WorldWideScience

Sample records for bright galactic sources

  1. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...... evidence for variation at known and candidate periods is seen for Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, and GX 17+2. We set upper limits for variation at other frequencies in those three sources, GX 5-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  2. Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the Fermi Bright Galactic Sources with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2009-01-01

    Using the Tibet-III air shower array, we search for TeV gamma-rays from 27 potential Galactic sources in the early list of bright sources obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies above 100 MeV. Among them, we observe 7 sources instead of the expected 0.61 sources at a significance of 2 sigma or more excess. The chance probability from Poisson statistics would be estimated to be 3.8 x 10^-6. If the excess distribution observed by the Tibet-III array has a density gradient toward the Galactic plane, the expected number of sources may be enhanced in chance association. Then, the chance probability rises slightly, to 1.2 x 10^-5, based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. These low chance probabilities clearly show that the Fermi bright Galactic sources have statistically significant correlations with TeV gamma-ray excesses. We also find that all 7 sources are associated with pulsars, and 6 of them are coincident with sources detected by the Milagro experiment at a significance of 3 sigma or more at ...

  3. A search for VHE counterparts of Galactic Fermi bright sources and GeV to TeV spectral characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H Thomas; Tibolla, Omar; Chaves, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Very high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-rays have been detected from a wide range of astronomical objects, such as SNRs, pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray binaries, molecular clouds, and possibly star-forming regions as well. At lower energies, sources detected using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard Fermi provide a rich set of data which can be used to study the behaviour of cosmic accelerators in the GeV to TeV energy bands. In particular, the improved angular resolution in both bands compared to previous instruments significantly reduces source confusion and facilitates the identification of associated counterparts at lower energies. In this paper, a comprehensive search for VHE gamma-ray sources which are spatially coincident with Galactic Fermi/LAT bright sources is performed, and the available GeV to TeV spectra of coincident sources are compared. It is found that bright LAT GeV sources are correlated to TeV sources, in contrast to previous studies using EGRET data. ...

  4. BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCE LIST FROM THE FIRST THREE MONTHS OF THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ALL-SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first three months of sky-survey operation with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveal 132 bright sources at |b|>10 deg. with test statistic greater than 100 (corresponding to about 10σ). Two methods, based on the CGRaBS, CRATES, and BZCat catalogs, indicate high-confidence associations of 106 of these sources with known active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This sample is referred to as the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). It contains two radio galaxies, namely, Centaurus A and NGC 1275, and 104 blazars consisting of 58 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 42 BL Lac objects, and 4 blazars with unknown classification. Four new blazars were discovered on the basis of the LAT detections. Remarkably, the LBAS includes 10 high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), sources which were previously difficult to detect in the GeV range. Another 10 lower-confidence associations are found. Only 33 of the sources, plus two at |b| < 10 deg., were previously detected with Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope(EGRET), probably due to variability. The analysis of the γ-ray properties of the LBAS sources reveals that the average GeV spectra of BL Lac objects are significantly harder than the spectra of FSRQs. No significant correlation between radio and peak γ-ray fluxes is observed. Blazar log N-log S distributions and luminosity functions are constructed to investigate the evolution of the different blazar classes, with positive evolution indicated for FSRQs but none for BL Lacs. The contribution of LAT blazars to the total extragalactic γ-ray intensity is estimated.

  5. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). II. Discovery of 40 Bright Quasars Near the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Myungshin; Cho, Yunseok; Choi, Changsu; Ko, Jongwan; Song, Mimi

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of 40 bright quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at low Galactic latitude (b<20deg). The low Galactic latitude region has been considered a place to avoid when searching for extragalactic sources, because of the high Galactic extinction, as well as a large number of stars contaminating the sample selection. Bright quasars (R<~17) suffer more from such difficulties because they look like bright stars, which are numerous at low b, yet their surface number density is very low. In order to find quasars in this region of the sky less explored for extragalactic sources, we have started a survey of low Galactic latitude bright quasars as a part of the Seoul National University Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO). Quasar candidates have been selected from radio and near-infrared (NIR) data. Out of 88 targets, we identify 29 bright quasars/AGNs around the antigalactic center, and 11 bright quasars/AGNs in the outskirts of the Galactic center, from two observing runs in 2006 at the Boh...

  6. High brightness electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy physics accelerators and free electron lasers put increased demands on the electron beam sources. This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams using photoinjectors. Recent results from the experimental programs will be given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers will be discussed, and the following topics will be covered. Progress has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency. Cesium telluride has demonstrated significantly longer lifetimes than cesium antimonide at 10-8 torr. However, the laser system is more difficult because cesium telluride requires quadrupled YLF instead of the doubled YLF required for cesium antimonide. The difficulty in using photoinjectors is primarily the drive laser, in particular the amplitude stability. Finally, emittance measurements of photoinjector systems can be complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam. An example of the difficulty in measuring beam emittance is given

  7. The EUVE bright source list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroozas, B.; Mcdonald, K.; Antia, B.; Mcdonald, J.; Wiercigroch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial results for bright extreme ultraviolet sources discovered during the EUVE all-sky and deep ecliptic surveys have been published as a Bright Source List (BSL) and released to the astronomical community with a recent NASA research announcement (NRA 93-OSS-02, Appendix F). This paper describes the data processing software, the EUVE survey data set, and the production of the BSL at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The contents, format, and selection criteria for sources, the data processing strategy, some problems encountered, and a summary of the BSL results are presented.

  8. Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Active Galactic Nuclei II: Frequency Phase Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Sin-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Soon-Wook; Kino, Motoki; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Park, Jong-Ho; Trippe, Sascha; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Active galactic nuclei (iMOGABA) program provides not only simultaneous multifrequency observations of bright gamma-ray detected active galactic nuclei (AGN), but also covers the highest Very Large Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frequencies ever being systematically monitored, up to 129 GHz. However, observation and imaging of weak sources at the highest observed frequencies is very challenging. In the second paper in this series, we evaluate the viability of the frequency phase transfer technique to iMOGABA in order to obtain larger coherence time at the higher frequencies of this program (86 and 129 GHz) and image additional sources that were not detected using standard techniques. We find that this method is applicable to the iMOGABA program even under non-optimal weather conditions.

  9. Recent star formation in the inner Galactic Bulge seen by ISOGAL. I - Classification of bright mid-IR sources in a test field

    CERN Document Server

    Schuller, F; Glass, I S; Omont, A; Price, S D; Schultheis, M

    2006-01-01

    Context: The stellar populations in the central region of the Galaxy are poorly known because of the high visual extinction and very great source density in this direction. Aims: To use recent infrared surveys for studying the dusty stellar objects in this region. Methods: We analyse the content of a 20x20 arcmin^2 field centred at (l,b)=(-0.27,-0.06) observed at 7 and 15 microns as part of the ISOGAL survey. These ISO observations are more than an order of magnitude better in sensitivity and spatial resolution than the IRAS observations. The sources are cross-associated with other catalogues to identify various types of objects. We then derive criteria to distinguish young objects from post-main sequence stars. Results: We find that a sample of about 50 young stellar objects and ultra-compact HII regions emerges, out of a population of evolved AGB stars. We demonstrate that the sources colours and spatial extents, as they appear in the ISOGAL catalogue, possibly complemented with MSX photometry at 21 microns...

  10. Development of a high brightness ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightness and emittance of an ion beam can depend on the ion temperature, aberrations and scattering, as well as other factors. However, it is the ion temperature which determines the irreducible minimum value of the emittance and hence brightness, as the other components can be eliminated by careful design. An ion source design is presented which has attained this minimum value for the emittance; the dependence of the ion temperature on the plasma source parameters is discussed

  11. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  12. Variable Radio Sources in the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Robert H; White, Richard L; Proctor, Deanne D

    2010-01-01

    Using three epochs of VLA observations of the Galactic Plane in the first quadrant taken ~15 years apart, we have conducted a search for a population of variable Galactic radio emitters in the flux density range 1-100 mJy at 6 cm. We find 39 variable sources in a total survey area of 23.2 sq deg. Correcting for various selection effects and for the extragalactic variable population of active galactic nuclei, we conclude there are ~1.6 Galactic sources per sq deg which vary by more than 50% on a time scale of years (or shorter). We show that these sources are much more highly variable than extragalactic objects; more than 50% show variability by a factor >2 compared to <10% for extragalactic objects in the same flux density range. We also show that the fraction of variable sources increases toward the Galactic center (another indication that this is a Galactic population), and that the spectral indices of many of these sources are flat or inverted. A small number of the variables are coincident with mid-IR ...

  13. Studies of IRAS sources at high galactic latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    530 IRAS sources have been identified from a complete sample, flux limited at S(60 μm)=0.5 Jy, in an area of sky covering 844 square degrees at the North Galactic Pole. After exclusion of 34 bright stars, 99 per cent of the remainder coincide with galaxies, mostly in the magnitude range 14-17, but with a tail of faint objects. Spectroscopic observations have been made of candidates for 183 IRAS sources. Together with published data, redshifts are now available for two overlapping complete sub-samples, totalling 303 galaxies. (author)

  14. Hypernovae as possible sources of Galactic positrons

    OpenAIRE

    Schanne, Stephane; Casse, Michel; Cordier, Bertrand; Paul, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    INTEGRAL/SPI has recently observed a strong and extended emission resulting from electron-positron annihilation located in the Galactic center region, consistent with the Galactic bulge geometry, without any counterpart at high gamma-ray energies, nor in the 1809 keV $^{26}$Al decay line. In order to explain the rate of positron injection in the Galactic bulge, estimated to more than 10$^{43}$ s$^{-1}$, the most commonly considered positron injection sources are type Ia supernovae. However, S...

  15. Surface Brightness Profiles of Galactic Globular Clusters from Hubble Space Telescope Images

    CERN Document Server

    Noyola, E

    2006-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope allows us to study the central surface brightness profiles for globular clusters at unprecedented detail. We have mined the HST archives to obtain 38 WFPC2 images of galactic globular clusters with adequate exposure times and filters, which we use to measure their central structure. We outline a reliable method to obtain surface brightness profiles from integrated light that we test on an extensive set of simulated images. Most clusters have central surface brightness about 0.5 mag brighter than previous measurements made from ground-based data, with the largest differences around 2 magnitudes. Including the uncertainties in the slope estimates, the surface brightness slope distribution is consistent with half of the sample having flat cores and the remaining half showing a gradual decline from 0 to -0.8 (dlog(Sigma)/dlogr). We deproject the surface brightness profiles in a non-parametric way to obtain luminosity density profiles. The distribution of luminosity density logarithmic slope...

  16. VARIABLE RADIO SOURCES IN THE GALACTIC PLANE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using three epochs of Very Large Array observations of the Galactic plane in the first quadrant taken ∼15 years apart, we have conducted a search for a population of variable Galactic radio emitters in the flux density range 1-100 mJy at 6 cm. We find 39 variable sources in a total survey area of 23.2 deg2. Correcting for various selection effects and for the extragalactic variable population of active galactic nuclei, we conclude there are ∼1.6 deg-2 Galactic sources which vary by more than 50% on a time scale of years (or shorter). We show that these sources are much more highly variable than extragalactic objects; more than 50% show variability by a factor >2 compared to <10% for extragalactic objects in the same flux density range. We also show that the fraction of variable sources increases toward the Galactic center (another indication that this is a Galactic population), and that the spectral indices of many of these sources are flat or inverted. A small number of the variables are coincident with mid-IR sources and two are coincident with X-ray emitters, but most have no known counterparts at other wavelengths. Intriguingly, one lies at the center of a supernova remnant, while another appears to be a very compact planetary nebula; several are likely to represent activity associated with star formation regions. We discuss the possible source classes which could contribute to the variable cohort and follow-up observations which could clarify the nature of these sources.

  17. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  18. Considerations for high-brightness electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators are now used in many areas of physics research and in industrial and medical applications. New uses are being studied to address major societal needs in energy production, materials research, generation of intense beams of radiation at optical and suboptical wavelengths, treatment of various kinds of waste, and so on. Many of these modern applications require a high intensity beam at the desired energy, along with a very good beam quality in terms of the beam confinement, aiming, or focusing. Considerations for ion and electron accelerators are often different, but there are also many commonalties, and in fact, techniques derived for one should perhaps more often be considered for the other as well. We discuss some aspects of high-brightness electron sources here from that point of view. 6 refs

  19. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  20. Monitoring of bright, nearby Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    R. Wagner; Backes, M.; Satalecka, K.; Bonnoli, G.; M. Doert(); B. Steinke(Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München, Germany); Strah, N.; Terzic, T.; Tescaro, D.; Uellenbeck, M.; The MAGIC Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Observations and detections of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) by Cherenkov telescopes are often triggered by information about high flux states in other wavelength bands. To overcome this bias, the VHE gamma-ray telescope MAGIC has conducted dedicated monitoring observations of nearby AGN since 2006. Three well established, TeV-bright blazars were selected to be observed regularly: Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES1959+650. The goals of these observations are to obtain an unbiased distribution of flux ...

  1. Galactic Cosmic Rays: From Earth to Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Theresa J.

    2012-01-01

    For nearly 100 years we have known that cosmic rays come from outer space, yet proof of their origin, as well as a comprehensive understanding of their acceleration, remains elusive. Direct detection of high energy (up to 10(exp 15)eV), charged nuclei with experiments such as the balloon-born, antarctic Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) have provided insight into these mysteries through measurements of cosmic ray abundances. The abundance of these rare elements with respect to certain intrinsic properties suggests that cosmic rays include a component of massive star ejecta. Supernovae and their remnants (SNe & SNRs), often occurring at the end of a massive star's life or in an environment including massive star material, are one of the most likely candidates for sources accelerating galactic comic ray nuclei up to the requisite high energies. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Detector (Fermi LAT) has improved our understanding of such sources by widening the window of observable energies and thus into potential sources' energetic processes. In combination with multiwavelength observations, we are now better able to constrain particle populations (often hadron-dominated at GeV energies) and environmental conditions, such as the magnetic field strength. The SNR CTB 37A is one such source which could contribute to the observed galactic cosmic rays. By assembling populations of SNRs, we will be able to more definitively define their contribution to the observed galactic cosmic rays, as well as better understand SNRs themselves. Such multimessenger studies will thus illuminate the long-standing cosmic ray mysteries, shedding light on potential sources, acceleration mechanisms, and cosmic ray propagation.

  2. Statistical study of galactic SNR source spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadband modeling of 24 Galactic supernova remnants was performed using a model to test the SNRs for hadronically generated γ-rays by examining combined spectra of π0-decay, bremsstrahlung, inverse compton, and synchrotron radiation. This is the first statistical study of the resulting source spectra, which are reviewed respectively to ascertain the origin of the gamma radiation. This allows a combined review to test the current prepositions of particle acceleration.

  3. Extra galactic sources of high energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the construction of large volume, high energy neutrino telescopes is the detection of extra-Galactic neutrino sources. The existence of such sources is implied by observations of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, cosmic-rays (UHECRs), the origin of which is a mystery. The observed UHECR flux sets an upper bound to the extra-Galactic high energy neutrino intensity, which implies that the detector size required to detect the signal in the energy range of 1 TeV to 1 PeV is >=1 giga-ton, and much larger at higher energy. Optical Cerenkov neutrino detectors, currently being constructed under ice and water, are expected to achieve 1 giga-ton effective volume for 1 TeV to 1 PeV neutrinos. Coherent radio Cerenkov detectors (and possibly large air-shower detectors) will provide the >> 1 giga-ton effective volume required for detection at ~10^{19} eV. Detection of high energy neutrinos associated with electromagnetically identified sources will allow to identify the sources of UHECRs, will provide a uniq...

  4. The Relation Between the Surface Brightness and the Diameter for Galactic Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Guseinov, O H; Sezer, A; Tagieva, S O; Guseinov, Oktay H.; Ankay, Askin; Sezer, Aytap; Tagieva, Sevinc O.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have constructed a relation between the surface brightness ($\\Sigma$) and diameter (D) of Galactic C- and S-type supernova remnants (SNRs). In order to calibrate the $\\Sigma$-D dependence, we have carefully examined some intrinsic (e.g. explosion energy) and extrinsic (e.g. density of the ambient medium) properties of the remnants and, taking into account also the distance values given in the literature, we have adopted distances for some of the SNRs which have relatively more reliable distance values. These calibrator SNRs are all C- and S-type SNRs, i.e. F-type SNRs (and S-type SNR Cas A which has an exceptionally high surface brightness) are excluded. The Sigma-D relation has 2 slopes with a turning point at D=36.5 pc: $\\Sigma$(at 1 GHz)=8.4$^{+19.5}_{-6.3}

  5. The MWA GLEAM 4 Jy sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C. A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Seymour, N.; White, S. V.; Murphy, T.; Salder, E. M.; Callingham, J. R.; Hunstead, R. W.; Hughes, J.; Wall, J. V.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapinska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first- user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  6. The MWA GLEAM 4Jy Sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, C A; Seymour, N; White, S V; Murphy, Tara; Sadler, E M; Callingham, J R; Hunstead, R W; Hughes, J; Wall, J V; Bell, M E; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B-Q; Gaensler, B M; Hancock, P J; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Morgan, J; Offringa, A R; Procopio, P; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  7. Galactic and extragalactic Fast X-ray Transient sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast X-ray Transients (FXTs) have long been an enigma in x-ray astronomy. These non-recurrent and bright x-ray sources, lasting up to a day and without quiescent x-ray emission, have been studied with the Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) during the 6 years of operational life of BeppoSAX. They were among the prime motivations for building the instrument. The WFC observations allow for the determination of duration, lightcurves and spectra, while the positional information is sufficiently good to search for counterparts. The results show the heterogeneous nature of FXTs. If we exclude the x-ray counterparts of Gamma Ray Bursts, at least two types can be distinguished, both seen at high galactic latitude with a spatial distribution consistent with isotropy. A galactic population of FXTs has a typical duration of an hour and is associated with stellar sources exhibiting coronal activity. An extragalactic population of FXTs, called X-ray Flashes, has a duration of order minutes. They are explosive events whose origin has most likely a connection with the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts. Recently the first spectroscopic distance determination from the optical afterglow of an X-ray Flash has been found at z=0.25. These results, together with recent developments in GRBs, indicate a two component cosmic explosion in which the prompt ultra-relativistic γ-ray energy can be minor, whereas the total energy release of the explosion is similar in XRFs and GRBs

  8. Mini-spiral as source of material for Sgr A* in bright state

    CERN Document Server

    Czerny, Bozena; Kunneriath, Devaky; Das, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    The question of the origin of the gas supplying the accretion process is pertinent especially in the context of enhanced activity of Galactic Center during the past few hundred years, seen now as echo from the surrounding molecular clouds, and the currently observed new cloud approaching Sgr A*. We discuss the so-called Galactic Center mini-spiral as a possible source of material feeding the supermassive black hole on a 0.1 parsec scale. The collisions between individual clumps reduce their angular momentum. and set some of the clumps on a plunging trajectory. We conclude that the amount of material contained in the mini-spiral is sufficient to sustain the luminosity of Sgr A* at the required level. The accretion episodes of relatively dense gas from the mini-spiral passing through a transient ring mode at $\\sim 10^4$ Rg provide a viable scenario for the bright phase of Galactic Center.

  9. The VSOP 5 GHz Active Galactic Nucleus Survey: V. Imaging Results for the Remaining 140 sources

    CERN Document Server

    Dodson, R; Wiik, K; Horiuchi, S; Hirabayashi, H; Edwards, P G; Murata, Y; Asaki, Y; Moellenbrock, G A; Scott, W K; Taylor, A R; Gurvits, L I; Paragi, Z; Frey, S; Shen, Z -Q; Lovell, J E J; Tingay, S J; Rioja, M J; Fodor, S; Lister, M L; Mosoni, L; Coldwell, G; Piner, B G; Yang, J

    2007-01-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) mission. Approximately twenty-five percent of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP Survey of bright compact Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in Paper III, which contained 102 sources. For most sources, the plots of the uv-coverage, the visibility amplitude versus uv-distance, and the high resolution image are presented. Model fit parameters to the major radio components are determined, and the brightness temperature of the core component for each source is calculated. The brightness temperature distributions for all of the sources in the VSOP AGN survey are discussed.

  10. A Statistical Analysis of Point-like Sources in the Chandra Galactic Center Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.F.Wu; S.N.Zhang; F.J.Lu; Y.K.Jin

    2007-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Center Survey detected ~ 800 X-ray point-like sources in the 2°× 0.8° sky region around the Galactic Center. We study the spatial and luminosity distributions of these sources according to their spectral properties. Fourteen bright sources detected are used to fit jointly an absorbed power-law model, from which the power-law photon index is determined to be ~2.5. Assuming that all other sources have the same power-law form, the relation between hardness ratio and HI column density NH is used to estimate the NH values for all sources. Monte Carlo simulations show that these sources are more likely concentrated in the Galactic center region, rather than distributed throughout the Galactic disk. We also find that the luminosities of the sources are positively correlated with their HI column densities, i.e., a more luminous source has a higher HI column density. From this relation, we suggest that the X-ray luminosity comes from the interaction between an isolated old neutron star and interstellar medium (mainly dense molecular clouds). Using the standard Bondi accretion theory and the statistical information of molecular clouds in the Galactic center, we confirm this positive correlation and calculate the luminosity range in this scenario,which is consistent with the observation (1032 - 1035 erg s-1).

  11. The Mysterious Galactic Center Radio Source N3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Dominic; Lang, Cornelia C.; Morris, Mark; Lucien Mutel, Robert; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Toomey, James E.; Ott, Juergen

    2016-06-01

    Here we report on new, multi-wavelength radio observations of the mysterious point source "N3" that appears to be located in the vicinity of the Galactic Center. VLA observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is a compact and bright non-thermal source (56 mJy at 10 GHz) which is superimposed upon the non-thermal radio filaments (NTFs) of the Radio Arc. Our highest frequency observations place a strict upper limit of 65x28 milli-arcseconds on the size of this source. We compare our observations to those of Yusef-Zadeh (1987) and Lang (1997) and conclude that N3 is variable over long time scales. Additionally, we present the detection of a compact molecular cloud located adjacent to N3 in projection. CH3CN, CH3OH, CS, HC3N, HNCO, SiO, SO, and NH3 are detected in the cloud and most transitions have FWHM line widths of ~20 km s-1. The rotational temperature determined from the metastable NH3 transitions ranges from 79 K to 183 K depending on the transitions used and the location in the cloud. We present evidence that this molecular cloud is interacting with N3. After exploring the relationship between the NTFs, molecular cloud, and N3, we conclude that N3 likely lies within the Galactic Center. While we are able to rule out many possible physical counterparts, including an active star, HII region, young supernova, AGN, and microquasar, further observations will be required to determine the true nature of this mysterious source.

  12. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  13. A Survey of UV Bright Sources Behind the Halo of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Fittingoff, Andrew; Kalirai, Jasonjot S; Strader, Jay; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaplan, Kyle F

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a wide-area ultraviolet (UV) imaging survey using the GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) to search for bright, point-like UV sources behind M31's extended halo. Our survey consisted of 46 pointings covering an effective area of ~50 deg^2, in both the far-UV and near-UV channels. We combined these data with optical R-band observations acquired with the WIYN Mosaic-1 imager on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 0.9m WIYN telescope. An analysis of the brightness and colors of sources matched between our photometric catalogs yielded ~100 UV-bright quasar candidates. We have obtained discovery spectra for 76 of these targets with the Kast spectrometer on the Lick 3m telescope and confirm 30 active galactic nuclei and quasars, 29 galaxies at z > 0.02 including several early-type systems, 16 Galactic stars (hot main-sequence stars), and one featureless source previously identified as a BL Lac object. Future UV spectroscopy of the brightest targets with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble S...

  14. A powerful bursting radio source towards the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Hyman, S D; Kassim, N E; Ray, P S; Markwardt, C B; Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2005-01-01

    Transient astronomical sources are typically powered by compact objects and usually signify highly explosive or dynamic events. While radio astronomy has an impressive record of obtaining high time resolution observations, usually it is achieved in quite narrow fields-of-view. Consequently, the dynamic radio sky is poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X- and gamma-ray bands in which wide-field instruments routinely detect transient sources. Here we report a new transient source, GCRT J1745-3009, detected in 2002 during a moderately wide-field radio transient monitoring program of the Galactic center (GC) region at 0.33 GHz. The characteristics of its bursts are unlike those known for any other class of radio transient. If located in or near the GC, its brightness temperature (~10^16 K) and the implied energy density within GCRT J1745-3009 vastly exceeds that observed in most other classes of radio astronomical sources, and is consistent with coherent emission processes rarely observed. We concl...

  15. Point Sources from a Spitzer IRAC Survey of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, Solange V; Sellgren, Kris; Stolovy, Susan R; Cotera, Angela; Smith, Howard A; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2007-01-01

    We have obtained Spitzer/IRAC observations of the central 2.0 x 1.4 degrees (~280 x 200 pc) of the Galaxy at 3.6-8.0 microns. A point source catalog of 1,065,565 objects is presented. The catalog includes magnitudes for the point sources at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns, as well as JHK photometry from 2MASS. The point source catalog is confusion limited with average limits of 12.4, 12.1, 11.7, and 11.2 magnitudes for [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0], respectively. We find that the confusion limits are spatially variable because of stellar surface density, background surface brightness level, and extinction variations across the survey region. The overall distribution of point source density with Galactic latitude and longitude is essentially constant, but structure does appear when sources of different magnitude ranges are selected. Bright stars show a steep decreasing gradient with Galactic latitude, and a slow decreasing gradient with Galactic longitude, with a peak at the position of the Galactic center. Fr...

  16. BLACK HOLE MASS LIMITS FOR OPTICALLY DARK X-RAY BRIGHT SOURCES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of the black hole mass in bright X-ray sources of nearby galaxies is crucial to the understanding of these systems and their formation. However, the present allowed black hole mass range spans five orders of magnitude (10 Msun 5 Msun) with the upper limit obtained from dynamical friction arguments. We show that the absence of a detectable optical counterpart for some of these sources can provide a much more stringent upper limit. The argument is based only on the assumption that the outer regions of their accretion disks are a standard one. Moreover, such optically dark X-ray sources cannot be foreground stars or background active galactic nuclei, and hence must be accreting systems residing within their host galaxies. As a demonstration we search for candidates among the point-like X-ray sources detected with Chandra in 13 nearby elliptical galaxies. We use a novel technique to search for faint optical counterparts in the Hubble Space Telescope images whereby we subtract the bright galaxy light based on isophotal modeling of the surface brightness. We show that for six sources with no detectable optical emission at the 3σ level, their black hole masses MBH sun. In particular, an ultra-luminous X-ray source in NGC 4486 has MBH sun. We discuss the potential of this method to provide stringent constraints on the black hole masses, and the implications on the physical nature of these sources.

  17. The VSOP 5 GHz active galactic nucleus survey. V. Imaging results for the remaining 140 sources

    OpenAIRE

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E. B.; Wiik, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Hirabayashi, H.; Edwards, P. G.; Murata, Y.; Asaki, Y.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Scott, W. K.; Taylor, A. R.; Gurvits, L. I.; Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Shen, Z. Q.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997 February, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) mission. Approximately 25% of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP survey of bright compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in the third p...

  18. Contribution of Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources to Microwave Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Sokasian, Aaron; Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the contribution of extragalactic radio sources to fluctuations in sky temperature over the range of frequencies (10-300 GHz) used for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and low frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We have compiled a catalog of 2207 bright radio sources, including 758 sources with flux measurements at 90 GHz. We develop a method to extrapolate the source spectra and predict ...

  19. An updated list of AGILE bright γ-ray sources and their variability in pointing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Chen, A. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Giommi, P.; Vercellone, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Argan, A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Caraveo, P.; Cardillo, M.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cocco, V.; Colafrancesco, S.; Contessi, T.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; De Paris, G.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Fanari, G.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorini, M.; Fornari, F.; Fuschino, F.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Liello, F.; Lipari, P.; Mattaini, E.; Marisaldi, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Mauri, A.; Mauri, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Pontoni, C.; Porrovecchio, G.; Prest, M.; Primavera, R.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Rossi, E.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.; Santolamazza, P.; Soffitta, P.; Stellato, S.; Striani, E.; Tamburelli, F.; Traci, A.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vittorini, V.; Zanello, D.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We present a variability study of a sample of bright γ-ray(30 Mev-50 Gev) sources. This sample is an extension of the first AGILE catalogue of γ-ray sources (1AGL), obtained using the complete set of AGILE observations in pointing mode performed during a 2.3 year period from July 9, 2007 until October 30, 2009. Methods: The dataset of AGILE pointed observations covers a long time interval and its γ-ray data archive is useful for monitoring studies of medium-to-high brightness γ-ray sources. In the analysis reported here, we used data obtained with an improved event filter that covers a wider field of view, on a much larger (about 27.5 months) dataset, integrating data on observation block time scales, which mostly range from a few days to thirty days. Results: The data processing resulted in a better characterized source list than 1AGL was, and includes 54 sources, 7 of which are new high galactic latitude (|BII| ≥ 5) sources, 8 are new sources on the galactic plane, and 20 sources from the previous catalogue with revised positions. Eight 1AGL sources (2 high-latitude and 6 on the galactic plane) were not detected in the final processing either because of low OB exposure and/or due to their position in complex galactic regions. We report the results in a catalogue of all the detections obtained in each single OB, including the variability results for each of these sources. In particular, we found that 12 sources out of 42 or 11 out of 53 are variable, depending on the variability index used, where 42 and 53 are the number of sources for which these indices could be calculated. Seven of the 11 variable sources are blazars, the others are Crab pulsar+nebula, LS I +61°303, Cyg X-3, and 1AGLR J2021+4030. Table 5 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A137

  20. HR 4453 - An anomalously bright UV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidan, R. S.; Oegerle, W. R.; Margon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Crawford et al. (1979) reported that HR 4453 has an anomalously large UV flux in the 1350-1600 A band. This paper reports results of the UV spectrophotometry of HR 4453 obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Portions of the spectrum from 1120 to 2660 A were scanned, but no stellar signal was detected in any wavelength interval. This result is consistent with both components of the binary being normal A2A stars. UV variability or a source other than HR 4453 must be invoked to explain the observations of Crawford et al.

  1. The Unusual Galactic Center Radio Source N3

    CERN Document Server

    Ludovici, Dominic A; Morris, Mark R; Mutel, Robert; Mills, Elisabeth A C; Toomey, James E; Ott, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Here we report on new, multi-wavelength radio observations of the unusual point source "N3" that appears to be located in the vicinity of the Galactic Center. VLA observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is a compact and bright source (56 mJy at 10 GHz) with a non-thermal spectrum superimposed upon the non-thermal radio filaments (NTFs) of the Radio Arc. Our highest frequency observations place a strict upper limit of 65 x 28 mas on the size of N3. We compare our observations to those of Yusef-Zadeh & Morris (1987) and Lang et al. (1997) and conclude that N3 is variable over long time scales. Additionally, we present the detection of a compact molecular cloud located adjacent to N3 in projection. CH3CN, CH3OH, CS, HC3N, HNCO, SiO, SO, and NH3 are detected in the cloud and most transitions have FWHM line widths of ~20 km/s. The rotational temperature determined from the metastable NH3 transitions ranges from 79 K to 183 K depending on the transitions used. We present evidence that this molecular cl...

  2. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan;

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared to the...... shapes used by now. In the present paper we describe a simple theoretical explanation of this unexpected behavior, which is based on the large difference in para-hydrogen between the values of the scattering mean free path for thermal neutrons (in the range of 1 cm) and its much larger equivalent for...

  3. Minimum-phase distribution of cosmic source brightness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimum-phase distributions of brightness (profiles) for cosmic radio sources 3C 144 (the wave lambda=21 cm), 3C 338 (lambda=3.5 m), and 3C 353 (labda=31.3 cm and 3.5 m) are obtained. A real possibility for the profile recovery from module fragments of its Fourier-image is shown

  4. Thermionic sources for HI-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper surveys the capabilities and limitations of modern thermionic electron sources for producing high emission density (>10 A/cm2)-high brightness beams. The emphasis is on dispenser cathodes. The capabilities of existing commercial cathodes as well as the potential for future cathode improvements as demonstrated in various prototype structures are described

  5. Spitzer 24 um Excesses for Bright Galactic Stars in Bootes and First Look Survey Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hovhannisyan, L R; Weedman, D W; Le Floc'h, E; Houck, J R; Soifer, B T; Brand, K; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T

    2009-01-01

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 square degrees for the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 square degrees for the First Look Survey (FLS). 128 stars are identified in Bootes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K-[24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the 2MASS survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 um luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 um excesses with (K-[24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least 8 of the FGK stars with excesses are main sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 u...

  6. Improvement in brightness of multicusp-plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Q.; Jiang, X.; King, T-J.; Leung, K-N.; Standiford, K.; Wilde, S.B.

    2002-05-24

    The beam brightness of a multicusp-plasma ion source has been substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. The current density of a 2 keV He{sup +} beam extracted from a 7.5-cm-diameter source operating at 2.5 kW RF power is {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2}, which is {approx}10 times larger than that of a beam extracted from a 5-cm-diameter source operating at 1 kW RF power. A smaller focused beam spot size is achieved with a counter-bored extractor instead of a conventional (''through-hole'') extractor, resulting another order of magnitude improvement in beam current density. Measured brightness can be as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2}Sr, which represents a 30 times improvement over prior work.

  7. RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP BRIGHTNESS AND NUMBER COUNTS IN 72 GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the broadest and most precise empirical investigation of red giant branch bump (RGBB) brightness and number counts ever conducted. We implement a new method and use data from two Hubble Space Telescope globular cluster (GC) surveys to measure the brightness and star counts of the RGBB in 72 GCs. The median measurement precision is 0.018 mag in the brightness and 31% in the number counts, respectively, reaching peak precision values of 0.005 mag and 10%. The position of the main-sequence turnoff and the number of horizontal branch stars are used as comparisons where appropriate. Several independent scientific conclusions are newly possible with our parameterization of the RGBB. Both brightness and number counts are shown to have second parameters in addition to their strong dependence on metallicity. The RGBBs are found to be anomalous in the GCs NGC 2808, 5286, 6388, and 6441, likely due to the presence of multiple populations. Finally, we use our empirical calibration to predict the properties of the Galactic bulge RGBB. The updated RGBB properties for the bulge are shown to differ from the GC-calibrated prediction, with the former having lower number counts, a lower brightness dispersion, and a brighter peak luminosity than would be expected from the latter. This discrepancy is well explained by the Galactic bulge having a higher helium abundance than expected from GCs, ΔY ∼ +0.06 at the median metallicity.

  8. Latest results on galactic sources obtained with the MAGIC telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Zanin, Roberta; collaboration, for the MAGIC

    2009-01-01

    The MAGIC telescope is the largest single-dish Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) with the lowest energy threshold among the current generation of IACTs as low as 25 GeV. Therefore, the MAGIC telescope is a perfect instrument to study the galactic sources especially in the context of observations with the satellite observatories Fermi and AGILE. This paper will give an overview of the MAGIC results on the galactic sources including detailed observations of binary systems, supernov...

  9. The Unusual Galactic Center Radio Source N3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, D. A.; Lang, C. C.; Morris, M. R.; Mutel, R.; Mills, E. A. C.; Toomey, J. E., IV; Ott, J.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we report on new multi-wavelength radio observations of the unusual point source “N3” that appears to be located in the vicinity of the Galactic Center (GC). VLA observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is a compact and bright source (56 mJy at 10 GHz) with a non-thermal spectrum superimposed upon the non-thermal radio filaments (NTFs) of the Radio Arc. Our highest frequency observations place a strict upper limit of 65 × 28 mas on the size of N3. We compare our observations to those of Yusef-Zadeh & Morris and Lang et al., and conclude that N3 is variable over long timescales. Additionally, we present the detection of a compact molecular cloud located adjacent to N3 in projection. CH3CN, CH3OH, CS, HC3N, HNCO, SiO, SO, and NH3 are detected in the cloud, and most transitions have FWHM line widths of ˜20 km s‑1. The rotational temperature determined from the metastable NH3 transitions ranges from 79 to 183 k depending on the transitions used. We present evidence that this molecular cloud is interacting with N3. After exploring the relationship between the NTFs, molecular cloud, and N3, we conclude that N3 likely lies within the GC. We are able to rule out the H ii region, young supernova, active star, AGN, and micro-quasar hypotheses for N3. While a micro-blazar may provide a viable explanation for N3, additional observations are needed to determine the physical counterpart of this mysterious source.

  10. Detection of extended galactic sources with an underwater neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigate the discovery capability of a Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescope to Galactic extended sources. We focus on the brightest HESS gamma rays sources which are considered also as very high energy neutrino emitters. We use the unbinned method taking into account both the spatial and the energy distribution of high energy neutrinos and we investigate parts of the Galactic plane where nearby potential neutrino emitters form neutrino source clusters. Neutrino source clusters as well as isolated neutrino sources are combined to estimate the observation period for 5 sigma discovery of neutrino signals from these objects

  11. X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Extended Groth Strip: Implications for AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Jeltema, Tesla; Myers, Adam D; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael; Finoguenov, Alexis; Laird, Elise; Montero-Dorta, Antonio; Nandra, Kripal; Willmer, Christopher; Yan, Renbin

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) we statistically detect the extended X-ray emission in the interstellar medium (ISM) in both active and normal galaxies at 0.3 < z < 1.3 at a scale of 40-60 kpc. We study the effect of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the diffuse interstellar gas by comparing the stacked X-ray surface brightness profiles of active and normal galaxies in the same redshift range with identical properties in optical color--magnitude space. In accordance with theoretical studies we detect a slight deficit (< 1.5 \\sigma) of X-ray photons when averaged over a scale of 0-30 kpc in the profile of AGN host galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7. The equivalent flux deficit is (1.25 +/- 0.75) X 10^(-19) ergs/s/cm^(-2). When averaged over a scale of 30-60 kpc, beyond the PSF scales of our AGN sources, we observe a (~ 2 \\sigma) photon excess in the profile of the AGN host galaxies with an equivalent flux excess of (1.1 +/- 0.5) X 10^{-19} ...

  12. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Wijnholds, S J; Abdalla, F B; Brouw, W N; Ciardi, B; Iliev, I T; Harker, G J A; Mellema, G; Bernardi, G; Zarka, P; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Hassall, T E; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Reich, W; van Nieuwpoort, R; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with LOFAR, similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of t...

  13. Contribution of Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources to Microwave Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Sokasian, A; Smoot, G F; Sokasian, Aaron; Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the contribution of extragalactic radio sources to fluctuations in sky temperature over the range of frequencies (10-300 GHz) used for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and low frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We have compiled a catalog of 2207 bright radio sources, including 758 sources with flux measurements at 90 GHz. We develop a method to extrapolate the source spectra and predict skymaps of extragalactic radio sources at instrument resolutions of 10 arcmin to 10 degrees FWHM. Our results indicate that the brightest sources will dominate microwave anisotropy for a wide range of resolutions and frequencies. Our skymaps predict the location and flux of the brightest radio sources at each frequency, making it straightforward to develop a template for masking the pixels containing them. This masking should be sufficient to protect high resolution CMB anisotropy observations from unacceptable radio sour...

  14. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the active-galactic-nucleus-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Alatalo, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Hearst Field Annex, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wrobel, J. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Morganti, Raffaella [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Deustua, Susana [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bureau, Martin, E-mail: knyland@nmt.edu [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P {sub rad} = 1.48 × 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup –1}, and a brightness temperature T {sub b} > 1.5 × 10{sup 7} K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  15. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    OpenAIRE

    Offringa, A. R.; De Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Ciardi, B.; Iliev, I. T.; Harker, G. J. A.; Mellema, G.; Bernardi, G.; Zarka, P.; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness ...

  16. Long term optical variability of bright X-ray point sources in elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present long term optical variability studies of bright X-ray sources in four nearby elliptical galaxies with the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer array (ACIS-S) and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys. Out of the 46 bright (X-ray counts > 60) sources that are in the common field of view of the Chandra and HST observations, 34 of them have potential optical counterparts, while the rest of them are optically dark. After taking into account systematic errors, estimated using optical sources in the field as a reference, we find that four of the X-ray sources (three in NGC 1399 and one in NGC 1427) have variable optical counterparts at a high level of significance. The X-ray luminosities of these sources are ∼ 1038 erg s−1 and are also variable on similar time scales. The optical variability implies that the optical emission is associated with the X-ray source itself rather than being the integrated light from a host globular cluster. For one source, the change in optical magnitude is > 0.3, which is one of the highest reported for this class of X-ray sources and this suggests that the optical variability is induced by the X-ray activity. However, the optically variable sources in NGC 1399 have been reported to have blue colors (g — z > 1). All four sources have been detected in the infrared (IR) by Spitzer as point sources, and their ratios of 5.8 to 3.6 μm flux are > 0.63, indicating that their IR spectra are like those of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). While spectroscopic confirmation is required, it is likely that all four sources are background AGNs. We find none of the X-ray sources having optical/IR colors different from AGNs to be optically variable

  17. Discrete sources as the origin of the Galactic X-ray ridge emission

    CERN Document Server

    Revnivtsev, M; Churazov, E; Forman, W; Vikhlinin, A; Sunyaev, R

    2009-01-01

    An unresolved X-ray glow (at energies above a few kiloelectronvolts) was discovered about 25 years ago and found to be coincident with the Galactic disk -the Galactic ridge X-ray emission. This emission has a spectrum characteristic of a 1e8 K optically thin thermal plasma, with a prominent iron emission line at 6.7 keV. The gravitational well of the Galactic disk, however, is far too shallow to confine such a hot interstellar medium; instead, it would flow away at a velocity of a few thousand kilometres per second, exceeding the speed of sound in gas. To replenish the energy losses requires a source of 10^{43} erg/s, exceeding by orders of magnitude all plausible energy sources in the Milky Way. An alternative is that the hot plasma is bound to a multitude of faint sources, which is supported by the recently observed similarities in the X-ray and near-infrared surface brightness distributions (the latter traces the Galactic stellar distribution). Here we report that at energies of 6-7 keV, more than 80 per c...

  18. Some observational aspects of compact galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis contains the following observations of compact galactic X-ray sources: i) the X-ray experiments onboard the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ANS, ii) a rocket-borne ultra soft X-ray experiment and iii) the Objective Grating Spectrometer onboard the EINSTEIN observatory. In Chapter I the various types of compact galactic X-ray sources are reviewed and put into the perspective of earlier and following observations. In Chapter II the author presents some of the observations of high luminosity X-ray sources, made with ANS, including the detection of soft X-rays from the compact X-ray binary Hercules X-1 and the ''return to the high state'' of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. Chapter III deals with transient X-ray phenomena. Results on low luminosity galactic X-ray sources are collected in Chapter IV. (Auth.)

  19. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Ciardi, B.; Iliev, I. T.; Harker, G. J. A.; Mellema, G.; Bernardi, G.; Zarka, P.; Ghosh, A.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bîrzan, L.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Hassall, T. E.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; McKean, J. P.; Meulman, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Rafferty, D.; Reich, W.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, S. ter; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-10-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionization (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted H I signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of the power law implies that the current LOFAR EoR observations should be severely RFI limited if the strength of RFI sources remains strong after time integration. This is in contrast with actual observations, which almost reach the thermal noise and are thought not to be limited by RFI. Therefore, we conclude that it is unlikely that there are undetected RFI sources that will become visible in long observations. Consequently, there is no indication that RFI will prevent an EoR detection with LOFAR.

  20. GT2318+620, a variable galactic source with a radio jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent galactic survey with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 91-m telescope revealed a small number of variable radio sources at low galactic latitude. Similar sources within the Galaxy, where they have been identified, are often associated with energetic objects such as X-ray binaries, pulsars, cataclysmic variables and flare stars. One of the new variable sources, GT2318 + 620, is within the error box for the Uhuru X-ray source 4U2316 + 61, and our measurement of the neutral hydrogen absorption towards GT2318 + 620, reported here, indicates that it is a galactic object, at a distance of 3-6 kpc. We also present a high-resolution radio image of the source, which reveals an unresolved core with a jet-like feature extending on either side. GT2318 + 620 is coincident with a star of ∼ 20th magnitude, and we suggest here that it is radio-emitting low-mass X-ray binary. The radio luminosity of GT2318 + 620 is markedly higher than that of Sco X-1, the only other low-mass X-ray binary to show a radio jet; in its radio brightness it resembles SS433, which is remarkable for its relativistic jet motion on arcsecond scales, thought to result from accretion onto a collapsed stellar object. (author)

  1. CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ∼30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales σ-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and σ-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E ≥ 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other γ-ray blazars and is likely to be the γ-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ∼3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ∼320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  2. The Brightness of the Galactic Radio Loops at 1420 MHz: Some Indications for the Existence of Loops V and VI

    CERN Document Server

    Borka, V; Urošević, D

    2008-01-01

    In this article we use 1420 MHz data to demonstrate the likely reality of Galactic radio Loops V and VI. We further estimate distances and spectral indices for both these and the four main radio loops. In the cases of Loops I - IV, radio spectral indices are calculated from the mean brightnesses at 1420 and 820/404 MHz. The spectral indices of Loops V and VI are obtained from $T - T$ plots between 1420 and 408 MHz. Using the supernova remnant (SNR) hypothesis for the origin of radio loops, distances are calculated from the surface brightnesses and the angular diameters at 1420 MHz. We also study how results for brightnesses and distances of radio loops agree with current theories of SNR evolution. For this purpose, the ambient density and initial explosion energy of the loops are discussed. We also discuss applications of different $\\Sigma - D$ relations. The results obtained confirm a non-thermal origin and nearby locations for the Galactic radio loops. Therefore, we have indications that they are very old S...

  3. Brightness limitations in multi-kiloampere electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuristic relationships such as the Lawson-Penner criterion, used to scale Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier gain and efficiency over orders of magnitude in beam current and brightness, have no fundamental basis. The brightness of a given source is set by practical design choices such as peak voltage, cathode type, gun electrode geometry, and focusing field topology. The design of low emittance, high current electron guns has received considerable attention at Livermore over the past few years. The measured brightnesses of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) guns are less than predicted with the EBQ gun design code; this discrepancy is due to plasma effects from the present cold, plasma cathode in the code. The EBQ code is well suited to exploring the current limits of gridless relativistic Pierce columns with moderate current density (2) at the cathode. As EBQ uses a steady-state calculation it is not amenable for study of transient phenomena at the beam head. For this purpose, a Darwin approximation code, DPC, has been written. The main component in our experimental cathode development effort is a readily modified electron gun that will allow us to test many candidate cathode materials, types and electrode geometries at field stresses up to 1 MV/cm. 6 references, 6 figures

  4. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  5. Bright source lasers and experiments at very high irradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Bright Source has been assembled to explore the effects of intense coherent ultraviolet radiation on matter. This ultra-high brightness excimer laser is used to study the response of atoms, ions, and plasmas to the unique conditions the laser can provide. Primary areas of interest include properties and behavior of highly energetic atomic species, studies of possible intense field-induced nuclear transitions, pumping for x-ray lasers, and incoherent x-ray sources. The project consists of two phases: Los Alamos Bright Source I (LABS I) that is now in operation and is producing experimental data at an intensity up to 7 x 1017 watts/cm2 with 25 mJ of radiation and LABS II that will deliver between .1 and 1 J at an intensity of 1018 to 1020 w/cm2. At these high intensities we observe collisionless excitations to the KeV level. The exact nature of the excitation process is not known and is itself part of the investigation. Because of the coherent nature of the pump and the very large fields obtainable, new regimes of optical excitation can be expected and examined. Work is underway with LABS I to produce highly ionized species and measure their spectral and other properties. This equipment has proven to be highly reliable in the last year and should afford the opportunity for many basic studies. LABS II with its increased pulse energy and intensity will support studies involving larger pump volume and higher excitation levels. It should serve as a test bed for studies of pumping schemes for x-ray lasers. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  6. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    OpenAIRE

    Offringa, A. R.; et al, .; Leeuwen, van; Wise, M.

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionization (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted H i signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness...

  7. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 z ..., both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Oxford University...

  8. The Einstein objective grating spectrometer survey of galactic binary X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtilek, S. D.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Seward, F. D.; Kahn, S. M.; Wargelin, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of observations of 22 bright Galactic X-ray point sources are presented, and the most reliable measurements to date of X-ray column densities to these sources are derived. The results are consistent with the idea that some of the objects have a component of column density intrinsic to the source in addition to an interstellar component. The K-edge absorption due to oxygen is clearly detected in 10 of the sources and the Fe L and Ne K edges are detected in a few. The spectra probably reflect emission originating in a collisionally excited region combined with emission from a photoionized region excited directly by the central source.

  9. Active Galactic Nuclei as High-Energy Neutrino Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be promising candidates of extragalactic cosmic-ray accelerators and sources, and associated high-energy neutrino and hadronic gamma-ray emission has been studied for many years. We review models of high-energy neutrino production in AGN, and discuss their implications for the latest IceCube observation of the diffuse neutrino intensity.

  10. Search for Galactic cosmic ray sources: The multimessenger approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Tjus Julia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for the sources of high-energy cosmic rays (CRs has made significant progress the past decade. By including multimessenger methods, the general picture of the presence of a Galactic component at low energies and an extragalactic one at the highest energies has been strengthened. Yet, unambiguous proof of the exact origins of CRs is missing. In this review, the current scientific status on Galactic CR sources from theory and experimental data is summarized. In particular, the focus of this review lies on the search for photon and neutrino signals from the Galaxy and their theoretical interpretation in the context of the quest for the origin of high-energy cosmic rays. The use of multiwavelength data, from radio to TeV energies, as well as the option of coincident observations of different wavelength bands in order to pin-point the sources of Galactic CRs are discussed. Finally, the objectives for the field of astroparticles to reach the goal of unambiguously identifying Galactic cosmic ray sources within the next decades are presented.

  11. The ALS -- A high-brightness XUV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is scheduled to be operational in the spring of 1993 as a US Department of Energy national user facility. The ALS will be a next-generation source of soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) synchrotron radiation. Undulators will provide high-brightness radiation oat photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes approaching 20 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. the high brightness will open new areas of research from the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy, to the life sciences, such as x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity. Experimental facilities (insertion devices, beamlines, and end stations) will be developed and operated by participating research teams working with the ALS staff. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Silicon-chip source of bright photon pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei C; Lu, Xiyuan; Zhang, Jidong; Painter, Oskar; Lin, Qiang

    2015-08-10

    Integrated quantum photonics relies critically on the purity, scalability, integrability, and flexibility of a photon source to support diverse quantum functionalities on a single chip. Here we report a chip-scale photon-pair source on the silicon-on-insulator platform that utilizes dramatic cavity-enhanced four-wave mixing in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator. The device is able to produce high-quality photon pairs at different wavelengths with a high spectral brightness of 6.24×10(7) pairs/s/mW(2)/GHz and photon-pair correlation with a coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 1386 ± 278 while pumped with a continuous-wave laser. The superior performance, together with the structural compactness and CMOS compatibility, opens up a great avenue towards quantum silicon photonics with capability of multi-channel parallel information processing for both integrated quantum computing and long-haul quantum communication. PMID:26367942

  13. Bright Photon Pair Source with High Spectral and Spatial Purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) is a reliable and robust source of photons for quantum information applications. For applications that involve operations such as entanglement swapping or single-photon heralding, two-photon states are required to be factorable (uncorrelated) in their spectral and spatial degrees of freedom. We report the design and experimental characterization of an SPDC source that has been optimized for high spectral and spatial purity. The source is pumped by the 776 nm output of a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser and consists of a periodically-poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP) crystal phase-matched for collinear type-II SPDC. The dispersive properties of PPKTP at these wavelengths is such that it is possible to minimize the spectral entanglement by matching the widths of the pump to the spectral phase-matching function. The spatial entanglement is minimized through careful control of the pump focus, yielding nearly single-mode emission. An advantage of this approach is that the emission rate into the collection modes is very high, resulting in a very bright SPDC source. We also report a scheme that employs the output of collinear sources such as these to produce polarization-entangled photon pairs. The scheme, which requires only simple polarization elements, can be scaled to N-photon GHZ states.

  14. Lattice Development for Pep-X High Brightness Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Design of PEP-X high brightness light source machine is under development at SLAC. The PEP-X is a proposed replacement for the PEP-II in the existing 2.2 km tunnel. Two of the PEP-X six arcs contain DBA type lattice providing 30 dispersion free straights suitable for 3.5 m long undulators. The lattice contains TME cells in the other four arcs and 89.3 m wiggler in a long straight section yielding a horizontal emittance of {approx}0.1 nm-rad at 4.5 GeV. The recent lattice modifications are aimed at increasing the predicted brightness and improving beam dynamic properties. The standard DBA cells are modified into supercells for providing low-{beta} undulator straights. The DBA and TME cell phase advance is better optimized. Harmonic sextupoles are added to minimize the sextupole driven resonance effects and amplitude dependent tune shift. Finally, the injection scheme is changed from vertical to horizontal plane in order to avoid large vertical amplitudes of injected beam within small vertical aperture of undulators.

  15. The National Synchrotron Light Source, Part I: Bright Idea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) was the first facility designed and built specifically for producing and exploiting synchrotron radiation. It was also the first facility to incorporate the Chasman-Green lattice for maximizing brightness. The NSLS was a $24-million project conceived about 1970. It was officially proposed in 1976, and its groundbreaking took place in 1978. Its construction was a key episode in Brookhaven's history, in the transition of synchrotron radiation from a novelty to a commodity, and in the transition of synchrotron-radiation scientists from parasitic to autonomous researchers. The way the machine was conceived, designed, promoted, and constructed illustrates much both about the tensions and tradeoffs faced by large scientific projects in the age of big science. In this article, the first of two parts, I cover the conception, design, and planning of the NSLS up to its groundbreaking. Part II, covering its construction, will appear in the next issue.

  16. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  17. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, T.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C.; Nelemans, G.; van Grunsven, T.; Gonzalez-Solares, E. A.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Britt, C.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-06-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centred at Galactic latitude b = 1.5° above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l × b) = (6° × 1°). The catalogue consists of two or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H α filters. The catalogue is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5σ depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ˜10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all optical sources within the 4σ X-ray error circle. This analysis yields 1480 potential counterparts (˜90 per cent of the sample). 584 counterparts have saturated photometry (r' ≤ 17, i' ≤ 16), indicating these objects are likely foreground sources and the real counterparts. 171 candidate counterparts are detected only in the i' band. These sources are good qLMXB and CV candidates as they are X-ray bright and likely located in the Bulge.

  18. Absorption Line Survey of H3+ toward the Galactic Center Sources II. Eight Infrared Sources within 30 pc of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Goto, Miwa; Nagata, T; Geballe, T R; McCall, B J; Indriolo, N; Suto, H; Henning, T; Morong, C P; Oka, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Infrared absorption lines of H3+, including the metastable R(3,3)l line, have been observed toward eight bright infrared sources associated with hot and massive stars located in and between the Galactic Center Cluster and the Quintuplet Cluster 30 pc to the east. The absorption lines with high velocity dispersion arise in the Galaxy's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) as well as in foreground spiral arms. The temperature and density of the gas in the CMZ, as determined from the relative strengths of the H3+ lines, are T=200-300K and n=50-200cm^-3. The detection of high column densities of H3+ toward all eight stars implies that this warm and diffuse gaseous environment is widespread in the CMZ. The products of the ionization rate and path length for these sight lines are 1000 and 10 times higher than in dense and diffuse clouds in the Galactic disk, respectively, indicating that the ionization rate, zeta, is not less than 10^-15 s^-1 and that L is at least on the order of 50 pc. The warm and diffuse gas is an impo...

  19. New structures near the compact radio source at the Galactic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixteen years ago, a bright compact radio source, Sgr A*, was found at the Galactic Centre, as had been predicted. The characteristics of its emission and the kinematics of gas near it have been used to argue for the presence of a black hole of 500-5 x 106 solar masses at the Galactic Centre. Here we present high-resolution (<0.2 arcsec) radio images, made at 2-cm wavelength, of the central arcsecond of the Galaxy. Sgr A* is surrounded by at least four satellite radio features. Interpreted as thermally emitting blobs of plasma, they have typical sizes <1,700 AU and are within a projected distance of 3,500 AU from Sgr A*. Another set of larger radio features, 2-4 arcsec from Sgr A*, shows a regular progression of galactocentric distance with position angle. The placement and appearance of all these structures lead us to suggest that they are physically associated with Sgr A*; if so, they can be used as probes of the immediate vicinity of the possible massive black hole at the Galactic Centre. (author)

  20. A Catalog of 24um Sources Toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Hinz, J L; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Hewitt, J; Balog, Z; Block, M

    2008-01-01

    We present a 1.5deg x 8deg (220pc x 1195pc) Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24um image of the Galactic Center and an accompanying point source list. This image is the highest spatial resolution (6" ~ 0.25pc) and sensitivity map ever taken across the GC at this wavelength, showing the emission by warm dust in unprecedented detail. Over 120,000 point sources are identified in this catalog with signal-to-noise ratios greater than five and flux densities from 0.6mJy to 9Jy.

  1. Galactic very high energy sources and enhancements of material content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedaletti, Giovanna; de Oña Wilhelmi, Emma; Torres, Diego F.; Natale, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    The association of very-high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) sources with regions of the sky rich in dust and gas has been noticed in the study of individual VHE sources. However, the statistical significance of this correlation for the whole population of TeV detections has not been assessed yet. To trace the material content, we make use of the publicly released all-sky maps of astrophysical foregrounds of the Planck Collaboration, and of an extensive existing CO mapping of the Galactic sky. To test the correlation, we construct randomized samples of VHE source positions starting from the inner Galactic plane survey. A positive correlation cannot be firmly established yet. Additionally we explore the possibility that unidentified VHE sources are located in environment particularly rich in material content unaccounted by traditional tracers, including HI hyperfine transition at 21 cm to trace atomic hydrogen in regions where the gas is diffuse. No additional gas component is found in the direction of unidentified VHE sources.

  2. An Ultraviolet imager to study bright UV sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A G; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and developed a compact ultraviolet imaging payload to fly on a range of possible platforms such as high altitude balloon experiments, cubesats, space missions, etc. The primary science goals are to study the bright UV sources (mag < 10) and also to look for transients in the Near UV (200 - 300 nm) domain. Our first choice is to place this instrument on a spacecraft going to the Moon as part of the Indian entry into Google lunar X-Prize competition. The major constraints for the instrument are, it should be lightweight (< 2Kg), compact (length < 50cm) and cost effective. The instrument is an 80 mm diameter Cassegrain telescope with a field of view of around half a degree designated for UV imaging. In this paper we will discuss about the various science cases that can be performed by having observations with the instrument on different platforms. We will also describe the design, development and the current state of implementation of the instrument. This includes opto-mechanical and e...

  3. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Imre; Haiman, Zoltán; Márka, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, LIGO, found direct evidence of double black hole binaries emitting gravitational waves. Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes, accounting for as much as ~2% of the mass of the nuclear stellar cluster. A significant fraction (~30%) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We examine the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. We show that binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk well within a Salpeter time. The binaries may also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, well above the Eddington rate. This could lead to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission, but would require hyper-Eddington accretion with a few % radiative efficiency, comparable to thin disks. We discuss implications for gravitational wave observations and black hole popul...

  4. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W M

    2015-01-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the VLA using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz, covering the central 30 pc region of the RBZ at the Galactic center. Using the MS-MFS algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1", achieving an rms 8 $\\mu$Jy/beam, and a dynamic range 100,000:1.The radio image is compared with X-ray, CN emission-line and Paschen-$\\alpha$ images obtained using Chandra, SMA and HST/NICMOS, respectively. We discuss several prominent radio features. The "Sgr A West Wings" extend 5 pc from the NW and SE tips of the ionized "Mini-spiral" in Sgr A West to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arc min to the NW and SE of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the "NW Streamers", form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 14.4 pc x 7.3 pc, has a known X-ray counterpart. A row of three thermally emitting rings is observed in the...

  5. Massive stellar X-ray sources in the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhan, Jon Christian

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to discover unidentified members of the massive stellar population in the Galactic center, using a novel selection technique: the identification of infrared counterparts to hard X-ray sources. This method provides a means of distinguishing a subset of hot, massive stars from the more numerous cool giants that dominate the stellar population of the central Galaxy, providing potential beacons toward undiscovered regions of massive star formation, and the remains of tidally-disrupted stellar clusters. Hard-X-ray selection also highlights exotic species of massive star, including Wolf-Rayet (WR) binaries with colliding supersonic winds, and wind-accreting neutron stars and black holes in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). Massive stars were sought in the central 300 pc of the Galaxy by cross- correlating X-ray and IR point-source catalogs. Approximately 1% of the 6067 Chandra X-ray sources near the Galactic center have near-infrared matches with K s consistent with thermal emission from plasma at temperatures above 2 keV, not a ubiquitous feature of single massive stars. The X-ray data are consistent with models of strong WR/O winds colliding with the surfaces of binary companions, but are also consistent with known, low-luminosity HMXBs. Future experiments are discussed, aimed at unambiguously determining the masses of the stellar components, and surveying the environments of confirmed massive stellar X-ray sources for additional massive stars. The overall rarity of hard X-ray-emitting massive stars among stellar populations suggests the presence of a massive stellar population, comparable in size to that within the known stellar clusters in the Galactic center.

  6. Markov Stochastic Technique to Determine Galactic Cosmic Ray Sources Distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashraf Farahat

    2010-06-01

    A new numerical model of particle propagation in the Galaxy has been developed, which allows the study of cosmic-ray production and propagation in 2D. The model has been used to solve cosmic ray diffusive transport equation with a complete network of nuclear interactions using the time backward Markov stochastic process by tracing the particles’ trajectories starting from the Solar System back to their sources in the Galaxy. This paper describes a further development of the model to calculate the contribution of various galactic locations to the production of certain cosmic ray nuclei observed at the Solar System.

  7. Soft gamma-ray constraints on a bright flare from the Galactic Center supermassive black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trap, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Ferrando, P. [Service d' Astrophysique - SAp, /IRFU/DSM/CEA Saclay, Bat. 709, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); AstroParticule and Cosmologie - APC, Universite Paris VII/CNRS/CEA/Observatoire de Paris, Bat. Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (FR); Terrier, R. [AstroParticule and Cosmologie - APC, Universite Paris VII/CNRS/CEA/Observatoire de Paris, Bat. Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (FR); Dodds-Eden, K.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterretrische Physik - MPE, 85748 Garching (Germany); Pantin, E.; Lagage, P.O. [Service d' Astrophysique - SAp, /IRFU/DSM/CEA Saclay, Bat. 709, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Astrophysique Interactions Multi-echelles - AIM/Universite Paris VII/CEA/CNRS, Bat. 709, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Belanger, G. [European Space Agency - ESA/ESAC, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Porquet, D.; Grosso, N. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg/Universite de Strasbourg/CNRS, 11, rue de l' Universite, 67000 Strasbourg (FR); Yusef-Zadeh, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy/Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (US); Melia, F. [Department of Physics and Steward Observatory/The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (US)

    2010-07-01

    Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) is the supermassive black hole residing at the center of the Milky Way. It has been the main target of an extensive multiwavelength campaign we carried out in April 2007. Herein, we report the detection of a bright flare from the vicinity of the horizon, observed simultaneously in X-rays (XMM-Newton/EPIC) and near infrared (VLT/NACO) on April 4 for 1-2 h. For the first time, such an event also benefited from a soft gamma-rays (INTEGRAL/ISGRI) and mid infrared (VLT/VISIR) coverage, which enabled us to derive upper limits at both ends of the flare spectral energy distribution (SED). We discuss the physical implications of the contemporaneous light curves as well as the SED, in terms of synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton emission processes. (authors)

  8. Soft gamma-ray constraints on a bright flare from the Galactic Center supermassive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Trap, G; Terrier, R; Dodds-Eden, K; Gillessen, S; Genzel, R; Pantin, E; Lagage, P O; Ferrando, P; Bélanger, G; Porquet, D; Grosso, N; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Melia, F

    2009-01-01

    Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is the supermassive black hole residing at the center of the Milky Way. It has been the main target of an extensive multiwavelength campaign we carried out in April 2007. Herein, we report the detection of a bright flare from the vicinity of the horizon, observed simultaneously in X-rays (XMM/EPIC) and near infrared (VLT/NACO) on April 4th for 1-2 h. For the first time, such an event also benefitted from a soft gamma-rays (INTEGRAL/ISGRI) and mid infrared (VLT/VISIR) coverage, which enabled us to derive upper limits at both ends of the flare spectral energy distribution (SED). We discuss the physical implications of the contemporaneous light curves as well as the SED, in terms of synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton emission processes.

  9. Soft gamma-ray constraints on a bright flare from the Galactic Center supermassive black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) is the supermassive black hole residing at the center of the Milky Way. It has been the main target of an extensive multiwavelength campaign we carried out in April 2007. Herein, we report the detection of a bright flare from the vicinity of the horizon, observed simultaneously in X-rays (XMM-Newton/EPIC) and near infrared (VLT/NACO) on April 4 for 1-2 h. For the first time, such an event also benefited from a soft gamma-rays (INTEGRAL/ISGRI) and mid infrared (VLT/VISIR) coverage, which enabled us to derive upper limits at both ends of the flare spectral energy distribution (SED). We discuss the physical implications of the contemporaneous light curves as well as the SED, in terms of synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton emission processes. (authors)

  10. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Santhana Raman, P.; Khursheed, A.; van Kan, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  11. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators

  12. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, N.; Santhana Raman, P. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Kan, J. A. van, E-mail: phyjavk@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Khursheed, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore)

    2016-02-15

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  13. Evolution of laser-produced Sn extreme ultraviolet source diameter for high-brightness source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effect of irradiation of solid Sn targets with laser pulses of sub-ns duration and sub-mJ energy on the diameter of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting region and source conversion efficiency. It was found that an in-band EUV source diameter as low as 18 μm was produced due to the short scale length of a plasma produced by a sub-ns laser. Most of the EUV emission occurs in a narrow region with a plasma density close to the critical density value. Such EUV sources are suitable for high brightness and high repetition rate metrology applications.

  14. Pixel Lensing Search For Bright Microlensing Events and Variables in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A; Gould, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method to search for gravitational microlensing toward the Galactic bulge that employs a small camera rather than a conventional telescope and probes new regions of parameter space. The small aperture (~65 mm) permits detection of stellar flux variations corresponding to magnitudes 715. The large pixel size (~10") and ~(6 deg)^2 field of view allows observation of the entire bulge with a few pointings. With this large pixel size (and with the even larger 30" PSF that we advocate) most bulge stars are unresolved, so one is in the regime of pixel lensing: microlensing and other forms of stellar variation are detected from the difference of pixel counts in successive images. We identify three principal uses of such a search. First, the observations are analogous to normal pixel lensing observations of the bulge of M31, but are carried out under conditions where the detected events can be followed up in detail. This permits crucial checks on the systematics of the M31 searches. Second, the searc...

  15. THE ChaMPlane BRIGHT X-RAY SOURCES—GALACTIC LONGITUDES l = 2°–358°

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) survey aims to constrain the Galactic population of mainly accretion-powered, but also coronal, low-luminosity X-ray sources (LX ∼33 erg s–1). To investigate the X-ray source content in the plane at fluxes FX ∼> 3 × 10–14 erg s–1 cm–2, we study 21 of the brightest ChaMPlane sources, viz., those with >250 net counts (0.3-8 keV). By excluding the heavily obscured central part of the plane, our optical/near-infrared follow-up puts useful constraints on their nature. We have discovered two likely accreting white dwarf binaries. CXOPS J154305.5-522709 (CBS 7) is a cataclysmic variable showing periodic X-ray flux modulations on 1.2 hr and 2.4 hr; given its hard spectrum the system is likely magnetic. We identify CXOPS J175900.8-334548 (CBS 17) with a late-type giant; if the X-rays are indeed accretion powered, it belongs to the small but growing class of symbiotic binaries lacking strong optical nebular emission lines. CXOPS J171340.5-395213 (CBS 14) is an X-ray transient that brightened ∼>100 times. We tentatively classify it as a very late type (>M7) dwarf, of which few have been detected in X-rays. The remaining sources are (candidate) active galaxies, normal stars and active binaries, and a plausible young T Tauri star. The derived cumulative number density versus flux (log N-log S) relation for the Galactic sources appears flatter than expected for an isotropic distribution, indicating that we are seeing a non-local sample of mostly coronal sources. Our findings define source templates that we can use, in part, to classify the >104 fainter sources in ChaMPlane.

  16. Observing Galactic Black Hole Sources in Hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R

    2013-01-01

    Observations of Galactic black hole sources are traditionally done in the classical X-ray range (2 -- 10 keV) due to sensitivity constraints. Most of the accretion power, however, is radiated above 10 keV and the study of these sources in hard X-rays has the potential to unravel the radiation mechanisms operating at the inner region of the accretion disk, which is believed to be the seat of a myriad of fascinating features like jet emission, high frequency QPO emission etc. I will briefly summarise the long term hard X-ray observational features like spectral state identification, state transitions and hints of polarised emission, and describe the new insights that would be provided by the forthcoming Astrosat satellite, particularly emphasising the contributions expected from the CZT-Imager payload.

  17. On the brightness of diluted photon source in synchrotron light facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyan, M. E-mail: ivanian@asls.candle.am; Martirosyan, Y.; Tsakanov, V

    2004-10-01

    The undulator radiation spectral brightness in storage ring is studied taking into account the effects of the electron beam oscillating trajectory and the beam transverse size variation along the undulator. The modified optimal beta function at the source point to reach maximum brightness is obtained that is in direct relation with the emitted photons wavelength. It is shown that the maximum spectral brightness in long wavelength range is achieved with low beta lattice, while in short wavelength range with larger beta.

  18. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Serafinelli, Roberto; Middei, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The variability of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis, who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X-ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter $\\beta$, defined as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarit...

  19. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafinelli, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.

    2016-02-01

    The variability of the X-Ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis [1], who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that the spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X- Ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter β, defined by Trevese and Vagnetti [2] as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarithmic flux variation. We find that the spectral variability of quasars has a softer when brighter behaviour, similarly to local AGNs.

  20. MACHO Project Analysis of the Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events with Clump Giants as Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowski, P; Vandehei, T; Griest, K; Alcock, C; Alves, D R; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Minniti, D; Nelson, C; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Welch, D L

    2002-03-06

    We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This class of events allows one to obtain robust conclusions because relatively bright clump stars are not strongly affected by blending. We discuss: (1) the selection of ''giant'' events, (2) the distribution of event durations, (3) the anomalous character of event durations and optical depth in the MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.1,-3{sup o}.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of {tau} = (2.0 {+-} 0.4) x10{sup -6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3{sup o}.9, -3{sup o}.8), and present a map of the spatial distribution of the optical depth. When field 104 is removed from the sample, the optical depth drops to {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, which is in excellent agreement with infrared-based models of the central Galactic region.

  1. X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Heinke, Craig O

    2011-01-01

    I review recent work on X-ray sources in Galactic globular clusters, identified with low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and coronally active binaries by Chandra. Faint transient LMXBs have been identified in several clusters, challenging our understanding of accretion disk instabilities. Spectral fitting of X-rays from quiescent LMXBs offers the potential to constrain the interior structure of neutron stars. The numbers of quiescent LMXBs scale with the dynamical interaction rates of their host clusters, indicating their dynamical formation. Large numbers of CVs have been discovered, including a very faint population in NGC 6397 that may be at or beyond the CV period minimum. Most CVs in dense clusters seem to be formed in dynamical interactions, but there is evidence that some are primordial binaries. Radio millisecond pulsars show thermal X-rays from their polar caps, and often nonthermal X-rays, either from magnetospheric emission, or from a shock betwe...

  2. Localized Galactic sources and their contribution beyond the second knee

    CERN Document Server

    De Donato, Cinzia

    2009-01-01

    The energy range encompassing the ankle of the cosmic ray energy spectrum probably marks the exhaustion of the accelerating sources in our Galaxy, as well as the end of the Galactic confinement. Furthermore, this is the region where the extragalactic flux penetrates the interstellar medium and starts, progressively, to be dominant. Although at lower energies it is likely that an "average" population of supernova remnants can be defined to account for most of the cosmic ray flux, this assumption is increasingly difficult to maintain as higher energies are considered. One possibility is that supernovas are still a main contributor along the first branch of the ankle region, but that the acceleration is now coming from well localized regions with a characteristic interstellar medium, or a sub-population of supernovas exploding in a peculiar circumstellar environment. These possibilities are analyzed in the present work using a two-dimensional diffusion model for cosmic ray propagation. Special emphasis is given ...

  3. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z ∼ 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z ∼ 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02-0.23+0.21×1013 h-1 Msun for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of ∼10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5σ level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z ∼ 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N 2/A ∼ 5 × 106 deg–2 (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg2) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys

  4. On the completeness of a sample of bright quasars selected by colour excess in the direction of the North Galactic Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Medium Bright Quasar survey (MBQS) shows evidence for a dearth of bright quasars in a Palomar Schmidt field centred on Selected Area (SA) 57 near the North Galactic Pole, compared to similar fields centred on SA 28, 29, 55, and 94. The SA 57 field has been searched again for bright quasar candidates with the held of a second survey plate exposed according to a slightly modified Haro-Luyten three-colour (Tonantzintla) prescription. Candidates so selected have both a blue and ultraviolet excess (B-UVX). The main result of the paper is that there appear to be no B-UVX quasars in the SA 57 field that are brighter than B=17.25 mag. The significance of this apparent anomaly is briefly discussed. (author)

  5. A Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from Variable or Transient Galactic Radio Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Shrader, C. R.; Macomb, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe an ongoing effort using the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for gamma-ray emission from a source sample derived from published surveys of variable or transient galactic radio sources.

  6. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Sahakyan, N

    2015-01-01

    The recent results from ground based $\\gamma$-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic $\\gamma$-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the $\\gamma$-rays and $\

  7. Source brightness fluctuation correction of solar absorption Fourier Transform mid infrared spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ridder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar absorption Fourier Transform infrared spectrometry is considered a precise and accurate method for the observation of trace gases in the atmosphere. The precision and accuracy of such measurements are dependent on the stability of the light source. Fluctuations in the source brightness reduce the precision and accuracy of the trace gas concentrations, but cannot always be avoided. Thus, a strong effort is made within the community to reduce the impact of source brightness fluctuations by applying a correction on the spectra following the measurements. So far, it could be shown that the precision and accuracy of CO2 total column concentrations could be improved by applying a source brightness fluctuation correction to spectra in the near infrared spectral region.

    The analysis of trace gas concentrations obtained from spectra in the mid infrared spectral region is fundamental. However, spectra below 2000 cm−1 are generally considered uncorrectable, if they are measured with a MCT detector. Such measurements introduce an unknown offset to MCT interferograms, which prevents a source brightness fluctuation correction.

    Here, we show a method of source brightness fluctuation correction, which can be applied on spectra in the whole infrared spectral region including spectra measured with a MCT detector. We present a solution to remove the unknown offset in MCT interferograms allowing MCT spectra for an application of source brightness fluctuation correction. This gives an improvement in the quality of MCT spectra and we demonstrate an improvement in the retrieval of O3 profiles and total column concentrations.

    For a comparison with previous studies, we apply our source brightness fluctuation correction method on spectra in the near infrared spectral region and show an improvement in the retrieval of CO2 total column concentrations.

  8. METHANOL MASER EMISSION FROM GALACTIC CENTER SOURCES WITH EXCESS 4.5 μm EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of signatures of on-going star formation in a sample of protostellar objects with enhanced 4.5 μm emission ('green' sources) near the Galactic center. To understand how star formation in the Galactic center region compares to that of the Galactic disk, we used the Expanded Very Large Array to observe radiatively excited Class II 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers and collisionally excited Class I 44 GHz CH3OH masers, both tracers of high-mass star formation, toward a sample of 34 Galactic center and foreground 'green' sources. We find that 33% ± 15% of Galactic center sources are coincident with 6.7 GHz masers, and that 44% ± 17% of foreground sources are coincident with 6.7 GHz masers. For 44 GHz masers, we find correlation rates of 27% ± 13% and 25% ± 13% for Galactic center green sources and foreground green sources, respectively. Based on these CH3OH maser detection rates, as well as correlations of green sources with other tracers of star formation, such as 24 μm emission and infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), we find no significant difference between the green sources in the Galactic center and those foreground to it. This suggests that once the star formation process has begun, the environmental differences between the Galactic center region and the Galactic disk have little effect on its observational signatures. We do find, however, some evidence that may support a recent episode of star formation in the Galactic center region.

  9. On the possible correlation of Galactic VHE source locations and enhancements of the surface density in the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Pedaletti, G; Torres, D F

    2014-01-01

    The association of very-high energy sources with regions of the sky rich in dust and gas has been noticed in the study of individual VHE sources. However, the statistical significance of such correlation for the whole population of TeV detections has not been assessed yet. Here we present a study of the association of VHE sources in the central Galactic region with positions of enhanced material content. We obtain estimates of the material content through two classical tracers: dust emission and intensity of the $^\\textrm{12}$CO(1$\\rightarrow$0) line. We make use of the recently released all-sky maps of astrophysical foregrounds of the Planck Collaboration and of the extensive existing CO mapping of the Galactic sky. In order to test the correlation, we construct randomized samples of VHE source positions starting from the inner Galactic plane survey sources detected by the H.E.S.S. array. We find hints of a positive correlation between positions of VHE sources and regions rich in molecular material, which in...

  10. Development of ion sources: Towards high brightness for proton beam writing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Ion Source Test Bench (ISTB) has been designed and commissioned to facilitate the measurement of ion beam reduced brightness (Br) obtained from different ion sources. Preliminary Br measurements were carried out, with RF ion source, in the ISTB for He ions. Meanwhile we have also fabricated and tested a novel ion source called electron impact gas ion source, whose reduced brightness is expected to reach up to 107 pA/μm2 mrad2 MeV. Initial ion-current measurements from such electron impact gas ion source (tested inside an environmental SEM) has yielded about 300 pA of Ar ions. The areal ion current density from this electron impact gas ion source is found to be at least 380 times higher than the existing RF ion source. This novel ion source is promising for application in proton beam writing lithography with feature sizes smaller than 10 nm

  11. High-brightness source based on luminescent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dick K G; Bruls, Dominique; Jagt, Henri

    2016-07-11

    The concept of a high-luminance light source based on luminescent conversion of LED light and optical concentration in a transparent phosphor is explained. Experiments on a realized light source show that a luminous flux of 8500 lm and a luminance of 500 cd/mm2 can be attained using 56 pump LEDs at 330 W electrical input power. The measurement results are compared to optical simulations, showing that the experimental optical efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The present status enables applications like mid-segment digital projection using LED technology, whereas the concept is scalable to higher fluxes. PMID:27410894

  12. High brightness single photon sources based on photonic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.; Bazin, M.;

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel single-photon-source based on the emission of a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in a single-mode photonic wire. This geometry ensures a very large coupling (> 95%) of the spontaneous emission to the guided mode. Numerical simulations show that a photon collection efficiency as...

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    OpenAIRE

    Abdo, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in 3 months produced a deeper and better-resolved map of the gamma-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10-sigma) gamma-ray sources in these data. These are the best-characterized and best-localized point-like (i.e.,...

  14. Methanol Maser Emission from Galactic Center Sources with Excess 4.5 {\\mu}m Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Edward T; Roberts, Doug

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of signatures of on-going star formation in a sample of protostellar objects with enhanced 4.5 {\\mu}m emission ('green' sources) near the Galactic center. To understand how star formation in the Galactic center region compares to that of the Galactic disk, we used the Expanded Very Large Array to observe radiatively excited Class II 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers and collisionally excited Class I 44 GHz CH3OH masers, both tracers of high-mass star formation, toward a sample of 34 Galactic center and foreground 'green' sources. We find that 33\\pm15% of Galactic center sources are coincident with 6.7 GHz masers, and that 44\\pm17% of foreground sources are coincident with 6.7 GHz masers. For 44 GHz masers, we find correlation rates of 27\\pm13% and 25\\pm13% for Galactic center green sources and foreground green sources, espectively. Based on these CH3OH maser detection rates, as well as correlations of green sources with other tracers of star formation, such as 24 {\\mu}m emission and infrared dark clouds...

  15. Galactic HI on the 50-AU scale in the direction of three extra-galactic sources observed with MERLIN

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, W M; Muxlow, T W B; Thomasson, P

    2008-01-01

    We present MERLIN observations of Galactic 21-cm HI absorption at an angular resolution of c. 0.1-0.2 arcsec and a velocity resolution of 0.5 km/s, in the direction of three moderately low latitude (-8< b <-12 deg) extragalactic radio sources, 3C111, 3C123 and 3C161, all of which are heavily reddened. HI absorption is observed against resolved background emission sources up to c. 2 arcsec in extent and we distinguish details of the opacity distribution within 1-1.5 arcsec regions towards 3C~123 and 3C~161. This study is the second MERLIN investigation of small scale structure in interstellar HI (earlier work probed Galactic HI in the directions of the compact sources 3C138 and 3C147). The 0.1-arcsec scale is intermediate between HI absorption studies made with other fixed element interferometers with resolution of 1 to 10 arcsec and VLBI studies with resolutions of 10-20 milli-arcsec. At a scale of 1 arcsec (about 500 AU), prominent changes in Galactic HI opacity in excess of 1-1.5 are determined in the...

  16. Impact of supernova and cosmic-ray driving on the surface brightness of the galactic halo in soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C O; Clark, Paul C; Klessen, Ralf S; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order $10^{-12}$erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject...

  17. Brightness enhancement of plasma ion source by utilizing anode spot for nano applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon-Jae [Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Gyeonggi 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Man-Jin [Research Institute of Nano Manufacturing System, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Dae Won [Nanobio Fusion Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Anode spots are known as additional discharges on positively biased electrode immersed in plasmas. The anode spot plasma ion source (ASPIS) has been investigated as a high brightness ion source for nano applications such as focused ion beam (FIB) and nano medium energy ion scattering (nano-MEIS). The generation of anode spot is found to enhance brightness of ion beam since the anode spot increases plasma density near the extraction aperture. Brightness of the ASPIS has been estimated from measurement of emittance for total ion beam extracted through sub-mm aperture. The ASPIS is installed to the FIB system. Currents and diameters of the focused beams with/without anode spot are measured and compared. As the anode spot is turned on, the enhancement of beam current is observed at fixed diameter of the focused ion beam. Consequently, the brightness of the focused ion beam is enhanced as well. For argon ion beam, the maximum normalized brightness of 12 300 A/m{sup 2} SrV is acquired. The ASPIS is applied to nano-MEIS as well. The ASPIS is found to increase the beam current density and the power efficiency of the ion source for nano-MEIS. From the present study, it is shown that the ASPIS can enhance the performance of devices for nano applications.

  18. Source brightness fluctuation correction of solar absorption fourier transform mid infrared spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ridder

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The precision and accuracy of trace gas observations using solar absorption Fourier Transform infrared spectrometry depend on the stability of the light source. Fluctuations in the source brightness, however, cannot always be avoided. Current correction schemes, which calculate a corrected interferogram as the ratio of the raw DC interferogram and a smoothed DC interferogram, are applicable only to near infrared measurements. Spectra in the mid infrared spectral region below 2000 cm−1 are generally considered uncorrectable, if they are measured with a MCT detector. Such measurements introduce an unknown offset to MCT interferograms, which prevents the established source brightness fluctuation correction. This problem can be overcome by a determination of the offset using the modulation efficiency of the instrument. With known modulation efficiency the offset can be calculated, and the source brightness correction can be performed on the basis of offset-corrected interferograms. We present a source brightness fluctuation correction method which performs the smoothing of the raw DC interferogram in the interferogram domain by an application of a running mean instead of high-pass filtering the corresponding spectrum after Fourier transformation of the raw DC interferogram. This smoothing can be performed with the onboard software of commercial instruments. The improvement of MCT spectra and subsequent ozone profile and total column retrievals is demonstrated. Application to InSb interferograms in the near infrared spectral region proves the equivalence with the established correction scheme.

  19. Numerical evaluation of a 13.5-nm high-brightness microplasma extreme ultraviolet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Hiroyuki, E-mail: mt146648@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za radnicí 828, 252 41 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Ejima, Takeo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-11-21

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission and its spatial distribution as well as plasma parameters in a microplasma high-brightness light source are characterized by the use of a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The expected EUV source size, which is determined by the expansion of the microplasma due to hydrodynamic motion, was evaluated to be 16 μm (full width) and was almost reproduced by the experimental result which showed an emission source diameter of 18–20 μm at a laser pulse duration of 150 ps [full width at half-maximum]. The numerical simulation suggests that high brightness EUV sources should be produced by use of a dot target based microplasma with a source diameter of about 20 μm.

  20. Numerical evaluation of a 13.5-nm high-brightness microplasma extreme ultraviolet source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission and its spatial distribution as well as plasma parameters in a microplasma high-brightness light source are characterized by the use of a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The expected EUV source size, which is determined by the expansion of the microplasma due to hydrodynamic motion, was evaluated to be 16 μm (full width) and was almost reproduced by the experimental result which showed an emission source diameter of 18–20 μm at a laser pulse duration of 150 ps [full width at half-maximum]. The numerical simulation suggests that high brightness EUV sources should be produced by use of a dot target based microplasma with a source diameter of about 20 μm

  1. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region II: X-ray Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, JaeSub; Hailey, Charles J; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Alexander, David M; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, David; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Desai, Meera A; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg^2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ~4 x and ~8 x 10^32 erg s^-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources ...

  2. Abundance gradients in low surface brightness spirals: clues on the origin of common gradients in galactic discs

    CERN Document Server

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We acquired spectra of 141 HII regions in ten late-type low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs). The analysis of the chemical abundances obtained from the nebular emission lines shows that metallicity gradients are a common feature of LSBGs, contrary to previous claims concerning the absence of such gradients in this class of galaxies. The average slope, when expressed in units of the isophotal radius, is found to be significantly shallower in comparison to galaxies of high surface brightness. This result can be attributed to the reduced surface brightness range measured across their discs, when combined with a universal surface mass density-metallicity relation. With a similar argument we explain the common abundance gradient observed in high surface brightness galaxy (HSBG) discs and its approximate dispersion. This conclusion is reinforced by our result that LSBGs share the same common abundance gradient with HSBGs, when the slope is expressed in terms of the exponential disc scale length.

  3. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy

  4. At the Cutting Edge of Bright Beams: The NSLS Source Development Lab (432nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspired by the discoveries with synchrotron light at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and similar facilities around the world, researchers are looking for more brilliant beams of light. To develop this next-generation of light sources, accelerator physicists at the NSLS Source Development Laboratory (SDL) make use of a magnesium photocathode irradiated by ultraviolet laser light to produce electron beams of unprecedented brightness. As Murphy will describe in his talk, he and fellow researchers have developed various techniques to catch molecules and atoms in action. In one recent study, the researchers used a laser to control the pulse duration of light from a free-electron laser (FEL), a type of light source with a potential peak brightness up to one billion times higher than that of ordinary synchrotron light. In another technique, Murphy and his colleagues generated extremely short pulses of terahertz radiation that are the highest intensity of their type ever produced.

  5. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  6. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    OpenAIRE

    Wevers, T.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C.; Nelemans, G.; van Grunsven, T.; Gonzalez-Solares, E. A.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T.J.; Britt, C.; Hynes, R.I.; Johnson, C; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centered at Galactic latitude b = 1.5 degrees above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l x b) = (6x1) degrees. The catalogue consists of 2 or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H{\\alpha} filters. It is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5{\\sigma} depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean ro...

  7. Modeling of emissive properties and electron-optical parameters of ultrahigh brightness pointed field electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: lt is well known that high brightness field electron sources are widely used in various electron probe analytical instruments and technological units. The reduced brightness (B) of electron probes formed by electron-optical systems (EOS) of those instruments and units may reach very high values (up to ∼ 108 A/(m2 sr V)). However, the known traditional applications do not exhaust the potentials of field (and thermal field) emission sources. Specifically, of considerable interest are the prospects for creating ultrahigh brightness electron beams. Forming electron beams with B >> 108 A/(m2 sr V) would make feasible development of a new class of electron probe instruments which will help to solve a number of current scientific and technological problems including those of micromechanics and microelectromechanics. Note that the main functional feature of such instruments is the possibility of in-depth analysis and surface modification of condensed matter exposed to an electronic beam whose power density (P) exceeds a threshold level necessary for the initiation of electron ablation. Since P ∞ B ∞ Bs, where Bs is the brightness of the electron source of EOS, the purpose of the present work was to study physical and technological aspects of the development of ultrahigh brightness pointed field electron sources. To solve the problem stated, one should first find an answer to the basic question, namely, whether Bs levels reached so far are maximum possible (or approach the physical limit for Bs) and, if not, how can we increase Bs of field emitters? To answer the above question, we studied emissive and electron-optical characteristics of various emitters in various modes of field emission, which include the following characteristic types of processes: Extended Schottky Emission, Thermal Field Emission (TFE), and finally ('pure') Field Emission. The numerical modeling of the electrostatic field potential distribution for a conventional electrode geometry in

  8. High-brightness beamline for X-ray spectroscopy at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard-x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order-of-magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new open-quotes Cowan typeclose quotes double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS

  9. High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Travish, G; Borland, M; Hahne, M; Harkay, K C; Lewellen, J W; Lumpkin, Alex H; Milton, S V; Sereno, N S

    2000-01-01

    The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventional linacs. Improvements have been made to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac in order to produce and characterize high-brightness beams. Specifically, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL in support of fourth-generation light source research. The enhancements to the linac technical and diagnostic capabilities that allowed for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm are described. Recent results, includi...

  10. Isotropy of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and multiple supernova I galactic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are usually associated with an extragalactic origin. Active galactic nuclei are an unlikely source because of photon drag. Here the possibility of supernova events are considered. The time spread of arrival of 10/sup 20/ eV protons is 100 to 400 years at 10 to 20 kpc and the angular spread is +-15 to +-30/sup 0/ depending upon the Galactic field configuration. The time spread is sufficient to include several to a dozen type I SN. This is enough events and angular spread to include the observed data. The concentration of the observed events at the galactic poles is contradictory. The flux is reasonable if the observed flux and slope at 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 15/ eV is characteristic of the source(s) and confined at this energy for roughly 100 traversals of the Galaxy, or 3 x 10/sup 6/ years.

  11. Search for TeV gamma rays from extragalactic sources and the Galactic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ooty atmospheric Cerenkov array was used in 1982-83 to see if the galactic center and the extra-galactic sources 3C 273, Centaurus A emit gamma rays at TeV energies. The ON/OFF method was used wherein the source was tracked for 16 minutes and immediately afterwards, a background region in the same zenith angle range was tracked for the next 16 minutes. Data were taken for approx 15 hours (55 scans) on 3C273, approx 7 hours (26 scans) on Cen A and 5 hours (19 scans) on galactic center. A preliminary analysis involving direct comparison of total rates on and off the source shows no significant excess from any of these orbits. Results of detailed analysis using different energy thresholds are presented

  12. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  13. Demonstration of a bright and compact source of tripartite nonclassical light

    OpenAIRE

    Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Andreoni, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the nonclassical photon number correlations expected in tripartite continuous variable states obtained by parametric processes. Our scheme involves a single nonlinear crystal, where two interlinked parametric interactions take place simultaneously, and represents a bright and compact source of a sub-shot-noise tripartite light field. We analyze the effects of the pump intensities on the numbers of detected photons and on the amount of noise reduction in some deta...

  14. A bright single-photon source based on a photonic trumpet

    OpenAIRE

    Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.; Bleuse, Joël; Dupuy, Emmanuel; Gregersen, Niels; Mørk, Jesper; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Claudon, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-like photonic nanowires, which are optical waveguides made of a high refractive index material n, have recently emerged as non-resonant systems providing an efficient spontaneous emission (SE) control. When they embed a quantum emitter like a quantum dot (QD), they find application to the realization of bright sources of quantum light and, reversibly, provide an efficient interface between propagating photons and the QD. For a wire diameter ∼ λ/n (λ is the operation wavelength), the fra...

  15. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  16. Design of bright, fiber-coupled and fully factorable photon pair sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From quantum computation to quantum key distribution, many quantum-enhanced applications rely on the ability to generate pure single photons. Even though the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC) is widely used as the basis for photon-pair sources, the conditions for pure heralded single-photon generation, taking into account both spectral and spatial degrees of freedom, have not been fully described. We present an analysis of the spatio-temporal correlations present in photon pairs produced by type-I, non-collinear SPDC. We derive a set of conditions for full factorability in all degrees of freedom-required for the heralding of pure single photons-between the signal and idler modes. In this paper, we consider several possible approaches for the design of bright, fiber-coupled and factorable photon-pair sources. We show through numerical simulations of the exact equations that sources based on: (i) the suppression of spatio-temporal entanglement according to our derived conditions and (ii) a tightly focused pump beam together with optimized fiber-collection modes and spectral filtering of the signal and idler photon pairs, lead to a source brightness of the same order of magnitude. Likewise, we find that both of these sources lead to a drastically higher factorable photon-pair flux, compared to an unengineered source.

  17. A high brightness lithium metal ion source for nuclear microprobe applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further development of a lithium liquid metal ion source for use in the terminal of a Van de Graaff accelerator is described. Test bench measurements of the resulting Li beam at 22 keV indicated a brightness of 5x104 A m-2 rad-2 V-1 on the beam axis, showing interesting potential for use in MeV microprobe applications. Uses of MeV Li beams produced with an early version of the source are described. They include microprobe scanning and high depth resolution RBS measurements. (orig.)

  18. Detection of a new, bright X-ray source in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, M. J.; Bird, A. J.; McBride, V.; Bartlett, E. S.; Haberl, F.

    2013-11-01

    Observations by the INTEGRAL space observatory on 25-26 October 2013 and 30-31 October 2013 of the Small Magellanic Cloud & Bridge detected a previously uncatalogued bright X-ray source. The source is much brighter in the first observation than the second and is seen in both the IBIS and the JEM-X instruments. A peak flux of approximately 4mCrab was detected in both IBIS and JEM-X detectors in the 20-40 keV range.

  19. Long-term variability in bright hard X-ray sources: 5+ years of BATSE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. R.; Harmon, B. A.; McCollough, M. L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Sahi, M.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Deal, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    The operation of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO)/burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) continues to provide data for inclusion into a data base for the analysis of long term variability in bright, hard X-ray sources. The all-sky capability of BATSE provides up to 30 flux measurements/day for each source. The long baseline and the various rising and setting occultation flux measurements allow searches for periodic and quasi-periodic signals with periods of between several hours to hundreds of days to be conducted. The preliminary results from an analysis of the hard X-ray variability in 24 of the brightest BATSE sources are presented. Power density spectra are computed for each source and profiles are presented of the hard X-ray orbital modulations in some X-ray binaries, together with amplitude modulations and variations in outburst durations and intensities in recurrent X-ray transients.

  20. High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector: The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac

    OpenAIRE

    Travish, G.; Biedron, S; Borland, M.; Hahne, M.; Harkay, K.; Lewellen, J.W.; Lumpkin, A.; Milton, S.; Sereno, N.

    2000-01-01

    The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventiona...

  1. Simple, compact, high brightness source for x-ray lithography and x-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, compact, high brightness x-ray source has recently been built. This source utilizes a commercially available, cylindrical geometry electron beam evaporator, which has been modified to enhance the thermal cooling to the anode. Cooling is accomplished by using standard, low-conductivity laboratory water, with an inlet pressure of less than 50 psi, and a flow rate of approx.0.3 gal/min. The anode is an inverted cone geometry for efficient cooling. The x-ray source has a measured sub-millimeter spot size (FWHM). The anode has been operated at 1 KW e-beam power (10 KV, 100 ma). Higher operating levels will be investigated. A variety of different x-ray lines can be obtained by the simple interchange of anodes of different materials. Typical anodes are made from easily machined metals, or materials which are vacuum deposited onto a copper anode. Typically, a few microns of material is sufficient to stop 10 KV electrons without significantly decreasing the thermal conductivity through the anode. The small size and high brightness of this source make it useful for step and repeat exposures over several square centimeter areas, especially in a research laboratory environment. For an aluminum anode, the estimated Al-K x-ray flux at 10 cms from the source is 70 μW/cm2

  2. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. J.; Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Twedt, K. A.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Wilson, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 μK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review, we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Nevertheless, a number of promising new approaches have been proposed and/or demonstrated, suggesting that a rapid evolution of this type of source is likely in the near future.

  3. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  4. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  5. Bright focused ion beam sources based on laser-cooled atoms

    CERN Document Server

    McClelland, J J; Knuffman, B; Twedt, K A; Schwarzkopf, A; Wilson, T M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale focused ion beams (FIBs) represent one of the most useful tools in nanotechnology, enabling nanofabrication via milling and gas-assisted deposition, microscopy and microanalysis, and selective, spatially resolved doping of materials. Recently, a new type of FIB source has emerged, which uses ionization of laser cooled neutral atoms to produce the ion beam. The extremely cold temperatures attainable with laser cooling (in the range of 100 uK or below) result in a beam of ions with a very small transverse velocity distribution. This corresponds to a source with extremely high brightness that rivals or may even exceed the brightness of the industry standard Ga+ liquid metal ion source. In this review we discuss the context of ion beam technology in which these new ion sources can play a role, their principles of operation, and some examples of recent demonstrations. The field is relatively new, so only a few applications have been demonstrated, most notably low energy ion microscopy with Li ions. Never...

  6. Potential of KM3NeT to observe galactic neutrino point-like sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Agata

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT (http://www.km3net.org">http://www.km3net.org) will be the next-generation cubic-kilometre-scale neutrino telescope to be installed in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. This location will allow for surveying the Galactic Centre, most of the Galactic Plane as well as a large part of the sky. We report KM3NeT discovery potential for the SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 and the PWN Vela X and its sensitivity to point-like sources with an E-2 spectrum.

  7. H2O maser survey of IRAS sources at high galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, P.; Codella, C.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Pareschi, G.

    A high galactic latitude sample of 175 IRAS sources located within the core of molecular clouds has been searched for H2O maser emission with the Medicina 32 m dish operated at 22 GHz. Seventeen percent of the sample previously searched by other authors contained only four detections. The search did not produce any new water maser emitter, while the previously known maser were seen again. The low value of 2 percent overall detection rate can be explained in terms of Galactic distribution of massive cores.

  8. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z>4.5

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Rocco; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É; Gurvits, Leonid I; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on observations of an additional ten z>4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50%. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z>4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis ...

  9. The broad-band properties of the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ceca, R D; Caccianiga, A; Severgnini, P; Braito, V

    2004-01-01

    We present here "The XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey", a survey program conducted by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Center. In particular we discuss the main goals of this project, we present the sample(s) and the current optical breakdown and we discuss some broad band spectral properties as derived from an hardness ratio analysis of the single sources. Finally we report the 4.5--7.5 keV Log(N$>$S)-LogS for type 1 and type 2 AGN.

  10. Prospects for Detecting Galactic Sources of Cosmic Neutrinos with IceCube: An Update

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis; Niro, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Air-Cherenkov telescopes have mapped the Galactic plane at TeV energies. Here we evaluate the prospects for detecting the neutrino emission from sources in the Galactic plane assuming that the highest energy photons originate from the decay of pions, which yields a straightforward prediction for the neutrino flux from the decay of the associated production of charged pions. Four promising sources are identified based on having a large flux and a flat spectrum. We subsequently evaluate the probability of their identification above the atmospheric neutrino background in IceCube data as a function of time. We show that observing them over the twenty-year lifetime of the instrumentation is likely, and that some should be observable at the $3\\,\\sigma$ level with six years of data. In the absence of positive results, we derive constraints on the spectral index and cut-off energy of the sources, assuming a hadronic acceleration mechanism.

  11. Galactic survey of 44Ti sources with the IBIS telescope onboard INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G.; Churazov, Eugene M.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Grebenev, Sergey A.

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of the deepest Galactic plane (|b| onboard the INTEGRAL satellite during 12 yr of operation. The peak sensitivity of our survey reached an unprecedented level of 4.8 × 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 (3σ) that improves the sensitivity of the survey done by Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/COMPTEL by a factor of ˜5. As a result, constraining upper limits for all sources from the catalogue of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs; Green 2014) are derived. These upper limits can be used to estimate the exposure needed to detect 44Ti emission from any known SNR using existing and prospective X- and gamma-ray telescopes. Among the youngest Galactic SNRs, only Cas A shows significant 44Ti emission flux in good agreement with the NuSTAR measurements. We did not detect any other sources of titanium emission in the Galactic plane at significance level higher than 5σ confirming previous claims of the rarity of such 44Ti-producing SNRs.

  12. Galactic survey of 44Ti sources with the IBIS telescope onboard INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Tsygankov, Sergey S; Lutovinov, Alexander A; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G; Churazov, Eugene M; Sunyaev, Rashid A; Grebenev, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the deepest Galactic Plane (|b| < 17.5 deg) survey in the 67.9 and 78.4 keV nuclear de-excitation lines of titanium-44 (44Ti) performed using the data acquired with the IBIS/ISGRI instrument onboard the INTEGRAL satellite during 12 years of operation. The peak sensitivity of our survey reached an unprecedented level of $4.8\\times10^{-6}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (3 sigma) that improves the sensitivity of the survey done by CGRO/COMPTEL by a factor of ~5. As a result, constraining upper limits for all sources from the catalog of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs; Green 2014) are derived. These upper limits can be used to estimate the exposure needed to detect 44Ti emission from any known SNR using existing and prospective X- and gamma-ray telescopes. Among the youngest Galactic SNRs, only Cas A shows significant 44Ti emission flux in good agreement with the NuSTAR measurements. We did not detect any other sources of titanium emission in the Galactic Plane at significance level higher ...

  13. The Nature of the Faint Chandra X-ray Sources in the Galactic Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiter, A.J.; Belczynski, K.; Harrison, T. E.

    2005-01-01

    Recent Chandra observations have revealed a large population of faint X-ray point sources in the Galactic Centre. The observed population consists of about 2000 faint sources in the luminosity range ~10^31-10^33 erg/s. The majority of these sources (70%) are described by hard spectra, while the rest are rather soft. The nature of these sources still remains unknown. Belczynski & Taam (2004) demonstrated that X-ray binaries with neutron star or black hole accretors may account for most of the ...

  14. THE CATALOG OF POSITIONS OF OPTICALLY BRIGHT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES OBRS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future space-borne astrometry missions, such as Gaia, will be able to determine the optical positions of hundreds of quasars with submilliarcsecond accuracies comparable to those achieved in radio by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Comparisons of coordinate systems from space-borne missions and VLBI will be very important, first for investigations of possible systematic errors and second for investigations of possible shifts between centroids of radio and optical emissions in active galactic nuclei. In order to make such a comparison more robust, a program for densification of the grid of radio sources detectable with both VLBI and Gaia was launched in 2006. Program sources are 398 quasars with declinations > – 10° that are brighter than 18 mag at the V band. The first two observing campaigns were run in 2007-2008. In the third campaign, a set of 291 objects from that list was observed with the VLBA+EVN in 2010-2011 with the primary goal of producing their images with milliarcsecond resolution. In this paper, following the method of absolute astrometry, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these observations. The catalog of positions of 295 target sources, estimates of their correlated flux densities at 2.2 and 8.4 GHz, and their images are presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in a range of 2-200 mas, with a median of 3.2 mas.

  15. Theoretical galactic cosmic ray electron spectrum obtained for sources of varying geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokipii and Meyer have recently obtained an electron density energy spectrum of the cosmic rays, originating in the Galaxy, using integral solutions of the steady state transfer equations, by considering a circular cylindric galactic disc as source and approximating the resulting fourth order integral. In this report, we present general results, obtained by using an arbitrary circular cylindric source, without restricting ourselves to the galactic disc. The integrals are treated exactly. The conclusions of Jokipii and Meyer form special cases of these results. We also obtain an exponential energy variation which, at the moment, is not observed experimentally. The second part of this work deals with more complicated, but perhaps more realistic models of elliptic cylindric and ellipsoidal galactic disc sources. One may also note that a very large source concentrated in a very small region gives a spectrum not unlike that for a small source distributed throughout a large volume. Finally, it may be remarked that the model adopted is much less restrictive than the artificial conception of 'leakage time' followed by other workers. (author)

  16. Detection of Galactic Center source G2 at 3.8 $\\mu$m during periapse passage

    CERN Document Server

    Witzel, Gunther; Morris, Mark; Sitarski, Breann; Boehle, Anna; Naoz, Smadar; Campbell, Randall; Becklin, Eric; Canalizo, Gabriela; Chappell, Samantha; Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica; Matthews, Keith; Meyer, Leo; Stockton, Alan; Wizinowich, Peter; Yelda, Sylvana

    2014-01-01

    We report new observations of Galactic Center source G2 from the W. M. Keck Observatory. G2 is a dusty red object associated with gas that shows tidal interactions as it nears closest approach (periapse) with the Galaxy's central black hole. Our observations, conducted as G2 passed through periapse, were designed to test the proposal that G2 is a 3 earth mass gas cloud. Such a cloud should be tidally disrupted during periapse passage. The data were obtained using the Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics system (LGSAO) and the facility near-infrared camera (NIRC2) through the K' [2.1 $\\mu$m] and L' [3.8 $\\mu$m] broadband filters. Several key results emerge from these observations: 1) G2 has survived its closest approach to the central black hole as a compact, unresolved source at L'; 2) G2's L' brightness measurements are consistent with those over the last decade; 3) G2's motion continues to be consistent with a Keplerian model. These results rule out G2 as a pure gas cloud and imply that G2 has a central...

  17. A bright on-demand source of indistinguishable single photons at telecom wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Je-Hyung; Richardson, Christopher J K; Leavitt, Richard P; Waks, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance quantum communication relies on the ability to efficiently generate and prepare single photons at telecom wavelengths. In many applications these photons must also be indistinguishable such that they exhibit interference on a beamsplitter, which implements effective photon-photon interactions. However, deterministic generation of indistinguishable single photons with high brightness remains a challenging problem. We demonstrate a telecom wavelength source of indistinguishable single photons using an InAs/InP quantum dot in a nanophotonic cavity. The cavity enhances the quantum dot emission, resulting in a nearly Gaussian transverse mode profile with high out-coupling efficiency exceeding 46%, leading to detected photon count rates that would exceed 1.5 million counts per second. We also observe Purcell enhanced spontaneous emission rate as large as 4. Using this source, we generate linearly polarized, high purity single photons at telecom-wavelength and demonstrate the indistinguishable nature o...

  18. Source Plane Reconstruction of the Bright Lensed Galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Wuyts, Eva; Koester, Benjamin P.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Barrientos, L. Felipe

    2011-01-01

    We present new HST/WFC3 imaging data of RCS2 032727-132609, a bright lensed galaxy at z=1.7 that is magnified and stretched by the lensing cluster RCS2 032727-132623. Using this new high-resolution imaging, we modify our previous lens model (which was based on ground-based data) to fully understand the lensing geometry, and use it to reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc represents a unique opportunity to peer into 100-pc scale structures in a high redshift galaxy. This new source reconstruction will be crucial for a future analysis of the spatially-resolved rest-UV and rest-optical spectra of the brightest parts of the arc.

  19. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, N.

    2016-07-01

    The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  20. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Bassa, C; Nelemans, G; van Grunsven, T; Gonzalez-Solares, E A; Torres, M A P; Heinke, C; Steeghs, D; Maccarone, T J; Britt, C; Hynes, R I; Johnson, C; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centered at Galactic latitude b = 1.5 degrees above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l x b) = (6x1) degrees. The catalogue consists of 2 or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H{\\alpha} filters. It is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5{\\sigma} depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ~ 10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all o...

  1. Simulation study of a photo-injector for brightness improvement in Thomson scattering X-ray source via ballistic bunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the peak brightness is beneficial to various applications of the Thomson scattering X-ray source. A higher peak brightness of the scattered X-ray pulse demands a shorter scattering electron beam realized by beam compression in the electron beam-line. In this article, we study the possibility of compressing the electron beam in a typical S-band normal conducting photo-injector via ballistic bunching, through just adding a short RF linac section right behind the RF gun, so as to improve the peak brightness of the scattered x-ray pulse. Numerical optimization by ASTRA demonstrates that the peak current can increase from 50 A to > 300 A for a 500 pC, 10 ps FWHM electron pulse, while normalized transverse RMS emittance and RMS energy spread increases very little. Correspondingly, the peak brightness of the Thomson scattering X-ray source is estimated to increase about three times. (authors)

  2. Stellar Sources in the ISOGAL Inner Galactic Bulge Field (=00, =-10)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Κ. Ojha; A. Omont; S. Ganesh; G. Simon; Μ. Schultheis

    2000-06-01

    ISOGAL is a survey at 7 and 15 μm with ISOCAM of the inner galactic disk and bulge of our Galaxy. The survey covers ∼ 22 deg2 in selected areas of the central = ± 30 degree of the inner Galaxy. In this paper, we report the study of a small ISOGAL field in the inner galactic bulge (=0°, =-1°, area = 0.033deg2). Using the multicolor near-infrared data (IJK) of DENIS (DEep Near Infrared Southern Sky Survey) and mid-infrared ISOGAL data, we discuss the nature of the ISOGAL sources. The various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the paper. While most of the detected sources are red giants (RGB tip stars), a few of them show an excess in J-K and K-[15] colors with respect to the red giant sequence. Most of them are probably AGB stars with large mass-loss rates.

  3. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-line Calibration Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  4. THE CATALOG OF POSITIONS OF OPTICALLY BRIGHT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES OBRS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. >-100 was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3-7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  5. Optical Identifications of Five INTEGRAL Hard X-ray Sources in the Galactic Plane Region

    CERN Document Server

    Bikmaev, I F; Revnivtsev, M G; Sazonov, S Yu; Sunyaev, R A; Pavlinsky, M N; Sakhibullin, N A

    2008-01-01

    The results of optical identifications of five hard X-ray sources in the Galactic plane region from the INTEGRAL all-sky survey are presented. The X-ray data on one source (IGRJ20216+4359) are published for the first time. The optical observations were performed with 1.5-m RTT-150 telescope (TUBITAK National Observatory, Antalya, Turkey) and 6-m BTA telescope (Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhny Arkhyz, Russia). A blazar, three Seyfert galaxies, and a high-mass X-ray binary are among the identified sources.

  6. The galactic center arc as source of high energy gamma-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1997-01-01

    observed flux is constant within the statistical limits and the spectrum is very hard. The lack of variability makes it highly unlikely that any of the compact sources in the vicinity of the Galactic Center is the counterpart of 2EG J1746-2852. This includes the peculiar source Sgr A* at the very center of...... the Galaxy, which is often discussed to harbour a black hole of 10(6) M.. Existing radio data on the arc support the view that its synchrotron emission originates from cooling, initially monoenergetic electrons which diffuse and convect from their sources to the outer extensions of the arc. If the...

  7. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  8. Insights into the Galactic Cosmic-ray Source from the TIGER Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason T.; Barbier, L. M.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, J. R.; Geier, S.; Israel, M. H.; Lodders, K.; Mewaldt,R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; deNolfo, G. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Schindler, S. M.; Scott, L. M.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from 50 days of data accumulated in two Antarctic flights of the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER). With a detector system composed of scintillators, Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating optical fibers, TIGER has a geometrical acceptance of 1.7 sq m sr and a charge resolution of 0.23 cu at Iron. TIGER has obtained abundance measurements of some of the rare galactic cosmic rays heavier than iron, including Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, and Sr, as well as the more abundant lighter elements (down to Si). The heavy elements have long been recognized as important probes of the nature of the galactic cosmic-ray source and accelerator. After accounting for fragmentation of cosmic-ray nuclei as they propagate through the Galaxy and the atmosphere above the detector system, the TIGER source abundances are consistent with a source that is a mixture of about 20% ejecta from massive stars and 80% interstellar medium with solar system composition. This result supports a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations previously inferred from ACE-CRIS data of more abundant lighter elements. These TIGER data also support a cosmic-ray acceleration model in which elements present in interstellar grains are accelerated preferentially compared with those found in interstellar gas.

  9. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  10. A Bright Spatially-Coherent Compact X-ray Synchrotron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Martins, J L; Martins, S F; Bellei, C; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Fonseca, R; Huntington, C; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C; Schreiber, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Silva, L O; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Each successive generation of x-ray machines has opened up new frontiers in science, such as the first radiographs and the determination of the structure of DNA. State-of-the-art x-ray sources can now produce coherent high brightness keV x-rays and promise a new revolution in imaging complex systems on nanometre and femtosecond scales. Despite the demand, only a few dedicated synchrotron facilities exist worldwide, partially due the size and cost of conventional (accelerator) technology. Here we demonstrate the use of a recently developed compact laser-plasma accelerator to produce a well-collimated, spatially-coherent, intrinsically ultrafast source of hard x-rays. This method reduces the size of the synchrotron source from the tens of metres to centimetre scale, accelerating and wiggling a high electron charge simultaneously. This leads to a narrow-energy spread electron beam and x-ray source that is >1000 times brighter than previously reported plasma wiggler and thus has the potential to facilitate a myri...

  11. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  12. Broadband and high-brightness light source: glass-clad Ti:sapphire crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Chang; Yang, Teng-I; Jheng, Dong-Yo; Hsu, Chun-Yang; Yang, Tzu-Te; Ho, Tuan-Shu; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2015-12-01

    High-brightness near-infrared broadband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was generated by glass-clad Ti:sapphire crystal fibers, which were developed using the co-drawing laser-heated pedestal growth method. As much as 29.2 mW of ASE power was generated using 520 nm laser diodes as the excitation source on an a-cut, 18 μm core-diameter Ti:sapphire crystal fiber (CF). The 3 dB bandwidth was 163.8 nm, and the radiance was 53.94  W·mm(-2) sr(-1). The propagation loss of the glass-clad sapphire CF measured using the cutback method was 0.017  cm(-1) at 780 nm. For single-mode applications, more than 100 μW of power was coupled into a SM600 single-mode fiber. PMID:26625059

  13. Detection of a very bright source close to the LMC supernova SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenson, P.; Papaliolios, C.; Karovska, M.; Noyes, R.

    1987-01-01

    High angular resolution observations of the supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud, SN 1987A, have revealed a bright source separated from the SN by approximately 60 mas with a magnitude difference of 2.7 at 656 nm (H-alpha). Speckle imaging techniques were applied to data recorded with the CfA two-dimensional photon counting detector on the CTIO 4 m telescope on March 25 and April 2 to allow measurements in H-alpha on both nights and at 533 nm and 450 nm on the second night. The nature of this object is as yet unknown, though it is almost certainly a phenomenon related to the SN.

  14. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  15. Evolution of laser-produced Sn extreme ultraviolet source diameter for high-brightness source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roy, Amitava; Arai, G.; Hara, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Ohashi, H.; Sunahara, A.; Li, B.; Dunne, P.; O´Sullivan, G.; Miura, Taisuke; Mocek, Tomáš; Endo, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 7 (2014), "074103-1"-"074103-4". ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant ostatní: HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * dynamics * EUV source * ultraviolet source * targets Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  16. A CATALOG OF 24 μm SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a ∼10.5 x 80 (220 x 1195 pc) multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer 24 μm image of the Galactic center (GC) and an accompanying point-source list. This image is the highest spatial resolution (6'' ∼ 0.25 pc) and sensitivity map ever taken across the GC at this wavelength, showing the emission by warm dust in unprecedented detail. Over 120,000 point sources are identified in this catalog with signal-to-noise ratios greater than five and flux densities from 0.6 mJy to 9 Jy.

  17. Populations of Bright X-ray Sources in the Starburst Galaxies NGC 4038/4039

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Wei Liu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-01-01

    Assuming a naive star formation history,we construct synthetic X-ray source populations.using a population synthesis code,for comparison with the observed X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039.We have included highand intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.young rotation-powered pulsars and fallback disk-fed black holes in modeling the bright X-ray sources detected.We find that the majority of the X-ray sources are likely to be intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.but for typical binary evolution parameters.the predicted XLF seems to be steeper than observed.We note that the shape of the XLFs depends critically on the existence of XLF break for young populations.and suggest super-Eddington accretion luminosities or the existence of intermediate-mass black holes to account for the high luminosity end and the slope of the XLF in NGC 4038/4039.

  18. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  19. Bright Laser-Driven Neutron Source Based on the Relativistic Transparency of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrons are unique particles to probe samples in many fields of research ranging from biology to material sciences to engineering and security applications. Access to bright, pulsed sources is currently limited to large accelerator facilities and there has been a growing need for compact sources over the recent years. Short pulse laser driven neutron sources could be a compact and relatively cheap way to produce neutrons with energies in excess of 10 MeV. For more than a decade experiments have tried to obtain neutron numbers sufficient for applications. Our recent experiments demonstrated an ion acceleration mechanism based on the concept of relativistic transparency. Using this new mechanism, we produced an intense beam of high energy (up to 170 MeV) deuterons directed into a Be converter to produce a forward peaked neutron flux with a record yield, on the order of 1010n/sr. We present results comparing the two acceleration mechanisms and the first short pulse laser generated neutron radiograph.

  20. New Detections of Galactic Molecular Absorption Systems toward ALMA Calibrator Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Ryo; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Umehata, Hideki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) detections of molecular absorption lines in Bands 3, 6 and 7 toward four radio-loud quasars, which were observed as the bandpass and complex gain calibrators. The absorption systems, three of which are newly detected, are found to be Galactic origin. Moreover, HCO absorption lines toward two objects are detected, which almost doubles the number of HCO absorption samples in the Galactic diffuse medium. In addition, high HCO to H13CO+ column density ratios are found, suggesting that the interstellar media (ISM) observed toward the two calibrators are in photodissociation regions, which observationally illustrates the chemistry of diffuse ISM driven by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These results demonstrate that calibrators in the ALMA Archive are potential sources for the quest for new absorption systems and for detailed investigation of the nature of the ISM.

  1. New detections of Galactic molecular absorption systems toward ALMA calibrator sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ryo; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Umehata, Hideki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We report on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) detections of molecular absorption lines in Bands 3, 6, and 7 toward four radio-loud quasars, which were observed as the bandpass and complex gain calibrators. The absorption systems, three of which are newly detected, are found to be Galactic origin. Moreover, HCO absorption lines toward two objects are detected, which almost doubles the number of HCO absorption samples in the Galactic diffuse medium. In addition, high HCO-to-H13CO+ column density ratios are found, suggesting that the interstellar media (ISM) observed toward the two calibrators are in photodissociation regions, which observationally illustrates the chemistry of diffuse ISM driven by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These results demonstrate that calibrators in the ALMA Archive are potential sources for the quest for new absorption systems and for detailed investigation of the nature of the ISM.

  2. Investigating the X-ray Emission from the Galactic TeV Gamma-ray Source MGRO J1908+06

    CERN Document Server

    Pandel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    MGRO J1908+06 is a bright, extended TeV gamma-ray source located near the Galactic plane. The TeV emission has previously been attributed to the pulsar wind nebula of the radio-faint gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+0602 discovered with Fermi. However, studies of the TeV morphology with VERITAS have shown that MGRO J1908+06 is somewhat larger than other pulsar wind nebulae of similar age and that the TeV spectrum does not soften with distance from the pulsar as is observed for other pulsar wind nebulae. Although MGRO J1908+06 is very bright in gamma rays with a flux corresponding to ~80% of the Crab Nebula flux at 20 TeV, no extended emission at other energies has so far been detected. We report on our analysis of X-ray data obtained with XMM-Newton of the region near MGRO J1908+06. We searched the data for point-like sources and detected several hard-spectrum X-ray sources that could be associated with the TeV emission, including the gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+0602. We also performed an extended source analysis to...

  3. Variability of Optical Counterparts to X-ray Selected Sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher; Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Britt, Christopher; Steeghs, Danny; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide-field, multi-wavelength survey of new X-ray sources in the Galactic Bulge detected with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The goals of the GBS are to test binary population models by uncovering quiescent Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXB), and to identify suitable systems for follow-up mass determination using multi-wavelength observations. This follow-up is essential to better determine black hole and neutron star mass distributions. We present preliminary results from the southernmost portion of the GBS positioned 1.5-2.0 degrees below the Galactic Center which contains 424 unique X-ray sources. The optical photometry presented here were acquired using the DECam imager and the previous Mosaic-II imager on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We combine photometry with optical spectroscopy from several different telescopes to help characterize the detected X-ray sources. To accomplish this goal, we analyze the light curve morphology and the spectroscopic features of the optical counterparts to classify these binary systems. I will describe the technique for determining the correct optical counterpart within the error circle using image subtraction and report on the statistics of the sample. I will then summarize the candidate LMXBs we have identified so far and highlight other interesting sources. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789 and by NASA through Chandra Award Number AR3-14002X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060. We also acknowledge support from a Graduate Student Research Award administered by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE).

  4. Deriving global structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field from Faraday Rotation Measures of extragalactic sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, M S; Kronberg, P P; Newton-McGee, K J

    2011-01-01

    We made use of the two latest sets of Rotational Measures (RMs) of extra-galactic radio sources, namely the NRAO VLA Sky Survey otation Measures Catalogue, and a compilation by Kronberg&Newton-McGee(2011), to infer the global structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field (GMF). We have checked that these two data sets are consistent with each other. Motivated by clear patterns in the observed distribution of RMs over the sky, we considered GMF models consisting of the two components: disk (spiral or ring) and halo. The parameters of these components were determined by fitting different model field geometries to the observed RMs. We found that the model consisting of a symmetric (with respect to the Galactic plane) spiral disk and anti-symmetric halo fits the data best, and reproduces the observed distribution of RMs over the sky very well. We confirm that ring disk models are disfavored. Our results favor small pitch angles around -5 degrees and an increased vertical scale of electron distribution, in agreemen...

  5. Galactic HI on the 50-AU scale in the direction of three extra-galactic sources observed with MERLIN

    OpenAIRE

    Goss, W.M.; Richards, A. M. S.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Thomasson, P.

    2008-01-01

    We present MERLIN observations of Galactic 21-cm HI absorption at an angular resolution of c. 0.1-0.2 arcsec and a velocity resolution of 0.5 km/s, in the direction of three moderately low latitude (-8< b

  6. Galactic cold cores. IV. Cold submillimetre sources: catalogue and statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montillaud, J.; Juvela, M.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Montier, L.; Marshall, D. J.; Marton, G.; Pagani, L.; Toth, L. V.; Zahorecz, S.; Ysard, N.; McGehee, P.; Paladini, R.; Falgarone, E.; Bernard, J.-P.; Motte, F.; Zavagno, A.; Doi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Context. For the project Galactic cold cores, Herschel photometric observations were carried out as a follow-up of cold regions of interstellar clouds previously identified with the Planck satellite. The aim of the project is to derive the physical properties of the population of cold sources and to study its connection to ongoing and future star formation. Aims: We build a catalogue of cold sources within the clouds in 116 fields observed with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. We wish to determine the general physical characteristics of the cold sources and to examine the correlations with their host cloud properties. Methods: From Herschel data, we computed colour temperature and column density maps of the fields. We estimated the distance to the target clouds and provide both uncertainties and reliability flags for the distances. The getsources multiwavelength source extraction algorithm was employed to build a catalogue of several thousand cold sources. Mid-infrared data were used, along with colour and position criteria, to separate starless and protostellar sources. We also propose another classification method based on submillimetre temperature profiles. We analysed the statistical distributions of the physical properties of the source samples. Results: We provide a catalogue of ~4000 cold sources within or near star forming clouds, most of which are located either in nearby molecular complexes (≲1 kpc) or in star forming regions of the nearby galactic arms (~2 kpc). About 70% of the sources have a size compatible with an individual core, and 35% of those sources are likely to be gravitationally bound. Significant statistical differences in physical properties are found between starless and protostellar sources, in column density versus dust temperature, mass versus size, and mass versus dust temperature diagrams. The core mass functions are very similar to those previously reported for other regions. On statistical grounds we find that

  7. DETECTION OF GALACTIC CENTER SOURCE G2 AT 3.8 μm DURING PERIAPSE PASSAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report new observations of the Galactic Center source G2 from the W. M. Keck Observatory. G2 is a dusty red object associated with gas that shows tidal interactions as it nears its closest approach with the Galaxy's central black hole. Our observations, conducted as G2 passed through periapse, were designed to test the proposal that G2 is a 3 Earth mass gas cloud. Such a cloud should be tidally disrupted during periapse passage. The data were obtained using the Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics system (LGSAO) and the facility near-infrared camera (NIRC2) through the K' [2.1 μm] and L' [3.8 μm] broadband filters. Several results emerge from these observations: (1) G2 has survived its closest approach to the black hole as a compact, unresolved source at L', (2) G2's L' brightness measurements are consistent with those over the last decade, (3) G2's motion continues to be consistent with a Keplerian model. These results rule out G2 as a pure gas cloud and imply that G2 has a central star. This star has a luminosity of ∼30 L ☉ and is surrounded by a large (∼2.6 AU) optically thick dust shell. The differences between the L' and Br-γ observations can be understood with a model in which L' and Br-γ emission arises primarily from internal and external heating, respectively. We suggest that G2 is a binary star merger product and will ultimately appear similar to the B-stars that are tightly clustered around the black hole (the so-called S-star cluster)

  8. Galactic Gamma-Ray Bursters The Cosmic-Ray Sources at all Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    1999-01-01

    We propose a new paradigm for the origin of nonsolar hadronic cosmic rays (CRs) at all energies: Highly relativistic, narrowly collimated jets from the birth or collapse of neutron stars in our Galaxy accelerate ambient disk and halo matter to CR energies and disperse it in hot spots which they form when they stop in the Galactic halo. Such events, seen as cosmological gamma-ray bursts in other galaxies when their beamed radiation happens to point towards Earth, account for many observed properties of the main hadronic component of CRs in a more natural way than all previously discussed CR sources.

  9. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    Among the many instruments carried on the first EURECA mission was also one aimed at doing astrophysical research. This instrument, WATCH, (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is sensitive in the 6 to 150 keV energy range and has a total field of view covering a quarter of the sky. During its 11 month operational life, EURECA tracked the Sun, and WATCH gradually scanned across the entire sky. The signals from more than two dozen known galactic X-ray sources have been identified in th...

  10. THE MULTIPHASE STRUCTURE AND POWER SOURCES OF GALACTIC WINDS IN MAJOR MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive, galaxy-scale outflows are known to be ubiquitous in major mergers of disk galaxies in the local universe. In this paper, we explore the multiphase structure and power sources of galactic winds in six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z –1, and the highest velocities (2000-3000 km s–1) are seen only in ionized gas. The outflow energy and momentum in the QSOs are difficult to produce from a starburst alone, but are consistent with the QSO contributing significantly to the driving of the flow. Finally, when all gas phases are accounted for, the outflows are massive enough to provide negative feedback to star formation.

  11. Determining the Nature of Faint X-Ray Sources from the ASCA Galactic Center Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lutovinov, A A; Karasev, D I; Shimansky, V V; Burenin, R A; Bikmaev, I F; Vorobyev, V S; Tsygankov, S S; Pavlinsky, M N

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the identification of six objects from the ASCA Galactic center and Galactic plane surveys: AXJ173548-3207, AXJ173628-3141, AXJ1739.5-2910, AXJ1740.4-2856, AXJ1740.5-2937, AXJ1743.9-2846. Chandra, XMM-Newton, and XRT/Swift X-ray data have been used to improve the positions of the optical counterparts to these sources. Thereafter, we have carried out a series of spectroscopic observations of the established optical counterparts at the RTT-150 telescope. Analysis of X-ray and optical spectra as well as photometric measurements in a wide wavelength range based on optical and infrared catalogs has allowed the nature of the program sources to be determined. Two X-ray objects have been detected in the error circle of AXJ173628-3141: one is a coronally active G star and the other may be a symbiotic star, a red giant with an accreting white dwarf. Three sources (AXJ1739.5-2910, AXJ1740.5-2937, AXJ1743.9-2846) have turned out to be active G-K stars, presumably RS CVn objects, one (AXJ1740.4-2...

  12. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  13. HerMES: disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, J. I.; Page, M. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Guo, K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Vaccari, M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ˜50 μJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ˜1 mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.

  14. Bright Single-Photon Sources Based on Anti-Reflection Coated Deterministic Quantum Dot Microlenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schnauber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on enhancing the photon-extraction efficiency (PEE of deterministic quantum dot (QD microlenses via anti-reflection (AR coating. The AR-coating deposited on top of the curved microlens surface is composed of a thin layer of Ta2O5, and is found to effectively reduce back-reflection of light at the semiconductor-vacuum interface. A statistical analysis of spectroscopic data reveals, that the AR-coating improves the light out-coupling of respective microlenses by a factor of 1.57 ± 0.71, in quantitative agreement with numerical calculations. Taking the enhancement factor into account, we predict improved out-coupling of light with a PEE of up to 50%. The quantum nature of emission from QDs integrated into AR-coated microlenses is demonstrated via photon auto-correlation measurements revealing strong suppression of two-photon emission events with g(2(0 = 0.05 ± 0.02. As such, these bright non-classical light sources are highly attractive with respect to applications in the field of quantum cryptography.

  15. EVIDENCE FOR INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES AS z > 1 RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z ∼> 1) active galactic nuclei.

  16. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, J D; Felter, T E; Searson, P C; Chen, M

    2005-02-03

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting.

  17. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting

  18. Raman-free, noble-gas-filled PCF source for ultrafast, very bright twin-beam squeezed vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Finger, Martin A; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagom\\'e-style photonic-crystal fibre. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ~2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (~50 THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes.

  19. Large peculiar motion of the solar system from the dipole anisotropy in sky brightness due to distant radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    According to the cosmological principle, the Universe should appear isotropic, without any preferred directions, to an observer whom we may consider to be fixed in the co-moving co-ordinate system of the expanding Universe. Such an observer is stationary with respect to the average distribution of the matter in the Universe and the sky brightness at any frequency should appear uniform in all directions to such an observer. However a peculiar motion of such an observer, due to a combined effect of Doppler boosting and aberration, will introduce a dipole anisotropy in the observed sky brightness; in reverse an observed dipole anisotropy in the sky brightness could be used to infer the peculiar velocity of the observer with respect to the average Universe. We determine the peculiar velocity of the solar system relative to the frame of distant radio sources, by studying the anisotropy in the sky brightness from discrete radio sources, i.e., an integrated emission from discrete sources per unit solid angle. Our re...

  20. The supernova remnant W51C: a plausible source of galactic cosmic rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzini, S. R.; Carmona, E.; Jankowski, F.; Krause, J.; Reichardt, I.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    Supernova remnants are a probable site of acceleration of particles via diffusive shock processes. High energies carried by electrons or protons are radiated into photons detectable from radio to γ rays. MAGIC has recently observed W51C, one of the most luminous galactic supernova remnants, and completed its spectrum between 50 GeV and 5 TeV. We modelled different processes for high energy photon emission of this source, and compared the predictions with the measured spectral energy distribution. It is plausible that hadrons are accelerated in the expansion front of this source, in interaction with the surrounding molecular cloud, and photons are produced in the decay of neutral mesons created in hadronic collisions.

  1. Infrared-excess Source DSO/G2 Near the Galactic Center: Theory vs. Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zajacek, Michal; Peissker, Florian; Karssen, Grischa D; Karas, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We monitored the Dusty S-cluster object (DSO/G2) during its closest approach to the Galactic Center supermassive black hole in 2014 with ESO VLT/SINFONI. We report on our findings, i.e. ionized-hydrogen emission from the DSO that remains spatially compact before and after the peribothron passage. The detection of DSO/G2 object as a compact single-peak emission line source is in contradiction with the original hypothesis of a core-less cloud that is necessarily tidally stretched, hence producing double-peak emission line profile around the pericentre passage. This strengthens the evidence that the DSO/G2 source is a dust-enshrouded young star. The accretion of material from the circumstellar disc onto the stellar surface can contribute significantly to the emission of Br$\\gamma$ line as well as to the observed large line width of the order of 10 angstroms.

  2. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    its 11 month operational life, EURECA tracked the Sun, and WATCH gradually scanned across the entire sky. The signals from more than two dozen known galactic X-ray sources have been identified in the data, and the activity state of each source has been recorded as a function of time. For several......Among the many instruments carried on the first EURECA mission was also one aimed at doing astrophysical research. This instrument, WATCH, (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is sensitive in the 6 to 150 keV energy range and has a total field of view covering a quarter of the sky. During...... special “offset pointing” program was initiated on request from the WATCH PI. This program proved very successful and allowed WATCH to scan more than 80% of the sky in the course of only two weeks....

  3. High brightness fiber laser pump sources based on single emitters and multiple single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Torsten; Wagner, Lars; Wolf, Jürgen; Bonati, Guido; Dörfel, Falk; Gabler, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Driven by the potential of the fiber laser market, the development of high brightness pump sources has been pushed during the last years. The main approaches to reach the targets of this market had been the direct coupling of single emitters (SE) on the one hand and the beam shaping of bars and stacks on the other hand, which often causes higher cost per watt. Meanwhile the power of single emitters with 100μm emitter size for direct coupling increased dramatically, which also pushed a new generation of wide stripe emitters or multi emitters (ME) of up to 1000μm emitter size respectively "minibars" with apertures of 3 to 5mm. The advantage of this emitter type compared to traditional bars is it's scalability to power levels of 40W to 60W combined with a small aperture which gives advantages when coupling into a fiber. We show concepts using this multiple single emitters for fiber coupled systems of 25W up to 40W out of a 100μm fiber NA 0.22 with a reasonable optical efficiency. Taking into account a further efficiency optimization and an increase in power of these devices in the near future, the EUR/W ratio pushed by the fiber laser manufacturer will further decrease. Results will be shown as well for higher power pump sources. Additional state of the art tapered fiber bundles for photonic crystal fibers are used to combine 7 (19) pump sources to output powers of 100W (370W) out of a 130μm (250μm) fiber NA 0.6 with nominal 20W per port. Improving those TFB's in the near future and utilizing 40W per pump leg, an output power of even 750W out of 250μm fiber NA 0.6 will be possible. Combined Counter- and Co-Propagated pumping of the fiber will then lead to the first 1kW fiber laser oscillator.

  4. Micro-fresnel structures for microscopy of laser generated bright x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief parametric survey of the x-ray characteristics of a gold micro-disk irradiated at 3 x 1014 watt/cm2 by a 1 nsec Nd-glass laser pulse has been provided as an example of a laser generated bright x-ray source. It was shown that a simple phenomenological model of the laser generated x-ray source as a microscopic equilibrium plasma radiating as a blackbody for a finite time determined by its hydrodynamic disassembly and radiation losses, serves to provide an adequate approximation to the x-ray characteristics of such sources. The current state of x-ray microscopy within the LLL laser fusion program was briefly reviewed. Kirpatrick--Baez grazing incidence reflection x-ray microscopes are being used to provide 3 to 5 μm resolution, broadband images (ΔE/E approx. 0.3) over a spectral range from .6 keV to 3.5 keV. Zone Plate Coded Imaging is used to provide 5 to 10 μm resolution, broadband (ΔE/E approx. 0.5) images over a spectral range from 3 keV to 50 keV. Efficient x-ray lensing elements with anticipated submicron resolution are being developed for narrowband (ΔE/E approx. 10-2) imaging applications over a spectral range .1 keV to 8 keV. The x-ray lens design is that of a transmission blazed Fresnel phase plate. Micro--Fresnel zone plates with 3200 A minimum linewidth have been fabricated and preliminary resolution tests begun. The first resolution test pattern, having minimum linewidth of 2.5 μm, was imaged in lambda = 8.34 A light with no difficulty. Newer test patterns with submicron minimum line are being prepared for the next stage of resolution testing. An off-axis Fresnel zone plate with 1600 A minimum linewidth is presently being fabricated for use as an imaging spectrometer in order to provide spatially separated, chromatically distinct images of characteristic line emissions from laser fusion targets

  5. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Faint Discrete X-ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morihana, Kumiko; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic Plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (~80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations, thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out Near-Infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l,b)=(0.1{\\arcdeg}, -1.4{\\arcdeg}) and (28.5{\\arcdeg}, 0.0{\\arcdeg}) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as HI(Br{\\gamma}), HeI, and HeII (2 objects), (B)...

  6. HerMES: Disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, J I; Symeonidis, M; Bock, J; Cooray, A; Farrah, D; Guo, K; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Oliver, S J; Roseboom, I G; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Vaccari, M; Wardlow, J L

    2015-01-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ~50 uJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that r...

  7. A 24 Micron Point Source Catalog of the Galactic Plane from Spitzer/MIPSGAL

    CERN Document Server

    Gutermuth, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we describe the applied methods to construct a 24 micron based point source catalog derived from the image data of the MIPSGAL 24 micron Galactic Plane Survey and the corresponding data products. The high quality catalog product contains 933,818 sources, with a total of 1,353,228 in the full archive catalog. The source tables include positional and photometric informa- tion derived from the 24 micron images, source quality and confusion flags and coun- terpart photometry from matched 2MASS, GLIMPSE, and WISE point sources. Completeness decay data cubes are constructed at 1 arcminute angular resolution that describe the varying background levels over the MIPSGAL field and the ability to extract sources of a given magnitude from this background. The completeness decay cubes are included in the set of data products. We present the results of our efforts to verify the astrometric and photometric calibration of the catalog, and present several analyses of minor anomalies in these measurements...

  8. XID Cross-Association of ROSAT/Bright Source Catalog X-ray Sources with USNO A2 Optical Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rutledge, R E; Prince, T A; Lonsdale, C; Rutledge, Robert E.; Brunner, Robert J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Lonsdale, Carol

    2000-01-01

    We quantitatively cross-associate the 18811 ROSAT Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources with optical sources in the USNO-A2 catalog, calculating the the probability of unique association (Pid) between each candidate within 75 arcsec of the X-ray source position, on the basis of optical magnitude and proximity. We present catalogs of RASS/BSC sources for which the probability of association is >98%, >90%, and >50%, which contain 2705, 5492, and 11301 unique USNO-A2 optical counterparts respectively down to the stated level of significance. We include in this catalog a list of objects in the SIMBAD database within 10 arcsec of the USNO position, as an aid to identification and source classification. The catalog is more useful than previous catalogs which either rely on plausibility arguments for association, or do not aid in selecting a counterpart between multiple off-band sources in the field. We find that a fraction ~65.8% of RASS/BSC sources have an identifiable optical counterpart, down to the mag...

  9. Localising the H.E.S.S. Galactic Centre point source

    CERN Document Server

    Van Eldik, C; Braun, I; Hermann, G; Hinton, J; Hofmann, W

    2007-01-01

    Observations by the H.E.S.S. system of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide the most sensitive measurements of the Galactic Centre region in the energy range 150 GeV - 30 TeV. The vicinity of the kinetic centre of our galaxy harbours numerous objects which could potentially accelerate particles to very high energies (VHE, > 100 GeV) and thus produce the Gamma-ray flux observed. Within statistical and systematic errors, the centroid of the point-like emission measured by H.E.S.S. was found to be in good agreement with the position of the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and the recently discovered PWN candidate G359.95-0.04. Given a systematic pointing error of about 30'', a possible association with the SNR Sgr A East could not be ruled out with the 2004 H.E.S.S. data. In this contribution an update is given on the position of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Centre source using 2005/2006 data. The systematic pointing error is reduced to 6'' per axis using guiding telescopes for pointing corrections, making it...

  10. DERIVING THE GLOBAL STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We made use of the two latest sets of rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic radio sources, namely the NRAO VLA Sky Survey rotation measures catalog and a compilation by Kronberg and Newton-McGee, to infer the global structure of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF). We have checked that these two data sets are mutually consistent. Given the existence of clear patterns in the all-sky RM distributions we considered GMF models consisting of two components: disk (spiral or ring) and halo. The parameters of these components were determined by fitting different model field geometries to the observed RMs. We found that the model consisting of a symmetric (with respect to the Galactic plane) spiral disk and antisymmetric halo fits the data best and reproduces the observed distribution of RMs over the sky very well. We confirm that ring disk models are disfavored. Our results favor small pitch angles around ∼ - 50 and an increased vertical scale of electron distribution, in agreement with some recent studies. Based on our fits, we select two benchmark models suitable for studies of cosmic ray propagation, including cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies.

  11. The Presence and Distribution of HI Absorbing Gas in Sub-galactic Sized Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pihlström, Y M; Vermeulen, R C

    2003-01-01

    We consider the incidence of HI absorption in intrinsically small sub-galactic sized extragalactic sources selected from sources classified as Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources. We find that the smaller sources (0.5 kpc). Both a spherical and an axi-symmetric gas distribution, with a radial power law density profile, can be used to explain this anti-correlation between projected linear size and HI column density. Since most detections occur in objects classified as galaxies, we argue that if the unified schemes apply to GPS/CSSs a disk distribution for the HI is more likely. The most favoured explanation for the compact sizes of the GPS/CSSs is that they are young sources evolving in a power law density medium. For the GPSs with measured expansion velocities, our derived densities are within an order of magnitude of those estimated from ram-pressure confinement of the lobes assuming equipartition. Our results therefore support the youth model.

  12. Inference of Unresolved Point Sources At High Galactic Latitudes Using Probabilistic Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Daylan, Tansu; Finkbeiner, Douglas P

    2016-01-01

    We construct a Bayesian framework to perform inference of dim or overlapping point sources. The method involves probabilistic cataloging, where samples are taken from the posterior probability distribution of catalogs consistent with an observed photon count map. By implementing across-model jumps between point source models of different dimensionality, we collect a representative ensemble of catalogs consistent with the image. In order to validate our method we sample random catalogs of the gamma-ray sky in the direction of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) by binning the data in energy and PSF (Point Spread Function) classes. Using three energy bins between $0.3 - 1$, $1 - 3$ and $3 - 10$ GeV, we identify $270\\substack{+30 -10}$ point sources inside a $40^\\circ \\times 40^\\circ$ region around the NGP above our point-source inclusion limit of $3 \\times 10^{-11}$/cm$^2$/s/sr/GeV at the $1-3$ GeV energy bin. Most of these point sources are time-variable blazars. Modeling the flux distribution as a single power law,...

  13. Gamma rays and neutrinos from a cosmic ray source in the Galactic Center region

    CERN Document Server

    Supanitsky, A D

    2013-01-01

    The center of the our Galaxy is a region where very energetic phenomena take place. In particular powerful cosmic ray sources can be located in that region. The cosmic rays accelerated in these sources may interact with ambient protons and/or low energy photons producing gamma rays and neutrinos. The observation of these two types of secondary particles can be very useful for the identification of the cosmic ray sources and for the understanding of the physical processes occurring during acceleration. Motivated by the excess in the neutrino spectrum recently reported by the IceCube Collaboration, we study in detail the shape of the gamma ray and neutrino spectra originated from the interaction of cosmic ray protons with ambient protons for sources located in the Galactic Center region. We consider different models for proton acceleration and study the impact on the gamma ray and neutrino spectra. We also discuss the possibility to constrain and even identify a particular neutrino source by using the informati...

  14. A new method for imaging faint objects nearby a bright source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In astronomical observation, it is difficult to obtain the image of faint objects in the peripheral area around a bright celestial body. In order to solve the problem, a new method is designed and experimented, which is called the separation readout technique (SRT). SRT is different from either the traditional coronagraphy or the newly-developed anti-blooming CCD technique, and allows an enough-long exposure to the faint objects in the area around a bright celestial body with the well-preserved bright body's image in one frame. This paper describes in detail the principle of SRT, the computer simulation, the experimental devising and result of SRT observation on a telescope.

  15. Note: Development of a volume-limited dot target for a high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on production of volume-limited dot targets based on electron beam lithographic and sputtering technologies for use in efficient high brightness extreme ultraviolet microplasma sources. We successfully produced cylindrical tin (Sn) targets with diameters of 10, 15, and 20 μm and a height of 150 nm. The calculated spectrum around 13.5 nm was in good agreement with that obtained experimentally

  16. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a γ Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/γ Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  17. The galactic center arc as source of high energy gamma-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.

    1997-01-01

    observed flux is constant within the statistical limits and the spectrum is very hard. The lack of variability makes it highly unlikely that any of the compact sources in the vicinity of the Galactic Center is the counterpart of 2EG J1746-2852. This includes the peculiar source Sgr A* at the very center of...... the Galaxy, which is often discussed to harbour a black hole of 10(6) M.. Existing radio data on the arc support the view that its synchrotron emission originates from cooling, initially monoenergetic electrons which diffuse and convect from their sources to the outer extensions of the arc. If the...... source of high-energy electrons coincides with the sickle region (G0.18-0.04), as indicated by the radio data, then the ambient far-infrared (FIR) photons can be up-scattered to gamma-rays by inverse-Compton interaction with the young high-energy electrons. We solve the continuity equation for the...

  18. THE 37 MONTH MAXI/GSC SOURCE CATALOG OF THE HIGH GALACTIC-LATITUDE SKY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of high Galactic-latitude (|b| > 10°) X-ray sources detected in the first 37 months of data of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC). To achieve the best sensitivity, we develop a background model of the GSC that well reproduces the data based on the detailed on-board calibration. Source detection is performed through image fits with a Poisson likelihood algorithm. The catalog contains 500 objects detected with significances of sD,4-10keV ≥ 7 in the 4-10 keV band. The limiting sensitivity is ≈7.5 × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 (≈0.6 mCrab) in the 4-10 keV band for 50% of the survey area, which is the highest ever achieved in an all-sky survey mission covering this energy band. We summarize the statistical properties of the catalog and results from cross matching with the Swift/BAT 70 month catalog, the meta-catalog of X-ray detected clusters of galaxies, and the MAXI/GSC 7 month catalog. Our catalog lists the source name (2MAXI), position and its error, detection significances and fluxes in the 4-10 keV and 3-4 keV bands, the hardness ratio, and the basic information of the likely counterpart available for 296 sources

  19. LARGE PECULIAR MOTION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM FROM THE DIPOLE ANISOTROPY IN SKY BRIGHTNESS DUE TO DISTANT RADIO SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the cosmological principle, the universe should appear isotropic, without any preferred directions, to an observer whom we may consider to be fixed in the comoving coordinate system of the expanding universe. Such an observer is stationary with respect to the average distribution of the matter in the universe and the sky brightness at any frequency should appear uniform in all directions to such an observer. However, a peculiar motion of such an observer, due to a combined effect of Doppler boosting and aberration, will introduce a dipole anisotropy in the observed sky brightness; in reverse an observed dipole anisotropy in the sky brightness could be used to infer the peculiar velocity of the observer with respect to the average universe. We determine the peculiar velocity of the solar system relative to the frame of distant radio sources, by studying the anisotropy in the sky brightness from discrete radio sources, i.e., an integrated emission from discrete sources per unit solid angle. Our results give a direction of the velocity vector in agreement with the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) value, but the magnitude (∼1600 ± 400 km s–1) is ∼4 times the CMBR value (369 ± 1 km s–1) at a statistically significant (∼3σ) level. A genuine difference between the two dipoles would imply an anisotropic universe, with the anisotropy changing with the epoch. This would violate the cosmological principle where the isotropy of the universe is assumed for all epochs, and on which the whole modern cosmology is based upon.

  20. Optical Spectral Properties of Swift BAT Hard X-ray Selected Active Galactic Nuclei Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Lisa M; Koss, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Keeney, Brian; Mushotzky, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is providing an unprecedented view of local AGNs ( = 0.03) and their host galaxy properties. In this paper, we present an analysis of the optical spectra of a sample of 64 AGNs from the 9-month survey, detected solely based on their 14-195 keV flux. Our analysis includes both archived spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and our own observations from the 2.1-m Kitt Peak National Observatory telescope. Among our results, we include line ratio classifications utilizing standard emission line diagnostic plots, [O III] 5007 A luminosities, and H-beta derived black hole masses. As in our X-ray study, we find the type 2 sources to be less luminous (in [O III] 5007 A and 14-195 keV luminosities) with lower accretion rates than the type 1 sources. We find that the optically classified LINERs, H II/composite galaxies, and ambiguous sources have the lowest luminosities, while both broad line and narrow line Seyferts have similar luminosit...

  1. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    CERN Document Server

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-01-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements of the night sky brightness (NSB). The Hong Kong Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (NSN) was established to monitor in detail the conditions of light pollution in Hong Kong. Monitoring stations were set up throughout the city covering a wide range of urban and rural settings to continuously measure the variations of the NSB. Over 4.6 million night sky measurements were collected from 18 distinct locations between May 2010 and March 2013. This huge dataset, over two thousand times larger than our previous survey, for...

  2. THE MULTIPHASE STRUCTURE AND POWER SOURCES OF GALACTIC WINDS IN MAJOR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupke, David S. N. [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: drupke@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Massive, galaxy-scale outflows are known to be ubiquitous in major mergers of disk galaxies in the local universe. In this paper, we explore the multiphase structure and power sources of galactic winds in six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z < 0.06 using deep integral field spectroscopy with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini North. We probe the neutral, ionized, and dusty gas phases using Na I D, strong emission lines ([O I], H{alpha}, and [N II]), and continuum colors, respectively. We separate outflow motions from those due to rotation and tidal perturbations, and find that all of the galaxies in our sample host high-velocity flows on kiloparsec scales. The properties of these outflows are consistent with multiphase (ionized, neutral, and dusty) collimated bipolar winds emerging along the minor axis of the nuclear disk to scales of 1-2 kpc. In two cases, these collimated winds take the form of bipolar superbubbles, identified by clear kinematic signatures. Less collimated (but still high-velocity) flows are also present on scales up to 5 kpc in most systems. The three galaxies in our sample with obscured QSOs host higher velocity outflows than those in the three galaxies with no evidence for an active galactic nucleus. The peak outflow velocity in each of the QSOs is in the range 1450-3350 km s{sup -1}, and the highest velocities (2000-3000 km s{sup -1}) are seen only in ionized gas. The outflow energy and momentum in the QSOs are difficult to produce from a starburst alone, but are consistent with the QSO contributing significantly to the driving of the flow. Finally, when all gas phases are accounted for, the outflows are massive enough to provide negative feedback to star formation.

  3. Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) - An X-ray Survey of Unidentified Sources in the Galactic Plane I: Source Sample and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, G E; Kaplan, D L; Slane, P O; Muno, M P; Posselt, B; Hong, J; Murray, S S; Steeghs, D T H; Brogan, C L; Drake, J J; Farrell, S A; Benjamin, R A; Chakrabarty, D; Drew, J E; Finley, J P; Grindlay, J E; Lazio, T J W; Lee, J C; Mauerhan, J C; van Kerkwijk, M H

    2014-01-01

    We present the Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) survey, which is designed to identify the unknown X-ray sources discovered during the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey (AGPS). Little is known about most of the AGPS sources, especially those that emit primarily in hard X-rays (2-10 keV) within the F_x ~ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2 s^-1 X-ray flux range. In ChIcAGO, the subarcsecond localization capabilities of Chandra have been combined with a detailed multi-wavelength follow-up program, with the ultimate goal of classifying the >100 unidentified sources in the AGPS. Overall to date, 93 unidentified AGPS sources have been observed with Chandra as part of the ChIcAGO survey. A total of 253 X-ray point sources have been detected in these Chandra observations within 3' of the original ASCA positions. We have identified infrared and optical counterparts to the majority of these sources, using both new observations and catalogs from existing Galactic plane surveys. X-ray and infrared population...

  4. Bright radio sources at 178 MHz: flux densities, optical identifications and the cosmological evolution of powerful radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to correct the biases introduced into the 3CR catalogue by confusion and partial resolution, a revised sample of bright sources has been defined at 178 MHz. The sample is 96 per cent complete to a flux-density limit of 10 Jy for sources smaller than 10 arcmin. The incompleteness of 3CR to sources of larger angular size has also been reduced. 96 per cent of the sources in the revised sample are identified optically, 71 and 25 per cent with galaxies and quasars, respectively. The radio-galaxy population shows strong space-density evolution for luminosities in excess of approx. 10sup(26.5) W Hz-1 sr-1 at 178 MHz (redshifts >approx. equal to 0.2); the evolutionary properties of galaxies and quasars of the same luminosity and redshift are very similar. (author)

  5. The Mid-Infrared Colors of the ISM and Extended Sources at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, R G; Ramírez, S V; Sellgren, K; Cotera, A S; Law, C J; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Smith, H A; Gezari, D Y

    2008-01-01

    A mid-infrared (3.6-8 um) survey of the Galactic Center has been carried out with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This survey covers the central 2x1.4 degree (~280x200 pc) of the Galaxy. At 3.6 and 4.5 um the emission is dominated by stellar sources, the fainter ones merging into an unresolved background. At 5.8 and 8 um the stellar sources are fainter, and large-scale diffuse emission from the ISM of the Galaxy's central molecular zone becomes prominent. The survey reveals that the 8 to 5.8 um color of the ISM emission is highly uniform across the surveyed region. This uniform color is consistent with a flat extinction law and emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Models indicate that this broadband color should not be expected to change if the incident radiation field heating the dust and PAHs is 10^4 times that of the solar neighborhood. Other regions of very red emission indicate cases where thick dust clouds obscure deeply embedded objects or very early stages of star...

  6. The Theory of Relativistic Jet Formation in Galactic Sources: Towards a Unified MOdel

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D L

    2003-01-01

    I review recent progress in the theory of relativistic jet production. The presently favored mechanism is an electrodynamic one, in which charged plasma is accelerated by electric fields that are generated by a rotating magnetic field. The most pressing issues of current interest are understanding what factors control the jet power, its speed, and its degree of collimation, and how these properties determine the type of jet observed and its effect on its environment. Recent observations of microquasars, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and core-collapse supernovae indicate that jets play an important, and in some cases possibly dominant, role in each of these. The presence of a jet in all cases may provide an important clue to how these sources may be related. Based on these observations, and on recent theoretical investigations, I propose an evolutionary scheme that attempts to unify all of these relativistic galactic jet sources. I also discuss several important issues that must be resolved before this (or ...

  7. High-energy neutrino production from photo-hadronic interactions of gamma rays from Active Galactic Nuclei at source

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Velazquez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recent astronomical observations reveal that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are sources of high-energy radiation. For example, the Fermi-LAT and Hess telescopes have detected gamma-ray emissions from the cores of several types of AGN's. Even more, the Pierre Auger observatory has found a correlation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray events with the position of Active Galactic Nuclei, such as Centaurus A. In this way, according to particle physics, a flux of high-energy neutrinos should be expected from the interactions of cosmic and gamma-rays with the ambient matter and radiation at the source. In this work, estimations of the diffuse neutrino flux from AGN's arising from interactions of the gamma radiation with the gas and dust of the sources will be presented.

  8. Development of the Model of Galactic Interstellar Emission for Standard Point-source Analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Remy, Q.; Renault, N.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the celestial γ rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point-source and extended-source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. Here, we describe the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM), which is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. This model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse-Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. In the GIEM, we also include large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric distance. We observe that the Fermi bubbles have boundaries with a shape similar to a catenary at latitudes below 20° and we observe an enhanced emission toward their base extending in the north and south Galactic directions and located within ∼4° of the Galactic Center.

  9. Next Generation High Brightness Electron Beams From Ultra-High Field Cryogenic Radiofrequency Photocathode Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenzweig, J B; Dolgashev, V; Emma, C; Fukusawa, A; Li, R; Limborg, C; Maxson, J; Musumeci, P; Nause, A; Pakter, R; Pompili, R; Roussel, R; Spataro, B; Tantawi, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of the performance of radio-frequency (RF) copper structures operated at cryogenic temperatures have shown a dramatic increase in the maximum surface electric field that may be reached. We propose to utilize this development to enable a new generation of photoinjectors operated at cryogenic temperatures that may attain, through enhancement of the launch field at the photocathode by a factor of four, well over an order of magnitude increase in peak electron beam brightness. We present detailed studies of the beam dynamics associated with such a system, concentrating on an emittance-compensated S-band photoinjector that may directly substitute that of the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser. We show in this case that the increase in brightness leads directly to a factor of two reduction in gain length, with attendant increase in X-ray radiative efficiency. Extreme low emittance scenarios obtained at low operating charge, appropriate for dramatically pushing performance limits of ultrafast electron dif...

  10. M-Band Spectra of Dust Embedded Sources at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Moultaka, J; Schödel, R

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present paper is to investigate the circumstellar material around the brightest dust-enshrouded sources in the central stellar cluster of the Milky Way. Observations have been carried out at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. We have used the long wavelength (LWS3) low resolution (LR) spectroscopic mode of the ISAAC camera at the VLT in the spectral range of the M filter from 4.4micron to 5.1micron. The use of a slit width of 0.6" implied a spectral resolution of R=l/Dl=800 (Dv=375 km/s). These observations resulted in M-band spectra of 15 bright sources in the central stellar cluster of the Milky Way. In addition to gaseous 12^CO (4.666 micron) and 13^CO (4.77 micron) vibration-rotational absorptions, we detect a strong absorption due to a mixture of polar and apolar CO ice (centered at 4.675 micron). In the shorter wavelength absorption wing there is an absorption feature due to XCN at 4.62 micron. The XCN absorption is strongest toward the M2 supergi...

  11. Hα line measurements from ten diffuse galactic sources using the DEFPOS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, M.; Oflaz, F. M.; Yegingil, I.; Tel, E.

    2015-08-01

    The hydrogen Balmer-α emission line spectrum of ten diffuse ionization sources in the Milk Way - NGC 40 (WC8), NGC 2022, NGC 6210, NGC 6618 (M17, Sh2-45), NGC 6720 (M57), NGC 6781, NGC 6888 (Sh2-105), NGC 6992 (Sh2-103), NGC 7635 (Sh2-162,) and IC 1848 (Sh2-199) - has been investigated using a dual etalon Fabry-Pérot optical spectrometer (DEFPOS) aatached to the 150 cm RTT150 telescope at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG, Antalya, Turkey: 36° 51' N; 30° 20' E; elevation: 2547 m). All of our galactic Hα observations discussed in this paper were carried out during the nights of 2013 June 21-24 with exposure time of 3600 s. As main results the intensity, the full width at half maximum, and the radial velocity with respect to the LSR have been determined for each data set. The intensities, the radial velocities, and the line widths of the Hα emission line vary from 59.15 to 8923.44 R, -46.72 to +54.07 km s-1, and 31.4 to 48.01 km s-1, respectively. The radial velocities and the half-widths of the H II regions and planetary nebulae determined from our measurements are found to be consistent with values given in literature, especially with those in Schneider et al. (1983) and Fich et al. (1990).

  12. Milliarcsecond angular resolution of reddened stellar sources in the vicinity of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Richichi, A; Mason, E; Stegmaier, J; Chandrasekhar, T

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, the lunar occultation technique has been employed on a very large telescope in the near-IR with the aim of achieving systematically milliarcsecond resolution on stellar sources. We have demonstrated the burst mode of the ISAAC instrument, using a fast read-out on a small area of the detector to record many tens of seconds of data at a time on fields of few squared arcsec. We have used the opportunity to record a large number of LO events during a passage of the Moon close to the Galactic Center in March 2006. We have developed a data pipeline for the treatment of LO data, including the automated estimation of the main data analysis parameters using a wavelet-based method, and the preliminary fitting and plotting of all light curves. We recorded 51 LO events over about four hours. Of these, 30 resulted of sufficient quality to enable a detailed fitting. We detected two binaries with subarcsec projected separation and three stars with a marginally resolved angular diameter of about 2 mas. Tw...

  13. The properties of bow-shock sources at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J; Alberdi, A; Muzic, K; Hummel, C A; Pott, J -U

    2014-01-01

    There are an enigmatic population of massive stars around the Galactic Center (GC) that were formed some Ma ago. A fraction of these stars has been found to orbit the supermassive black hole, SgrA*, in a projected clockwise disk, which suggests that they were formed in a formerly existing dense disk around SgrA*. We focus on the extended, near-infrared (NIR) sources IRS1W, IRS5, IRS10W, and IRS21 that have been suggested to be young, massive stars that form bow-shocks through their interaction with the ISM. Their nature has impeded accurate determination of their orbital parameters. We aim at establishing their nature and kinematics to test whether they form part of the clockwise disk. We performed NIR multi-wavelength imaging using adaptive optics (AO) and sparse aperture masking (SAM). We introduce a new method for self-calibration of the SAM PSF in dense stellar fields. The emission mechanism, morphology and kinematics of the targets were examined via 3D bow-shock models. We confirm previous findings that ...

  14. The Multiphase Structure and Power Sources of Galactic Winds in Major Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Rupke, David S N

    2013-01-01

    Massive, galaxy-scale outflows are known to be ubiquitous in major mergers of disk galaxies in the local universe. In this paper, we explore the multiphase structure and power sources of galactic winds in six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z < 0.06 using deep integral field spectroscopy with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini North. We probe the neutral, ionized, and dusty gas phases using Na I D, strong emission lines ([O I], Halpha, and [N II]), and continuum colors, respectively. We separate outflow motions from those due to rotation and tidal perturbations, and find that all of the galaxies in our sample host high-velocity flows on kiloparsec scales. The properties of these outflows are consistent with multiphase (ionized, neutral, and dusty) collimated bipolar winds emerging along the minor axis of the nuclear disk to scales of 1-2 kpc. In two cases, these collimated winds take the form of bipolar superbubbles, identified by clear kinematic signatures. Less collimated (...

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  16. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Martin A; Iskhakov, Timur Sh; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ∼2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (∼50  THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content. PMID:26551812

  17. Temporary blinding from bright light sources as a significant impact on occupational safety and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low power laser and high-brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs) have been applied in specially developed and computer assisted test setups in order to determine the duration and progression of colours in afterimages, the disturbance of visual acuity as well as the impairment of colour and contrast vision. Interrelationships between wavelength, exposure duration, optical power and energy have been investigated. Afterimage durations up to 300 seconds were found if the fovea of the human retina is irradiated from a laser beam at less than 30 μW, whereas lower values are valid in the Parafoveal region and in the periphery. The visual acuity was strongly reduced during about 30 % of the afterimage time. The time-dependent progression of the afterimage colours was determined for 4 different dominant wavelengths of HB-LEDs, i.e. 455 nm, 530 nm, 590 nm and 625 nm, in the power range between 0.05 m W and 0.5 m W for exposure durations between 0.5 s and 5 s. The flight of colours obtained with 5 test persons is given as 8-bit RGB-values and illustrated as a function of the applied optical energy in the CIE chromaticity diagram together with the respective total afterimage durations. The colour contrast capability was investigated for 3 volunteers with specially developed test charts in 7 colours, namely without and after glare from 4 coloured high-brightness LEDs. Each subject completed 56 time-consuming tests since adequate adaptation was necessary between the respective tests. Glare increases the identification times about 14 s and 16 s and even stronger impairment is observable especially at low colour contrast. Tests with 40 subjects and 4 different pseudoisochromatic colour plates have shown that colour vision was impaired for periods between 27 s and 186 s depending on the applied colour plate and respective LED colour. Such relatively long lasting visual disturbances could be of particular concern connected with performing safety critical operations such as working with machines

  18. Bright gamma-ray Galactic Center excess and dark dwarfs: Strong tension for dark matter annihilation despite Milky Way halo profile and diffuse emission uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Keeley, Ryan E.

    2016-04-01

    We incorporate Milky Way dark matter halo profile uncertainties, as well as an accounting of diffuse gamma-ray emission uncertainties in dark matter annihilation models for the Galactic Center Extended gamma-ray excess (GCE) detected by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The range of particle annihilation rate and masses expand when including these unknowns. However, two of the most precise empirical determinations of the Milky Way halo's local density and density profile leave the signal region to be in considerable tension with dark matter annihilation searches from combined dwarf galaxy analyses for single-channel dark matter annihilation models. The GCE and dwarf tension can be alleviated if: one, the halo is very highly concentrated or strongly contracted; two, the dark matter annihilation signal differentiates between dwarfs and the GC; or, three, local stellar density measures are found to be significantly lower, like that from recent stellar counts, increasing the local dark matter density.

  19. Photocathodes inside superconducting cavities. Studies on the feasibility of a superconducting photoelectron source of high brightness. External report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have done studies and experiments to explore the feasibility of a photoemission RF gun with a superconducting accelerator cavity. This concept promises to provide an electron beam of high brightness in continuous operation. It is thus of strong interest for a free-electron-laser or a linear collider based on a superconducting accelerator. In a first step we studied possible technical solutions for its components, especially the material of the photocathode and the geometrical shape of the cavity. Based on these considerations, we developed the complete design for a prototype electron source. The cathode material was chosen to be alkali antimonide. In spite of its sensitivity, it seems to be the best choice for a gun with high average current due to its high quantum efficiency. The cavity shape was at first a reentrant-type single cell of 500 MHz. It is now replaced by a more regular two-and-half cell shape, an independent half cell added for emittance correction. Its beam dynamics properties are investigated by numerical simulations; we estimated a beam brightness of about 5x1011 A/(m.rad)2. But the mutual interactions between alkali antimonide photocathode and superconducting cavity must be investigated experimentally, because they are completely unkown. (orig.)

  20. A Catalog of X-ray Point Sources from Two Megaseconds of Chandra Observations of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Muno, M P; Baganoff, F K; Bandyopadhyay, R M; Bower, G C; Brandt, W N; Broos, P S; Cotera, A; Eikenberry, S S; Garmire, G P; Hyman, S D; Kassim, N E; Lang, C C; Lazio, T J W; Law, C; Mauerhan, J C; Morris, M R; Nagata, T; Nishiyama, S; Park, S; Ramírez, S V; Stolovy, S R; Wijnands, R; Wang, Q D; Wang, Z; Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2008-01-01

    We present a catalog of 9017 X-ray sources identified in Chandra observations of a 2 by 0.8 degree field around the Galactic center. We increase the number of known X-ray sources in the region by a factor of 2.5. The catalog incorporates all of the ACIS-I observations as of 2007 August, which total 2.25 Msec of exposure. At the distance to the Galactic center (8 kpc), we are sensitive to sources with luminosities >4e32 erg/s (0.5-8.0 keV; 90% confidence) over an area of one square degree, and up to an order of magnitude more sensitive in the deepest exposure (1.0 Msec) around Sgr A*. The positions of 60% of our sources are accurate to <1" (95% confidence), and 20% have positions accurate to <0.5". We search for variable sources, and find that 3% exhibit flux variations within an observation, 10% exhibit variations from observation-to-observation. We also find one source, CXOUGC J174622.7-285218, with a periodic 1745 s signal (1.4% chance probability), which is probably a magnetically-accreting cataclysm...

  1. Development of the Model of Galactic Interstellar Emission for Standard Point-Source Analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kamae, T; Kuss, M; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Maldera, S; Malyshev, D; Manfreda, A; Martin, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mirabal, N; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Remy, Q; Renault, N; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2016-01-01

    Most of the celestial gamma rays detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope originate from the interstellar medium when energetic cosmic rays interact with interstellar nucleons and photons. Conventional point and extended source studies rely on the modeling of this diffuse emission for accurate characterization. We describe here the development of the Galactic Interstellar Emission Model (GIEM) that is the standard adopted by the LAT Collaboration and is publicly available. The model is based on a linear combination of maps for interstellar gas column density in Galactocentric annuli and for the inverse Compton emission produced in the Galaxy. We also include in the GIEM large-scale structures like Loop I and the Fermi bubbles. The measured gas emissivity spectra confirm that the cosmic-ray proton density decreases with Galactocentric distance beyond 5 kpc from the Galactic Center. The measurements also suggest a softening of the proton spectrum with Galactocentric ...

  2. A bright triggered twin-photon source in the solid state

    CERN Document Server

    Thoma, Alexander; Schlehahn, Alexander; Gschrey, Manuel; Schnauber, Peter; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Carmele, Alexander; Knorr, Andreas; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    A non-classical light source emitting pairs of identical photons represents a versatile resource of interdisciplinary importance with applications in quantum optics and quantum biology. Emerging research fields, which benefit from such type of quantum light source, include quantum-optical spectroscopy or experiments on photoreceptor cells sensitive to photon statistics. To date, photon twins have mostly been generated using parametric downconversion sources, relying on Poissonian number distributions, or atoms, exhibiting low emission rates. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate the efficient, triggered generation of photon twins using the energy-degenerate biexciton-exciton radiative cascade of a single semiconductor quantum dot. Deterministically integrated within a microlens, this nanostructure emits highly-correlated photon pairs, degenerate in energy and polarization, at a rate of up to (2.8 $\\pm$ 0.4) MHz. Two-photon interference experiments reveal a significant degree of indistinguishability ...

  3. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-Line Calibration Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal to noise and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high signal to noise. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial mass planets. These high precision calibration sources often use single mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to...

  4. Bright quantum dot single photon source based on a low Q defect cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Sebastian; Gold, Peter; Forchel, A.;

    2014-01-01

    The quasi-planar single photon source presented in this paper shows an extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or lithography steps as well as a high purity with a g2(0) value of 0.023.......The quasi-planar single photon source presented in this paper shows an extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or lithography steps as well as a high purity with a g2(0) value of 0.023....

  5. Atomic physics with high-brightness synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of atomic physics experiments that we intend to carry out at the National Synchrotron Light Source is given. Emphasis is given to work that investigates the properties of multiply charged ions. The use of a synchrotron storage ring for highly charged heavy ions is proposed as a way to produce high current beams which will make possible experiments to study the photoexcitation and ionization of multiply charged ions for the first time. Experiments along the same lines which are feasible at the proposed Advanced Light Source are considered briefly. 7 refs., 2 figs

  6. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY SOURCE LIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ∼10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data.

  7. OPTICAL-FAINT, FAR-INFRARED-BRIGHT HERSCHEL SOURCES IN THE CANDELS FIELDS: ULTRA-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1 AND THE EFFECT OF SOURCE BLENDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Somerville, Rachel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Davé, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, 7535 Bellville, Cape Town (South Africa); Pérez-González, Pablo G. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Facultad de CC. Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cava, Antonio [Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, 51 Ch. des Maillettes, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Wiklind, Tommy [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Kocevski, Dale [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Rafelski, Marc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kartaltepe, Jeyhan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven ''SDSS-invisible'', very bright 250 μm sources (S {sub 250} > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ∼ 1-2 whose high L {sub IR} is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  8. OPTICAL-FAINT, FAR-INFRARED-BRIGHT HERSCHEL SOURCES IN THE CANDELS FIELDS: ULTRA-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1 AND THE EFFECT OF SOURCE BLENDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven ''SDSS-invisible'', very bright 250 μm sources (S 250 > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ∼ 1-2 whose high L IR is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources

  9. A bright single-photon source based on a photonic trumpet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.; Bleuse, Joël;

    be brought close to unity with a proper engineering of the wire ends. In particular, a tapering of the top wire end is necessary to achieve a directive far-field emission pattern [1]. Recently, we have realized a single-photon source featuring a needle-like taper. The source efficiency, though record...... with a divergence controlled by the top-facet diameter: for a top diameter of 1.5 µm, less than 5% of the light is scattered outside the collection cone of a lens with a 0.75 NA. iii) the large top facet also simplifies the implementation of a top electrode, to achieve an electrical driving of the device [3]. Using...

  10. Bright single photon source based on self-aligned quantum dot-cavity systems

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Sebastian; Gold, Peter; Forchel, Alfred; Gregersen, Niels; Mørk, Jesper; Höfling, Sven; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We report on a quasi-planar quantum-dot-based single-photon source that shows an unprecedented high extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or post-growth nanofabrication. This very high efficiency originates from the coupling of the photons emitted by a quantum dot to a Gaussian shaped nanohill defect that naturally arises during epitaxial growth in a self-aligned manner. We investigate the morphology of these defects and characterize the photonic operation...

  11. Single Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Microcavities: Bright sources of indistinguishable Photons

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, C.; Gold, P.; Lu, C. -Y.; Höfling, S.; Pan, J. -W.; Kamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we will discuss the technology and experimental techniques to realize quantum dot (QD) single photon sources combining high outcoupling efficiencies and highest degrees of non-postselected photon indistinguishability. The system, which is based on ultra low density InAs QDs embedded in a quasi planar single sided microcavity with natural photonic traps is an ideal testbed to study quantum light emission from single QDs. We will discuss the influence of the excitation condition...

  12. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range

  13. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 L170, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  14. Infrared-excess Source DSO/G2 Near the Galactic Center: Theory vs. Observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajaček, M.; Eckart, A.; Peissker, F.; Karssen, G.; Karas, Vladimír

    Prague: Matfyzpress, 2015 - (Šafránková, J.; Pavlů, J.), s. 27-35 ISBN 9788073783112. [Week of Doctoral Students. Prague (CZ), 20150604] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : galactic centre Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics https://hera.ph1.uni-koeln.de/~zajacek/WDS15_04_f1_Zajacek.pdf

  15. High brightness single mode source of correlated photon pairs using a photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Fulconis, J; Wadsworth, W J; Russell, P S J; Rarity, J G

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a picosecond source of correlated photon pairs using a micro-structured fibre with zero dispersion around 715 nm wavelength. The fibre is pumped in the normal dispersion regime at ~708 nm and phase matching is satisfied for widely spaced parametric wavelengths. Here we generate up to 10^7 photon pairs per second in the fibre at wavelengths of 587 nm and 897 nm. On collecting the light in single-mode-fibre-coupled Silicon avalanche diode photon counting detectors we detect ~3.2.10^5 coincidences per second at pump power 0.5 mW.

  16. A high-brightness source of polarization-entangled photons optimized for applications in free space

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Jofre, Marc; Weier, Henning; Perez, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Rarity, John; Mitchell, Morgan W; Torres, Juan P; Weinfurter, Harald; Pruneri, Valerio; 10.1364/OE.20.009640

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple but highly efficient source of polarization-entangled photons based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in bulk periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (PPKTP) pumped by a 405 nm laser diode. Utilizing one of the highest available nonlinear coefficients in a non-degenerate, collinear type-0 phase-matching configuration, we generate polarization entanglement via the crossed-crystal scheme and detect 0.64 million photon pair events/s/mW, while maintaining an overlap fidelity with the ideal Bell state of 0.98 at a pump power of 0.025 mW.

  17. Bright single photon source based on self-aligned quantum dot–cavity systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Sebastian; Gold, Peter; Forchel, Alfred;

    2014-01-01

    We report on a quasi-planar quantum-dot-based single-photon source that shows an unprecedented high extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or post-growth nanofabrication. This very high efficiency originates from the coupling of the photons emitted by a quantum...... dot to a Gaussian shaped nanohill defect that naturally arises during epitaxial growth in a self-aligned manner. We investigate the morphology of these defects and characterize the photonic operation mechanism. Our results show that these naturally arising coupled quantum dot-defects provide a new...

  18. Utra-bright compact sources of correlated photons based on SPDC in periodically-poled KTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, Ray; Fiorentino, Marco; Spillane, Sean; Roberts, Tony; Battle, Phil; Munroe, Mark

    2007-05-01

    Photon pairs generated using spontaneous parametric down- conversion (SPDC) have been a central ingredient for a number of quantum optics experiments ranging from the generation of entanglement to demonstrations of quantum information processing protocols. The flux of pairs generated by SPDC sources has been steadily growing over the years opening the door to practical applications of correlated and entangled photon pairs. SPDC sources based on periodically poled waveguides have shown a great potential to generate large numbers of correlated pairs with a few μW of pump. These works, however, lack a clear explanation of the increased pair rate in waveguides and do not directly compare the waveguide result with bulk. Na"ively, field confinement in waveguides is not expected to enhance pair generation rate, since SPDC is a scattering phenomenon that only involves one pump photon and therefore does not benefit from higher photon densities created by focussing. In this talk we present a theoretical and experimental comparison of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in periodically poled waveguides and bulk KTP crystals. We measured a waveguide pair generation rate of 2.9 .10^6 pairs/s per mW of pump in a 1-nm band: more than 50 times higher than the bulk crystal generation rate. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.E3.4

  19. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies at z>1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Haojing; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, Steven; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew; Dave, Romeel; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha

    2013-01-01

    Optical counterpart identification is a critical link in maximizing the science returns of the Herschel very wide-field survey data. Currently, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas. However a large number of very bright FIR sources are not detected in the SDSS, and their true nature remains to be determined. Using the public HerMES data, we studied seven such sources that are within the CANDELS fields. To deal with the source blending problem, we used the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors and decomposed these FIR sources. This new appraoch is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the position priors are derived from the mid-IR data that still suffer from the source blending problem in the first place, and can be applied to the regions where the mid-IR data are not available. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that may or may not b...

  20. DHIGLS: DRAO H I Intermediate Galactic Latitude Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Blagrave, K; Joncas, G; Kothes, R; Stil, J; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Lockman, Felix J; Taylor, A R

    2016-01-01

    Observations of Galactic H I gas for seven intermediate Galactic latitude fields are presented at 1' angular resolution using data from the DRAO Synthesis Telescope (ST) and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The DHIGLS data are the most extensive arcminute resolution measurements of the diffuse atomic interstellar medium beyond those in the Galactic plane. The acquisition, reduction, calibration, and mosaicking of the DRAO ST data and the cross calibration and incorporation of the short-spacing information from the GBT are described. The high quality of the DHIGLS data enables a variety of new studies in directions of low Galactic column density. We find evidence for dramatic changes in the structures in channel maps over even small changes in velocity. This narrow line emission has counterparts in absorption spectra against bright background radio sources, quantifying that the gas is cold and dense and can be identified as the cold neutral medium phase. We analyze the angular power spectra of maps of the integ...

  1. Ultrahigh-brightness, spectrally-flat, short-wave infrared supercontinuum source for long-range atmospheric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Zhu, Rongzhen; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Tian; Chen, Shengping; Hou, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Fiber based supercontinuum (SC) sources with output spectra covering the infrared atmospheric window are very useful in long-range atmospheric applications. It is proven that silica fibers can support the generation of broadband SC sources ranging from the visible to the short-wave infrared region. In this paper, we present the generation of an ultrahigh-brightness spectrally-flat 2-2.5 μm SC source in a cladding pumped thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) numerically and experimentally. The underlying physical mechanisms behind the SC generation process are investigated firstly with a numerical model which includes the fiber gain and loss, the dispersive and nonlinear effects. Simulation results show that abundant soliton pulses are generated in the TDFA, and they are shifted towards the long wavelength side very quickly with the nonlinearity of Raman soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS), and eventually the Raman SSFS process is halted due to the silica fiber's infrared loss. A spectrally-flat 2-2.5 μm SC source could be generated as the result of the spectral superposition of these abundant soliton pulses. These simulation results correspond qualitatively well to the following experimental results. Then, in the experiment, a cladding pumped large-mode-area TDFA is built for pursuing a high-power 2-2.5 μm SC source. By enhancing the pump strength, the output SC spectrum broadens to the long wavelength side gradually. At the highest pump power, the obtained SC source has a maximum average power of 203.4 W with a power conversion efficiency of 38.7%. It has a 3 dB spectral bandwidth of 545 nm ranging from 1990 to 2535 nm, indicating a power spectral density in excess of 370 mW/nm. Meanwhile, the output SC source has a good beam profile. This SC source, to the best of our knowledge, is the brightest spectrally-flat 2-2.5 μm light source ever reported. It will be highly desirable in a lot of long-range atmospheric applications, such as broad-spectrum LIDAR, free

  2. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  3. High brightness laser source based on polarization coupling of two diode lasers with asymmetric feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Chi, M.; Sass, B.; Petersen, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we show that polarization coupling and asymmetric diode-laser feedback can be used to combine two diode-laser beams with low spatial coherence into a single beam with high spatial coherence. The coupled laser source is based on two similar laser systems each consisting of a 1 mumx......200 mum broad area laser diode applied with a specially designed feedback circuit. When operating at two times threshold, 50% of the freely running system output power is obtained in a single beam with an M-2 beam quality factor of 1.6+/-0.1, whereas the M-2 values of the two freely running diode...... lasers are 29+/-1 and 34+/-1, respectively. (C) 2003 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Bright single photon source based on self-aligned quantum dot-cavity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Sebastian; Gold, Peter; Forchel, Alfred; Gregersen, Niels; Mørk, Jesper; Höfling, Sven; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin

    2014-04-01

    We report on a quasi-planar quantum-dot-based single-photon source that shows an unprecedented high extraction efficiency of 42% without complex photonic resonator geometries or post-growth nanofabrication. This very high efficiency originates from the coupling of the photons emitted by a quantum dot to a Gaussian shaped nanohill defect that naturally arises during epitaxial growth in a self-aligned manner. We investigate the morphology of these defects and characterize the photonic operation mechanism. Our results show that these naturally arising coupled quantum dot-defects provide a new avenue for efficient (up to 42% demonstrated) and pure (g(2)(0) value of 0.023) single-photon emission. PMID:24718190

  5. Study of X-ray and gamma ray sources observed by the SIGNE (Prognoz 6 Satellite) experiment in the regions of the galactic center and anticenter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of the SIGNE II MP 6 experiment are reported and procedures to obtain the fluxes detected from all the sources are described. We next present deconvolution method used to isolate the galactic center sources. In the last chapter we present and discuss the photon spectra of the sources observed by the SIGNE II MP 6 experiment

  6. A Sino-German 6cm polarisation survey of the Galactic plane - VIII. Small-diameter sources

    CERN Document Server

    Reich, W; Reich, P; Gao, X Y; Xiao, L; Han, J L

    2013-01-01

    Information of small-diameter sources is extracted from the Sino-German 6cm polarisation survey of the Galactic plane carried out with the Urumqi 25-m telescope. We performed two-dimensional elliptical Gaussian fits to the 6cm maps to obtain a list of sources with total-intensity and polarised flux densities. The source list contains 3832 sources with a fitted diameter smaller than 16 arcmin and a peak flux density exceeding 30 mJy, so about 5 times the rms noise, of the total-intensity data. The cumulative source count indicates completeness for flux densities exceeding about 60 mJy. We identify 125 linearly polarised sources at 6cm with a peak polarisation flux density greater than 10 mJy, so about 3 times the rms noise, of the polarised-intensity data. Despite lacking compact steep spectrum sources, the 6cm catalogue lists about 20 percent more sources than the Effelsberg 21cm source catalogue at the same angular resolution and for the same area. Most of the faint 6cm sources must have a flat spectrum and ...

  7. Ionized gas clouds and the nature of apparent variability of a compact radio source in the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozernoj, L.M.; Shishov, V.I. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    1982-05-01

    Clouds of ionized gas recently discovered at the center of our Galaxy are proposed to be responsible for the observed ''halo- core'' structure of the ''point'' radio source (which is explained as a result of scattering on inhomogeneities of substantially scales). This hypothesis implies that the core flux is probably variable, which resolves a contradiction between observations made by Kellermann et al. (1977) and Lo et al. (1981). It is capable also to explain both the origin and variability of the 0.511 MeV annihilation line observed in the direction of the Galactic center.

  8. Ionized gas clouds and the origin of the apparent variability of the compact galactic-center radio source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionized gas clouds recently discovered at the center of the Galaxy could be responsible for the core--halo structure observed in the compact radio source there. The apparent structure would result from scattering by irregularities of widely differing scale. On this hypothesis the core radio flux would probably be variable, resolving the conflict between the VLBI measurements by Kellermann et al. and Lo et al. The origin and variability of the 0.511-MeV annihilation line observed toward the galactic center could be explained as well

  9. Ionized gas clouds and the origin of the apparent variability of the compact galactic-center radio source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozernoi, L.M.; Shishov, V.I.

    1982-05-01

    The ionized gas clouds recently discovered at the center of the Galaxy could be responsible for the core--halo structure observed in the compact radio source there. The apparent structure would result from scattering by irregularities of widely differing scale. On this hypothesis the core radio flux would probably be variable, resolving the conflict between the VLBI measurements by Kellermann et al. and Lo et al. The origin and variability of the 0.511-MeV annihilation line observed toward the galactic center could be explained as well.

  10. Ionized gas clouds and the nature of apparent variability of a compact radio source in the galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouds of ionized gas recently discovered at the center of our Galaxy are proposed to be responsible for the observed ''halo- core'' structure of the ''point'' radio source (which is explained as a result of scattering on inhomogeneities of substantially scales). This hypothesis implies that the core flux is probably variable, which resolves a contradiction between observations made by Kellermann et al. (1977) and Lo et al. (1981). It is capable also to explain both the origin and variability of the 0.511 MeV annihilation line observed in the direction of the Galactic center

  11. A Bright Submillimeter Source in the Bullet Cluster (1E0657--56) Field Detected with BLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Rex, Marie; Aretxaga, Itziar; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2009-01-01

    We present the 250, 350, and 500 micron detection of bright submillimeter emission in the direction of the Bullet Cluster measured by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). The 500 micron centroid is coincident with an AzTEC 1.1 millimeter detection at a position close to the peak lensing magnification produced by the cluster. However, the 250 micron and 350 micron emission is resolved and elongated, with centroid positions shifted toward the south of the AzTEC source and a differential shift between bands that cannot be explained by pointing uncertainties. We therefore conclude that the BLAST detection is contaminated by emission from foreground galaxies associated with the Bullet Cluster. The submillimeter redshift estimate based on 250-1100 micron photometry at the position of the AzTEC source is z_phot = 2.9 (+0.6/-0.3), consistent with the infrared color redshift estimation of the most likely Spitzer IRAC counterpart. These flux densities indicate an apparent far-infrared lumin...

  12. Meteoritic silicon carbide and its stellar sources - Implications for galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward; Hoppe, Peter; Zinner, Ernst

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar silicon carbide grains in meteorites provide a novel means for studying the carbon-star population of about 5 x 10 to the 9th years ago. Their C-12/C-13 ratios differ greatly from the solar value but resemble those of present-day csrbon stars, implying little change in the galactic C-13 inventory. Isotope data on nitrogen and silicon suggest that the silicon carbide grains come mainly from red giants, with small contributions from novae.

  13. Long-Term Variability and Transient Behavior of some Galactic Hard X-Ray Sources as Observed with BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1998-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment on the Compton Observatory has been providing continuous, all-sky monitoring of the hard X-ray sky for over seven years. A wide variety of transient and high-variability phenomena are observed for about sixty Galactic neutron star and black hole systems. A daily sensitivity level of approximately 75 mCrab is attained for sources observed by Earth occultation in un-crowded regions and approximately 20 mCrab for pulsars with known periods. This talk will qualitatively describe the types of variability that are observed from some of the brighter sources, including their duty-cycle and the various time-scales observed. Implications for the INTEGRAL mission will be discussed.

  14. Effect of Biased Disc on Brightness of Highly Charged Uranium Ions from RIKEN 28 GHz Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Kazutaka; Higurashi, Yoshihide; Ohnishi, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Takahide

    2013-06-01

    The emittance and beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions were measured as a function of the negative voltage of a biased disc. We observed that the brightness of the highly charged uranium ion beam generated by the RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source was strongly influenced by the bias voltage.

  15. Neutron star population in the Galactic center region as a potential source of polarized X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajacek, Michal; Karas, Vladimir; Eckart, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the emission properties of neutron stars that are predicted to exist in large numbers of the order of 10000 in the innermost parts of the Galactic center. A part of the population of isolated neutron stars propagates supersonically through denser ionized streams of the Minispiral (Sgr A West), forming bow shocks where particles are accelerated and are expected to produce polarized X-ray synchrotron signal. Another source of the synchrotron emission is an elongated magnetosphere and tail. We investigate whether the polarized X-ray emission from Galactic center neutron stars will be potentially detectable in the framework of future X-ray polarimeters. A special case is a detected young neutron star - magnetar SGRJ1745-2900 - that has undergone a series of outbursts with a peak X-ray luminosity of the order of 10^{35} erg s^{-1} (1-10 keV). Apart from an intrinsic X-ray emission, the X-ray emission from neutron star outbursts may be scattered by molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone by Thomson scattering, which is another potential source of polarized X-ray emission.

  16. Scanning wire beam position monitor for alignment of a high brightness inverse-Compton x-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Hadmack, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser Laboratory at the University of Hawai`i has constructed and tested a scanning wire beam position monitor to aid the alignment and optimization of a high spectral brightness inverse-Compton scattering x-ray source. X-rays are produced by colliding the 40 MeV electron beam from a pulsed S-band linac with infrared laser pulses from a mode-locked free-electron laser driven by the same electron beam. The electron and laser beams are focused to 60 {\\mu}m diameters at the interaction point to achieve high scattering efficiency. This wire-scanner allows for high resolution measurements of the size and position of both the laser and electron beams at the interaction point to verify spatial coincidence. Time resolved measurements of secondary emission current allow us to monitor the transverse spatial evolution of the e-beam throughout the duration of a 4 {\\mu}s macro-pulse while the laser is simultaneously profiled by pyrometer measurement of the occulted infrared beam. Using this apparatus we ...

  17. LAT Bright Source List

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a successor to EGRET, with greatly improved sensitivity, resolution, and energy range....

  18. Near-Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-ray Sources toward the Galactic Center. I. Statistics and a Catalog of Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Morris, Mark R; Bauer, Franz E; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    We present a catalog of 5184 candidate infrared counterparts to X-ray sources detected towards the Galactic center. The X-ray sample contains 9017 point sources detected in this region by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, including data from a recent deep survey of the central 2 x 0.8 deg of the Galactic plane. A total of 6760 of these sources have hard X-ray colors, and the majority of them lie near the Galactic center; while most of the remaining 2257 soft X-ray sources lie in the foreground. We cross-correlated the X-ray source positions with the 2MASS and SIRIUS near-infrared catalogs, which collectively contain stars with a 10-sigma limiting flux of K_s=0.9 and <=0.9 mag, respectively. We find that 5.8(1.5)% of the hard X-ray sources have real infrared counterparts, of which 228(99) are red and 166(27) are blue. The red counterparts are probably comprised of WR/O stars, HMXBs, and symbiotics near the Galactic center. We also find that 39.4(1.0)% of the soft X-ray sources have blue infrared counterparts; ...

  19. Star Formation Sites toward the Galactic Center Region: The Correlation of CH3OH Masers, H2O Masers, and Near-IR Green Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, E T; Ott, J

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of star formation in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy through the association of three star formation indicators: 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers, 22 GHz H2O masers, and enhanced 4.5 micron emission (`green') sources. We explore how star formation in the Galactic center (l < 1.3 deg, |b| < 10', where l and b are Galactic longitude and Galactic latitude) compares with that of the Galactic disk (6 deg < l < 345 deg, |b| < 2 deg). Using an automated algorithm, we search for enhanced 4.5 micron emission sources toward 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers detected in the Parkes Methanol Multibeam Survey. We combine these results with our 22 GHz H2O maser survey of the CMZ carried out with the Mopra telescope. We find that the correlation of CH3OH masers with green sources is a function of Galactic latitude, with a minimum close to b=0 and increasing with |b| (toward the central part of the Galaxy, 6 deg < l < 345 deg, |b| < 2 deg). We find no significant difference between the correla...

  20. DEEP SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES: HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRSs) are a rare class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelengths but very faint at infrared and optical wavelengths. Here we present sensitive near-infrared observations of a sample of these sources taken as part of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey. Nearly all the IFRSs are undetected at a level of ∼1 μJy in these new deep observations, and even the detections are consistent with confusion with unrelated galaxies. A stacked image implies that the median flux density is S3.6μm ∼ 0.2 μJy or less, giving extreme values of the radio-infrared flux density ratio. Comparison of these objects with known classes of object suggests that the majority are probably high-redshift radio-loud galaxies, possibly suffering from significant dust extinction.

  1. NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS TO CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER. I. STATISTICS AND A CATALOG OF CANDIDATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of 5184 candidate infrared counterparts to X-ray sources detected toward the Galactic center. The X-ray sample contains 9017 point sources detected in this region by the Chandra X-ray Observatory during the past decade, including data from a recent deep survey of the central 20 x 0.08 of the Galactic plane. A total of 6760 of these sources have hard X-ray colors, and the majority of them lie near the Galactic center, while most of the remaining 2257 soft X-ray sources lie in the foreground. We cross-correlated the X-ray source positions with the 2MASS and SIRIUS near-infrared catalogs, which collectively contain stars with a 10σ limiting flux of Ks ≤ 15.6 mag. In order to distinguish absorbed infrared sources near the Galactic center from those in the foreground, we defined red and blue sources as those which have H - Ks ≥ 0.9 and <0.9 mag, respectively. We find that 5.8% ± 1.5% (2σ) of the hard X-ray sources have real infrared counterparts, of which 228 ± 99 are red and 166 ± 27 are blue. The red counterparts are probably comprised of Wolf-Rayet and O stars, high-mass X-ray binaries, and symbiotic binaries located near the Galactic center. Foreground X-ray binaries suffering intrinsic X-ray absorption could be included in the sample of blue infrared counterparts to hard X-ray sources. We also find that 39.4% ± 1.0% of the soft X-ray sources have blue infrared counterparts; most of these are probably coronally active dwarfs in the foreground. There is a noteworthy collection of ∼20 red counterparts to hard X-ray sources near the Sagittarius B H II region, which are probably massive binaries that have formed within the last several Myr. For each of the infrared matches to X-ray sources in our catalog we derived the probability that the association is real, based on the source properties and the results of the cross-correlation analysis. These data are included in our catalog and will serve spectroscopic surveys to identify infrared

  2. SEARCHES FOR POINT-LIKE AND EXTENDED NEUTRINO SOURCES CLOSE TO THE GALACTIC CENTER USING THE ANTARES NEUTRINO TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for cosmic neutrino sources using six years of data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope has been performed. Clusters of muon neutrinos over the expected atmospheric background have been looked for. No clear signal has been found. The most signal-like accumulation of events is located at equatorial coordinates R.A. = –46.°8 and decl. = –64.°9 and corresponds to a 2.2σ background fluctuation. In addition, upper limits on the flux normalization of an E –2 muon neutrino energy spectrum have been set for 50 pre-selected astrophysical objects. Finally, motivated by an accumulation of seven events relatively close to the Galactic Center in the recently reported neutrino sample of the IceCube telescope, a search for point sources in a broad region around this accumulation has been carried out. No indication of a neutrino signal has been found in the ANTARES data and upper limits on the flux normalization of an E –2 energy spectrum of neutrinos from point sources in that region have been set. The 90% confidence level upper limits on the muon neutrino flux normalization vary between 3.5 and 5.1 × 10–8 GeV cm–2 s–1, depending on the exact location of the source

  3. SEARCHES FOR POINT-LIKE AND EXTENDED NEUTRINO SOURCES CLOSE TO THE GALACTIC CENTER USING THE ANTARES NEUTRINO TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M. [Institut d' Investigació per a la Gestió Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC) - Universitat Politècnica de València. C/Paranimf 1, E-46730 Gandia (Spain); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568, F-68008 Colmar (France); André, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Rambla Exposició, E-08800 Vilanova i la Geltrú, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Baret, B. [APC, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Barrios-Martí, J. [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificios Investigación de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de València, Apdo. de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Basa, S. [LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Pôle de l' Étoile Site de Château-Gombert, rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie 38, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A. [INFN -Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-05-01

    A search for cosmic neutrino sources using six years of data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope has been performed. Clusters of muon neutrinos over the expected atmospheric background have been looked for. No clear signal has been found. The most signal-like accumulation of events is located at equatorial coordinates R.A. = –46.°8 and decl. = –64.°9 and corresponds to a 2.2σ background fluctuation. In addition, upper limits on the flux normalization of an E {sup –2} muon neutrino energy spectrum have been set for 50 pre-selected astrophysical objects. Finally, motivated by an accumulation of seven events relatively close to the Galactic Center in the recently reported neutrino sample of the IceCube telescope, a search for point sources in a broad region around this accumulation has been carried out. No indication of a neutrino signal has been found in the ANTARES data and upper limits on the flux normalization of an E {sup –2} energy spectrum of neutrinos from point sources in that region have been set. The 90% confidence level upper limits on the muon neutrino flux normalization vary between 3.5 and 5.1 × 10{sup –8} GeV cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, depending on the exact location of the source.

  4. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  5. Surface Brightness Profiles of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Noyola

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los perfiles de brillo superficial para 28 cúmulos galácticos. Los perfiles son imágenes en diversos filtros del archivo de la cámara WFPC2 del HST. El perfil de brillo superficial para obtener la densidad de luminosidad es un importante medio de estudio de cualquier sistema dinámico. En particular la pendiente central del perfil de densidad superficial puede tener efectos significativos en la evolución del sistema. Los perfiles se obtienen midiendo la luz residual después de restar las estrellas mas brillantes, y combinando este perfil con el que se obtiene de conteos estelares. Se ha reportado que los cúmulos de esta muestra presentan una variedad de formas de brillo superficial, desde núcleos colapsados hasta muy bajas concentraciones. Los resultados muestran que la pendiente logarítmica interior para el perfil de densidad de luminosidad cubre un intervalo continuo desde 0 a 1.7 en vez de mostrar separación entre núcleos aplanados y perfiles muy empinados.

  6. Precessing $\\gamma$ jets in extended and evaporating galactic halo as a source of GRB

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    1996-01-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) by a relativistic electron beam jet at GeV energies (emitted by a compact object as a NS, BH,...), a NSJ, onto thermal BBR photons (from a nearby stellar companion) may originate a collinear gamma jet (GJ). Due to the binary system interaction the GJ precession would blaze suddenly toward the observer leading to a GRB event. The internal GJ cone structure is ruled by relativistic kinematics into a concentric onion-like sequence of photon rings, the softer in the external boundaries, the harder in the inner cone. The pointing and the crossing of such different GJ photon rings to the detector lead to a GRB hardness spectra evolution nearly corresponding to most observed ones. Moreover expected time integral spectra are also comparable with known GRB spectra. The total energy input of tens of thousands of such NSJ in an extended galactic halo, mainly cosmic rays electrons, should be reflected into the recent observational evidence (COMPTEL) of a diffused relic extended halo. Evid...

  7. High-energy cosmic neutrinos and photons from point sources, and implications for galactic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power input into highly relativistic electrons at the Crab pulsar nearly equals the neutron star's rate of energy loss due to spin-down. (a) Assuming that a newly formed pulsar is an 10% efficient accelerator of cosmic rays (approximately efficiency), and (b) adopting Ruderman's estimates of the initial pulsar spin-down rate (4 x 1043 ergs /sec), we calculate the rate at which neutrinos are detected. In 1011 tons of water, in 4 months, and for Esub(ν) >= 4 TeV, one can expect approximately 6 x 105 to 108 neutrino events from a supernova at 10 Kpc, and 1 to 300 from 7.5 Mpc; about 1 supernova per year occurs at the latter distance. These rates correspond to the range of estimated values of the original rate of spin-down. For the closed galaxy model of Peters and Westergaard, the required rate of energy input into cosmic rays is less by about two orders of magnitude. In the latter case, only galactic supernovae are likely to generate observable fluxes of neutrinos. Strong radio galaxies like Cen A are powerful emitters of gamma rays between 1011 and 1012 eV, and Cen A should yield approximately 10 neutrino events per year in a 1011 ton detector. (author)

  8. HESS J1641-463, a very hard spectrum TeV gamma-ray source in the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Oya, I; Aharonian, F; Dalton, M

    2015-01-01

    HESS J1641-463 is a unique source discovered by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) telescope array in the multi-TeV domain. The source had been previously hidden in the extended tail of emission from the bright nearby source HESS J1640-465. However, the analysis of the very-high-energy (VHE) data from the region at energies above 4 TeV revealed this new source at a significance level of 8.5$\\sigma$. HESS J1641-463 showed a moderate flux level F(E > 1 TeV) = (3.64 +/- 0.44_stat +/- 0.73_sys) 10^-13 cm^-2s^-1, corresponding to 1.8% of the Crab Nebula flux above the same energy, and a hard spectrum with a photon index Gamma = 2.07 +/- 0.1_stat +/- 0.20_sys. The light curve was investigated for evidence of variability, but none was found on both short (28-min observation) and long (yearly) timescales. HESS J1641-463 is positionally coincident with the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G338.5+0.1. There is no clear X-ray counterpart of the SNR, although Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal some weak emission...

  9. A truncated accretion disk in the galactic black hole candidate source H1743-322

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandulapati Sriram; Vivek Kumar Agrawal; Arikkala Raghurama Rao

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the geometry of the accretion disk in the source H1743-322, we have carded out a detailed X-ray temporal and spectral study using RXTE pointed observations. We have selected all data pertaining to the Steep Power Law (SPL) state during the 2003 outburst of this source. We find anti-correlated hard X-ray lags in three of the observations and the changes in the spectral and timing parameters (like the QPO fre-quency) confirm the idea of a truncated accretion disk in this source. Compiling data from similar observations of other sources, we find a correlation between the fractional change in the QPO frequency and the observed delay. We suggest that these observations indicate a definite size scale in the inner accretion disk (the radius of the truncated disk) and we explain the observed correlation using various disk parameters like Compton cooling time scale, viscous time scale etc..

  10. XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic Centre Region - I: The distribution of low-luminosity X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Heard, V

    2012-01-01

    We exploit XMM-Newton archival data in a study of the extended X-ray emission emanating from the Galactic Centre (GC) region. EPIC-pn and EPIC-MOS observations, with a total exposure approaching 0.5 and 1 Ms respectively, were used to create mosaiced images of a 100 pc x 100 pc region centred on Sgr A* in four bands covering the 2-10 keV energy range. We have also constructed a set of narrow-band images corresponding to the neutral iron fluorescence line at 6.4 keV and the K-shell lines at 6.7 keV and 6.9 keV from helium-like and hydrogenic iron. We use a combination of spatial and spectral information to decompose the GC emission into three distinct components. These comprise: the emission from hard X-ray emitting unresolved point sources; the reflected continuum and fluorescent line emission from dense molecular material; and the soft diffuse emission from thermal plasma in the temperature range, kT ~ 0.8-1.5 keV. We show that the unresolved-source component accounts for the bulk of the 6.7-keV and 6.9-keV ...

  11. Wisps in the Galactic center: NIR triggered observations of the radio source Sgr A* at 43 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, C; Krichbaum, T P; Eckart, A; Zensus, J A; Shahzamanian, B; Muzic, K

    2015-01-01

    Context. The compact radio and near-infrared (NIR) source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) associated with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center was observed at 7 mm in the context of a NIR triggered global Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) campaign. Aims. Sgr A* shows variable flux densities ranging from radio through X-rays. These variations sometimes appear in spontaneous outbursts that are referred to as flares. Multi-frequency observations of Sgr A* provide access to easily observable parameters that can test the currently accepted models that try to explain these intensity outbursts. Methods. On May 16-18, 2012 Sgr A* has been observed with the VLBA at 7 mm (43 GHz) for 6 hours each day during a global multi-wavelength campaign. These observations were triggered by a NIR flare observed at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Accurate flux densities and source morphologies were acquired. Results. The total 7 mm flux of Sgr A* shows only minor variations during its quiescent states on a daily basis of 0.06 J...

  12. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE NORTHERN GALACTIC CAP SOURCES IN THE 58 MONTH SWIFT/BAT CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed X-ray spectral analysis of the non-beamed, hard X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the northern Galactic cap of the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT) catalog, consisting of 100 AGNs with b > 50°. This sky area has excellent potential for further dedicated study due to a wide range of multi-wavelength data that are already available, and we propose it as a low-redshift analog to the 'deep field' observations of AGNs at higher redshifts (e.g., CDFN/S, COSMOS, Lockman Hole). We present distributions of luminosity, absorbing column density, and other key quantities for the catalog. We use a consistent approach to fit new and archival X-ray data gathered from XMM-Newton, Swift/XRT, ASCA, and Swift/BAT. We probe to deeper redshifts than the 9 month BAT catalog ((z) = 0.043 compared to (z) = 0.03 for the 9 month catalog), and uncover a broader absorbing column density distribution. The fraction of obscured (log N H ≥ 22) objects in the sample is ∼60%, and 43%-56% of the sample exhibits 'complex' 0.4-10 keV spectra. We present the properties of iron lines, soft excesses, and ionized absorbers for the subset of objects with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. We reinforce previous determinations of the X-ray Baldwin (Iwasawa-Taniguchi) effect for iron Kα lines. We also identify two distinct populations of sources; one in which a soft excess is well-detected and another where the soft excess is undetected, suggesting that the process responsible for producing the soft excess is not at work in all AGNs. The fraction of Compton-thick sources (log N H > 24.15) in our sample is ∼9%. We find that 'hidden/buried AGNs' (which may have a geometrically thick torus or emaciated scattering regions) constitute ∼14% of our sample, including seven objects previously not identified as hidden. Compton reflection is found to be important in a large fraction of our sample using joint XMM-Newton+BAT fits ((R) = 2.7 ± 0.75), indicating

  13. New method of determining distances to some extra-galactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure evolution of the variable radio source in the ''Hedgehog'' model is analysed. It is shown that the time evolution of the angular separation theta between two components (the nucleus and the cloud of electrons dissipating in the ''tube'' of this nucleus radial magnetic field) is described by the equation of an ellipse between initial and final separations. As a result, the following ways of determining the distance R to the radio source are obtained: 1) the ratio R1 of axes of the ellipse defines the distances R/c=R1 in terms of light time (c is the light velocity); 2) R can also be obtained from the relation R/c=R2, where Rsup(2)=[theta|theta''|-(theta')sup(2)]sup(-1/2), theta' is the velocity, theta'' is the acceleration at any point of this ellipse; 3) if thetasub(m) is the maximum (among observed) angular separation between evolute clouds and nonevolute nucleus and if tau is a duration of a radio flux flare, then R/c=R3, where R3 > or approximately tau/kxthetasub(m), k=1 and k=2 for the outflowing and approaching components, respectively. The distances R/c were estimated to the sources 3C84, 3C120, 3C273, 3C345, 4C39.25 using observations and R3 for all these sources and R1, R2 for the object VRO 42.22.01. All these model estimates do not contradict the distances to these sources determined from their redshifts. The conditions R1 approximately const, R2 approximately const, R1 approximately R2 for the observed source can serve as a criteria of the model applicability to this object

  14. Near-Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources Toward the Galactic Center. I. Statistics and a Catalog of Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Muno, M. P.; Morris, M. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Nishiyama, S.; Nagata, T.

    2009-09-01

    We present a catalog of 5184 candidate infrared counterparts to X-ray sources detected toward the Galactic center. The X-ray sample contains 9017 point sources detected in this region by the Chandra X-ray Observatory during the past decade, including data from a recent deep survey of the central 2° × 0fdg8 of the Galactic plane. A total of 6760 of these sources have hard X-ray colors, and the majority of them lie near the Galactic center, while most of the remaining 2257 soft X-ray sources lie in the foreground. We cross-correlated the X-ray source positions with the 2MASS and SIRIUS near-infrared catalogs, which collectively contain stars with a 10σ limiting flux of Ks red and blue sources as those which have H - Ks >= 0.9 and red and 166 ± 27 are blue. The red counterparts are probably comprised of Wolf-Rayet and O stars, high-mass X-ray binaries, and symbiotic binaries located near the Galactic center. Foreground X-ray binaries suffering intrinsic X-ray absorption could be included in the sample of blue infrared counterparts to hard X-ray sources. We also find that 39.4% ± 1.0% of the soft X-ray sources have blue infrared counterparts; most of these are probably coronally active dwarfs in the foreground. There is a noteworthy collection of ≈20 red counterparts to hard X-ray sources near the Sagittarius B H II region, which are probably massive binaries that have formed within the last several Myr. For each of the infrared matches to X-ray sources in our catalog we derived the probability that the association is real, based on the source properties and the results of the cross-correlation analysis. These data are included in our catalog and will serve spectroscopic surveys to identify infrared counterparts to X-ray sources near the Galactic center.

  15. Long-term X-ray Observations of Galactic Superluminal Sources with GRANAT/WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.; Lund, Niels

    The authors present X-ray time histories for the radio-jet sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 observed by the GRANAT/WATCH all-sky monitor at 8-20 keV. GRS 1915+105 is extremely variable on the time scales of months to years. The analysis of a 3-year data set gives no evidence for periodicity in...

  16. High precision microlensing maps of the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Kerins, E; Marshall, D J

    2008-01-01

    We present detailed maps of the microlensing optical depth and event density over an area of 195 sq. deg towards the Galactic bulge. The maps are computed from synthetic stellar catalogues generated from the Besancon Galaxy Model, which comprises four stellar populations and a three-dimensional extinction map calibrated against the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey. The optical depth maps have a resolution of 15 arcminutes, corresponding to the angular resolution of the extinction map. We compute optical depth and event density maps for all resolved sources above I=19, for unresolved (difference image) sources magnified above this limit, and for bright standard candle sources in the bulge. We show that the resulting optical depth contours are dominated by extinction effects, exhibiting fine structure in stark contrast to previous theoretical optical depth maps. Optical depth comparisons between Galactic models and optical microlensing survey measurements cannot safely ignore extinction or assume it to be smooth. We s...

  17. Milliarcsecond angular resolution of reddened stellar sources in the vicinity of the Galactic Center

    OpenAIRE

    Richichi, A.; Fors, O.; Mason, E.; Stegmaier, J; T.Chandrasekhar

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, the lunar occultation technique has been employed on a very large telescope in the near-IR with the aim of achieving systematically milliarcsecond resolution on stellar sources. We have demonstrated the burst mode of the ISAAC instrument, using a fast read-out on a small area of the detector to record many tens of seconds of data at a time on fields of few squared arcsec. We have used the opportunity to record a large number of LO events during a passage of the Moon close ...

  18. A NEW SAMPLE OF BURIED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED FROM THE SECOND XMM-NEWTON SERENDIPITOUS SOURCE CATALOGUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of X-ray spectral analysis of 22 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a small scattering fraction selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue using hardness ratios. They are candidates of buried AGNs, since a scattering fraction, which is a fraction of scattered emission by the circumnuclear photoionized gas with respect to direct emission, can be used to estimate the size of the opening part of an obscuring torus. Their X-ray spectra are modeled by a combination of a power law with a photon index of 1.5-2 absorbed by a column density of ∼1023-24 cm-2, an unabsorbed power law, narrow Gaussian lines, and some additional soft components. We find that scattering fractions of 20 among 22 objects are less than a typical value (∼3%) for Seyfert 2s observed so far. In particular, those of eight objects are smaller than 0.5%, which are in the range for buried AGNs found in recent hard X-ray surveys. Moreover, [O III] λ5007 luminosities at given X-ray luminosities for some objects are smaller than those for Seyfert 2s previously known. This fact could be interpreted as a smaller size of optical narrow emission-line regions produced in the opening direction of the obscuring torus. These results indicate that they are strong candidates for the AGN buried in a very geometrically thick torus.

  19. Is SS 433 a misaligned ultraluminous X-ray source? Constraints from its reflected signal in the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Khabibullin, Ildar

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the emission that must arise due to reflection of the putative collimated X-ray radiation of SS 433 by atomic gas and molecular clouds in the Galactic plane and compare the predicted signal with existing RXTE and ASCA data for the region of interest. Assuming that the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of SS 433 is similar to that of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), we obtain an upper limit of $\\sim 4\\times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ on its total (angular-integrated) luminosity in the 2--10 keV energy band, which is only weakly dependent on the half-opening angle, $\\Theta_r$, of the emission cone. In contrast, the upper limit on the apparent luminosity of SS 433 (that would be perceived by an observer looking at its supercritical accretion disk face-on) decreases with increasing $\\Theta_r$ and is $\\sim 3\\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for $\\Theta_r\\gtrsim\\Theta_p=21\\deg$, where $\\Theta_p$ is the precession angle of the baryonic jets (assuming that the emission cones precess in the same manner as the jets). This ...

  20. Large peculiar motion of the solar system from the dipole anisotropy in sky brightness due to distant radio sources

    OpenAIRE

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2011-01-01

    According to the cosmological principle, the Universe should appear isotropic, without any preferred directions, to an observer whom we may consider to be fixed in the co-moving co-ordinate system of the expanding Universe. Such an observer is stationary with respect to the average distribution of the matter in the Universe and the sky brightness at any frequency should appear uniform in all directions to such an observer. However a peculiar motion of such an observer, due to a combined effec...

  1. Swift-BAT Survey of Galactic Sources: Catalog and Properties of the populations

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, R

    2010-01-01

    We study the populations of X-ray sources in the Milky Way in the 15-55 keV band using a deep survey with the BAT instrument aboard the Swift observatory. We present the logN-logS distributions of the various source types and we analyze their variability and spectra. For the low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) we derive the luminosity functions to a limiting luminosity of L_X~7 times10^{34} erg s/s. Our results confirm the previously found flattening of the LMXB luminosity function below a luminosity of L_X~10^{37} erg s/s. The luminosity function of the HMXBs is found to be significantly flatter in the 15-55 keV band than in the 2-10 keV band. From the luminosity functions we estimate the ratios of the hard X-ray luminosity from HMXBs to the star-formation rate, and the LMXB luminosity to the stellar mass. We use these to estimate the X-ray emissivity in the local universe from X-ray binaries and show that it constitutes only a small fraction of the hard X-ray background.

  2. Wisps in the Galactic center: Near-infrared triggered observations of the radio source Sgr A* at 43 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, C.; Ros, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Eckart, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Shahzamanian, B.; Mužić, K.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The compact radio and near-infrared (NIR) source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) associated with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center was observed at 7 mm in the context of a NIR triggered global Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) campaign. Aims: Sgr A* shows variable flux densities ranging from radio through X-rays. These variations sometimes appear in spontaneous outbursts that are referred to as flares. Multi-frequency observations of Sgr A* provide access to easily observable parameters that can test the currently accepted models that try to explain these intensity outbursts. Methods: On May 16-18, 2012 Sgr A* has been observed with the VLBA at 7 mm (43 GHz) for 6 h each day during a global multi-wavelength campaign. These observations were triggered by a NIR flare observed at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Accurate flux densities and source morphologies were acquired. Results: The total 7 mm flux of Sgr A* shows only minor variations during its quiescent states on a daily basis of 0.06 Jy. An observed NIR flare on May 17 was followed ~4.5 h later by an increase in flux density of 0.22 Jy at 43 GHz. This agrees well with the expected time delay of events that are casually connected by adiabatic expansion. Shortly before the peak of the radio flare, Sgr A* developed a secondary radio off-core feature at 1.5 mas toward the southeast. Even though the closure phases are too noisy to place actual constraints on this feature, a component at this scale together with a time delay of 4.5 ± 0.5 h between the NIR and radio flare provide evidence for an adiabatically expanding jet feature.

  3. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmogorov, A.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ritter, J.; Stupishin, N.; Zelenski, A.

    2014-02-01

    The RHIC polarized H- ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H2 gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ˜0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce "geometrical" beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  4. Search for galactic sources of X-ray bursts with scintillation spectrometers of the Kosmos-856 satellite in the energy range of 20-320 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Search for galactic sources of X-pay bursts with a scintillation spectrometer of ''Kosmos-856'' satellite has given a negative result. During 21 hours of observations with two independent detectors not one burst of X-rays with the energy flux P 2x10-7 erg/cm2 has been found in the energy range 20-320 keV and duration 10s. This result disagrees with the data obtained with the ''Kosmos-428'' satellite

  5. Search for galactic sources and X-ray bursts with spectrometers of the Kosmos-914 satellite in the energy range of 20-320 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of observations carried out with two scintillation spectrometers of ''Kosmos-914'' satellite used for searches for bursts of galactic hard X-rays are described. The comparison of the results obtained with ''Kosmos-428'' and ''Kosmos-856'' satellites is given. The results of observation of the Whale constellation and the celestial sphere area near the centre of Galaxy are given, where, according to the data of ''Kosmos-428'' satellite the presence of X-ray sources was experted

  6. Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Point-like Sources in the Inner Galactic Plane with a Partial Configuration of the HAWC Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerril Reyes, A. D.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bernal, A.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Capistrán, T.; Carramiñana, A.; Casanova, S.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; Coutińo de León, S.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Enriquez-Rivera, O.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hernandez, S.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hui, C. M.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Raya, G. Luis; Malone, K.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Ren, Z.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Tibolla, O.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Vrabel, K.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yapici, T.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A survey of the inner Galaxy region of Galactic longitude l\\in [+15^\\circ ,+50^\\circ ] and latitude b\\in [-4^\\circ ,+4^\\circ ] is performed using one-third of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, operated during its construction phase. To address the ambiguities arising from unresolved sources in the data, we use a maximum likelihood technique to identify point source candidates. Ten sources and candidate sources are identified in this analysis. Eight of these are associated with known TeV sources but not all have differential fluxes that are compatible with previous measurements. Three sources are detected with significances >5 σ after accounting for statistical trials, and are associated with known TeV sources.

  7. Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Point-like Sources in the Inner Galactic Plane with a Partial Configuration of the HAWC Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Reyes, A D Becerril; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Bernal, A; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Capistrán, T; Carramiñana, A; Casanova, S; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de León, S Coutiño; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Enriquez-Rivera, O; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernandez, S; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Raya, G Luis; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Ren, Z; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tibolla, O; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Vrabel, K; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yapici, T; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2015-01-01

    A survey of the inner Galaxy region of Galactic longitude l in [+15, +50] degree and latitude b in [-4,+4] degree is performed using one-third of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory operated during its construction phase. To address the ambiguities arising from unresolved sources in the data, we use a maximum likelihood technique to identify point source candidates. Ten sources and candidate sources are identified in this analysis. Eight of these are associated with known TeV sources but not all have differential fluxes compatible with previous measurements. Three sources are detected with significances $>5\\,\\sigma$ after accounting for statistical trials, and are associated with known TeV sources.

  8. A signature of EeV protons of Galactic origin

    CERN Document Server

    Tinyakov, P G; Ivanov, D; Thomson, G B; Tirone, A H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate signatures that would be produced in the spectrum and sky distribution of UHECR by a population of the Galactic sources of high-energy protons in the energy range around 1 EeV, i.e., around the diffusive-to-ballistic transition. In this regime, the CR flux has to be calculated numerically. We employ the approach that consists in backtracking anti-protons from Earth through the Galaxy and integrating the source emissivity along the trajectory. This approach makes evident two generic features of the transition region: sharp increase of the total flux as the energy decreases across the transition region, and its strong anisotropy (appearance of a bright compact spot) all the way until the onset of the diffusive regime. We then discuss and compare several methods to experimentally detect or constrain these features. We find that a few percent admixture of the Galactic protons can in principle be detected by the current UHECR experiments.

  9. The XMM-Newton/2dF survey - II. The nature of X-ray faint optically bright X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Vallbe, M; Kolokotronis, V G; Basilakos, S; Plionis, M; Stewart, G C; Shanks, T; Boyle, B J

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the properties of low X-ray-to-optical flux ratio sources detected in a wide area (2.5deg^2) shallow (f(0.5-8keV)~10e-14cgs) XMM-Newton survey. We find a total of 26 sources (5% of the total X-ray selected population) with log f_X/f_{opt}<-0.9 to the above flux limit. Optical spectroscopy is available for 20 of these low X-ray-to-optical flux ratio objects. Most of them are found to be associated with Galactic stars (total of 8) and broad line AGNs (total of 8).We also find two sources with optical spectra showing absorption and/or narrow emission lines and X-ray/optical properties suggesting AGN activity. Another two sources are found to be associated with low redshift galaxies with narrow emission line optical spectra, X-ray luminosities L_X(0.5-8keV)~10e41cgs and logf_X/f_opt ~ -2 suggesting `normal' star-forming galaxies. Despite the small number statistics the sky density of `normal' X-ray selected star-forming galaxies at the flux limit of the present sample is low consis...

  10. TESTING THE GLOBAL STAR FORMATION RELATION: AN HCO+ (3-2) MAPPING STUDY OF RED MSX SOURCES IN THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and mass of dense gas in Galactic clumps and nearby galaxies. Using the bolometric luminosity as a measure of SFR and the molecular line luminosity of HCO+ (3-2) as a measure of dense gas mass, we find that the relation between SFR and Mdense is approximately linear. This is similar to published results derived using HCN (1-0) as a dense gas tracer. HCO+ (3-2) and HCN (1-0) have similar conditions for excitation. Our work includes 16 Galactic clumps that are in both the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey and the Red MSX Source Survey, 27 water maser sources from the literature, and the aforementioned HCN (1-0) data. Our results agree qualitatively with predictions of recent theoretical models which state that the nature of the relation should depend on how the critical density of the tracer compares with the mean density of the gas.

  11. Ion beams in SEM: An experiment towards a high brightness low energy spread electron impact gas ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jun, D.S.; Kutchoukov, V.G.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    A next generation ion source suitable for both high resolution focused ion beam milling and imaging applications is currently being developed. The new ion source relies on a method of which positively charged ions are extracted from a miniaturized gas chamber where neutral gas atoms become ionized b

  12. Spectral states and state preference of galactic X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using observations in the past four years with the All Sky Monitor(ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer(RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope(BAT) onboard the Swift,we demonstrate that the hard state and the soft state are the primary spectral states in galactic black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries.In addition,we show quantitatively the preference of the two spectral states for each of the 22 bright persistent sources.

  13. Herschel-ATLAS: Planck sources in the Phase 1 fields

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, D.; González-Nuevo, J.; Clements, D. L.; López-Caniego, M.; Lapi, A.; Danese, L.; Fu, Hai; Baes, M.; Carrera, Francisco J.; Eales, S.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Lagache, G.; Massardi, Marcella; Negrello, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a cross-correlation of the Planck Early Release Compact Source catalogue (ERCSC) with the catalogue of Herschel-ATLAS sources detected in the phase 1 fields, covering 134.55 deg2. There are 28ERCSC sources detected by Planck at 857GHz in this area. Asmany as16 of them are probably high Galactic latitude cirrus; 10additional sources can be clearly identified as bright, low-z galaxies; one further source is resolved by Herschel as two relatively bright sources; and the...

  14. Detection of metagalactic and galactic sources of very high-energy gamma-quanta and neutrinos with the mirror Cherenkov telescope SHALON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-astronomy and neutrino astronomy are unique experimental possibilities to search for sources of high-energy cosmic rays (1012-1014eV). Experimental data on sources of γ-quanta with the energy >1TeV are characterized by the fact that observed metagalactic sources (active galactic nuclei), being different in power from galactic sources by the factor of 106-107, do not differ in the energy spectrum, F(>Eγ)∝Eγ-1.3+/-0.15. The power of the metagalactic sources and their unlimited number casts doubts on the assumption of a galactic origin of the observed cosmic-ray flux. It is possible to assume that the uniform cosmic-ray spectrum is formed by ''braking'' in multiple elastic or inelastic collisions with relict photons in intergalactic space. Thus, the observed distribution of protons and cosmic-ray nuclei with the spectral index 2.72+/-0.02 (=2.718..., the Napier's constant) may be a consequence of such a ''braking'' that warms up the relict photons. Problems in observation of extensive air showers generated by neutrinos are connected with an extremely small cross section of inelastic collisions of neutrinos with nuclei. However, two facts allow to search for showers generated by neutrinos: (1) a hadron cascade with the primary energy of more than 1012eV leaves a mountain ridge to the atmosphere from the depth ∼300g/cm2 without an essential loss of the total energy in the hadron cascade, and (2) air Cherenkov radiation from such hadron cascades will be observed with a 7.5km distant telescope over an area of more than 7x105m2. This partially compensates the small cross section of inelastic neutrino collisions

  15. Kes 73: A Young Supernova Remnant with an X-ray Bright, Radio-quiet Central Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Vasisht, G.

    1997-01-01

    We clarify the nature of the small-diameter supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 and its central compact source, 1E 1841-045, using X-ray data acquired with the ASCA Observatory. We introduce a spatio-spectral decomposition technique necessary to disentangle the ASCA spectrum of the compact source from the barely resolved shell-type remnant. The source spectrum (1 - 8 keV) is characterized by an absorbed power-law with a photon index ~ 3.4 and N_H ~ 3.0E22 cm^-2, possibly non-thermal in nature. Thi...

  16. Testing the global star formation relation: An HCO+ (3-2) mapping study of Red MSX sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schenck, David E; Reiter, Megan; Juneau, Stephanie; 10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/94

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and mass of dense gas in Galactic clumps and nearby galaxies. Using the bolometric luminosity as a measure of SFR and the molecular line luminosity of HCO+ (3-2) as a measure of dense gas mass, we find that the relation between SFR and M_{dense} is approximately linear. This is similar to published results derived using HCN (1-0) as a dense gas tracer. HCO+ (3-2) and HCN (1-0) have similar conditions for excitation. Our work includes 16 Galactic clumps that are in both the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey and the Red MSX Survey, 27 water maser sources from the literature, and the aforementioned HCN (1-0) data. Our results agree qualitatively with predictions of recent theoretical models which state that the nature of the relation should depend on how the critical density of the tracer compares with the mean density of the gas.

  17. On the potential of atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays for resolving TeV gamma-ray sources in the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrogi, Lucia; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The potential of an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to detect gamma-ray sources in complex regions has been investigated. The basic characteristics of the gamma-ray instrument have been parametrized using simple analytic representations. In addition to the ideal (Gaussian form) point spread function (PSF), the impact of more realistic non-Gaussian PSFs with tails has been considered. Simulations of isolated point-like and extended sources have been used as a benchmark to test and understand the response of the instrument. The capability of the instrument to resolve multiple sources has been analyzed and the corresponding instrument sensitivities calculated. The results are of particular interest for weak gamma-ray emitters located in crowded regions of the Galactic plane, where the chance of clustering of two or more gamma-ray sources within 1 degree is high.

  18. New Extended GeV Sources in the Galactic Plane Found in a Search of the Pass 8 Data from Fermi-LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Jamie; Grondin, Marie-Hélène; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolving pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs) at GeV energies enables accurate representation of spectra, aids identification of multiwavelength counterparts, and probes possible substructure within the gamma-ray sources. Using 6 years of Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data above 10 GeV, we searched for spatially extended sources near the Galactic plane. The improved angular resolution and photon acceptance of the Pass 8 event reconstruction significantly aids in characterizing source extension and assessing spectral and morphological properties, a key consideration for studies of PWNe and SNRs in the gamma-ray band. Selecting photons above 10 GeV strikes a balance between keeping photon statistics high and diffuse gamma-ray emission low, and also carries benefits of a near constancy with energy of the point spread function of the LAT. More than 30 significantly extended sources are detected, many of which are resolved at GeV energies for the first time.

  19. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80–120–200 keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40 at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors. -- Highlights: ► STEM EDX dopant distribution analysis (As and P) in Si devices is carried out. ► High brightness electron source and four EDX Silicon Drift detectors are used. ► The obtained signal dynamics (four decades) allows detection down to 0.01 at%. ► During silicon axis analysis coherent Bremmsstrahlung is observed. ► This effect is studied at different energies and Si crystal orientations.

  20. Cut-off Characterisation of Energy Spectra of Bright Fermi Sources: Current instrument limits and future possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Romoli, C; Aharonian, F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper some of the brightest GeV sources observed by the Fermi-LAT were analysed, focusing on their spectral cut-off region. The sources chosen for this investigation were the brightest blazar flares of 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 and the Vela pulsar using catalogue data and reanalysis with the latest Fermi-LAT software. For the study the spectral cut-off we first explored the Vela pulsar spectrum, whose statistics in the 3FGL catalog allowed strong constraints to be obtained on the parameters. We subsequently performed a new analysis of the flaring blazar SEDs. For these sources we obtained constraints on the cut-off parameters under the assumption that their underlying spectral distribution is described by a power-law with a stretched exponential cut-off. We then highlighted the significant potential improvements on such constraints by observations with next generation ground based Cherenkov telescopes, represented in our study by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Adopting currently available simulations ...

  1. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Ranitovic, Predrag; Robinson, Joseph S.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Table-top sources of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light based on high-harmonic generation (HHG) provide novel insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials, or correlated solids and are of interest for advanced applications. Extending HHG to high repetition rates is important for experiments, yet efficient XUV conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate an efficient source of femtosecond XUV pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate using ultraviolet second-harmonic pulses focused tightly into Kr. As a result, a photon flux of about 10^14 s^-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, corresponding to 2?10^-4 conversion efficiency which surpasses our similar, direct-driven harmonics by two orders-of-magnitude. This enhancement exceeds the expected dipole scaling, evidencing improved phase-matching for ultraviolet-driven HHG under tight focusing as corroborated by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single harmonic renders this efficient 50-kHz XUV source a highly valuable tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other experiments.

  2. The VLA Survey of Chandra Deep Field South. V. Evolution and Luminosity Functions of Sub-millijansky Radio Sources and the Issue of Radio Emission in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, P.; Miller, N.; Kellermann, K. I.; Mainieri, V.; Rosati, P.; Tozzi, P.

    2011-10-01

    We present the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions of the radio sources belonging to the Chandra Deep Field South Very Large Array survey, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 43 μJy at the field center and redshift ~5 and which includes the first radio-selected complete sample of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use a new, comprehensive classification scheme based on radio, far- and near-IR, optical, and X-ray data to disentangle star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from AGNs and radio-quiet from radio-loud AGNs. We confirm our previous result that SFGs become dominant only below 0.1 mJy. The sub-millijansky radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of SFGs and radio-quiet AGNs evolving at a similar, strong rate; non-evolving low-luminosity radio galaxies; and declining radio powerful (P >~ 3 × 1024 W Hz-1) AGNs. Our results suggest that radio emission from radio-quiet AGNs is closely related to star formation. The detection of compact, high brightness temperature cores in several nearby radio-quiet AGNs can be explained by the coexistence of two components, one non-evolving and AGN related and one evolving and star formation related. Radio-quiet AGNs are an important class of sub-millijansky sources, accounting for ~30% of the sample and ~60% of all AGNs, and outnumbering radio-loud AGNs at bypassing the problems of obscuration that plague the optical and soft X-ray bands.

  3. Fermi LAT detection of two high Galactic latitude gamma-ray sources, Fermi J1049.7+0435 and J1103.2+1145

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimichi, Masaki; Mori, Masaki; Edwards, Philip G; Stevens, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    During a search for gamma-ray emission from NGC 3628 (Arp 317), two new unidentified gamma-ray sources, Fermi J1049.7+0435 and J1103.2+1145 have been discovered \\cite{ATel}. The detections are made in data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, in the 100\\,MeV to 300\\,GeV band during the period between 2008 August 5 and 2012 October 27. Neither is coincident with any source listed in the 2FGL catalogue \\cite{Nolan2012}. Fermi J1049.7+0435 is at Galactic coordinates $(l,b) = (245.34^\\circ, 53.27^\\circ)$, $(\\alpha_{J2000}, \\delta_{J2000}) = (162.43^\\circ, 4.60^\\circ)$. Fermi J1103.2+1145 is at Galactic coordinates $(l,b) = (238.85^\\circ, 60.33^\\circ)$, $(\\alpha_{J2000},\\delta_{J2000})= (165.81^\\circ, 11.75^\\circ)$. Possible radio counterparts are found for both sources, which show flat radio spectra similar to other Fermi LAT detected AGN, and their identifications are discussed. These identification have been supoorted by snap-shot observations with the Australia Tel...

  4. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, He; Ulonska, Stefan; Ranitovic, Predrag; Robinson, Joseph S; Kaindl, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Novel table-top sources of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light based on high-harmonic generation (HHG) yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials, or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending HHG to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient XUV conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond XUV pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ~3e13 per second is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5e-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar directly-driven harmonics by two orders-of-magnitude. This enhancement exceeds the predicted dipole wavelength scaling, evidencing improved phase-matching for ultraviolet-driven HHG under tight focusing as corroborated by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single sub-80 meV harmonic re...

  5. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    of brightness represent a robust visual response to the likely sources of stimuli, as determined, in this instance, by the known statistical relationship between scenes and their retinal responses. While the responses of the early visual system (receptors in this case may represent specifically the statistics of images, post receptor responses are more likely represent the statistical relationship between images and scenes. A corollary of this suggestion is that the visual cortex is adapted to relate the retinal image to behaviour given the statistics of its past interactions with the sources of retinal images: the visual cortex is adapted to the signals it receives from the eyes, and not directly to the world beyond.

  6. Dust-grain scattering of X-rays observed during the lunar occultation of a transient X-ray source near the Galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extended X-ray emission surrounding point X-ray sources has been detected in the energy band 1-10 keV during lunar occultation observations of the Galactic center region. These extended X-rays are most likely due to X-ray scattering by interstellar dust grains. The spatial size and the intensity of the extended emission around the transient X-ray source GS 1741.2-2859/1741.6-2849 have been studied extensively. The spatial size is consistent with the typical grain size of about 0.06 micron. The intensity is used to obtain the energy dependence of the scattering optical depth to the source, which suggests the existence of iron in the grains. The ratio of the iron column density contained in the grains to the hydrogen column density of the neutral gas is roughly consistent with the cosmic abundance of iron. 30 refs

  7. TANAMI - Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Cornelia; Ojha, Roopesh; Boeck, M; Booth, R; Dutka, M S; Edwardsk, P; Fey, A L; Fuhrmann, L; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Jauncey, D L; Johnston, K J; Katz, U; Lister, M; Lovell, J E J; Ploetz, C; Quick, J F H; Ros, E; Taylor, G B; Thompson, D J; Tingay, S J; Tosti, G; Tzioumisk, A K; Wilms, J; Zensus, J A

    2009-01-01

    We present a summary of the observation strategy of TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry), a monitoring program to study the parsec-scale structure and dynamics of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the Southern Hemisphere with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the trans-oceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek, TIGO, and O'Higgins. TANAMI is focusing on extragalactic sources south of -30 degrees declination with observations at 8.4 GHz and 22 GHz every ~2 months at milliarcsecond resolution. The initial TANAMI sample of 43 sources has been defined before the launch of the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to include the most promising candidates for bright gamma-ray emission to be detected with its Large Area Telescope (LAT). Since November 2008, we have been adding new sources to the sample, which now includes all known radio- and gamma-ray bright AGN of the Southern Hemisphere. The combination of VLBI and gamma-ray observations is crucial to u...

  8. High-brightness diode pump sources for solid-state and fiber laser pumping across 8xx-9xx nm range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Ronen; Berk, Yuri; Cohen, Shalom; Klumel, Genady; Levy, Moshe; Openhaim, Yaki; Peleg, Ophir; Yanson, Dan; Karni, Yoram

    2011-06-01

    Advanced solid state laser architectures place increasingly demanding requirements on high-brightness, low-cost QCW laser diode pump sources, with custom apertures both for side and end rod pumping configurations. To meet this need, a new series of scalable QCW pump sources at 808nm and 940nm was developed. The stacks, available in multiple output formats, allow for custom aperture filling by varying both the length and quantity of stacked laser bars. For these products, we developed next-generation laser bars based on improved epitaxial wafer designs delivering power densities of 20W/mm of emission aperture. With >200W of peak QCW power available from a full-length 1cm bar, we have demonstrated power scaling to over 2kW in 10-bar stacks with 55% wall plug efficiency. We also present the design and performance of several stack configurations using full-length and reduced-length (mini) bars that demonstrate the versatility of both the bar and packaging designs. We illustrate how the ROBUST HEAD packaging technology developed at SCD is capable of accommodating variable bar length, pitch and quantity for custom rod pumping geometries. The excellent all-around performance of the stacks is supported by reliability data in line with the previously reported 20 Gshot space-grade qualification of SCD's stacks.

  9. MAGIC Upper Limits for Two Milagro-detected Bright Fermi Sources in the Region of SNR G65.1+0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the observation of the region around supernova remnant G65.1+0.6 with the stand-alone MAGIC-I telescope. This region hosts the two bright GeV gamma-ray sources 1FGL J1954.3+2836 and 1FGL J1958.6+2845. They are identified as GeV pulsars and both have a possible counterpart detected at about 35 TeV by the Milagro observatory. MAGIC collected 25.5 hr of good quality data and found no significant emission in the range around 1 TeV. We therefore report differential flux upper limits, assuming the emission to be point-like (<=0fdg1) or within a radius of 0fdg3. In the point-like scenario, the flux limits around 1 TeV are at the level of 3% and 2% of the Crab Nebula flux for the two sources, respectively. This implies that the Milagro emission is either extended over a much larger area than our point-spread function or it must be peaked at energies beyond 1 TeV, resulting in a photon index harder than 2.2 in the TeV band.

  10. MAGIC Upper Limits for two Milagro-detected, Bright Fermi Sources in the Region of SNR G65.1+0.6

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; DelgadoMendez, C; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the observation of the region around supernova remnant G65.1+0.6 with the stand-alone MAGIC-I telescope. This region hosts the two bright GeV gamma-ray sources 1FGL J1954.3+2836 and 1FGL J1958.6+2845. They are identified as GeV pulsars and both have a possible counterpart detected at about 35 TeV by the Milagro observatory. MAGIC collected 25.5 hours of good quality data, and found no significant emission in the range around 1 TeV. We therefore report differential flux upper limits, assuming the emission to be point-like (<0.1 deg) or within a radius of 0.3 deg. In the point-like scenario, the flux limits around 1 TeV are at the level of 3 % and 2 % of the Crab Nebula flux, for the two sources respectively. This implies that the Milagro emission is either extended over a much larger area than our point spread function, or it must be peaked at energies beyond 1 TeV, resulting in a photon index harder than 2.2 in the TeV band.

  11. Spitzer bright, UltraVISTA faint sources in COSMOS: the contribution to the overall population of massive galaxies at z=3-7

    CERN Document Server

    Caputi, K I; Laigle, C; McCracken, H J; Fevre, O Le; Fynbo, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Capak, P; Salvato, M; Taniguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed a sample of 574 Spitzer 4.5 micron-selected galaxies with [4.5]24 (AB) over the UltraVISTA ultra-deep COSMOS field. Our aim is to investigate whether these mid-IR bright, near-IR faint sources contribute significantly to the overall population of massive galaxies at redshifts z>=3. By performing a spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis using up to 30 photometric bands, we have determined that the redshift distribution of our sample peaks at redshifts z~2.5-3.0, and ~32% of the galaxies lie at z>=3. We have studied the contribution of these sources to the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) at high redshifts. We found that the [4.5]24 galaxies produce a negligible change to the GSMF previously determined for Ks~50% of the galaxies with stellar masses Mst>~6 x 10^10 Msun. We also constrained the GSMF at the highest-mass end (Mst>~2 x 10^11 Msun) at z>=5. From their presence at 5=

  12. Hi-GAL, the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey: photometric maps and compact source catalogues. First data release for Inner Milky Way: +68{\\deg}> l > -70{\\deg}

    CERN Document Server

    Molinari, S; Elia, D; Pestalozzi, M; Traficante, A; Pezzuto, S; Swinyard, B M; Noriega-Crespo, A; Bally, J; Moore, T J T; Plume, R; Zavagno, A; di Giorgio, A M; Liu, S J; Pilbratt, G L; Mottram, J C; Russeil, D; Piazzo, L; Veneziani, M; Benedettini, M; Calzoletti, L; Faustini, F; Natoli, P; Piacentini, F; Merello, M; Palmese, A; Del Grande, R; Polychroni, D; Rygl, K L J; Polenta, G; Barlow, M J; Bernard, J -P; Martin, P G; Testi, L; Ali, B; Andrè, P; Beltrán, M T; Billot, N; Brunt, C; Carey, S; Cesaroni, R; Compiègne, M; Eden, D; Fukui, Y; Garcia-Lario, P; Hoare, M G; Huang, M; Joncas, G; Lim, T L; Lord, S D; Martinavarro-Armengol, S; Motte, F; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Peretto, N; Robitaille, T; Schilke, P; Schneider, N; Schulz, B; Sibthorpe, B; Strafella, F; Thompson, M A; Umana, G; Ward-Thompson, D; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged) We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the {\\em Herschel} infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic Plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio, and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 l > -70{\\deg} in a |b|<1{\\deg} latitude strip. Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, that optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the {\\em Herschel} PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras, to deliver images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with {\\em Planck} and {\\em IRAS}, and recovering extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales. The compact source catalogues have been generated with the CuTEx algorithm, specifically developed to optimize source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intens...

  13. Experimental study of the interaction of a terawatt laser with an underdense plasma: production of a bright and short source of relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation is an experimental study in the context of laser-plasma interaction in the relativistic regime. The coupling of the laser to the plasma causes numerous nonlinear phenomena such as relativistic self-focusing, Raman instabilities, wakefield generation and the breaking of plasma waves. In this self-modulated laser wakefield regime, these effects combine and accelerate background plasma electrons to relativistic velocities. In the first part of the dissertation, nonlinear effects are studied. A new method based on chirped laser pulses allowed us to measure the dynamics of Raman instabilities. The results show that backward Raman scattering occurs at the front of the pulse while forward Raman scattering occurs at the back. In addition, laser self-focusing was studied using shadowgraphy. The results show that the laser power is not the only important parameter for self-focusing: the laser pulse duration must be compared to plasma particle motion times: ωp-1 for electrons and ωpi-1 for ions. In particular, when the pulse duration is too short, relativistic self-focusing does not occur. The second part of the dissertation discusses the production of a relativistic electron source (0 to 70 MeV) using a 10 Hz laser (35 fs, 600 mJ). This bright (1010 electrons) electron source was characterized experimentally: it has a Maxwell-like velocity distribution and is potentially short (<100 fs). The source is now available for applications. Finally, the third part deals with experiments which explore electron acceleration up to GeV energies. Specifically, we discuss the guiding of a Terawatt pulse in a plasma channel and the creation of centimeter long plasmas in rectangular and supersonic gas jets. (author)

  14. The bandmerged Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue: probing sub-structure in the molecular gas at high Galactic latitude

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Pearson, Timothy J.; Mcgehee, Peregrine,; Fowler, John W.; Helou, George

    2016-01-01

    The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) includes nine lists of highly reliable sources, individually extracted at each of the nine Planck frequency channels. To facilitate the study of the Planck sources, especially their spectral behaviour across the radio/infrared frequencies, we provide a "bandmerged" catalogue of the ERCSC sources. This catalogue consists of 15191 entries, with 79 sources detected in all nine frequency channels of Planck and 6818 sources detected in only...

  15. Theoretical galactic cosmic ray electron spectrum obtained for sources of varying geometry; Spectre theorique des electrons du rayonnement cosmique dans la galaxie obtenu pour des sources a geometrie variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Jokipii and Meyer have recently obtained an electron density energy spectrum of the cosmic rays, originating in the Galaxy, using integral solutions of the steady state transfer equations, by considering a circular cylindric galactic disc as source and approximating the resulting fourth order integral. In this report, we present general results, obtained by using an arbitrary circular cylindric source, without restricting ourselves to the galactic disc. The integrals are treated exactly. The conclusions of Jokipii and Meyer form special cases of these results. We also obtain an exponential energy variation which, at the moment, is not observed experimentally. The second part of this work deals with more complicated, but perhaps more realistic models of elliptic cylindric and ellipsoidal galactic disc sources. One may also note that a very large source concentrated in a very small region gives a spectrum not unlike that for a small source distributed throughout a large volume. Finally, it may be remarked that the model adopted is much less restrictive than the artificial conception of 'leakage time' followed by other workers. (author) [French] Jokipii et Meyer ont dernierement obtenu un spectre d'energie pour les electrons galactiques dans le rayonnement cosmique, en utilisant les solutions des equations de transfert, a l'etat stationnaire, ces dernieres etant sous forme d'integrales, en prenant une source completement diffusee dans le disque galactique, celui-ci etant hypothetiquement choisi comme circulaire et cylindrique et en faisant une approximation sur l'integrale du quatrieme degre. Dans ce rapport, nous presentons des resultats generaux obtenus en faisant appel a une source, diffusee dans un cylindre circulaire, arbitrairement choisi, c'est-a-dire sans nous restreindre au disque galactique comme source. Les integrales sont traitees d'une maniere exacte. Les conclusions de Jokipii et Meyer constituent des cas speciaux

  16. Coherent Bremsstrahlung effect observed during STEM analysis of dopant distribution in silicon devices using large area silicon drift EDX detectors and high brightness electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, R

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, during dopant analysis of silicon devices, we have observed a phenomenon generally neglected in EDX analysis: the coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB). We discussed the reason why and came to the conclusion that the analytical TEM used for these experiments presents a configuration and performances, which makes this equipment very sensitive to the CB effect. This is due to large collection solid angle and high counting rate of the four silicon drift EDX detectors (SDD), a high brightness electron source providing large probe current and moreover a geometry favorable to on axis crystal observations. We analyzed silicon devices containing Si [110] and Si [100] crystal areas at different energies (80-120-200keV). We also observed relaxed SiGe (27 and 40at% of Ge). The CB effect, whose intensity is maximum near zone axis beam alignment, manifests as characteristic broad peaks present in the X-ray spectrum background. The peak energies are predicted by a simple formula deduced for the CB models found in the literature and that we present simply. We evaluate also the CB peak intensities and discuss the importance of this effect on the detection and quantification traces of impurities. The CB peaks also give information on the analyzed crystal structure (measurement of the periodicity along the zone axis) and allow, in every particular experiment or system, to determine the median take off angle of the EDX detectors. PMID:21946001

  17. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  18. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb Heα x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated

  19. Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  20. Studies of IRAS sources at high galactic latitudes. I - Source counts at /b/greater than 60 deg and evidence for a north-south anisotropy of cosmological significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Walker, D.; Chester, T.; Soifer, T.; Fairclough, J.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the IRAS sky at b with an absolute value greater than 60 deg is conducted. Source counts at 12, 25, 60 and 100 microns are presented, and it is shown that emission from interstellar dust at 100 microns is localized to a few small areas of tathe galactic polar caps. At 12 and 25 microns, the sky is dominated by stars; at 60 and 100 microns, by galaxies. Comparison with the minisurvey source counts indicates the 12and 25-micron source denstiy is lower at the present latitude than at a latitude whereby the absolute value of b equals 10-40 deg. Due to the greatly reduced effects of emission from interstellar dust, the 100 micron survey reaches a factor 1.6 deeper in flux at the present latitude than the minisurvey. An anisotropy significant at the 4-sigma level was found between the north and south galactic polar caps at 60 and 100 microns, after exclusion of the Virgo cluster and of the few remaining areas significantly affected by interstellar-dust emission. It is suggested that this anisotropy represents a cosmologically significant anisotropy in the galaxy distribution. The scale of associated inhomogeneity is of the order of at least 100(50/H)Mpc.

  1. Review of low-mass X-ray binaries near the Galactic center

    OpenAIRE

    Lutovinov, A.; Grebenev, S.; Molkov, S.; Sunyaev, R.

    2003-01-01

    Results of observations of several LMXBs in the Galactic center region carried out with the ART-P telescope on board \\Granat observatory are briefly reviewed. More than dozen sources were revealed in this region during five series of observations which were performed with the ART-P telescope in 1990-1992. The investigation of the spectral evolution of persistent emission of two X-ray bursters GX3+1 and KS1731-260, discussion of QPO and spectral variations detected from the very bright Z-sourc...

  2. Comparison of 3.6 - 8.0 Micron Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Survey Point Sources with Chandra X-Ray Point Sources in the Central 40x40 Parsecs

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, R G; Stolovy, S R; Sellgren, K; Smith, R; Ramírez, S V; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Law, C J; Smith, H A; Cotera, A S; Moseley, S H

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the correlation between 2357 Chandra X-ray point sources in a 40 x 40 parsec field and ~20,000 infrared sources we observed in the corresponding subset of our 2 x 1.4 degree Spitzer/IRAC Galactic Center Survey at 3.6-8.0 um, using various spatial and X-ray hardness thresholds. The correlation was determined for source separations of less than 0.5", 1" or 2". Only the soft X-ray sources show any correlation with infrared point sources on these scales, and that correlation is very weak. The upper limit on hard X-ray sources that have infrared counterparts is <1.7% (3 sigma). However, because of the confusion limit of the IR catalog, we only detect IR sources with absolute magnitudes < ~1. As a result, a stronger correlation with fainter sources cannot be ruled out. Only one compact infrared source, IRS 13, coincides with any of the dozen prominent X-ray emission features in the 3 x 3 parsec region centered on Sgr A*, and the diffuse X-ray and infrared emission around Sgr A* seems to be ant...

  3. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  4. Jet opening angles and gamma-ray brightness of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Pushkarev, A B; Lister, M L; Savolainen, T

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the differences in apparent opening angles between the parsec-scale jets of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first three months of operations and those of non-LAT-detected AGN. We used 15.4 GHz VLBA observations of sources from the 2 cm VLBA MOJAVE program, a subset of which comprise the statistically complete flux density limited MOJAVE sample. We determined the apparent opening angles by analyzing transverse jet profiles from the data in the image plane and by applying a model fitting technique to the data in the (u,v) plane. Both methods provided comparable opening angle estimates. The apparent opening angles of gamma-ray bright blazars are preferentially larger than those of gamma-ray weak sources. At the same time, we have found the two groups to have similar intrinsic opening angle distributions. This suggests that the jets in gamma-ray bright AGN are oriented at preferentially smaller angles to the line of sight resulting ...

  5. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  6. A jet model for Galactic black-hole X-ray sources: The correlation between cutoff energy and phase lag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, mildy relativistic radio jet when they are in the hard and hard-intermediate states, that is, typically at the beginning and the end of an X-ray outburst. In a series of papers, we have developed a jet model and have shown through Monte Carlo simulations that our model can explain many observational results. Aims: In this work, we investigate one more constraining relationship between the cutoff energy and the phase lag during the early stages of an X-ray outburst of the black-hole X-ray binary GX 339-4: the cutoff energy decreases while the phase lag increases during the brightening of the hard state. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft accretion-disk photons in the jet and computed the phase lag between soft and hard photons and the cutoff energy of the resulting high-energy power law. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the above correlation, with a minor modification consisting of introducing an acceleration zone at the base of the jet. Conclusions: The observed correlation between the cutoff energy and the phase lag in the black-hole binary GX 339-4 suggests that the lags are produced by the hard component. Here we show that this correlation arises naturally if Comptonization in the jet produces these two quantities.

  7. Atomic hydrogen properties of active galactic nuclei host galaxies: H I in 16 nuclei of galaxies (NUGA) sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN), observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ∼20'', ∼5 km s–1) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei, and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA)—a spectrally and spatially resolved interferometric survey of gas dynamics in nearby galaxies designed to identify the fueling mechanisms of AGN and the relation to host galaxy evolution. Here we investigate the relationship between the H I properties of these galaxies, their environment, their stellar distribution, and their AGN type. The large-scale H I morphology of each galaxy is classified as ringed, spiral, or centrally concentrated; comparison of the resulting morphological classification with the AGN type reveals that ring structures are significantly more common in low-ionization narrow emission-line regions (LINER) than in Seyfert host galaxies, suggesting a time evolution of the AGN activity together with the redistribution of the neutral gas. Dynamically disturbed H I disks are also more prevalent in LINER host galaxies than in Seyfert host galaxies. While several galaxies are surrounded by companions (some with associated H I emission), there is no correlation between the presence of companions and the AGN type (Seyfert/LINER).

  8. A jet model for Galactic black-hole X-ray sources: the cutoff energy-phase-lag correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P

    2015-01-01

    Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, mildy relativistic radio jet when they are in the hard and hard-intermediate states. In a series of papers, we have developed a jet model and have shown, through Monte Carlo simulations, that our model can explain many observational results. In this work, we investigate one more constraining relationship between the cutoff energy and the phase lag during the early stages of an X-ray outburst of the black-hole X-ray binary GX 339-4: the cutoff energy decreases while the phase lag increases during the brightening of the hard state. We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the above correlation, with a minor modification consisting of introducing an acceleration zone at the base of the jet. The observed correlation between the cutoff energy and the phase lag suggests that the lags are produced by the hard component. Here we show that this correlation arises naturally if Comptonization in the jet produces these two quantities.

  9. The bandmerged Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue: Probing sub-structure in the molecular gas at high Galactic latitude

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi; Pearson, Timothy J; McGehee, Peregrine; Fowler, John W; Helou, George

    2016-01-01

    The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) includes nine lists of highly reliable sources, individually extracted at each of the nine Planck frequency channels. To facilitate the study of the Planck sources, especially their spectral behaviour across the radio/infrared frequencies, we provide a "bandmerged" catalogue of the ERCSC sources. This catalogue consists of 15191 entries, with 79 sources detected in all nine frequency channels of Planck and 6818 sources detected in only one channel. We describe the bandmerging algorithm, including the various steps used to disentangle sources in confused regions. The multi-frequency matching allows us to develop spectral energy distributions of sources between 30 and 857 GHz, in particular across the 100 GHz band, where the energetically important CO J=1->0 line enters the Planck bandpass. We find ~3-5sigma evidence for contribution to the 100 GHz intensity from foreground CO along the line of sight to 147 sources with |b|>30 deg. The median excess cont...

  10. The Galactic Center

    OpenAIRE

    R. Genzel; Karas, V.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade high resolution measurements in the infrared employing adaptive optics imaging on 10m telescopes have allowed determining the three dimensional orbits stars within ten light hours of the compact radio source at the center of the Milky Way. These observations show the presence of a three million solar mass black hole in Sagittarius A* beyond any reasonable doubt. The Galactic Center thus constitutes the best astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes which have ...

  11. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources: Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Norris, Ray P; Spitler, Lee R; Deller, Adam T; Collier, Jordan D; Parker, Quentin A

    2015-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z >~ 2). Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginal...

  12. Gravitational lensing by a massive black hole at the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Mark; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    1992-01-01

    The manifestations of gravitational lensing by a massive black hole at the Galactic center, with particular attention given to lensing of stars in the stellar cluster that lie behind Sgr A*, and of Sgr A east, a nonthermal extended radio source which is known with certainty to lie behind the Galactic center. Lensing of the stellar cluster produces a deficit of stellar images within 10 mas of the center, and a surplus between 30 and 300 mas. The results suggest that the proper motion of the stars will produce brightness variations of stellar images on a time scale of a few years or less. Both images of such a source should be visible, and will rise and fall in luminosity together.

  13. A Bursting Radio Transient in the Direction of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Paul S; Lazio, T Joseph; Kassim, Namir E; Roy, Subhashis; Kaplan, David L; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2008-01-01

    The radio sky is poorly sampled for rapidly varying transients because of the narrow field-of-view of most imaging radio telescopes at cm and shorter wavelengths. The emergence of sensitive long wavelength observations with intrinsically larger fields-of-view are changing this situation, as partly illustrated by our ongoing meter-wavelength monitoring observations and archival studies of the Galactic Center. In this search, we discovered a transient, bursting, radio source in the direction of the Galactic Center, GCRT J1745-3009, with extremely unusual properties. Its flux and rapid variability imply a brightness temperature >10^12 K if it is at a distance >70 pc, implying that it is a coherent emitter. I will discuss the discovery of the source and the subsequent re-detections, as well as searches for counterparts at other wavelengths, and several proposed models.

  14. The Galactic Nova Rate Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Shafter, A W

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, a reliable estimate of the Galactic nova rate has remained elusive. Here, the overall Galactic nova rate is estimated by extrapolating the observed rate for novae reaching $m\\leq2$ to include the entire Galaxy using a two component disk plus bulge model for the distribution of stars in the Milky Way. The present analysis improves on previous work by considering important corrections for incompleteness in the observed rate of bright novae. Several models are considered to account for differences in the assumed properties of bulge and disk nova populations. The simplest models, which assume uniform properties between bulge and disk novae, predict Galactic nova rates between $\\sim$50 to as many as $\\sim$100 per year, depending on the assumed incompleteness at bright magnitudes. Models where the disk novae are assumed to be more luminous than bulge novae are explored, and predict nova rates up to 30% lower, in the range of $\\sim$35 to $\\sim$70 per year. An average of the most p...

  15. The bandmerged Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue: probing sub-structure in the molecular gas at high Galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Chary, R.; Pearson, T. J.; McGehee, P.; Fowler, J. W.; Helou, G.

    2016-06-01

    The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) includes nine lists of highly reliable sources, individually extracted at each of the nine Planck frequency channels. To facilitate the study of the Planck sources, especially their spectral behaviour across the radio/infrared frequencies, we provide a `bandmerged' catalogue of the ERCSC sources. This catalogue consists of 15 191 entries, with 79 sources detected in all nine frequency channels of Planck and 6818 sources detected in only one channel. We describe the bandmerging algorithm, including the various steps used to disentangle sources in confused regions. The multifrequency matching allows us to develop spectral energy distributions of sources between 30 and 857 GHz, in particular across the 100 GHz band, where the energetically important CO J = 1→0 line enters the Planck bandpass. We find ˜3σ-5σ evidence for contribution to the 100 GHz intensity from foreground CO along the line of sight to 147 sources with |b|>{30°}. The median excess contribution is 4.5 ± 0.9 per cent of their measured 100 GHz flux density which cannot be explained by calibration or beam uncertainties. This translates to 0.5 ± 0.1 K km s-1 of CO which must be clumped on the scale of the Planck 100 GHz beam, i.e. ˜10 arcmin. If this is due to a population of low-mass (˜15 M⊙) molecular gas clumps, the total mass in these clumps may be more than 2000 M⊙. Further, high-spatial-resolution, ground-based observations of the high-latitude sky will help shed light on the origin of this diffuse, clumpy CO emission.

  16. Suzaku X-ray Follow-up Observations of Seven Unassociated Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Sources at High Galactic Latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Maeda, Koto; Makiya, Ryu; Totani, Tomonori; Cheung, Chi Chiu; Stawarz, Łukasz; Guillemot, Lucas; Freire, Paulo César Carvalho; Cognard, Ismaël

    2011-01-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi-LAT \\gamma-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>10 degree) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT ~0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets which were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and millisecond pulsars (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were o...

  17. NuSTAR Observations of the Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus and Ultraluminous X-ray Source Candidate in NGC 5643

    CERN Document Server

    Annuar, A; Alexander, D M; Lansbury, G B; Arévalo, P; Ballantyne, D R; Baloković, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Matt, G; Puccetti, S; Ricci, C; Rigby, J R; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Zappacosta, L; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    We present two NuSTAR observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband spectral analysis of the AGN over two decades in energy ($\\sim$0.5-100 keV). Previous X-ray observations suggested that the AGN is obscured by a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line-of-sight. However, the lack of high-quality $\\gtrsim$ 10 keV observations, together with the presence of a nearby X-ray luminous source, NGC 5643 X-1, had left significant uncertainties in the characterization of the nuclear spectrum. NuSTAR now enables the AGN and NGC 5643 X-1 to be separately resolved above 10 keV for the first time and allows a direct measurement of the absorbing column density toward the nucleus. The new data show that the nucleus is indeed obscured by a CT column of $N_{\\rm{H}}$ $\\gtrsim$ 5 $\\times$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The range of 2-10 ...

  18. The Spitzer Space Telescope Extra-Galactic First Look Survey: 24 micron data reduction, catalog, and source identification

    CERN Document Server

    Fadda, D; Armus, L; Chapman, S C; Choi, P I; Fang, F; Frayer, D T; Heinrichsen, I; Helou, G; Im, M; Lacy, M; Makovoz, D; Marleau, F R; Shupe, D L; Soifer, B T; Squires, G K; Storrie-Lombardi, L J; Surace, J; Teplitz, H I; Wilson, G; Yan, L; Fadda, Dario

    2006-01-01

    We present the reduction of the 24 micron data obtained during the first cosmological survey performed by the Spitzer Space Telescope (First Look Survey, FLS). The survey consists of a shallow observation of 2.5x2 sq deg centered at 17h18m +59d30m (main survey) and a deeper observation of 1x0.5 sq deg centered at 17h17m +59d45m(verification survey). Issues with the reduction of the 24 micron MIPS data are discussed and solutions to attenuate instrumental effects are proposed and applied to the data. Approximately 17000 sources are extracted with a SNR greater than five. The photometry of the point sources is evaluated through PSF fitting using an empirical PSF derived from the data. Aperture corrections and the absolute calibration have been checked using stars in the field. Astrometric and photometric errors depend on the SNR of the source varying between 0.35-1 arcsec and 5-15%, respectively, for sources detected at 20-5 sigma. The flux of the 123 extended sources have been estimated through aperture photom...

  19. BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 μm, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 μm) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 μm), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 ± 0.23 nW m–2 sr–1 or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 μm and at least 0.47 ± 0.14 nW m–2 sr–1 or 0.02% at 18 μm. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2σ error into account.

  20. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources. Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Deller, A. T.; Collier, J. D.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z ≳ 2). Aims: Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. Methods: We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Results: Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginally higher VLBI detection fraction than randomly selected sources with mJy flux densities at arcsec-scales. Moreover, our data provide a positive correlation between compactness - defined as the ratio of milliarcsec- to arcsec-scale flux density - and redshift for IFRS, but suggest a decreasing mean compactness with increasing arcsec-scale radio flux density. Based on these findings, we suggest that IFRS tend to contain young AGNs whose jets have not formed yet or have not expanded, equivalent to very compact objects. We found two IFRS that are resolved into two components. The two components are spatially separated by a few hundred milliarcseconds in both cases. They might be components of one AGN, a binary black hole, or the result of gravitational lensing.

  1. The Ariel V (SSI) catalogue of high galactic latitude (bar b bar > 100) X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2A catalogue is the result of 10 000 orbits of observation by the Leicester University Sky Survey Instrument on the Ariel V satellite and it contains 105 X-ray sources with modulus b modulus > 100. The procedures and criteria used in establishing these sources and measuring their intensities and positions are described. As consequence of the comparatively small error boxes (0.1 to 0.5 square degree) and the sensitivity limit of the survey (90 per cent of the sky to better than 1.2 Ariel count/s approximately 3.2 Uhuru count/s), new optical identifications are suggested. (author)

  2. MAGPIS: A Multi-Array Galactic Plane Imaging Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Helfand, D J; White, R L; Fallon, A; Tuttle, S; Helfand, David J.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Fallon, Adam; Tuttle, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    We present the Multi-Array Galactic Plane Imaging Survey (MAGPIS), which maps portions of the first Galactic quadrant with an angular resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range that surpasses existing radio images of the Milky Way by more than an order of magnitude. The source detection threshold at 20 cm is in the range 1--2 mJy over the 85% of the survey region (5 deg < l < 32 deg, |b| < 0.8 deg) not covered by bright extended emission. We catalog over 3000 discrete sources (diameters mostly <30 arcsec) and present an atlas of ~400 diffuse emission regions. New and archival data at 90 cm for the whole survey area are also presented. Comparison of our catalogs and images with the MSX mid-infrared data allow us to provide preliminary discrimination between thermal and non-thermal sources. We identify 49 high-probability supernova remnant candidates, increasing by a factor of seven the number of known remnants with diameters smaller than 5 arcmin in the survey region; several are pulsar wind nebula ...

  3. Upper limit of 3.3 astronomical units to the diameter of the galactic center radio source sgr a*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D C; Zensus, J A; Kellermann, K I; Reid, M; Moran, J M; Lo, K Y

    1993-11-26

    Sagittarius (Sgr) A(*) is a unique radio source located at the center of our galaxy. The radiation from Sgr A(*) may be generated in matter accreting onto a massive black hole. In observations at long wavelengths, the apparent angular size of Sgr A(*) decreases in the manner expected for emission from a point source scattered by electron density fluctuations along the line of sight. Measurements at a wavelength of 7 millimeters with the nearly completed Very Long Baseline Array indicate a size of 0.7 milliarc seconds, which is consistent with an extrapolation from results at longer wavelengths. The true size of Sgr A(*) must be less than 0.4 milliarc seconds, or 3.3 astronomical units. The inferred black hole mass is less than 1.5 x 10(6) solar masses according to a recent model for the emission. PMID:17736821

  4. DISCOVERY OF A GeV BLAZAR SHINING THROUGH THE GALACTIC PLANE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = -1.02) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray absorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new GeV source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width >5 A, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.

  5. Number density distribution of near-infrared sources on a sub-degree scale in the Galactic center: Comparison with the Fe XXV Kα line at 6.7 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kazuki; Nishiyama, Shogo; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagatomo, Schun; Uchiyama, Hideki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sugitani, Koji; Schödel, Rainer; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    The stellar distribution derived from an H- and KS-band survey of the central region of our Galaxy is compared with the Fe XXV Kα (6.7 keV) line intensity observed with the Suzaku satellite. The survey is for the galactic coordinates |l| ≲ 3.0° and |b | ≲ 1.0° (equivalent to 0.8 kpc × 0.3 kpc for R⊙ = 8 kpc), and the number-density distribution N(KS,0; l, b) of stars is derived by using the extinction-corrected magnitude KS,0 = 10.5. This is deep enough to probe the old red-giant population and in turn to estimate the (l, b) distribution of faint X-ray point sources such as coronally active binaries and cataclysmic variables. In the Galactic plane (b = 0°), N(10.5; l, b) increases in the direction of the Galactic center as |l|-0.30±0.03 in the range of - 0.1° ≥ l ≥ - 0.7°, but this increase is significantly slower than the increase (|l|-0.44±0.02) of the Fe XXV Kα line intensity. If normalized with the ratios in the outer region 1.5° ≤ |l| ≤ 2.8°, where faint X-ray point sources are argued to dominate the diffuse Galactic X-ray ridge emission, the excess of the Fe XXV Kα line intensity over the stellar number density is at least a factor of two at |l| = 0.1°. This indicates that a significant part of the Galactic-center diffuse emission arises from a truly diffuse optically thin thermal plasma, and not from an unresolved collection of faint X-ray point sources related to the old stellar population.

  6. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X

  7. Astrometric calibration of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present astrometric calibration of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC). XSTPS-GAC is the photometric part of the Digital Sky Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (DSS-GAC), which is a photometric and spectroscopic sky survey, in combination with LAMOST. In order to select an astrometric reference catalog, we made comparisons between the four widely used astrometric catalogs, GSC2.3, USNO-B1.0, UCAC3 and PPMXL. PPMXL shows relatively small systematic errors in positions and more homogeneous proper motion distributions toward the Galactic Anti-center (GAC), and was selected as the reference catalog. Based on the high quality and bright reference stars that were picked out from PPMXL, we performed a 4th-order polynomial fitting in image units, to construct the transformation relation between coordinates used by XSTPS-GAC and standard coordinates, and to simultaneously correct the image distortions in the CCD. Then we applied the derived relation to all sources to obtain their mean celestial coordinates based on the International Celestial Reference System. For bright point sources with r < 17.0 mag, the accuracy of astrometric calibration could reach about 80 mas for each of the g, r, i bands, with systematic errors being less than 10 mas. But for the faint sources at the brightness limit of the survey, which was r ∼ 19.0 mag, the accuracy can still reach 200 mas. After combining all observations, the final weighted average coordinates could reach an accuracy of less than 70 mas for bright stars. For faint stars, the rms residuals of weighted coordinates decrease to ∼ 110 mas. The final combined XSTPS-GAC coordinates show a good consistency with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

  8. Optical spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radio galaxies have strong emission lines in their optical spectra. The fraction with such lines is much larger than in ''normal'' galaxies. Radio galaxies generally also have very bright nuclei; thus those with strong emission lines are similar in both respects to Seyfert galaxies. Hence radio and Seyfert galaxies are both generally considered to be similar physical objects: active galactic nuclei. Their observational properties show they are closely related to quasars (quasi-stellar radio sources) and (radio-quiet) QSOs. A short table of the space density of these objects is presented and their optical spectra are discussed. (Auth.)

  9. SN 1987A as an extragalactic probe of the galactic halo and extragalactic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright extragalactic sources, such as supernovae and QSOs, are ideal probes of the structure and chemical composition of the interstellar and extragalactic medium also at large Z, by means of the high resolution spectral analysis of the optical and ultraviolet interstellar absorption features. The LMC supernova has been for several months the brightest extragalactic point-like object, and has offered a unique opportunity of investigating to a grater detail the galactic halo and the ISM in the LMC. SN 1987A also represents a good example of the astrophysical impact of future HIRES spectroscopic observations of distant SNs with the forthcoming new technology telescopes, and the Hubble space telescope

  10. Herschel-ATLAS: Planck sources in the Phase 1 fields

    CERN Document Server

    Herranz, D; Clements, D L; Clemens, M; De Zotti, G; López-Caniego, M; Lapi, A; Rodighiero, G; Danese, L; Fu, H; Cooray, A; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Bonavera, L; Carrera, F J; Dole, H; Eales, S; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M; Lagache, G; Massardi, M; Michalowski, M J; Negrello, M; Rigby, E; Scott, D; Valiante, E; Valtchanov, I; Van der Werf, P; Auld, R; Buttiglione, S; Dariush, A; Dunne, L; Hopwood, R; Hoyos, C; Ibar, E; Maddox, S

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a cross-correlation of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) with the catalog of Herschel-ATLAS sources detected in the Phase 1 fields, covering 134.55 deg2. There are 28 ERCSC sources detected by Planck at 857 GHz in this area. As many as 16 of them are probably high Galactic latitude cirrus; 10 additional sources can be clearly identified as bright, low-z galaxies; one further source is resolved by Herschel as two relatively bright sources; and the last is resolved into an unusual condensation of low-flux, probably high-redshift point sources, around a strongly lensed Herschel-ATLAS source at z = 3.26. Our results demonstrate that the higher sensitivity and higher angular resolution H-ATLAS maps provide essential information for the interpretation of candidate sources extracted from Planck sub-mm maps.

  11. Theory of the X-ray emission of the extended galactic source Monogem Ring in the constellation Monoceros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the X-ray emission of the source Monogem Ring, for which a possible generation mechanism is thermal bremsstrahlung of hot gas filling the interior of a spherical shock wave produced by a supernova explosion. An analytic expression is obtained for the X-ray spectra for this generation mechanism in the cases when the undisturbed interstellar gas surrounding the supernova before the explosion has a constant uniform density distribution and a density distribution in accordance with a power law. The calculated spectra are compared with the observational data, and good agreement is obtained in both cases. 14 references

  12. Errarum: Detection of Absorption-Line Features in the X-Ray Spectra of the Galactic Superluminal Source GRO J1655-40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Y.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Ebisawa, K.; Nagase, F.; Kotani, T.; Gehrels, N.

    1998-06-01

    In the paper ``Detection of Absorption-Line Features in the X-Ray Spectra of the Galactic Superluminal Source GRO J1655-40'' by Y. Ueda, H. Inoue, Y. Tanaka, K. Ebisawa, F. Nagase, T. Kotani, and N. Gehrels (ApJ, 492, 782 [1998]), there is an error in the curve of growth for the Kα absorption line (Fig. 4). The revised version of Figure 4 given here replaces Figure 4 in the paper. Several numbers derived from the figure should be corrected accordingly, but the conclusion of the paper is not affected. In the third paragraph of the discussion section (page 786), the iron column density of the plasma should be 1019-1020 cm-2, which corresponds to a hydrogen column density of 3 × 1023-3 × 1024 cm-2. The final limit on the hydrogen column density of the line-absorbing plasma should be changed to 3 × 1023 cm-2 < NH < 1024 cm-2.

  13. NuSTAR Observations of the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Candidate in NGC 5643

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annuar, A.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present two Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband...... column density toward the nucleus. The new data show that the nucleus is indeed obscured by a CT column of NH greater than or similar to 5 x 1024 cm-2. The range of 2-10 keV absorption-corrected luminosity inferred from the bestfitting models is L2-10,int = (0.8-1.7) x 1042 erg s-1, consistent with that...... predicted from multiwavelength intrinsic luminosity indicators. In addition, we also study the NuSTAR data for NGC 5643 X-1 and show that it exhibits evidence of a spectral cutoff at energy E∼10 keV, similar to that seen in other ULXs observed by NuSTAR. Along with the evidence for significant X...

  14. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  15. Jets, hotspots and lobes: what X-ray observations tell us about extra-galactic radio sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Martin J

    2005-12-15

    The brightest and most numerous discrete radio sources in the sky, radio galaxies and quasars, are powered by twin jets of plasma which emerge at relativistic speeds from very small regions at the centre of large elliptical galaxies, powered by mass infall on to supermassive black holes. The jets can carry material out to very large distances (millions of light years) where it forms balloon-like lobes. Until recently it has been impossible to make definite statements about the energy or the nature of the matter supplied by the jets, or the dynamics of the lobes as they expand into the external medium. This has meant that crucial questions about the generation of radio sources and their effect on their environment have gone unanswered. The situation has been revolutionized by the launch at the start of this decade of a new generation of X-ray observatories, Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this article, I explain why observations with these instruments have made such a difference, what we have learned as a result and why the community remains divided on some important features of the interpretation of the data. PMID:16286286

  16. Active star formation at intermediate Galactic latitude: the case of IRAS 06345-3023

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, J L

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a small aggregate of young stars seen in high-resolution, deep near-infrared ($JHK_S$) images towards IRAS 06345-3023 in the outer Galaxy and well below the mid-plane of the Galactic disc. The group of young stars is likely to be composed of low-mass stars, mostly Class I young stellar objects. The stars are seen towards a molecular cloud whose CO map peaks at the location of the IRAS source. The near-infrared images reveal, additionally, the presence of nebular emission with rich morphological features, including arcs in the vicinity of embedded stars, wisps and bright rims of a butterfly-shaped dark cloud. The location of this molecular cloud as a new star formation site well below the Galactic plane in the outer Galaxy indicates that active star formation is taking place at vertical distances larger than those typical of the (thin) disc.

  17. Energy Radiation of the Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2004-01-01

    In the Hellings-Nordtvedt theory, we obtain some expressions of energy radiation and mass defect effect for a kind of the active galactic nuclei, which is meaningful to calculating the energy radiation in the procession of forming this kind of celestial bodies. This calculation can give some interpretation for energy source of the jet from the active galactic nuclei.

  18. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  19. Leptonic origin of the 100 MeV gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, D; Neronov, A; Walter, R

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre is a bright gamma-ray source with the GeV-TeV band spectrum composed of two distinct components in the 1-10 GeV and 1-10 TeV energy ranges. The nature of these two components is not clearly understood. We investigate the gamma-ray properties of the GC in order to clarify the origin of the observed emission. We report imaging, spectral and timing analysis of the data of 74 months of observations of the Galactic Centre by FERMI/LAT gamma-ray telescope complemented by the sub-MeV data from ~10 years of INTEGRAL/PICsIT observations. We find that in the GeV band the Galactic Centre is spatially consistent with a point source. The 3 sigma upper limit on its radius is 0.13 degree. The spectrum of the source in the 100 MeV energy range does not have a characteristic turnover which would point to the pion decay origin of the signal. Instead, the source spectrum is consistent with a model of inverse Compton scattering by high-energy electrons. In such a model, the GeV bump in the spectrum originates...

  20. BrightFocus Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size: A A Contrast En Español Donate BrightFocus Foundation Alzheimer’s Disease Research Macular Degeneration Research National Glaucoma ... Bovenkamp, Ph.D., Scientific Program Officer for BrightFocus Foundation, about the basic science and therapeutic research the ...

  1. DISCOVERY OF 5000 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that using mid-IR color selection to find active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is as effective in dense stellar fields such as the Magellanic Clouds as it is in extragalactic fields with low stellar densities using comparisons between the Spitzer Deep Wide Field Survey data for the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Boeotes region and the SAGE Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use this to build high-purity catalogs of ∼5000 AGN candidates behind the Magellanic Clouds. Once confirmed, these quasars will expand the available astrometric reference sources for the Clouds and the numbers of quasars with densely sampled, long-term (>decade) monitoring light curves by well over an order of magnitude and potentially identify sufficiently bright quasars for absorption line studies of the interstellar medium of the Clouds.

  2. XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectroscopic studies of unidentified X-ray sources towards the Galactic bulge: 1RXS J180556.1-343818 and 1RXS J173905.2-392615

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideyuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    With XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, for the first time, we acquired broad-band spectra of two unidentified X-ray sources towards the Galactic bulge: 1RXS J180556.1-343818 and 1RXS J173905.2-392615. The 1RXS J180556.1-343818 spectrum in the 0.3-7 keV band was explained by X-ray emission that originated from an optically-thin thermal plasma with temperatures of 0.5 and 1.8 keV. The estimated absorption column density of NH ˜ 4 × 1020 cm-2 was significantly smaller than the Galactic H I column density towards the source. A candidate for its optical counterpart, HD 321269, was found within 4″. In terms of the X-ray properties and the positional coincidence, it is quite conceivable that 1RXS J180556.1-343818 is an active G giant. We also found a dim X-ray source that was positionally consistent with 1RXS J173905.2-392615. Assuming that the X-ray spectrum can be reproduced with an absorbed, optically-thin thermal plasma model with kT = 1.6 keV, the X-ray flux in the 0.5-8 keV band was 8.7 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2, fainter by a factor of ˜7 than that of 1RXS J173905.2-392615 during the ROSAT observation. The follow-up observations we conducted revealed that these two sources would belong to the Galactic disk, rather than the Galactic bulge.

  3. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  4. Unidentified Galactic High-Energy Sources as Ancient Pulsar Wind Nebulae in the light of new high energy observations and the new code

    CERN Document Server

    Tibolla, O; de Jager, O; Ferreira, S E S; Kaufmann, S; Venter, C; Mannheim, K; Giordano, F

    2012-01-01

    In a Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN), the lifetime of inverse Compton (IC) emitting electrons exceeds the lifetime of its progenitor pulsar (as well as its shell-type remnant), but it also exceeds the age of those that emit via synchrotron radiation. Therefore, during its evolution, the PWN can remain bright in IC so that its GeV-TeV gamma-ray flux remains high for timescales much larger (for 10^5 - 10^6 yrs) than the pulsar lifetime and the X-ray PWN lifetime. In this scenario, the magnetic field in the cavity induced by the wind of the progenitor star plays a crucial role. This scenario is in line with the discovery of several unidentified or "dark" sources in the TeV gamma-ray band without X-ray counterparts; and it is also finding confirmation in the recent discoveries at GeV gamma rays. Moreover, these consequences could be also important for reinterpreting the detection of starburst galaxies in the TeV gamma-ray band when considering a leptonic origin of the gamma-ray signal. Both theoretical aspects and their...

  5. Monitoring of bright blazars with MAGIC telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, C. C.; Satalecka, K.; Thom, M; Backes, M.; Bernardini, E.; Bonnoli, G.; Galante, N.; Goebel, F; Lindfors, E.; Majumdar, P.; Stamerra, A.; Wagner, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Blazars, a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) characterized by a close orientation of their relativistic outflows (jets) towards the line of sight, are a well established extragalactic TeV $\\gamma$-ray emitters. Since 2006, three nearby and TeV bright blazars, Markarian (Mrk) 421, Mrk 501 and 1ES 1959+650, are regularly observed by the MAGIC telescope with single exposures of 30 to 60 minutes. The sensitivity of MAGIC allows to establish a flux level of 30% of the Crab flux for each such o...

  6. Constraints on the Galactic Magnetic Field from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    The Galactic magnetic field is important in the dynamics of our Galaxy. It is believed to play a role in star formation and influence the structure of the Galaxy. In order to understand how the Galactic magnetic field originally formed or how it is evolving, we must first determine its present topology. To this end, we have used observations from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) to calculate the highest source density of rotation measures (RM) to date in the disk of the Galaxy. Using these data, we estimate the Galactic longitude of the RM null point in the outer Galaxy (where the RMs of extragalactic sources are observed to pass through zero, on average, with increasing Galactic longitude). We have also examined the RM scale height using the CGPS latitude extension. The values of these parameters offer critical constraints for modeling the large-scale magnetic field in the Galactic disk.

  7. Galactic bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Peletier, Reynier; Gadotti, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This book consists of invited reviews on Galactic Bulges written by experts in the field. A central point of the book is that, while in the standard picture of galaxy formation a significant amount of the baryonic mass is expected to reside in classical bulges, the question what is the fraction of galaxies with no classical bulges in the local Universe has remained open. The most spectacular example of a galaxy with no significant classical bulge is the Milky Way. The reviews of this book attempt to clarify the role of the various types of bulges during the mass build-up of galaxies, based on morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations, and connecting their properties at low and high redshifts. The observed properties are compared with the predictions of the theoretical models, accounting for the many physical processes leading to the central mass concentration and their destruction in galaxies. This book serves as an entry point for PhD students and non-specialists and as a reference work for researchers...

  8. High-brightness electron injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators and synchrotron light sources require pulse trains of high peak brightness and, in some applications, high-average power. Recent developments in the technology of photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for electron-linac injector applications offer promising advances over conventional electron injectors. Reduced emittance growth in high peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by using high field strengths and by linearizing the radial component of the cavity electric field at the expense of lower shunt impedance

  9. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. III. THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ∼4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 × 106 K, interquartile range = 0.63 × 106 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (∼(0.4-7) × 10–3 cm–6 pc and ∼(0.5-7) × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 deg–2, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 × 10–3 cm–6 pc and 1.5 × 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 deg–2, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper

  10. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  11. A New Method to Calibrate the Stellar Color/Surface-Brightness Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    I show that the standard microlensing technique to measure the angular radius of a star using color/surface-brightness relations can be inverted, via late-time proper motion measurements, to calibrate these relations. The method is especially useful for very metal-rich stars because such stars are in short supply in the solar neighborhood where other methods are most effective, but very abundant in Galactic bulge microlensing fields. I provide a list of eight spectroscopically identified high-metallicity bulge stars with the requisite finite-source effects, seven of which will be suitable calibrators when the Giant Magellan Telescope comes on line. Many more such sources can be extracted from current and future microlensing surveys.

  12. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  13. The ATCA Intraday Variability Survey of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kedziora-Chudczer, L L; Wieringa, M H; Tzioumis, A K; Reynolds, J E

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of an Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) survey for intra-day variability (IDV) of the total and polarized flux densities of 118 compact, flat spectrum, extragalactic radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz Survey. A total of 22 total flux density IDV sources were discovered and 15 sources were found to show IDV of their polarized flux density. We discuss the statistical properties of the IDV sources, including the distribution of source modulation indices, and the dependence of the variability amplitude on source spectral index and on Galactic position. We suggest interstellar scintillation (ISS) in the Galactic interstellar medium as the most likely mechanism for IDV. Even so, the inferred high brightness temperatures cannot be easily explained.

  14. Conservation of an ion beam brightness. Study of a non brightness disturbing lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of ion sources prove that large initial brightnesses can be obtained by using the plasma expansion principle. However these brightnesses are usually spoiled by the beam focusing and accelerating systems. A high intensity focusing set up is first theoretically studied, then numerically determined by use of a 7094 IBM computer. Aberrations have been minimized. It has then been possible to construct a set up conserving the source initial brightness. For a 100 mA beam the focusing voltage is 150 kV, the beam study has been done for 350 keV beam final energy. Given is a discussion of results. (author)

  15. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  16. Variability, Brightness Temperature, Superluminal Motion, Doppler Boosting, and Related Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2003-01-01

    We review the observations of rapid flux density variations in compact radio sources, and discuss the inverse Compton limit to the maximum brightness temperature of incoherent synchrotron sources in comparison with recent VLBA observations. The apparent agreement of the theoretical brightness temperature limit due to inverse Compton cooling and the brightness temperatures observed by early VLBI observations appears to have been fortuitous. VLBA observations have greatly improved the quality of the data, but many of the early issues remain unresolved.

  17. Swift/BAT monitoring of Fermi/LAT sources

    CERN Document Server

    Krimm, Hans A; Gehrels, Neil; Tueller, Jack; Baumgartner, Wayne H; Cummings, Jay R; Sakamoto, Taka; Fenimore, Edward E; Palmer, David M; Markwardt, Craig B; Skinner, Gerald K; Stamatikos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray transient monitor tracks more than 700 galactic and extragalactic sources on time scales ranging from a single Swift pointing (approximately 20 minutes) to one day. The monitored sources include all objects from the Fermi LAT bright source list which are either identified or which have a 95% error confidence radius of less than eight arc minutes. We report on the detection statistics of these sources in the BAT monitor both before and after the launch of Fermi.

  18. The solar brightness temperature at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuseski, R. A.; Swanson, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the brightness temperature of the sun near 36 GHz and 93 GHz were made using the new moon as a calibration source. Provided the brightness temperature of the moon is known and all measurements are reduced to the same zenith angle, a simple expression can be used for the sun-to-new moon ratio which is independent of antenna gain, atmospheric absorption and reemission, and radiometer calibration constants. This ratio was measured near 36 GHz and at two frequencies near 93 GHz with a Dicke switched superheterodyne radiometer system and a 2.4 m Cassegrain antenna. The slopes of the solar brightness temperature spectrum based on these ratios were measured. The absolute solar brightness spectrum derived from all current available measurements supplemented by the present ones is also plotted and discussed.

  19. Number Density Distribution of Near-Infrared Sources on a Sub-Degree Scale in the Galactic Center: Comparison with the Fe XXV Ka Line at 6.7 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Kazuki; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagatomo, Schun; Uchiyama, Hideki; Tsuru, Takeshi G; Koyama, Katsuji; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sugitani, Koji; Schödel, Rainer; Nagata, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The stellar distribution derived from an $H$ and $K_{\\mathrm S}$-band survey of the central region of our Galaxy is compared with the Fe XXV K$\\alpha$ (6.7 keV) line intensity observed with the Suzaku satellite. The survey is for the Galactic coordinates $|l| \\lesssim 3^{\\circ}.0$ and $|b| \\lesssim 1^{\\circ}.0$ (equivalent to 0.8 kpc $\\times$ 0.3 kpc for $R_0 = 8$ kpc), and the number-density distribution $N(K_{\\mathrm S,0}; l, b)$ of stars is derived using the extinction-corrected magnitude $K_{\\mathrm S,0}=10.5$. This is deep enough to probe the old red giant population and in turn to estimate the ($l$, $b$) distribution of faint X-ray point sources such as coronally active binaries and cataclysmic variables. In the Galactic plane ($b=0^{\\circ}$), $N(10.5; l, b)$ increases to the Galactic center as $|l|^{-0.30 \\pm 0.03}$ in the range of $-0^{\\circ}.1 \\geq l \\geq -0^{\\circ}.7$, but this increase is significantly slower than the increase ($|l|^{-0.44 \\pm 0.02}$ ) of the Fe XXV K$\\alpha$ line intensity. If nor...

  20. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  1. High Brightness Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements

  2. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  3. INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring observations of GRO J1750-27 (AX J1749.1-2639), H1743-322 and SLX 1746-331

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuulkers, E.; Beckmann, V.; Shaw, S.;

    2008-01-01

    A new season of the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring program (see ATels #438, #874, #1005; Kuulkers et al. 2007, A&A 466, 595) started, with observations on UT 11 Feb 2008, 16:33-18:07. We here report on results from three currently active transient sources. The IBIS/ISGRI and JEM-X1 images sho...... a bright source near GX 3+1, coincident with the position of the transient accreting X-ray pulsar GRO J1750-27 (AX J1749.1-2639)....

  4. Trigonometric parallaxes to star-forming regions within 4 kpc of the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, A.; Menten, K. M.; Zhang, B.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Immer, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Moscadelli, L., E-mail: asanna@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    We report four trigonometric parallaxes for high-mass star-forming regions within 4 kpc of the Galactic center. These measurements were made with the Very Long Baseline Array as part of the BeSSeL Survey. By associating these sources kinematically with large-scale features in CO and H I longitude-velocity diagrams, we begin to outline some major features of the inner Milky Way: the Connecting arm, the near and far 3 kpc arms, and the Norma arm. The Connecting arm in the first Galactic quadrant lies closer to the Galactic center than the far 3 kpc arm and is offset by the long-bar's major axis near its leading edge, supporting the presence of an inner Lindblad resonance. Assuming the 3 kpc arms are a continuous physical structure, the relative Galactocentric distance of its near and far sides suggests highly elliptical streamlines of gas around the bar(s) and a bar corotation radius, r {sub CR} ≳ 3.6 kpc. At a Galactic longitude near 10° and a heliocentric distance of about 5 kpc, the near 3 kpc arm and the Norma arm intersect on a face-on view of our Galaxy, while passing at different Galactic latitudes. We provide an accurate distance measurement to the W 31 star-forming complex of 4.95{sub −0.43}{sup +0.51} kpc from the Sun, which associates it with a bright CO feature belonging to the near 3 kpc arm.

  5. Hi-GAL, the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey: photometric maps and compact source catalogues. First data release for the inner Milky Way: +68° ≥ l ≥ -70°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Swinyard, B. M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bally, J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Zavagno, A.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Liu, S. J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Russeil, D.; Piazzo, L.; Veneziani, M.; Benedettini, M.; Calzoletti, L.; Faustini, F.; Natoli, P.; Piacentini, F.; Merello, M.; Palmese, A.; Del Grande, R.; Polychroni, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Polenta, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Martin, P. G.; Testi, L.; Ali, B.; André, P.; Beltrán, M. T.; Billot, N.; Carey, S.; Cesaroni, R.; Compiègne, M.; Eden, D.; Fukui, Y.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Hoare, M. G.; Huang, M.; Joncas, G.; Lim, T. L.; Lord, S. D.; Martinavarro-Armengol, S.; Motte, F.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Peretto, N.; Robitaille, T.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, N.; Schulz, B.; Sibthorpe, B.; Strafella, F.; Thompson, M. A.; Umana, G.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We present the first public release of high-quality data products (DR1) from Hi-GAL, the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey. Hi-GAL is the keystone of a suite of continuum Galactic plane surveys from the near-IR to the radio and covers five wavebands at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm, encompassing the peak of the spectral energy distribution of cold dust for 8 ≲ T ≲ 50 K. This first Hi-GAL data release covers the inner Milky Way in the longitude range 68° ≳ ℓ ≳ -70° in a | b | ≤ 1° latitude strip. Methods: Photometric maps have been produced with the ROMAGAL pipeline, which optimally capitalizes on the excellent sensitivity and stability of the bolometer arrays of the Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric cameras. It delivers images of exquisite quality and dynamical range, absolutely calibrated with Planck and IRAS, and recovers extended emission at all wavelengths and all spatial scales, from the point-spread function to the size of an entire 2°× 2° "tile" that is the unit observing block of the survey. The compact source catalogues were generated with the CuTEx algorithm, which was specifically developed to optimise source detection and extraction in the extreme conditions of intense and spatially varying background that are found in the Galactic plane in the thermal infrared. Results: Hi-GAL DR1 images are cirrus noise limited and reach the 1σ-rms predicted by the Herschel Time Estimators for parallel-mode observations at 60'' s-1 scanning speed in relatively low cirrus emission regions. Hi-GAL DR1 images will be accessible through a dedicated web-based image cutout service. The DR1 Compact Source Catalogues are delivered as single-band photometric lists containing, in addition to source position, peak, and integrated flux and source sizes, a variety of parameters useful to assess the quality and reliability of the extracted sources. Caveats and hints to help in this assessment are provided. Flux completeness limits in all bands are

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered in the Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Mushotzky, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We report on candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) discovered during the monitoring of ∼500 bright (r variability over three month periods, as seen in the SFs and power spectral densities (PSDs), can dramatically change for many of these AGN candidates. Four of the candidates have features in their SFs that may indicate quasi-periodic behavior, although other possibilities are discussed.

  7. Synergies in extragalactic and Galactic jet research

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of relativistic jets and superluminal sources associated with accreting X-ray binaries in the Galaxy opened new ways of investigating the physics of outflows from compact objects. The short timescales and relatively large angular sizes of Galactic jets allow to probe the physics of relativistic outflows to unprecedented details. In this article I discuss results of recent modelling of Galactic jets, covering both radiative and dynamical aspects, which can shed light on different features of their extragalactic cousins.

  8. An infrared survey of galactic supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are preliminary results from a survey of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the data base collected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). About one-third of the known galactic SNRs are visible in the IRAS data. Confusion with other sources in the galactic plane prohibits the detection of many remnants. The objects that are detected have similar spectral characteristics and temperatures, except that the three youngest remnants known, Tycho, Kepler, and Cassiopeia A, are distinctly warmer

  9. Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    Continuum and emission-line variability of active galactic nuclei provides a powerful probe of microarcsecond scale structures in the central regions of these sources. In this contribution, we review basic concepts and methodologies used in analyzing AGN variability. We develop from first principles the basics of reverberation mapping, and pay special attention to emission-line transfer functions. We discuss application of cross-correlation analysis to AGN light curves. Finally, we provide a ...

  10. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  11. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts

  12. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY WITH THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY: FARADAY ROTATION TOWARD BRIGHT POLARIZED RADIO GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed 37 bright, polarized radio sources with the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to present a novel analysis of their Faraday rotation properties. Each source was observed during the commissioning phase with two to four 100 MHz bands at frequencies ranging from 1 to 2 GHz. These observations demonstrate how the continuous frequency coverage of the ATA's log-periodic receiver can be applied to the study of Faraday rotation measures (RMs). We use RM synthesis to show that wide-bandwidth data can find multiple RM components toward a single source. Roughly a quarter of the sources studied have extra RM components with high confidence (brighter than ∼40 mJy), when observing with an RM resolution of roughly 100 rad m-2. These extra components contribute 10%-70% of the total polarized flux. This is the first time multiple RM components have been identified in a large sample of point sources. For our observing configuration, these extra RM components bias the measurement of the peak RM by 10-15 rad m-2; more generally, the peak RM cannot be determined more precisely than the RM beam size. Comparing our 1-2 GHz RM spectra to Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) polarimetric maps shows that both techniques can identify complicated Faraday structures in the sources. However, the RM values and fractional polarization are generally smaller at lower frequencies than in the higher frequency VLBA maps. With a few exceptions, the RMs from this work are consistent with that of earlier, narrow-bandwidth, all-sky surveys. This work also describes the polarimetry calibration procedure and that on-axis ATA observations of linear polarization can be calibrated to an accuracy of 0.2% of Stokes I. Future research directions include studying the time-dependent RM structure in active galactic nuclei and enabling accurate, wide-area RM surveys to test models of Galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields.

  13. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  14. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  15. Cosmic Rays in a Galactic Breeze

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the non-thermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through Galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a Galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to gamma-ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of $\\approx 200$ GV.

  16. The IAC Stripe 82 Legacy Project: a wide-area survey for faint surface brightness astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliri, Jürgen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Stripe 82 covers 275 ° ^2 within -50° ≤ RA ≤ +60° and -1.25° ≤ Dec. ≤ +1.25°. We discuss the steps of our reduction which puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy. Our reduction reaches a limit of ˜28.5 mag arcsec-2 (3σ, 10 × 10 arcsec2) in the r band. The effective surface brightness limit (50 per cent completeness for exponential light distribution) lies at ˜ 25.5 mag arcsec-2. For point sources, we reach 50 per cent completeness limits (3σ level) of (24.2, 25.2, 24.7, 24.3, 23.0) mag in (u, g, r, i, z). This is between 1.7 and 2.0 mag deeper than the single-epoch SDSS releases. The co-adds show point spread functions (PSFs) with median full width at half-maximum values ranging from 1 arcsec in i and z to 1.3 arcsec in the u band. The imaging data are made publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82. The release includes deep co-adds and representations of the PSF for each field. Additionally, we provide object catalogues with stars and galaxies confidently separated until g ˜ 23 mag. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe, exemplified by the discovery of stellar streams around NGC 0426 and NGC 0936. We also discuss further science cases like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness galaxies, the intracluster light in galaxy clusters and the diffuse emission of Galactic dust known as Galactic Cirrus.

  17. The INTEGRAL View of the Galactic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Goldwurm, A; Goldoni, P; Paul, J; Terrier, R; Falanga, M; Ubertini, P; Bazzano, A; Santo, M D; Winkler, C; Parmar, A N; Kuulkers, E; Ebisawa, K; Roques, J P; Skinner, G K; Lund, N; Melia, F; Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2004-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of the observational campaign performed in 2003 to study the Galactic Nucleus with INTEGRAL. The mosaicked images obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI coded aperture instrument in the energy range above 20 keV, give a yet unseen view of the high-energy sources of this region in hard X and gamma-rays, with an angular resolution of 12'. We report on the discovery of a source, IGR J17456-2901, compatible with the instrument's point spread function and coincident with the Galactic Nucleus Sgr A* to within 0.9'. The source is visible up to 60-80 keV with a 20-100 keV luminosity at 8 kpc of 3 x 10E35 erg/s. Although we cannot unequivocally associate the new INTEGRAL source to the Galactic Nucleus, this is the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the galactic center supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded. Here we discuss the results obtained and the perspectives for future observations of the Galactic Nuc...

  18. Iron Fluorescent Line Emission from the mCvs and Hard X-ray Emitting Symbiotic Stars as a Source of the Iron Fluorescent Line Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Romanus, Eze; Ebisawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) spectrum has strong iron emission lines at 6.4, 6.7, and 7.0~keV, each corresponding to the neutral (or low-ionized), He-like, and H-like iron ions. The 6.4~keV fluorescence line is due to irradiation of neutral (or low ionized) material (iron) by hard X-ray sources, indicating uniform presence of the cold matter in the Galactic plane. In order to resolve origin of the cold fluorescent matter, we examined the contribution of the 6.4~keV line emission from white dwarf surfaces in the hard X-ray emitting symbiotic stars (hSSs) and magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) to the GRXE. In our spectral analysis of 4~hSSs and 19~mCVs observed with Suzaku, we were able to resolve the three iron emission lines. We found that the equivalent-widths (EWs) of the 6.4~keV lines of hSSs are systematically higher than those of mCVs, such that the average EWs of hSSs and mCVs are $179_{-11}^{+46}$~eV and $93_{-3}^{+20}$~eV, respectively. The EW of hSSs compares favorably with the typical...

  19. Stellar Encounter Rate in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bahramian, Arash; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Gladstone, Jeanette C

    2013-01-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates (Gamma) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed "King-model" profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat "King-model" and "core-collapsed" clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte-Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on Gamma, producing t...

  20. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project: the bright sample

    CERN Document Server

    Massardi, Marcella; Bonavera, Laura; López-Caniego, Marcos; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Ekers, Ronald D

    2011-01-01

    The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) have provided flux density measurements at frequencies below and overlapping with Planck frequency bands of suitably chosen samples of AT20G radio sources, almost simultaneously with Planck observations. On the whole, we have observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) 482 sources in the frequency range between 4.5 and 40 GHz in the period between July 2009 and August 2010. Several sources were observed more than once. In this paper we present the aims of the project, the selection criteria, and the observation and data reduction procedures. We also present the data in total intensity for a complete sample of 189 sources with S(20 GHz)>500 mJy, Galactic latitude |b|>5{\\deg}, and declination <-30{\\deg}, and some statistical analysis of the spectral behaviour and variability of this sample, referred to as the "bright PACO sample". These data are important to investigate confusion effects affecting Planck data on radio sources. On the other hand, comp...

  1. Intrinsic brightness temperatures of blazar jets at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovatta Talvikki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to deconvolve light curves of blazars into individual flares, including proper estimation of the fit errors. We use the method to fit 15GHzlight curves obtained within the OVRO 40-m blazar monitoring program where a large number of AGN have been monitored since 2008 in support of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope mission. The time scales obtained from the fitted models are used to calculate the variability brightness temperature of the sources. Additionally, we have calculated brightness temperatures of a sample of these objects using Very Long Baseline Array data from the MOJAVE survey. Combining these two data sets enables us to study the intrinsic brightness temperature distribution in these blazars at 15 GHz. Our preliminary results indicate that the mean intrinsic brightness temperature in a sample of 14 sources is near the equipartition brightness temperature of ~ 1011K.

  2. Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX): Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Cameron; Mohammed, Steven; Schiminovich, David; Tam, Benjamin; Seibert, Mark; Martin, Christopher D.; GALEX Science Team

    2015-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) completed its survey of the Galactic plane in the near-ultraviolet during 2012. Although preliminary data were released shortly after the completion of the survey, the full dataset was reanalyzed during 2014 using refined attitude correction techniques that yield angular resolution-limited images. The GALEX Galactic plane survey includes more than 75% of the sky between 10 > b > -10 degrees. The initial photon dataset contains about 400 individual scans, each of which is a vertical slice of the Galactic plane. Each slice spans 1500-1700 seconds, during which the 1.24 degree diameter field of view performed a double-pass sweep across the Galactic plane. The Galactic Plane survey was the only time this non-standard, high scan rate acquisition mode was exercised during the mission, and required specialized processing and astrometric refinement to produce high quality sky maps. We present the first high-resolution map of the Galactic plane in the near-ultraviolet as well as a catalogue of thousands of sources for follow-up with HST. This work was partially supported by the Keck Institute for Space Studies.

  3. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, P W; Longmore, A; Schröder, A C; Davis, C J; Adamson, A; Bandyopadhyay, R M; De Grijs, R; Smith, M; Gosling, A; Mitchison, S; Gaspar, A; Coe, M; Tamura, M; Parker, Q; Irwin, M; Hambly, N; Byant, J; Collins, R S; Cross, N; Evans, D W; Gonzalez-Solares, E; Hodgkin, S; Lewis, J; Read, M; Riello, M; Sutorius, E T W; Lawrence, A; Drew, J E; Dye, S

    2007-01-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 sq.deg. of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5sources. Data for ~530 sq.deg. are presently available in UKIDSS DR2. Here we describe the properties of the dataset and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science includes studies of: (i) the star formation region G28.983-0.603, cross m...

  4. The INTEGRAL Galactic Plane Scanning

    CERN Document Server

    Fiocchi, Mariateresa

    2013-01-01

    After the first nine years of INTEGRAL operational life, the discovery of new sources and source types, a large fraction of which are highly transient or highly absorbed, is certainly one of the most compelling results and legacies of INTEGRAL. Frequent monitoring of the Galactic Plane in AO8 and AO9 campaigns allowed us to detect transient sources, both known and new, confirming that the gamma-ray sky is dominated by the extreme variability of different classes of objects. Regular scans of the Galactic Plane by INTEGRAL provide the most sensitive hard X-ray wide survey to date of our Galaxy, with flux limits of the order of 0.3 mCrab for an exposure time of ~2Ms. Many transient sources have been detected on a wide range of time scales (~hours to months) and identified by triggered followup observations, mainly by Swift/XRT and optical/infrared telescopes. These discoveries are very important to characterize the X-ray binary population in our Galaxy, that is necessary input for evolution studies. The transien...

  5. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FIRST SOURCE CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), during the first 11 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. The First Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) contains 1451 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Source detection was based on the average flux over the 11 month period, and the threshold likelihood Test Statistic is 25, corresponding to a significance of just over 4σ. The 1FGL catalog includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and power-law spectral fits as well as flux measurements in five energy bands for each source. In addition, monthly light curves are provided. Using a protocol defined before launch we have tested for several populations of gamma-ray sources among the sources in the catalog. For individual LAT-detected sources we provide firm identifications or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. Identifications are based on correlated variability with counterparts at other wavelengths, or on spin or orbital periodicity. For the catalogs and association criteria that we have selected, 630 of the sources are unassociated. Care was taken to characterize the sensitivity of the results to the model of interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission used to model the bright foreground, with the result that 161 sources at low Galactic latitudes and toward bright local interstellar clouds are flagged as having properties that are strongly dependent on the model or as potentially being due to incorrectly modeled structure in the Galactic diffuse emission.

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL DISTORTION OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shapes and sizes of 116 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are presented, based on the analysis of the spatial distribution of 2MASS point sources. In general, Galactic GCs are slightly flattened in shape, with a median axial ratio of 0.87. The GCs close to the Galactic bulge have various degrees of flattening, and those exhibiting obvious flattening tend to have their elongation pointing toward the Galactic center, manifesting the tidal effect from the bulge. In comparison, GCs away from the Galactic center tend to be spherical. A few GCs in the halo are also found to have elongated shape. Three notable cases of highly flattened clusters were previously known to be associated with stellar streams or particular dynamical history: NGC 5897 is known to have a stellar tidal tail extending to its equatorial north and south; NGC 6838 had a recent encounter with the Galactic plane; and IC 4499 is spatially close to, and collimated with, the 'Magellanic Stream'. We also found 31 GCs associated with possible clumpy structures in stellar distributions, as diagnosed by possible cluster members selected by colors and magnitudes. Four such cases of stellar debris are presented: NGC 6366 is experiencing heavy tidal stripping and NGC 2808 has been known to have multiple main-sequence branches. NGC 3201 and NGC 6397, like the flattened cluster, NGC 6838, also have their recent passage through the Galactic plane. Our sample is derived from the most inclusive analysis of the morphology of Galactic GCs, and should provide a valuable database to probe the mass distribution, or merging history of the Milky Way galaxy.

  7. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The galaxies in this cosmic pairing, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, display some curious features, demonstrating that each member of the duo is close enough to feel the distorting gravitational influence of the other. The gravitational tug of war has warped the spiral shape of one galaxy, NGC 3169, and fragmented the dust lanes in its companion NGC 3166. Meanwhile, a third, smaller galaxy to the lower right, NGC 3165, has a front-row seat to the gravitational twisting and pulling of its bigger neighbours. This galactic grouping, found about 70 million light-years away in the constellation Sextans (The Sextant), was discovered by the English astronomer William Herschel in 1783. Modern astronomers have gauged the distance between NGC 3169 (left) and NGC 3166 (right) as a mere 50 000 light-years, a separation that is only about half the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy. In such tight quarters, gravity can start to play havoc with galactic structure. Spiral galaxies like NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 tend to have orderly swirls of stars and dust pinwheeling about their glowing centres. Close encounters with other massive objects can jumble this classic configuration, often serving as a disfiguring prelude to the merging of galaxies into one larger galaxy. So far, the interactions of NGC 3169 and NGC 3166 have just lent a bit of character. NGC 3169's arms, shining bright with big, young, blue stars, have been teased apart, and lots of luminous gas has been drawn out from its disc. In NGC 3166's case, the dust lanes that also usually outline spiral arms are in disarray. Unlike its bluer counterpart, NGC 3166 is not forming many new stars. NGC 3169 has another distinction: the faint yellow dot beaming through a veil of dark dust just to the left of and close to the galaxy's centre [1]. This flash is the leftover of a supernova detected in 2003 and known accordingly as SN 2003cg. A supernova of this

  8. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  9. Rectlinear cooling scheme for bright muon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A fast cooling technique is described that simultaneously reduces all six phase-space dimensions of a charged particle beam. In this process, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss only in the longitudinal direction rf cavities. In this work we review its main features and describe the main results.

  10. Bright Solid State Source of Photon Triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Khoshnegar, Milad; Predojević, Ana; Dalacu, Dan; Prilmüller, Maximilian; Lapointe, Jean; Wu, Xiaohua; Tamarat, Philippe; Lounis, Brahim; Poole, Philip; Weihs, Gregor; Majedi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Producing advanced quantum states of light is a priority in quantum information technologies. While remarkable progress has been made on single photons and photon pairs, multipartite correlated photon states are usually produced in purely optical systems by post-selection or cascading, with extremely low efficiency and exponentially poor scaling. Multipartite states enable improved tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics as well as implementations of complex quantum optical networks and protocols. It would be favorable to directly generate these states using solid state systems, for better scaling, simpler handling, and the promise of reversible transfer of quantum information between stationary and flying qubits. Here we use the ground states of two optically active coupled quantum dots to directly produce photon triplets. The wavefunctions of photogenerated excitons localized in these ground states are correlated via molecular hybridization and Coulomb interactions. The formation of a triexciton leads...

  11. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/γ, where γ is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron's longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristics of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets

  12. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  13. A new system of nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, John; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of a new system of bright nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center is reported. This system is located in the interior of the western lobe of the Galactic center lobes and at the edge of a molecular cloud centered at V(LSR) of roughly -140 km/s in a relatively uncluttered field. The cloud has spectral lines about 50 km/s wide in (C-12)O, (C-13)O, and CS and a mass of order 100,000 solar.

  14. New system of nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bally, J.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of a new system of bright nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center is reported. This system is located in the interior of the western lobe of the Galactic center lobes and at the edge of a molecular cloud centered at V(LSR) of roughly -140 km/s in a relatively uncluttered field. The cloud has spectral lines about 50 km/s wide in (C-12)O, (C-13)O, and CS and a mass of order 100,000 solar. 22 references.

  15. New system of nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a new system of bright nonthermal filaments near the Galactic center is reported. This system is located in the interior of the western lobe of the Galactic center lobes and at the edge of a molecular cloud centered at V(LSR) of roughly -140 km/s in a relatively uncluttered field. The cloud has spectral lines about 50 km/s wide in (C-12)O, (C-13)O, and CS and a mass of order 100,000 solar. 22 references

  16. Galactic Building Blocks Seen Swarming Around Andromeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    University of Virginia. The Milky Way and Andromeda were formed many billions of years ago in a cosmic neighborhood brimming with galactic raw materials -- among which hydrogen, helium, and cold dark matter were primary constituents. By now, most of this raw material has probably been gobbled up by the two galaxies, but astronomers suspect that some primitive clouds are still floating free. Previous studies have revealed a number of clouds of neutral atomic hydrogen that are near the Milky Way but not part of its disk. These were initially referred to as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) when they were first discovered because they appeared to move at velocities difficult to reconcile with Galactic rotation. Scientists were uncertain if HVCs comprised building blocks of the Milky Way that had so far escaped capture, or if they traced gas accelerated to unexpected velocities by energetic processes (multiple supernovae) within the Milky Way. The discovery of similar clouds bound to the Andromeda Galaxy strengthens the case that at least some of these HVCs are indeed galactic building blocks. Astronomers are able to use radio telescopes to detect the characteristic 21-centimeter radiation emitted naturally by neutral atomic hydrogen. The great difficulty in analyzing these low-mass galactic building blocks has been that their natural radio emission is extremely faint. Even those nearest to us, clouds orbiting our Galaxy, are hard to study because of serious distance uncertainties. "We know the Milky Way HVCs are relatively nearby, but precisely how close is maddeningly tough to determine," said Thilker. Past attempts to find missing satellites around external galaxies at well-known distances have been unsuccessful because of the need for a very sensitive instrument capable of producing high-fidelity images, even in the vicinity of a bright source such as the Andromeda Galaxy. One might consider this task similar to visually distinguishing a candle placed adjacent to a spotlight. The

  17. Lamp spectrum and spatial brightness at photopic levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Atli, Deniz; Cheal, Chris; Houser, Kevin; Logadóttir, Ásta

    2015-01-01

    lower illuminance with potential reductions in energy consumption. Consideration of experimental design was used to review 70 studies of spatial brightness. Of these, the 19 studies considered to provide credible evidence of SPD effects were used to explore metrics for predicting the effect of SPD but......Light sources are available in a variety of spectral power distributions (SPDs) and this affects spatial brightness in a manner not predicted by quantities such as illuminance. Tuning light source SPD to better match the sensitivity of visual perception may allow the same spatial brightness but at...

  18. The Galactic Center as a Paradigm for Low Luminosity Nuclei? The K-band identification of the DSO/G2 source from VLT and Keck data

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, M; Zamaninasab, M; Muzic, K; Sabha, N; Shahzamanian, B; Yazici, S; Moser, L; Zuther, J; Garcia-Marin, M; Valencia-S., M; Bursa, M; Karssen, G; Karas, V; Jalali, B; Vitale, M; Bremer, M; Fischer, S; Smajic, S; Rauch, C; Kunneriath, D; Moultaka, J; Straubmeier, C; Rashed, Y E; Iserlohe, C; Busch, G; Markakis, K; Borkar, A; Zensus, A

    2013-01-01

    The super-massive 4 million solar mass black hole (SMBH) SgrA* shows flare emission from the millimeter to the X-ray domain. The nucleus of the Milky Way has properties (stellar cluster, young stars, molecular gas and an accreting SMBH) that resemble those of currently higher luminous Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. A detailed analysis of the infrared light curves shows that the flares are probably generated in a single-state process forming a power-law distribution of the flux density. Near-infrared polarimetry shows signatures of strong gravity that are statistically significant against randomly polarized red noise. Details of the emission mechanism are discussed in a synchrotron/self-Compton model. SgrA* also allows to study the interaction of the SMBH with the immediate interstellar and gaseous environment of the central stellar cluster. Through infrared imaging of the central few arcseconds it is possible to study both inflow and outflow phenomena linked to the SgrA* black hole. In this context we...

  19. Virgin Galactic explores CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  20. A signature of E eV protons of Galactic origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinyakov, P. G.; Urban, F. R.; Ivanov, D.; Thomson, G. B.; Tirone, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate signatures that would be produced in the spectrum and sky distribution of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) by a population of the Galactic sources of high-energy protons in the energy range around 1 EeV, i.e. around the diffusive-to-ballistic transition. In this regime, the CR flux has to be calculated numerically. We employ the approach that consists in backtracking anti-protons from Earth through the Galaxy and integrating the source emissivity along the trajectory. This approach makes evident two generic features of the transition region: sharp increase of the total flux as the energy decreases across the transition region, and its strong anisotropy (appearance of a bright compact spot) all the way until the onset of the diffusive regime. We then discuss and compare several methods to experimentally detect or constrain these features. We find that a few per cent admixture of the Galactic protons can in principle be detected by the current UHECR experiments.

  1. The Stacked Lyman-Alpha Emission Profile from the Circum-Galactic Medium of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Battaia, Fabrizio Arrigoni; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the FLASHLIGHT survey, we obtained deep narrow band images of 15 $z\\sim2$ quasars with GMOS on Gemini-South in an effort to measure Ly$\\alpha$ emission from circum- and inter-galactic gas on scales of hundreds of kpc from the central quasar. We do not detect bright giant Ly$\\alpha$ nebulae (SB~10$^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ at distances >50 kpc) around any of our sources, although we routinely ($\\simeq47$%) detect smaller scale <50 kpc Ly$\\alpha$ emission at this SB level emerging from either the extended narrow emission line regions powered by the quasars or by star-formation in their host galaxies. We stack our 15 deep images to study the average extended Ly$\\alpha$ surface brightness profile around $z\\sim2$ quasars, carefully PSF-subtracting the unresolved emission component and paying close attention to sources of systematic error. Our analysis, which achieves an unprecedented depth, reveals a surface brightness of SB$_{\\rm Ly\\alpha}\\sim10^{-19}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}...

  2. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  3. A thin diffuse component of the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission and heating of the interstellar medium contributed by the radiation of Galactic X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, Margherita; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a thin (scale height ~80 pc) diffuse component to the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) arising from the scattering of the radiation of bright X-ray binaries (XBs) by the interstellar medium. The morphology of the scattered component is expected to trace the clumpy molecular and HI clouds. We calculate this contribution to the GRXE from known Galactic XBs assuming that they are all persistent. The known XBs sample is however incomplete as it is flux-limited and spans the small lifetime of X-ray astronomy (~50 years), compared to the characteristic time of 1000-10000 years that would contribute to the diffuse emission observed today due to time delays. We therefore also use a simulated sample of sources, to estimate the diffuse emission we should expect in an optimistic case assuming that the X-ray luminosity of our Galaxy is on average similar to that of other galaxies. In the calculations we also take into account the enhancement of the total scattering cross section due to coherence effects in...

  4. SKY BRIGHTNESS AND TRANSPARENCY IN THE i-BAND AT DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The i-band observing conditions at Dome A on the Antarctic plateau have been investigated using data acquired during 2008 with the Chinese Small Telescope Array. The sky brightness, variations in atmospheric transparency, cloud cover, and the presence of aurorae are obtained from these images. The median sky brightness of moonless clear nights is 20.5 mag arcsec-2 in the SDSS i band at the south celestial pole (which includes a contribution of about 0.06 mag from diffuse Galactic light). The median over all Moon phases in the Antarctic winter is about 19.8 mag arcsec-2. There were no thick clouds in 2008. We model contributions of the Sun and the Moon to the sky background to obtain the relationship between the sky brightness and transparency. Aurorae are identified by comparing the observed sky brightness to the sky brightness expected from this model. About 2% of the images are affected by relatively strong aurorae.

  5. XMM-Newton Observations of G32.45+0.1and G38.55+0.0: diffuse hard X-ray sources found with the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, H; Koyama,; bamba, A; Yamauchi, S; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Ueno, Masaru; Koyama, katsuji; bamba, Aya; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2003-01-01

    We report on XMM-Newton observations of G32.45+0.1 and G38.55+0.0. These were discovered as diffuse hard X-ray sources with the ASCA Galactic plane survey, but the limited spatial resolution of ASCA could not conclude whether these are truly diffuse or a group of unresolved point-sources. XMM-Newton, with higher spatial resolution than ASCA, confirmed that G32.45+0.1 has a diffuse shell-like structure with a radius of ~4'. The spectrum shows featureless continuum, hence can be fitted with a power-law model of Gamma ~2.2 with an absorption of N_H~5.2*10^{22}cm^{-2}. From this N_H value, we estimate the distance to G32.45+0.1 to be ~17kpc, then the luminosity (in the 0.5-10.0keV band) and radius of the shell are ~9.5*10^{34}ergs/s and ~20pc, respectively. The radio complex sources in the NRAO/VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; 1.4GHz) are globally associated to the X-ray shell of G32.45+0.1. Therefore G32.45+0.1 is likely to be a synchrotron dominant shell-like SNR. No significant diffuse structure was found in the XMM-Newt...

  6. HOW TO IDENTIFY AND SEPARATE BRIGHT GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO SKY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we simulate the 50-200 MHz radio sky that is constrained in the field of view (50 radius) of the 21 Centimeter Array (21CMA), a low-frequency radio interferometric array constructed in the remote area of Xinjiang, China, by carrying out Monte Carlo simulations to model the strong contaminating foreground of the redshifted cosmological reionization signals, including emissions from our Galaxy, galaxy clusters, and extragalactic discrete sources (i.e., star-forming galaxies, radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and radio-loud AGNs). As an improvement over previous works, we consider in detail not only random variations of morphological and spectroscopic parameters within the ranges allowed by multi-band observations, but also the evolution of radio halos in galaxy clusters, assuming that relativistic electrons are re-accelerated in the intracluster medium (ICM) in merger events and lose energy via both synchrotron emission and inverse Compton scattering with cosmic microwave background photons. By introducing a new approach designed on the basis of independent component analysis and wavelet detection algorithm, we prove that, with a cumulative observation of one month with the 21CMA array, about 80% of galaxy clusters (37 out of 48 clusters assuming a mean magnetic field of B = 2 μG in the ICM, or 15 out of 18 clusters assuming B = 0.2 μG) with central brightness temperatures of >10 K at 65 MHz can be safely identified and separated from the overwhelmingly bright foreground. By examining the brightness temperature images and spectra extracted from these identified clusters, we find that the morphological and spectroscopic distortions are extremely small compared to the input simulated clusters, and the reduced χ2 of brightness temperature profiles and spectra are controlled to be ∼<0.5 and ∼<1.3, respectively. These results robustly indicate that in the near future a sample of dozens of bright galaxy clusters will be disentangled from the

  7. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means

  8. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  9. THE GALACTIC SPIN OF AGN GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an extensive sample of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5, we compare the angular momentum distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with non-AGN hosting late-type galaxies. To this end we characterize galactic spin through the dimensionless angular momentum parameter λ, which we estimate through simple dynamical considerations. Using a volume-limited sample, we find a considerable difference when comparing the empirical distributions of λ for AGNs and non-AGN galaxies, the AGNs showing typically low λ values and associated dispersions, while non-AGNs present higher λ values and a broader distribution. A more striking difference is found when looking at λ distributions in thin Mr cuts; while the spin of non-AGN galaxies presents an anticorrelation with Mr , with bright (massive) galaxies having low spins, AGN host galaxies present uniform values of λ at all magnitudes, a behavior probably imposed by the fact that most late-type AGN galaxies present a narrow range in color, with a typical constant λ value. We also find that the fraction of AGN hosting galaxies in our sample strongly depends on galactic spin, increasing dramatically for decreasing λ. For AGN host galaxies, we compute the mass of their supermassive black holes and find that this value tends to be higher for low spin galaxies, even at fixed luminosity, a result that could account, to a certain extent, for the spread on the luminosity-black-hole mass relation.

  10. Galactic Archeology - requirements on survey spectrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Feltzing, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Galactic Archeology is about exploring the Milky Way as a galaxy by, mainly, using its (old) stars as tracers of past events and thus figure out the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. I will briefly outline some of the key scientific aspects of Galactic Archeology and then discuss the associated instrumentations. Gaia will forever change the way we approach this subject. However, Gaia on its own is not enough. Ground-based complementary spectroscopy is necessary to obtain full phase-space information and elemental abundances for stars fainter than the top few percent of the bright part of the Gaia catalogue. I will review the requirement on instrumentation for Gaia follow-up that Galactic Archeology sets. In particular, I will discuss the requirements on radial velocity and elemental abundance determination, including a brief look at potential pit-falls in the abundance analysis (e.g., NLTE, atomic diffusion). This contribution also provides a non-exhaustive comparison of the various current and future sp...

  11. The Crossroads between the Galactic Disk and Interstellar Space, Ablaze in 3/4 keV Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2016-04-01

    The halo is the crossroads between the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. This region is inhabited by hot gas that has risen from the disk, gas heated in situ, and hot material that has fallen in from intergalactic space. Owing to high spectral resolution observations made by by XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra of the hot plasma's 3/4 keV emission and absorption, increasingly sophisticated and CPU intensive computer modeling, and an awareness that charge exchange can contaminate 3/4 keV observations, we are now better able to understand the hot halo gas than ever before.Spectral analyses indicate that the 3/4 keV emission comes from T ~ 2.2 million Kelvin gas. Although observations suggest that the gas may be convectively unstable and the spectra's temperature is similar to that predicted by recent sophisticated models of the galactic fountain, the observed emission measure is significantly brighter than that predicted by fountain models. This brightness disparity presents us with another type of crossroads: should we continue down the road of adding physics to already sophisticated modeling or should we seek out other sources? In this presentation, I will discuss the galactic fountain crossroads, note the latitudinal and longitudinal distribution of the hot halo gas, provide an update on charge exchange, and explain how shadowing observations have helped to fine tune our understanding of the hot gas.

  12. What planetary nebulae tell us about helium and the CNO elements in Galactic bulge stars

    OpenAIRE

    Buell, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) models of bulge stars are calculated using a synthetic model. The goal is to infer typical progenitor masses and compositions by reproducing the typical chemical composition and central star masses of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic bulge. The AGB tip luminosity and the observation that the observed lack of bright carbon stars in the bulge are matched by the models. Five sets of galactic bulge PNe were analyzed to find typical abundan...

  13. Penetrating the Deep Cover of Compton Thick Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Levenson, N A; Krolik, J H; Weaver, K A; Zycki, P T

    2006-01-01

    We analyze observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of bright Compton thick active galactic nuclei (AGNs), those with column densities in excess of 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^{-2} along the lines of sight. We therefore view the powerful central engines only indirectly, even at X-ray energies. Using high spatial resolution and considering only galaxies that do not contain circumnuclear starbursts, we reveal the variety of emission AGNs alone may produce. Approximately 1% of the continuum's intrinsic flux is detected in reflection in each case. The only hard X-ray feature is the prominent Fe K alpha fluorescence line, with equivalent width greater than 1 keV in all sources. The Fe line luminosity provides the best X-ray indicator of the unseen intrinsic AGN luminosity. In detail, the morphologies of the extended soft X-ray emission and optical line emission are similar, and line emission dominates the soft X-ray spectra. Thus, we attribute the soft X-ray emission to material that the central engines photo...

  14. Identification of 5 Interacting Binaries in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, C T; Hynes, R I; Jonker, P G; Maccarone, T J; Greiss, S; Steeghs, D; Groot, P; Knigge, C; Dieball, A; Nelemans, G; Mikles, V J; Gossen, L

    2013-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves, spectroscopy, and classification of five X-ray sources in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey [CXOGBS J174009.1-284725 (CX5), CXOGBS J173935.7-272935 (CX18), CXOGBS J173946.9-271809 (CX28), CXOGBS J173729.1-292804 (CX37), CXOGBS J174607.6-261547 (CX561)]. These objects were selected based on bright optical counterparts which were quickly found to have emission lines in their optical spectra. This paper presents an illustration of GBS optical follow-up, targeting emission line objects. Of these five objects, four exhibit photometric variability in the Sloan r' band. CX5 shows a tentative period of 2.1 hours and is clearly an Intermediate Polar (IP). CX28 and CX37 both exhibit flickering with no clear period. Both are suggested to also be IPs. CX18 was observed to undergo 2 dwarf nova outbursts. Finally, CX561 shows no detectable variability, although its characteristics would be consistent with either a quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binary or Cataclysmic Variable.

  15. Search for galactic sources and bursts of x radiation in the 40-290 keV energy range with a spectrometer of the Kosmos-428 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary sources and bursts of X-radiation in the 40-290 keV energy range have been found in the cetus constellation as a result of observations carried out with a spectrometer of the ''Kosmos-3428'' satellite

  16. IDENTIFYING BREAKS AND CURVATURE IN THE FERMI SPECTRA OF BRIGHT FLAT SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing the site of γ-ray emission in active galactic nucleus jets will do much for our understanding of the physics of the source. In particular, if the emission region is close to the black hole then absorption of γ-rays with photons from the broad-line region could become significant. Such absorption is predicted to produce two specific spectral breaks in the γ-ray spectra of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs). We test this hypothesis using three years of Fermi observations of nine bright FSRQs. A simple power-law fit to the spectrum of each source can be significantly improved by introducing a break, but the break energies are inconsistent with those predicted by the double-absorber model. In some cases the fit can be further improved by a log-parabola. In addition, by dividing the data from each source into two equal epochs we find that the best description of an object's spectrum often varies between a log-parabola and a broken power law.

  17. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Pacaud, F; Giles, P A; Adami, C; Sadibekova, T; Pierre, M; Maughan, B J; Lieu, M; Fèvre, J -P Le; Alis, S; Altieri, B; Ardila, F; Baldry, I; Benoist, C; Birkinshaw, M; Chiappetti, L; Démoclès, J; Eckert, D; Evrard, A E; Faccioli, L; Gastaldello, F; Guennou, L; Horellou, C; Iovino, A; Koulouridis, E; Brun, V Le; Lidman, C; Liske, J; Maurogordato, S; Menanteau, F; Owers, M; Poggianti, B; Pomarède, D; Pompei, E; Ponman, T J; Rapetti, D; Reiprich, T H; Smith, G P; Tuffs, R; Valageas, P; Valtchanov, I; Willis, J P; Ziparo, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\\times 10^{-14}\\,\\mathrm{erg \\,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On th...

  18. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  19. Constraints on galactic wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft x-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star-formation rate of 0.5 - 3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v_inf to scale with the star formation rate SFR (in solar masses per year) approximately as v_inf ~ (700 - 1000) km/s SFR^{1/6}. The corresponding mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass-loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from the...

  20. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Could stars be forming in the inhospitable environment near Sagittarius A* in the heart of the Milky Way? A possible signature of low-mass star formation has recently been found just two light-years from the black hole at the center of our galaxy — a region that was previously thought to be too hostile for such activity. Searching for Signatures: Previous observations of the central few light-years of the Milky Way had focused on a population of about 200 massive, young and very bright stars in tight orbits around Sgr A*. These stars are only a few million years old and prompted scientists to wonder: have they somehow managed to form in situ, in spite of their close proximity to the black hole, or did they form further out and then migrate in? Motivated by this mystery, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University and collaborators looked for evidence of even younger stars close to Sagittarius A*, which would demonstrate that star formation in the area is an ongoing process. Using the Very Large Array (VLA), the collaboration discovered several small sources in one arm of activity near Sgr A*. This 34-GHz image provides a close-up view of two protoplanetary disk candidates (labeled P26 and P8) located near Sgr A*. These objects are outlined on the right side by a bow shock caused by impacting stellar wind that streams from the young, hot stars closer to the Galactic center. The disks are thought to contain recently-formed, low-mass stars. (Credit: Yusef-Zadeh et al., 2015) Heated Disks: The team identified these sources as candidate photoevaporative protoplanetary disks, or “proplyds” — areas of dense, ionized gas and dust surrounding young, newly formed stars. The proplyd candidates are between 10,000 and 100,000 years old, and they lie along the edge of a large molecular cloud. It is likely that this cloud produced the disks by providing a reservoir of gas to feed the star-formation activity. The region surrounding these proplyds is blasted with harsh

  1. The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS): DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Monroe, TalaWanda R; Tejos, N; Worseck, G; Hennawi, Joseph F; Schmidt, Tobias; Tumlinson, Jason; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We present the first data release (DR1) from our UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) for new $z \\sim 1$ active galactic nuclei (AGN) across the sky. Using simple GALEX UV and WISE near-IR color selection criteria, we generated a list of 1450 primary candidates with $FUV 0.5$. Including a small set of observed secondary candidates, we report the discovery of 217 AGN with $FUV < 18$ mag that had no previously reported spectroscopic redshift. These are excellent potential targets for UV spectroscopy before the end of the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} mission. The main data products are publicly released through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  2. Bright Lights, Big Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Overabundant lighting has become another pollution source in the Chinese cities The glow of electric lights illuminating the nights of ever-brighter cities has been regarded as one of the signs of prosperity and modern civilization.

  3. The Galactic Center Region Imaged by VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beilicke, M

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic Center has long been a region of interest for high-energy and very-high-energy observations. Many potential sources of GeV/TeV gamma-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic Center has been detected at MeV/GeV energies by EGRET and recently by Fermi/LAT. At GeV/TeV energies, the Galactic Center was detected by different ground-based Cherenkov telescopes such as CANGAROO, Whipple 10m, H.E.S.S., and MAGIC. We present the results from 15 hrs of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles, resulting in a >10 standard deviation detection and confirmation of the high-energy spectrum observed by H.E.S.S. The combined Fermi/VERITAS results are compared to astrophysical models.

  4. The Galactic Center region imaged by VERITAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilicke, M., E-mail: beilicke@physics.wustl.edu [Department of Physics and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-11-11

    The Galactic Center has long been a region of interest for high-energy and very-high-energy observations. Many potential sources of GeV/TeV {gamma}-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic Center has been detected at MeV/GeV energies by EGRET and recently by Fermi/LAT. At GeV/TeV energies, the Galactic Center was detected by different ground-based Cherenkov telescopes such as CANGAROO, Whipple 10 m, HESS, and MAGIC. We present the results from 15 h of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles, resulting in a >10 standard deviation detection. The combined Fermi/VERITAS results are compared to astrophysical models.

  5. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  6. Structured Molecular Gas Reveals Galactic Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Koda, Jin

    2012-01-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function (BDF) and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J=1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formati...

  7. Design and project status of the National Synchrotron Light Source; storage rings (2.5 GeV, 0.7 GeV) for the generation of bright synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two high intensity storage rings are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength region (700 MeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 31.5 A) and in the x-ray wavelength region (2.5 GeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 2.5 A). A description is given of the facility, the main features of the storage rings are presented and the basic parameters are enumerated. High field superconducting wigglers, to lower the short wavelength cutoff in the x-ray ring, and undulators, for flux enhancement or a free electron laser experiment will be incorporated and parameters are given here. Special design aspects to optimize the electron storage rings as dedicated synchrotron radiation sources will be emphasized and the status of the project will be given

  8. Brightness, coherence, and propagation characteristics of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formalism is presented by means of which the propagation and imaging characteristics of synchrotron radiation can be studied, taking into account the effects of diffraction, electron beam emittance, and the transverse and longitudinal extent of the source. An important quantity in this approach is the Wigner distribution of the electric fields, which can be interpreted as a phase-space distribution of photon flux, and thus can be identified with the brightness. When integrated over the angular variables, the brightness becomes the intensity distribution in the spatial variables and when integrated over the spatial variables, it becomes the intensity distribution in angular variables. The brightness so defined transforms through a general optical medium in exactly the same way as in the case of a collection of geometric rays. Finally, the brightness of different electrons adds in a simple way. Optical characteristics of various synchrotron radiation sources - bending magnets, wigglers and undulators, are analyzed using this formalism

  9. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. I. Survey Description, Goals, and Initial Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Pisano, D. J.; Calabretta, M. R.; Ford, H. A.; Lockman, F.J.; Staveley-Smith, L; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Bailin, J.; Dedes, L.; Janowiecki, S.; Gibson, B. K.; Murphy, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Newton-McGee, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (HI) emission in the Southern sky covering declinations $\\delta \\leq 1^{\\circ}$ using the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey covers $2\\pi$ steradians with an effective angular resolution of ~16', at a velocity resolution of 1.0 km/s, and with an rms brightness temperature noise of 57 mK. GASS is the most sensitive, highest angular resolution survey of Galactic HI emission ever made in the Southern sky. In this p...

  10. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey IX: Data Release 2 and Outer Galaxy Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P; Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Miranda; Merello, Manuel; Shirley, Yancy; Bally, John; Evans, Neal J; Stringfellow, Guy; Aguirre, James

    2013-01-01

    We present a re-reduction and expansion of the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, first presented by Aguirre et al. (2011) and Rosolowsky et al. (2010). The BGPS is a 1.1 mm survey of dust emission in the Northern galactic plane, covering longitudes -10 < \\ell < 90 and latitudes |b| < 0.5 with a typical 1-\\sigma RMS sensitivity of 30-100 mJy in a 33" beam. Version 2 of the survey includes an additional 20 square degrees of coverage in the 3rd and 4th quadrants and 2 square degrees in the 1st quadrant. The new data release has improved angular recovery, with complete recovery out to 100" and partial recovery to 300", and reduced negative bowls around bright sources resulting from the atmospheric subtraction process. We resolve the factor of 1.5 flux calibration offset between the v1.0 data release and other data sets and determine that there is no offset between v2.0 and other data sets. The v2.0 pointing accuracy is tested against other surveys and demonstrated to be accurate and an improvement over v1.0...

  11. Topics on Galactic Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    I discuss three different topics in Galactic chemical evolution:the "puzzling" absence of any observational signature of secondary elements ; the building of the Galactic halo in the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation, as evidenced from its metallicity distribution ; and the potentially important role that radial migration may play in the evolution of galactic disks, according to recent studies.

  12. Widespread Methanol Emission from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Viti, S; Wardle, M; Royster, M

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4_{-1} to 3$_0 E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66'x18' (160x43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of ~16.6 km/s taken from 41 channels of a VLA continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2--1) and CH3OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km/s clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25+0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H2. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH3OH abundance of 10^{-8} to 10^{...

  13. Time lag in transient cosmic accreting sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2016-01-01

    We develop models for time lag between maxima of the source brightness in different wavelengths during a transient flash of luminosity connected with a short period of increase of the mass flux onto the central compact object. We derive a simple formula for finding the time delay among events in different wavelengths, valid in general for all disk accreting cosmic sources, and discuss quantitatively a model for time lag formation in AGNs. In close binaries with accretion disks the time lag is connected with effects of viscosity defining a radial motion of matter in the accretion disk. In AGN flashes, the falling matter has a low angular momentum, and the time lag is defined by the free fall time to the gravitating center. We show the validity of these models by means of several examples of galactic and extragalactic accreting sources.

  14. Galactic Archaeology: Current Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the science goals and achievements of ongoing spectroscopic surveys of individual stars in the nearby Universe. I include a brief discussion of the development of the field of Galactic Archaeology - using the fossil record in old stars nearby to infer how our Galaxy evolved and place the Milky Way in cosmological context.

  15. THE PROPER MOTION OF THE GALACTIC CENTER PULSAR RELATIVE TO SAGITTARIUS A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, Geoffrey C. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 645 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Deller, Adam; Falcke, Heino [ASTRON, PO Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Demorest, Paul [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Brunthaler, Andreas; Eatough, Ralph P.; Kramer, Michael; Lee, K. J.; Spitler, Laura; Desvignes, Gregory [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Moscibrodzka, Monika [Department of Astrophysics, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP), Radboud University, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); O' Leary, Ryan M. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Rushton, Anthony P. [Department of Physics, Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Doeleman, Sheperd [MIT Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Reid, Mark J., E-mail: gbower@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 ± 11 km s{sup –1} at position angle 22 ± 2 deg east of north at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A*; however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position are consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of ≲ 500 km s{sup –1}. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multiyear astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepen the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic center pulsars.

  16. The Proper Motion of the Galactic Center Pulsar Relative to Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Deller, Adam; Demorest, Paul; Brunthaler, Andreas; Falcke, Heino; Moscibrodzka, Monika; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Eatough, Ralph P.; Kramer, Michael; Lee, K. J.; Spitler, Laura; Desvignes, Gregory; Rushton, Anthony P.; Doeleman, Sheperd; Reid, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 ± 11 km s–1 at position angle 22 ± 2 deg east of north at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A* however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position are consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of <~ 500 km s–1. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multiyear astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepen the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic center pulsars.

  17. CALIBRATING THE CORRELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND X-RAY VARIABILITY AMPLITUDE: X-RAY ONLY BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calibration is made for the correlation between the X-ray Variability Amplitude (XVA) and black hole (BH) mass. The correlation for 21 reverberation-mapped Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) appears very tight, with an intrinsic dispersion of 0.20 dex. The intrinsic dispersion of 0.27 dex can be obtained if BH masses are estimated from the stellar velocity dispersions. We further test the uncertainties of mass estimates from XVAs for objects that have been observed multiple times with good enough data quality. The results show that the XVAs derived from multiple observations change by a factor of 3. This means that BH mass uncertainty from a single observation is slightly worse than either reverberation-mapping or stellar velocity dispersion measurements; however, BH mass estimates with X-ray data only can be more accurate if the mean XVA value from more observations is used. With this calibrated relation, the BH mass and accretion rate may be determined for a large sample of AGNs with the planned International X-ray Observatory mission. Proper interpretation of the first AGN X-ray quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO), seen in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396, depends on its BH mass, which is not currently known very well. Applying this relation, the BH mass of RE J1034+396 is found to be 4+3-2 x 106 Msun. The high end of the mass range follows the relationship between the 2f0 frequencies of high-frequency QPO and the BH masses derived from the Galactic X-ray binaries. We also calculate the high-frequency constant C = 2.37 Msun Hz-1 from 21 reverberation-mapped AGNs. As suggested by Gierlinski et al., MBH = C/CM, where CM is the high-frequency variability derived from XVA. Given the similar shape of power-law dominated X-ray spectra in ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) and AGNs, this can be applied to BH mass estimates of ULXs. We discuss the observed QPO frequencies and BH mass estimates in the ULXs M82 X-1 and NGC 5408 X-1 and favor ULXs as intermediate mass BH systems.

  18. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from undulators and bending magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the maximum of the Wigner distribution (WD) of synchrotron radiation (SR) fields as a possible definition of SR source brightness. Such figure of merit was originally introduced in the SR community by Kim. The brightness defined in this way is always positive and, in the geometrical optics limit, can be interpreted as maximum density of photon flux in phase space. For undulator and bending magnet radiation from a single electron, the WD function can be explicitly calculated. In the case of an electron beam with a finite emittance the brightness is given by the maximum of the convolution of a single electron WD function and the probability distribution of the electrons in phase space. In the particular case when both electron beam size and electron beam divergence dominate over the diffraction size and the diffraction angle, one can use a geometrical optics approach. However, there are intermediate regimes when only the electron beam size or the electron beam divergence dominate. In this asymptotic cases the geometrical optics approach is still applicable, and the brightness definition used here yields back once more the maximum photon flux density in phase space. In these intermediate regimes we find a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and the approximation for undulator brightness currently used in literature. We extend the WD formalism to a satisfactory theory for the brightness of a bending magnet. We find that in the intermediate regimes the usually accepted approximation for bending magnet brightness turns out to be inconsistent even parametrically.

  19. AXIAL RATIO OF EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES AS A TEST FOR BRIGHT RADIO HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Jones, E.; Dunlap, H. [Physics Department, University of Richmond 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Kogut, A., E-mail: jsingal@richmond.edu [Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We use surface brightness contour maps of nearby edge-on spiral galaxies to determine whether extended bright radio halos are common. In particular, we test a recent model of the spatial structure of the diffuse radio continuum by Subrahmanyan and Cowsik which posits that a substantial fraction of the observed high-latitude surface brightness originates from an extended Galactic halo of uniform emissivity. Measurements of the axial ratio of emission contours within a sample of normal spiral galaxies at 1500 MHz and below show no evidence for such a bright, extended radio halo. Either the Galaxy is atypical compared to nearby quiescent spirals or the bulk of the observed high-latitude emission does not originate from this type of extended halo. (letters)

  20. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  1. Infrared astronony and galactic dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of infrared sources of cosmic radiation - interstellar dust clouds, cocoon stars, novae, and gas supergiants - is presented. The possibilities of exact estimation of the star and galaxy brightness are considered. The difficulties of experiments and the reasons for choosing the infrared range for observations (teh maximum radiation of cold dust particles and the high transparency of the dust clouds) are noted. A Galaxy centre strongly radiating in the infrared range and situated in the Sagittarius constellation is considered as an example, and its schematic picture is given. A rough estimate of the absorption by stellar structures, dust and gas clouds is given. The diagram of the Main sequence of infrared sources and the dependence of their luminosity on the effective temperature are presented. The energy distribution in the spectrum of a complex object at different temperatures and wave lengths is considered. The frequency dependence of the radiation flux for the objects of the Orion constellation is given

  2. VLBI detection of an Infrared-Faint Radio Source

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P; Phillips, Chris; Middelberg, Enno; Deller, Adam; Appleton, Philip N

    2007-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources represent a new and unexpected class of object which is bright at radio wavelengths but unusually faint at infrared wavelengths. If, like most mJy radio sources, they were either conventional active or star-forming galaxies in the local Universe, we would expect them to be detectable at infrared wavelengths, and so their non-detection by the Spitzer Space Telescope is surprising. Here we report the detection of one of these sources using Very Long Baseline Interferometry, from which we conclude that the sources are driven by Active Galactic Nuclei. We suggest that these sources are either normal radio-loud quasars at high redshift or abnormally obscured radio galaxies.

  3. Galactic cosmic ray iron composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, R.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.; Hertzman, S.; Kristansson, K.; Soederstroem, K.

    1980-11-01

    The isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray iron was studied in the energy interval 500-750 MeV/nucleon with a visual track detector system consisting of nuclear emulsion and cellulose nitrate plastic. Stopping iron nuclei were identified from ionization range measurements in the two detector parts. Cone lengths were measured in the plastic sheets and the residual ranges of the particles were measured in plastic and in emulsion. The mass of iron-17 nuclei was determined with an uncertainty of about 0.3 amu. The isotopic composition at the detector level was found to be Fe-52:Fe-53:Fe-54:Fe-55:Fe-56:Fe-57:Fe-58 = 0:1:4:3:8:1:0. These numbers are not in conflict with the assumption that the isotopic composition of cosmic ray iron at the source is similar to the solar system composition.

  4. Ultrafast outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Tazaki, F.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Ueda, Y.; Cappi, M.; Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent X-ray observations show absorbing winds with velocities up to mildly relativistic values of the order of ˜0.1c in a limited sample of six broad-line radio galaxies. They are observed as blueshifted Fe XXV-XXVI K-shell absorption lines, similarly to the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) reported in Seyferts and quasars. In this work we extend the search for such Fe K absorption lines to a larger sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The sample is drawn from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58-month catalogue and blazars are excluded. X-ray bright Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio galaxies constitute the majority of the sources. Combining the results of this analysis with those in the literature we find that UFOs are detected in >27 per cent of the sources. However, correcting for the number of spectra with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we can estimate that the incidence of UFOs is this sample of radio-loud AGN is likely in the range f ≃ (50 ± 20) per cent. A photoionization modelling of the absorption lines with XSTAR allows us to estimate the distribution of their main parameters. The observed outflow velocities are broadly distributed between vout ≲ 1000 km s-1 and vout ≃ 0.4c, with mean and median values of vout ≃ 0.133c and vout ≃ 0.117c, respectively. The material is highly ionized, with an average ionization parameter of logξ ≃ 4.5 erg s-1 cm, and the column densities are larger than NH > 1022 cm-2. Overall, these characteristics are consistent with the presence of complex accretion disc winds in a significant fraction of radio-loud AGN and demonstrate that the presence of relativistic jets does not preclude the existence of winds, in accordance with several theoretical models.

  5. Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.;

    2013-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system (130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ and -50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ). Strong ultra-violet (UV) flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse for...

  6. Infrared observations and galactic structure at large scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infra-red observations of the Milky Way allows the calculation of the stellar emission in the inner Galaxy by two independent methods. The far infra-red (lambda>=100μm) is emetted by the cosmic dust. The recent measurements show that the grain temperature lays between 20 and 30 K for the inner Galaxy. Assuming that the heating of the dust is due to stellar radiation, this radiation can be deduced from the far infra-red galactic brightness. For the region of galactocentric distance approximately 5 kpc, the total luminosity is estimated to approximately 1.5x1027W.pc-3. The near infra-red (lambda approximately equal to 2.4μm) is directly emetted by the stars and the galactic extinction is not too large. The solar neighbourhood stellar population can be taken as representative of the galactic disc population; at lambda approximately equal to 2.4 μm its luminosity is approximately 1.3x1024 W.pc-3.μm-1. With the mass density distribution models, it is possible to evaluate at any galactic radius this luminosity due to the disc population, and to compute the galactic disc brightness. The calculated 2.4 μm disc population luminosity for the approximately 5 kpc region is approximately 0.7x1025W.pc-3.μm-1 whereas the luminosity needed to explain the observations is: approximately 4x1025W.pc-3.μm-1. The difference is attributed to a younger population. The stellar total luminosity in this region is estimated to approximately 1.2x1027 W.pc-3 in good agreement with the value deduced from the far infra-red observations. These facts suggest that the coefficient p of the initial mass function of the stars formed, defined by PSI(M)=k.Msup(-p) is not a constant

  7. Asymmetry in the Spectrum of High-Velocity H2O Maser Emission Features in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenok, A V; 10.1134/S1063773710010019

    2010-01-01

    We suggest a mechanism for the amplification of high-velocity water-vapor maser emission features from the central regions of active galactic nuclei. The model of an emitting accretion disk is considered. The high-velocity emission features originate in the right and left wings of the Keplerian disk. The hyperfine splitting of the signal levels leads to an asymmetry in the spectral profile of the water vapor maser line at a frequency of 22.235 GHz. We show that the gain profile asymmetry must lead to an enhanced brightness of the blueshifted high-velocity emission features compared to the redshifted ones. Such a situation is observed in the source UGC 3789.

  8. Galactic-scale civilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  9. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  10. Spitzer IRS Observations of the Galactic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Spitzer IRS R ∼ 600 spectra (10 - 38 μm) of 38 positions in the Galactic Center (GC), all at the same Galactic longitude of and including the Arches Cluster. Our positions include the Arched Filaments, regions near the Quintuplet Cluster, the ''Bubble'' lying along the same line-of-sight as the molecular cloud MO.13-0.13, and the diffuse interstellar gas along the line of sight at higher Galactic latitudes. From measurements of the [O IV], [Ne II], [Ne III], [Si II], [S III], [Fe II], [Fe III], and H2 S(0), S(1), and S(2) lines we determine the gas excitation and ionic abundance ratios. The main source of excitation is photoionization, with the Arches Cluster ionizing the Arched Filaments and the Quintuplet Cluster ionizing the gas nearby and at lower Galactic latitudes including the far side of the Bubble. In addition, strong shocks ionize gas to O+3 and destroy dust grains, releasing iron into the interstellar medium (ISM); the shock effects are particularly noticeable in the center of the Bubble but the highly ionized gas is present in all positions. The H2 lines are formed both in photodissociation regions in the GC and along the line of sight to the GC

  11. Quintessence at Galactic Level?

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, T.; Guzman, F. S.

    2000-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed that the main contributor to the dark energy of the Universe is a dynamical, slow evolving, spatially inhomogeneous scalar field called quintessence. We investigate the behavior of this scalar field at galactic level by assuming that it is the dark matter compossing the halos of galaxies. Using an exact solution of the Einstein's equations we find an excellent concordance between our results and observations.

  12. GALACTIC AND EXTRAGALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AS SITES OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Sasaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernova remnants, owing to their strong shock waves, are likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Studies of supernova remnants in X-rays and gamma rays provide us with new insights into the acceleration of particles to high energies. This paper reviews the basic physics of supernova remnant shocks and associated particle acceleration and radiation processes. In addition, the study of supernova remnant populations in nearby galaxies and the implications for Galactic cosmic ray distribution are discussed.

  13. TANAMI - Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Cornelia; Kadler, Matthias; Ojha, Roopesh; De Boeck, M.; Booth, R.; Dutka, M. S.; Edwardsk, P.; Fey, A. L.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Johnston, K.J.; Katz, U.; Lister, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a summary of the observation strategy of TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry), a monitoring program to study the parsec-scale structure and dynamics of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the Southern Hemisphere with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the trans-oceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek, TIGO, and O'Higgins. TANAMI is focusing on extragalactic sources south of -30 degrees declination with observations a...

  14. Origin of Enigmatic Galactic-center Filaments Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Twenty years ago, astronomers discovered a number of enigmatic radio-emitting filaments concentrated near the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. These features initially defied explanation, but a new study of radio images of the Galactic center may point to their possible source. By combining data from the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) astronomer Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University has found evidence that at least some of the filaments spring from the concentrated star-formation regions that populate the Galactic center. Galatic Center Combined VLA and GBT image (green) of the Galactic center, with red inset of GBT data only (red). Bright region on right is location of supermassive black hole. Linear filaments are visible above this area. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Yusef-Zadeh, et.al. (Click on Image for Larger Version) Yusef-Zadeh presented his findings at the Denver, Colorado, meeting of the American Astronomical Society. William Cotton of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Virginia, and William Hewitt of Northwestern University also contributed to this research. "Astronomers have long puzzled over the cause of these striking features," said Yusef-Zadeh, "and the turbulent nature of the Galactic center has made detailed analysis difficult. With new multi-wavelength radio images of the Galactic center, however, we can finally see a link between areas of starburst activity and these long-linear filaments." The filaments, which range from 10 to 100 light-years in length and are perhaps little more than 1 to 3 light-years across, occur only in a very narrow area, within approximately two degrees of the Galactic center (which translates to approximately 900 light-years across). Early theories about the origin of these filaments suggested that they were somehow related to the Milky Way’s own magnetic field. This was due to the fact that the first filaments detected

  15. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  16. Bubbles in galactic haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Shchekinov, Yu A; Schröer, A; Steinacker, A; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2001-01-01

    We briefly discuss a possible interconnection of vertical HI structures observed in the Milky Way Galaxy with large scale blow-outs caused by the explosions of multiple clustered SNe. We argue that the observed OB associations can produce only about 60 such events, or approximately one chimney per 3 kpc$^2$ within the solar circle. We also discuss the overall properties of HI shells in nearby face-on galaxies and the distribution of H$\\alpha$ and dust in edge-on galaxies. We argue that the presence of dust in galactic haloes may indicate that radiation pressure is the most probable mechanism capable of transporting dust to large heights above the galactic plane. In order to make this possible, the galactic magnetic field must have a strong vertical component. We mention that SNe explosions can initiate the Parker instability which in turn creates large scale magnetic loops with a strong vertical component. Recent observations of nearby edge-on galaxies favour this suggestion.

  17. On minor black holes in galactic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Yaqoob, Tahir; Winter, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Small and intermediate mass black holes should be expected in galactic nuclei as a result of stellar evolution, minor mergers and gravitational dynamical friction. If these minor black holes accrete as X-ray binaries or ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and are associated with star formation, they could account for observations of many low luminosity AGN or LINERs. Accreting and inspiralling intermediate mass black holes could provide a crucial electromagnetic counterpart to strong gravitational ...

  18. Search for Compton-backscattered annihilation radiation from the galactic center with the OSSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Leventhal, M.; Gehrels, N.; Tueller, J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M . S.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Purcell, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An emission feature near 170 keV, interpreted as Compton-backscattered 511 keV positron-annihilation radiation, has been reported twice by balloon-borne germanium spectrometers from within approximately 15 deg of the Galactic center (Leventhal, MacCallum, & Stang 1978; Smith et al. 1993). Upper limits on this feature set by HEAO 3 (Mahoney, Ling, & Wheaton 1993) and other instruments indicate that it must be transient. We have searched data from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) for this feature, using daily spectral accumulations from all pointings near the Galactic center up to 1993 August, and covering most of the region viewed by the balloon instruments. We find no evidence for backscatter emission. Under the hypothesis that the source is 1E 1740.7-2942, the OSSE data set (186 days) disagrees with the balloon measurements with 99.3% confidence. The average daily 3 sigma OSSE upper limit on bakscatter flux from 1E 1740.7-2942 is 6.8 x 10(exp -4) photons/sq cm/s, compared to the 1.3 x 10(exp -3) photons/sq cm reported by the balloon observations. We also saw no evidence in 186 days for linelike emission from the point source EXS 1737.9-2952 recently discovered by Grindlay, Covault, & Manandhar (1993). This source exhibited bright emission from 83-111 keV, which has been interpreted as doubly backscattered 511 keV radiation. The average daily 3 sigma upper limit from OSSE for this line is 9.8 x 10(exp -4) photons/sq cm/s, or approximately 8% of the reported flux.

  19. All things bright and beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    'All Things Bright and Beautiful' was exhibited in 20/21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe, which is sited in a 'redundant' church. The fundamental question that the exhibition explored concerned the role of 'the animal' within contemporary art and within secular society, which in turn hoped to prompt reflections on our understanding of the place of 'the human' in the world and in nature. If there is no divine order, as posited by the hymn 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', where does this leave...

  20. [C II] absorption and emission in the diffuse interstellar medium across the Galactic plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, M.; Ruaud, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gusdorf, A.; Godard, B.; de Luca, M.; Falgarone, E.; Goldsmith, P.; Lis, D. C.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D.; Phillips, T. G.; Liszt, H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Ionized carbon is the main gas-phase reservoir of carbon in the neutral diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and its 158 μm fine structure transition [C ii] is the most important cooling line of the diffuse ISM. We combine [C ii] absorption and emission spectroscopy to gain an improved understanding of physical conditions in the different phases of the ISM. Methods: We present high-resolution [C ii] spectra obtained with the Herschel/HIFI instrument towards bright dust continuum regions in the Galactic plane, probing simultaneously the diffuse gas along the line of sight and the background high-mass star forming regions. These data are complemented by single pointings in the 492 and 809 GHz fine structure lines of atomic carbon and by medium spectral resolution spectral maps of the fine structure lines of atomic oxygen at 63 and 145 μm with Herschel/PACS. Results: We show that the presence of foreground absorption may completely cancel the emission from the background source in medium spectral resolution PACS data and that high spectral resolution spectra are needed to interpret the [C ii] and [O i] emission and the [C ii]/FIR ratio. This phenomenon may explain part of the [C ii]/FIR deficit seen in external luminous infrared galaxies where the bright emission from the nuclear regions may be partially canceled by absorption from diffuse gas in the foreground. The C+ and C excitation in the diffuse gas is consistent with a median pressure of ~5900 K cm-3 for a mean kinetic temperature of ~100 K. A few higher pressure regions are detected along the lines of sight, as emission features in both fine structure lines of atomic carbon. The knowledge of the gas density allows us to determine the filling factor of the absorbing gas along the selected lines of sight. The derived median value of the filling factor is 2.4%, in good agreement with the properties of the Galactic cold neutral medium. The mean excitation temperature is used to derive the average cooling due