMR for these galaxies using stellar population synthesis models. We nd that these galaxies may have su ered a small amount of recent residual star formation (1{2% of the galaxy mass. Extreme Horizontal Branch (EHB stars can explain galaxies with 4 < NUV- r < 5:4.

  7. Supernovae without host galaxy? - Hypervelocity stars in foreign galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, Peter-Christian; Bomans, Dominik J

    2011-01-01

    Harvesting the SAI supernova catalog, we search for SNe that apparently do not occur within a distinct host galaxy but lie a great distance apart from their assigned host galaxy. Assuming two possible explanations for this host-lessness of a fraction of reported SNe, namely (i) a host galaxy which is too faint to be detected within the limits of currently available surveys or (ii) a hypervelocity star (HVS) as progenitor of the SN,we want to distinguish between these two cases. To do so, we use deep imaging to test explanation (i). If within our detection limit of 27 mag/arcsec^2, the central surface brightness of the faintest known LSB galaxy so far, no galaxy could be identified, we discard this explanation and regard the SN, after several other checks, to have had a hypervelocity star progenitor. Analyzing a selected subsample of five host-less SNe we find one, SN 2006bx in UGC5434, to be put in the hypervelocity progenitor category with a high probability, exhibiting a projected velocity of > 800 km/s. SN...

  8. The 10k zCOSMOS : Morphological transformation of galaxies in the Group Environment since z ~1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovač, K.; Lilly, S. J.; Knobel, C.; Bolzonella, M.; Iovino, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Scarlata, C.; Sargent, M.; Cucciati, O.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Scodeggio, M.; Kampczyk, P.; Peng, Y.; Oesch, P.; Zucca, E.; Finoguenov, A.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Coppa, G.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Perez Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Fumana, M.; Guzzo, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution of galaxies inside and outside of the group environment since z = 1 using a large well-defined set of groups and galaxies from the zCOSMOS-bright redshift survey in the COSMOS field. The fraction of galaxies with early-type morphologies increases monotonically with MB luminosi

  9. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  10. Anarthria impairs subvocal counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubelli, R; Nichelli, P; Pentore, R

    1993-12-01

    We studied subvocal counting in two pure anarthric patients. Analysis showed that they performed definitively worse than normal subjects free to articulate subvocally and their scores were in the lower bounds of the performances of subjects suppressing articulation. These results suggest that subvocal counting is impaired after anarthria.

  11. EcoCount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip P. Allen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Techniques that analyze biological remains from sediment sequences for environmental reconstructions are well established and widely used. Yet, identifying, counting, and recording biological evidence such as pollen grains remain a highly skilled, demanding, and time-consuming task. Standard procedure requires the classification and recording of between 300 and 500 pollen grains from each representative sample. Recording the data from a pollen count requires significant effort and focused resources from the palynologist. However, when an adaptation to the recording procedure is utilized, efficiency and time economy improve. We describe EcoCount, which represents a development in environmental data recording procedure. EcoCount is a voice activated fully customizable digital count sheet that allows the investigator to continuously interact with a field of view during the data recording. Continuous viewing allows the palynologist the opportunity to remain engaged with the essential task, identification, for longer, making pollen counting more efficient and economical. EcoCount is a versatile software package that can be used to record a variety of environmental evidence and can be installed onto different computer platforms, making the adoption by users and laboratories simple and inexpensive. The user-friendly format of EcoCount allows any novice to be competent and functional in a very short time.

  12. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; /UC, Irvine; Berrier, Joel C.; /Arkansas U.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /Pittsburgh U.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  13. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: stochastic relative biasing between galaxy populations

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, V; Lahav, O; Conway, E; Maddox, S; Baldry, I K; Baugh, C M; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T; Cannon, R; Cole, S; Colless, M; Collins, C; Couch, W; Dalton, G B; De Propris, R; Driver, S P; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, Richard S; Frenk, C S; Glazebrook, K; Jackson, C; Lewis, I; Lumsden, S; Madgwick, D; Norberg, P; Peterson, B A; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the clustering of galaxies depends on galaxy type. Such relative bias complicates the inference of cosmological parameters from galaxy redshift surveys, and is a challenge to theories of galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper we perform a joint counts-in-cells analysis on galaxies in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, classified by both colour and spectral type, eta, as early or late type galaxies. We fit three different models of relative bias to the joint probability distribution of the cell counts, assuming Poisson sampling of the galaxy density field. We investigate the nonlinearity and stochasticity of the relative bias, with cubical cells of side 10Mpc \\leq L \\leq 45Mpc (h=0.7). Exact linear bias is ruled out with high significance on all scales. Power law bias gives a better fit, but likelihood ratios prefer a bivariate lognormal distribution, with a non-zero `stochasticity' - i.e. scatter that may result from physical effects on galaxy formation other than those from the loca...

  14. Satellites and Haloes of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Laura V; White, Simon D M; Navarro, Julio F

    2012-01-01

    We study the abundance of satellite galaxies as a function of primary stellar mass using the SDSS/DR7 spectroscopic catalogue. In contrast with previous studies, which focussed mainly on bright primaries, our central galaxies span a wide range of stellar mass, 10^7.5 < M_*^pri/M_sun < 10^11, from dwarfs to central cluster galaxies. Our analysis confirms that the average number of satellites around bright primaries, when expressed in terms of satellite-to-primary stellar mass ratio (m_*^sat/M_*^pri), is a strong function of M_*^pri. On the other hand, satellite abundance is largely independent of primary mass for dwarf primaries (M_*^pri<10^10 M_sun). These results are consistent with galaxy formation models in the LCDM scenario. We find excellent agreement between SDSS data and semi-analytic mock galaxy catalogues constructed from the Millennium-II Simulation. Satellite galaxies trace dark matter substructure in LCDM, so satellite abundance reflects the dependence on halo mass, M_200, of both substru...

  15. Galaxies The Long Wavelength View

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, J

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the ISO LWS has shown that there is strong variation (more than 2 orders of magnitude) in the [C II]/FIR ratios in galaxies extending from blue compact dwarfs, to normal and starburst galaxies, down to elliptical and ultraluminous galaxies (ULIGs). The variation in the relative [C II] 158 micron line strength has been attributed to low metallicity in blue compact dwarfs, high /n for normal galaxies and ULIGs, soft radiation fields in ellipticals, and extinction or enhanced abundance of dust in ionized regions in ULIGs. Full ISO/LWS far-infrared (43 - 197 micron) spectra of six nearby IR-bright galaxies reveal a dramatic progression of decreasing fine-structure line emission from ionized species to molecular (OH and H2O) absorption line dominated. The archetypical ULIG, Arp 220, lies at the absorption line dominated end of this sequence. For Arp 220, radiative transfer models indicate that it is optically thick in the FIR and that the water molecules observed in absorpti...

  16. Consecutive Bright Pulses in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Palfreyman, Jim L; Dickey, John M; Young, Timothy G; Hotan, Claire E; 10.1088/2041-8205/735/1/L17

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  17. A catalog of Kazarian galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, M. A.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; McLean, B.; Allen, R. J.; Petrosian, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The entire Kazarian galaxies (KG) catalog is presented, which combines extensive new measurements of their optical parameters with a literature and database search. The measurements were made using images extracted from the STScI Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) of Jpg(blue), Fpg(red), and Ipg(NIR) band photographic sky survey plates obtained by the Palomar and UK Schmidt telescopes. We provide accurate coordinates, morphological types, spectral and activity classes, blue apparent diameters, axial ratios, position angles, red, blue, and NIR apparent magnitudes, as well as counts of neighboring objects in a circle of radius 50 kpc from centers of KG. Special attention was paid to the individual descriptions of the galaxies in the original Kazarian lists, which clarified many cases of misidentifications of the objects, particularly among interacting systems. The total number of individual Kazarian objects in the database is now 706. We also include the redshifts, which are now available for 404 galaxies and the 2MASS infrared magnitudes for 598 KG. The database also includes extensive notes, which summarize information about the membership of Kazarian galaxies in different systems of galaxies and about revised activity classes and redshifts. An atlas of several interesting subclasses of Kazarian galaxies is also presented.

  18. Dusty Star Forming Galaxies and Supermassive Black Holes at High Redshifts: In- Situ Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    We have exploited the continuity equation approach and the star-formation timescales derived from the observed 'main sequence' relation (Star Formation Rate vs Stellar Mass), to show that the observed high abundance of galaxies with stellar masses ≥ a few 10^10 M⊙ at redshift z ≥ 4 implies the existence of a galaxy population featuring large star formation rates (SFRs) ψ ≥ 10^2 M⊙ yr^-1 in heavily dust-obscured conditions. These galaxies constitute the high-redshift counterparts of the dusty star-forming population already surveyed for z ≤ 3 in the Far-InfraRed (FIR) band by the Herschel space observatory. We work out specific predictions for the evolution of the corresponding stellar mass and SFR functions out to z ∼10, elucidating that the number density at z ≤ 8 for SFRs ψ ≥ 30 M⊙ yr^-1 cannot be estimated relying on the UltraViolet (UV) luminosity function alone, even when standard corrections for dust extinction based on the UV slope are applied. We compute the number counts and redshift distributions (including galaxy-scale gravitational lensing) of this galaxy population, and show that current data from AzTEC-LABOCA, SCUBA-2 and ALMA-SPT surveys are already digging into it. We substantiate how an observational strategy based on a color preselection in the far-IR or (sub-)mm band with Herschel and SCUBA-2, supplemented by photometric data via on-source observations with ALMA, can allow to reconstruct the bright end of the SFR functions out to z ≤ 8. In parallel, such a challenging task can be managed by exploiting current UV surveys in combination with (sub-)mm observations by ALMA and NIKA2. The same could be done with radio observations by SKA and its precursors. In particular we have worked out predictions for the radio counts of star-forming galaxies down to nJy levels, along with redshift distributions down to the detection limits of the phase 1 Square Kilometer Array MID telescope (SKA1-MID) and of its precursors. To do that we

  19. No time for dead time: timing analysis of bright black hole binaries with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time ...... techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  20. FIRST RESULTS FROM THE DRAGONFLY TELEPHOTO ARRAY: THE APPARENT LACK OF A STELLAR HALO IN THE MASSIVE SPIRAL GALAXY M101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Merritt, Allison [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Abraham, Roberto [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-02-20

    We use a new telescope concept, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to study the low surface brightness outskirts of the spiral galaxy M101. The radial surface brightness profile is measured down to μ {sub g} ∼ 32 mag arcsec{sup –2}, a depth that approaches the sensitivity of star count studies in the Local Group. We convert surface brightness to surface mass density using the radial g – r color profile. The mass density profile shows no significant upturn at large radius and is well-approximated by a simple bulge + disk model out to R = 70 kpc, corresponding to 18 disk scale lengths. Fitting a bulge + disk + halo model we find that the best-fitting halo mass M{sub halo}=1.7{sub −1.7}{sup +3.4}×10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The total stellar mass of M101 is M{sub tot,∗}=5.3{sub −1.3}{sup +1.7}×10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, and we infer that the halo mass fraction f{sub halo}=M{sub halo}/M{sub tot,∗}=0.003{sub −0.003}{sup +0.006}. This mass fraction is lower than that of the Milky Way (f {sub halo} ∼ 0.02) and M31 (f {sub halo} ∼ 0.04). All three galaxies fall below the f {sub halo}-M {sub tot,} {sub *} relation predicted by recent cosmological simulations that trace the light of disrupted satellites, with M101's halo mass a factor of ∼10 below the median expectation. However, the predicted scatter in this relation is large, and more galaxies are needed to better quantify this possible tension with galaxy formation models. Dragonfly is well suited for this project: as integrated-light surface brightness is independent of distance, large numbers of galaxies can be studied in a uniform way.

  1. Environments and Morphologies of Red Sequence Galaxies with Residual Star Formation in Massive Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Stott, John P; Jones, D Heath

    2013-01-01

    We present a photometric investigation into recent star formation in galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.1. We use spectral energy distribution templates to quantify recent star formation in large X-ray selected clusters from the LARCS survey using matched GALEX NUV photometry. These clusters all have signs of red sequence galaxy recent star formation (as indicated by blue NUV-R colour), regardless of cluster morphology and size. A trend in environment is found for these galaxies, such that they prefer to occupy low density, high cluster radius environments. The morphology of these UV bright galaxies suggests that they are in fact red spirals, which we confirm with light curves and Galaxy Zoo voting percentages as morphological proxies. These UV bright galaxies are therefore seen to be either truncated spiral galaxies, caught by ram pressure in falling into the cluster, or high mass spirals, with the photometry dominated by the older stellar population.

  2. Les galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Francoise

    2016-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made on galaxy formation and evolution in recent years, and new issues. The old Hubble classification according to the tuning fork of spirals, lenticulars and ellipticals, is still useful but has given place to the red sequence, the blue cloud and the green valley, showing a real bimodality of types between star forming galaxies (blue) and quenched ones (red). Large surveys have shown that stellar mass and environment density are the two main factors of the evolution from blue to red sequences. Evolution is followed directly with redshift through a look-back time of more than 12 billion years. The most distant galaxy at z=11. has already a stellar mass of a billion suns. In an apparent anti-hierarchical scenario, the most massive galaxies form stars early on, while essentially dwarf galaxies are actively star-formers now. This downsizing feature also applies to the growth of super-massive black holes at the heart of each bulgy galaxy. The feedback from active nuclei is essential to explain the distribution of mass in galaxies, and in particular to explain why the fraction of baryonic matter is so low, lower by more than a factor 5 than the baryonic fraction of the Universe. New instruments just entering in operation, like MUSE and ALMA, provide a new and rich data flow, which is developed in this series of articles.

  3. Bright PanSTARRS Nuclear Transients – what are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smartt S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an initial analysis of 49 bright transients occurring in the nuclei of galaxies with no previous known Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN. They have been discovered as part of the PanSTARRs 3π survey, and followed up with the Liverpool Telescope. Based on colours, light curve shape, and a small number with optical spectra, these transients seem to fall into three groups. Red/fast transients are nuclear supernovae of various types. Some bright nuclear transients are blue and decay on a timescale of a few months; these may be candidates for tidal disruption events. However most of the events we have found are blue and are either still rising or decaying slowly, on a timescale of years; the few spectra we have show AGN at z ∼ 1. We argue that these transients are background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies by a factor 10–100. Monitoring such events gives us very promising prospects for measuring the structure of AGN and so testing current theories.

  4. Imprint of inflation on galaxy shape correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Dvorkin, Cora

    2015-10-01

    We show that intrinsic (not lensing-induced) correlations between galaxy shapes offer a new probe of primordial non-Gaussianity and inflationary physics which is complementary to galaxy number counts. Specifically, intrinsic alignment correlations are sensitive to an anisotropic squeezed limit bispectrum of the primordial perturbations. Such a feature arises in solid inflation, as well as more broadly in the presence of light higher spin fields during inflation (as pointed out recently by Arkani-Hamed and Maldacena). We present a derivation of the all-sky two-point correlations of intrinsic shapes and number counts in the presence of non-Gaussianity with general angular dependence, and show that a quadrupolar (spin-2) anisotropy leads to the analog in galaxy shapes of the well-known scale-dependent bias induced in number counts by isotropic (spin-0) non-Gaussianity. Moreover, in the presence of non-zero anisotropic non-Gaussianity, the quadrupole of galaxy shapes becomes sensitive to far superhorizon modes. These effects come about because long-wavelength modes induce a local anisotropy in the initial power spectrum, with which galaxies will correlate. We forecast that future imaging surveys could provide constraints on the amplitude of anisotropic non-Gaussianity that are comparable to those from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). These are complementary as they probe different physical scales. The constraints, however, depend on the sensitivity of galaxy shapes to the initial conditions which we only roughly estimate from observed tidal alignments.

  5. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Wijnholds, S J; Abdalla, F B; Brouw, W N; Ciardi, B; Iliev, I T; Harker, G J A; Mellema, G; Bernardi, G; Zarka, P; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Hassall, T E; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Reich, W; van Nieuwpoort, R; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with LOFAR, similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of t...

  6. Sublattice Counting and Orbifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, Amihay; Reffert, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Abelian orbifolds of C^3 are known to be encoded by hexagonal brane tilings. To date it is not known how to count all such orbifolds. We fill this gap by employing number theoretic techniques from crystallography, and by making use of Polya's Enumeration Theorem. The results turn out to be beautifully encoded in terms of partition functions and Dirichlet Series. The same methods apply to counting orbifolds of any toric non-compact Calabi-Yau singularity. As additional examples, we count the orbifolds of the conifold, of the L^{aba} theories, and of C^4.

  7. A New Method for Calculating Counts in Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Szapudi, I

    1997-01-01

    In the near future a new generation of CCD based galaxy surveys will enable high precision determination of the N-point correlation functions. The resulting information will help to resolve the ambiguities associated with two-point correlation functions thus constraining theories of structure formation, biasing, and Gaussianity of initial conditions independently of the value of $\\Omega$. As one the most successful methods to extract the amplitude of higher order correlations is based on measuring the distribution of counts in cells, this work presents an advanced way of measuring it with unprecedented accuracy. Szapudi and Colombi (1996, hereafter \\cite{sc96}) identified the main sources of theoretical errors in extracting counts in cells from galaxy catalogs. One of these sources, termed as measurement error, stems from the fact that conventional methods use a finite number of sampling cells to estimate counts in cells. This effect can be circumvented by using an infinite number of cells. This paper present...

  8. Supermassive black holes in the Sbc spiral galaxies NGC 3310, NGC 4303 and NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorini, G; Capetti, A; Axon, D J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Atkinson, J; Batcheldor, D; Carollo, C M; Collett, J; Dressel, L; Hughes, M A; Macchetto, D; Maciejewski, W; Sparks, W; van der Marel, R; Pastorini, Guia; Marconi, Alessandro; Capetti, Alessandro; Axon, David J.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Atkinson, John; Batcheldor, Dan; Collett, James; Dressel, Linda; Hughes, Mark A.; Macchetto, Duccio; Maciejewski, Witold; Sparks, William; Marel, Roeland van der

    2007-01-01

    We present new Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of three spiral galaxies, NGC 4303, NGC 3310 and NGC 4258. The bright optical emission lines H$\\alpha$ $\\lambda$ $6564 \\AA$, [NII] $\\lambda

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The unimodal nature of the dwarf galaxy population

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Smriti; Driver, S; Kelvin, Lee S; Hopkins, A M; Baldry, I; Phillipps, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Loveday, J; Penny, Samantha J; Robotham, A S G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we aim to (i) test the number of statistically distinct classes required to classify the local galaxy population, and, (ii) identify the differences in the physical and star formation properties of visually-distinct galaxies. To accomplish this, we analyse the structural parameters (effective radius r_e, effective surface brightness within r_e (mu_e), central surface brightness (mu_0), and S'ersic index (n)), obtained by fitting the light profile of 432 galaxies (0.002galaxies (irregulars, blue spheroids and low surface brightness galaxies) form a unimodal population in a parameter space mapped by mu_e, mu_0, n, r_e, SFR, sSFR, M*, M_{dust} and (g-i). The SFR and sSFR distribution of passively evolving ...

  10. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  11. A catalog of Kazarian galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kazarian, M A; McLean, B; Allen, R J; Petrosian, A R

    2009-01-01

    The entire Kazarian galaxies (KG) catalog is presented which combines extensive new measurements of their optical parameters with a literature and database search. The measurements were made using images extracted from the STScI Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) of Jpg(blue), Fpg(red) and Ipg(NIR) band photographic sky survey plates obtained by the Palomar and UK Schmidt telescopes. We provide accurate coordinates, morphological type, spectral and activity classes, blue apparent diameters, axial ratios, position angles, red, blue and NIR apparent magnitudes, as well as counts of neighboring objects in a circle of radius 50 kpc from centers of KG. Special attention was paid to the individual descriptions of the galaxies in the original Kazarian lists, which clarified many cases of misidentifications of the objects, particularly among interacting systems. The total number of individual Kazarian objects in the database is now 706. We also include the redshifts which are now available for 404 galaxies and the 2MASS infr...

  12. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Interactions and Kinematic Anomalies in Abell 119

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sree; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Cortese, Luca; van de Sande, Jesse; Mahajan, Smriti; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Allen, James T.; Bekki, Kenji; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Colless, Matthew; Croom, Scott M.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, Michael; Green, Andy; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Medling, Anne M.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel; Scott, Nicholas; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-11-01

    Galaxy mergers are important events that can determine the fate of a galaxy by changing its morphology, star formation activity and mass growth. Merger systems have commonly been identified from their disturbed morphologies, and we now can employ integral field spectroscopy to detect and analyze the impact of mergers on stellar kinematics as well. We visually classified galaxy morphology using deep images ({μ }{{r}}=28 {mag} {{arcsec}}-2) taken by the Blanco 4 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. In this paper we investigate 63 bright ({M}{{r}}\\lt -19.3) spectroscopically selected galaxies in Abell 119, of which 53 are early type and 20 show a disturbed morphology by visual inspection. A misalignment between the major axes in the photometric image and the kinematic map is conspicuous in morphologically disturbed galaxies. Our sample is dominated by early-type galaxies, yet it shows a surprisingly tight Tully-Fisher relation except for the morphologically disturbed galaxies which show large deviations. Three out of the eight slow rotators in our sample are morphologically disturbed. The morphologically disturbed galaxies are generally more asymmetric, visually as well as kinematically. Our findings suggest that galaxy interactions, including mergers and perhaps fly-bys, play an important role in determining the orientation and magnitude of a galaxy’s angular momentum.

  13. AN UPDATED ULTRAVIOLET CATALOG OF GALEX NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yu; Zou, Hu; Liu, JiFeng; Wang, Song, E-mail: ybai@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zouhu@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: jfliu@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: songw@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang Distict, 100012 Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    The ultraviolet (UV) catalog of nearby galaxies compiled by Gil de Paz et al. presents the integrated photometry and surface brightness profiles for 1034 nearby galaxies observed by GALEX. We provide an updated catalog of 4138 nearby galaxies based on the latest Genral Release (GR6/GR7) of GALEX. These galaxies are selected from HyperLeda with apparent diameters larger than 1′. From the surface brightness profiles accurately measured using the deep NUV and FUV images, we have calculated the asymptotic magnitudes, aperture (D25) magnitudes, colors, structural parameters (effective radii and concentration indices), luminosities, and effective surface brightness for these galaxies. Archival optical and infrared photometry from HyperLeda, 2MASS, and IRAS are also integrated into the catalog. Our parameter measurements and some analyses are consistent with those of Paz et al. The (FUV − K) color provides a good criterion to distinguish between early- and late-type galaxies, which can be improved further using the concentration indices. The IRX–β relation is reformulated with our UV-selected nearby galaxies.

  14. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  15. Counting Belief Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Natarajan, Sriraam

    2012-01-01

    A major benefit of graphical models is that most knowledge is captured in the model structure. Many models, however, produce inference problems with a lot of symmetries not reflected in the graphical structure and hence not exploitable by efficient inference techniques such as belief propagation (BP). In this paper, we present a new and simple BP algorithm, called counting BP, that exploits such additional symmetries. Starting from a given factor graph, counting BP first constructs a compressed factor graph of clusternodes and clusterfactors, corresponding to sets of nodes and factors that are indistinguishable given the evidence. Then it runs a modified BP algorithm on the compressed graph that is equivalent to running BP on the original factor graph. Our experiments show that counting BP is applicable to a variety of important AI tasks such as (dynamic) relational models and boolean model counting, and that significant efficiency gains are obtainable, often by orders of magnitude.

  16. Analog multivariate counting analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, A V; Armstrong, T P

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing rates of occurrence of various features of a signal is of great importance in numerous types of physical measurements. Such signal features can be defined as certain discrete coincidence events, e.g. crossings of a signal with a given threshold, or occurrence of extrema of a certain amplitude. We describe measuring rates of such events by means of analog multivariate counting analyzers. Given a continuous scalar or multicomponent (vector) input signal, an analog counting analyzer outputs a continuous signal with the instantaneous magnitude equal to the rate of occurrence of certain coincidence events. The analog nature of the proposed analyzers allows us to reformulate many problems of the traditional counting measurements, and cast them in a form which is readily addressed by methods of differential calculus rather than by algebraic or logical means of digital signal processing. Analog counting analyzers can be easily implemented in discrete or integrated electronic circuits, do not suffer fro...

  17. 1996 : Track Count Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge's Track Count Protocol is to provide an index to the population size of game animals inhabiting St. Vincent Island.

  18. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  19. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  20. Why are some galaxy disks extremely thin?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Arunima

    2012-01-01

    Some low surface brightness galaxies are known to have extremely thin stellar disks with the vertical to planar axes ratio 0.1 or less, often referred to as superthin disks. Although their existence is known for over three decades, the physical origin for the thin distribution is not understood. We model the stellar thickness for a two-component (gravitationally coupled stars and gas) disk embedded in a dark matter halo, for a superthin galaxy UGC 7321 which has a dense, compact halo, and compare with a typical dwarf galaxy HoII which has a non-compact halo. We show that while the presence of gas does constrain the disk thickness, it is the compact dark matter halo which plays the decisive role in determining the superthin disk distribution in low-mass disks. Thus the compact dark matter halo significantly affects the disk structure and this could be important for the early evolution of galaxies.

  1. Counting RG flows

    OpenAIRE

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts --- from counting RG walls to AdS/C...

  2. Counting curves on surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider an elementary, and largely unexplored, combinatorial problem in low-dimensional topology. Consider a real 2-dimensional compact surface $S$, and fix a number of points $F$ on its boundary. We ask: how many configurations of disjoint arcs are there on $S$ whose boundary is $F$? We find that this enumerative problem, counting curves on surfaces, has a rich structure. For instance, we show that the curve counts obey an effective recursion, in the general framework of to...

  3. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  4. Neutron counting with cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  5. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  6. A New Approach to Galaxy Morphology I. Analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, R; Nair, P; Abraham, Roberto; Bergh, Sidney van den; Nair, Preethi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a new statistic for quantifying galaxy morphology based on measurements of the Gini coefficient of galaxy light distributions. This statistic is easy to measure and is commonly used in econometrics to measure how wealth is distributed in human populations. When applied to galaxy images, the Gini coefficient provides a quantitative measure of the inequality with which a galaxy's light is distributed amongst its constituent pixels. We measure the Gini coefficient of local galaxies in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and demonstrate that this quantity is closely correlated with measurements of central concentration, but with significant scatter. This scatter is almost entirely due to variations in the mean surface brightness of galaxies. By exploring the distribution of galaxies in the three-dimensional parameter space defined by the Gini coefficient, central concentration, and mean surface brightness, we show that all nearby galaxies lie on a well-defined two-dimen...

  7. A High Stellar Velocity Dispersion and ~100 Globular Clusters for the Ultra-diffuse Galaxy Dragonfly 44

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Abraham, Roberto; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Danieli, Shany; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Romanowsky, Aaron; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-09-01

    Recently a population of large, very low surface brightness, spheroidal galaxies was identified in the Coma cluster. The apparent survival of these ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a rich cluster suggests that they have very high masses. Here, we present the stellar kinematics of Dragonfly 44, one of the largest Coma UDGs, using a 33.5 hr integration with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope. We find a velocity dispersion of σ ={47}-6+8 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which implies a dynamical mass of {M}{dyn}(\\lt {r}1/2)={0.7}-0.2+0.3× {10}10 {M}ȯ within its deprojected half-light radius of {r}1/2=4.6+/- 0.2 {kpc}. The mass-to-light ratio is M/{L}I(\\lt {r}1/2)={48}-14+21 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , and the dark matter fraction is 98% within {r}1/2. The high mass of Dragonfly 44 is accompanied by a large globular cluster population. From deep Gemini imaging taken in 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 4 seeing we infer that Dragonfly 44 has {94}-20+25 globular clusters, similar to the counts for other galaxies in this mass range. Our results add to other recent evidence that many UDGs are “failed” galaxies, with the sizes, dark matter content, and globular cluster systems of much more luminous objects. We estimate the total dark halo mass of Dragonfly 44 by comparing the amount of dark matter within r=4.6 {kpc} to enclosed mass profiles of NFW halos. The enclosed mass suggests a total mass of ∼ {10}12 {M}ȯ , similar to the mass of the Milky Way. The existence of nearly dark objects with this mass is unexpected, as galaxy formation is thought to be maximally efficient in this regime.

  8. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Troughs in DES Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D. [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany). et al.

    2015-09-29

    We measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ–15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. Furthermore, the prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. Finally, the lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.

  9. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Consolandi, Guido; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness profiles and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS that represents 25% of all Local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g =0.35R{Pet})) zone, and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, consistently with the growing relevance of a...

  10. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog I: 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Brimacombe, J.; Bersier, D.; Bishop, D. W.; Dong, Subo; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G. V.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Falco, E.; Pojmanski, G.; Skowron, D. M.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Guo, Zhen; Herczeg, G. J.; Hissong, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Jose, J.; Kiyota, S.; Long, Feng; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present basic statistics for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during its first year-and-a-half of operations, spanning 2013 and 2014. We also present the same information for all other bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered from 2014 May 1 through the end of 2014, providing a comparison to the ASAS-SN sample starting from the point where ASAS-SN became operational in both hemispheres. In addition, we present collected redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes, where available, for all host galaxies of the bright supernovae in both samples. This work represents a comprehensive catalog of bright supernovae and their hosts from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were not previously possible because the all-sky emphasis of ASAS-SN redresses many previously existing biases. In particular, ASAS-SN systematically finds bright supernovae closer to the centers of host galaxies than either other professional surveys or amateurs, a remarkable result given ASAS-SN's poorer angular resolution. This is the first of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts that will be released by the ASAS-SN team.

  11. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  12. Galaxies Probing Galaxies: Cool Halo Gas from a z = 0.47 Post-Starburst Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kate H. R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2010-03-01

    We study the cool gas around a galaxy at z = 0.4729 using Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a bright (B = 21.7) background galaxy at z = 0.6942 at a transverse distance of 16.5h -1 70 kpc. The background galaxy spectrum reveals strong Fe II, Mg II, Mg I, and Ca II absorption at the redshift of the foreground galaxy, with an Mg II λ2796 rest equivalent width of 3.93 ± 0.08 Å, indicative of a velocity width exceeding 400 km s-1. Because the background galaxy is large (>4h -1 70 kpc), the high covering fraction of the absorbing gas suggests that it arises in a spatially extended complex of cool clouds with large velocity dispersion. Spectroscopy of the massive (log M */M sun = 11.15 ± 0.08) host galaxy reveals that it experienced a burst of star formation about 1 Gyr ago and that it harbors a weak active galactic nucleus. We discuss the possible origins of the cool gas in its halo, including multiphase cooling of hot halo gas, cold inflow, tidal interactions, and galactic winds. We conclude that the absorbing gas was most likely ejected or tidally stripped from the interstellar medium of the host galaxy or its progenitors during the past starburst event. Adopting the latter interpretation, these results place one of only a few constraints on the radial extent of cool gas driven or stripped from a galaxy in the distant universe. Future studies with integral field unit spectroscopy of spatially extended background galaxies will provide multiple sight lines through foreground absorbers and permit analysis of the morphology and kinematics of the gas surrounding galaxies with a diverse set of properties and environments. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Searching the Sky for the Brightest Galaxies in the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven

    We propose to analyze a Spitzer/IRAC survey of nine independent sight-lines in the sky which have been identified to host plausible candidates for the brightest galaxies in the z > 9 universe. While the z > 9 universe is still a vast unknown, tremendous progress has been made with ultra-deep surveys such as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. However, these data only constrain the faint-end of the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function, while the bright-end is largely unconstrained. Attempts to search for bright z > 9 galaxies in the few well-studied deep fields have been met with discrepant results, dominated by cosmic variance uncertainties. We searched 80 fields from two Hubble Space Telescope pure parallel surveys for bright z > 9 galaxies, and found 16 candidates. However, the available imaging cannot discern between true z > 9 galaxies, and passive/dusty z~2.5 galaxies. The addition of IRAC imaging at 3.6um unambiguously breaks this degeneracy. Using a recently approved allocation of 77.2 hours of IRAC imaging over these nine fields, we will build the most robust sample of bright z > 9 galaxies. This dataset will place stringent constraints on the abundance of bright z~9 galaxies, robust against cosmic variance, which can be used to constrain the physics behind galaxy evolution in the distant universe. These observations will also roughly double the number of massive, UV bright galaxies at z=8, allowing us to increase the fidelity of the presently very rough z=8 stellar mass function. These observations highlight the remarkable utility of this 80cm telescope for studying galaxies at a time only 500 Myr removed from the Big Bang.

  14. Searching for Evidence of Energetic Feedback in Distant Galaxies: A Galaxy Wide Outflow in a z~2 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, D M; Smail, I; McDermid, R; Nesvadba, N

    2009-01-01

    Leading models of galaxy formation require large-scale energetic outflows to regulate the growth of distant galaxies and their central black holes. However, current observational support for this hypothesis at high redshift is mostly limited to rare z>2 radio galaxies. Here we present Gemini-North NIFS Intregral Field Unit (IFU) observations of the [OIII] emission from a z~2 ultraluminous infrared galaxy (L_IR>10^12 solar luminosities) with an optically identified Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). The spatial extent (~4-8 kpc) of the high velocity and broad [OIII] emission are consistent with that found in z>2 radio galaxies, indicating the presence of a large-scale energetic outflow in a galaxy population potentially orders of magnitude more common than distant radio galaxies. The low radio luminosity of this system indicates that radio-bright jets are unlikely to be responsible for driving the outflow. However, the estimated energy input required to produce the large-scale outflow signatures (of order ~10^59 e...

  15. Bright Times for an Ancient Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, K.; Chini, R.

    2017-01-01

    Field stars of Population II are among the oldest sources in the Galaxy. Most of their solar-type dwarfs are non-single and, given their extreme age, a significant fraction is accompanied by stellar remnants. Here we report the discovery of the bright F7V star 49 Lib as a massive and very metal-rich Population II field blue straggler, along with evidence for a white dwarf as its dark and unseen companion. 49 Lib is known as a relatively fast-rotating, single-lined spectroscopic binary in a 3 year orbit and with an apparent age of about τ ≃ 2.3 Gyr. Its chemistry and kinematics, however, both consistently imply that 49 Lib must be an ancient Population II star at τ ≃ 12 Gyr. With reference to the inclination from the astrometric orbit, leading to a {M}{WD}={0.50}-0.04+0.03 M⊙ low-mass white dwarf, and in view of the {M}{BS}={1.55}-0.13+0.07 M⊙ massive, evolved F-type blue straggler star, we demonstrate that 49 Lib must have been the subject of a mostly conservative mass transfer with a near-equal-mass M ≃ 1.06 + 1.00 M⊙ G-type binary at birth. For its future evolution, we point to the possibility as a progenitor system toward a type Ia supernova. Most importantly, however, we note that the remarkable metal enrichment of 49 Lib at [Mg/H] = +0.23 and [Fe/H] = ‑0.11 has principally very relevant implications for the early epoch when the Milky Way came into being.

  16. MgII Absorption through Intermediate Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Steidel, C C; Churchill, Christopher W.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2005-01-01

    The current status and remaining questions of MgII absorbers are reviewed with an eye toward new results incorporating high quality Hubble Space Telescope images of the absorbing galaxies. In the end, we find that our current picture of extended gaseous regions around galaxies at earlier epochs is in need of some revision; MgII absorbing "halos" appear to be patchier and their geometry less regular than previously inferred. We also find that the so-called "weak" MgII absorbers are associated with normal galaxies over a wide range of impact parameters, suggesting that this class of absorber does not strictly select low surface brightness, dwarf galaxies, or IGM material. We emphasize the need for a complete survey of the galaxies in quasar fields, and the importance of obtaining rotation curves of confirmed absorbing galaxies.

  17. Environment of MAMBO galaxies in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris L; Schinnerer, Eva; McCracken, Henry J; Salvato, Mara; Riechers, Dominik; Sheth, Kartik; Smolcic, Vernesa; Capak, Peter; Koekemoer, Anton; Menten, Karl M

    2009-01-01

    Submillimeter galaxies (SMG) represent a dust-obscured high-redshift population undergoing massive star formation activity. Their properties and space density have suggested that they may evolve into spheroidal galaxies residing in galaxy clusters. In this paper, we report the discovery of compact (~10"-20") galaxy overdensities centered at the position of three SMGs detected with the Max-Planck Millimeter Bolometer camera (MAMBO) in the COSMOS field. These associations are statistically significant. The photometric redshifts of galaxies in these structures are consistent with their associated SMGs; all of them are between z=1.4-2.5, implying projected physical sizes of ~170 kpc for the overdensities. Our results suggest that about 30% of the radio-identified bright SMGs in that redshift range form in galaxy density peaks in the crucial epoch when most stars formed.

  18. IPC two-color analysis of x ray galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1990-01-01

    The mass distributions were determined of several clusters of galaxies by using X ray surface brightness data from the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Determining cluster mass distributions is important for constraining the nature of the dark matter which dominates the mass of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the Universe. Galaxy clusters are permeated with hot gas in hydrostatic equilibrium with the gravitational potentials of the clusters. Cluster mass distributions can be determined from x ray observations of cluster gas by using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium and knowledge of the density and temperature structure of the gas. The x ray surface brightness at some distance from the cluster is the result of the volume x ray emissivity being integrated along the line of sight in the cluster.

  19. [Blood Count Specimen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takako

    2015-12-01

    The circulating blood volume accounts for 8% of the body weight, of which 45% comprises cellular components (blood cells) and 55% liquid components. We can measure the number and morphological features of blood cells (leukocytes, red blood cells, platelets), or count the amount of hemoglobin in a complete blood count: (CBC). Blood counts are often used to detect inflammatory diseases such as infection, anemia, a bleeding tendency, and abnormal cell screening of blood disease. This count is widely used as a basic data item of health examination. In recent years, clinical tests before consultation have become common among outpatient clinics, and the influence of laboratory values on consultation has grown. CBC, which is intended to count the number of raw cells and to check morphological features, is easily influenced by the environment, techniques, etc., during specimen collection procedures and transportation. Therefore, special attention is necessary to read laboratory data. Providing correct test values that accurately reflect a patient's condition from the laboratory to clinical side is crucial. Inappropriate medical treatment caused by erroneous values resulting from altered specimens should be avoided. In order to provide correct test values, the daily management of devices is a matter of course, and comprehending data variables and positively providing information to the clinical side are important. In this chapter, concerning sampling collection, blood collection tubes, dealing with specimens, transportation, and storage, I will discuss their effects on CBC, along with management or handling methods.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara C.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Turner, Jean L.

    1987-01-01

    The Brackett alpha and beta lines with 7.2 seconds angular and 350 km/s velocity resolution were observed in 11 infrared-bright galaxies. From these measurements extinctions, Lyman continuum fluxes, and luminosities due to OB stars were derived. The galaxies observed to date are NGC3690, M38, NGC 5195, Arp 220, NGC 520, NGC660, NGC1614, NGC 3079, NGC 6946, NGC 7714, and Maffei 2, all of which were suggested at some time to be starburst ogjects. The contributions of OB stars to the luminosities of these galaxies can be quantified from the measurements and range from insignificant to sufficient to account for the total energy output. The OB stellar luminosities observed are as high as 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the galaxy NGC 1614. It is noteworthy that star formation can play very different roles in the infrared energy output of galaxies of similar luminosity, as for example Arp 220 and NGC 1614. In addition to probing the star formation process in these galaxies, the Brackett line measurements, when compared to radio and infrared continuum results, have revealed some unexpected and at present imperfectly understood phenomena: in some very luminous sources the radio continuum appears to be suppressed relative to the infrared recombination lines; in many galaxies there is a substantial excess of 10 micron flux over that predicted from simple models of Lyman alpha heating of dust if young stars are the only significant energy source.