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Sample records for bright field cell

  1. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration.

  2. Bright field microscopy as an alternative to whole cell fluorescence in automated analysis of macrophage images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Selinummi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity. METHODOLOGY: We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells. SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining.

  3. Automatic Cell Detection in Bright-Field Microscope Images Using SIFT, Random Forests, and Hierarchical Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mualla, Firas; Scholl, Simon; Sommerfeldt, Bjorn; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel machine learning-based system for unstained cell detection in bright-field microscope images. The system is fully automatic since it requires no manual parameter tuning. It is also highly invariant with respect to illumination conditions and to the size and orientation of cells. Images from two adherent cell lines and one suspension cell line were used in the evaluation for a total number of more than 3500 cells. Besides real images, simulated images were also used in the evaluation. The detection error was between approximately zero and 15.5% which is a significantly superior performance compared to baseline approaches.

  4. Super-resolved 3-D imaging of live cells organelles from bright-field photon transmission micrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Rychtarikova, Renata; Shi, Kevin; Malakhova, Daria; Machacek, Petr; Smaha, Rebecca; Urban, Jan; Stys, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Current biological and medical research is aimed at obtaining a detailed spatiotemporal map of a live cell's interior to describe and predict cell's physiological state. We present here an algorithm for complete 3-D modelling of cellular structures from a z-stack of images obtained using label-free wide-field bright-field light-transmitted microscopy. The method visualizes 3-D objects with a volume equivalent to the area of a camera pixel multiplied by the z-height. The computation is based on finding pixels of unchanged intensities between two consecutive images of an object spread function. These pixels represent strongly light-diffracting, light-absorbing, or light-emitting objects. To accomplish this, variables derived from R\\'{e}nyi entropy are used to suppress camera noise. Using this algorithm, the detection limit of objects is only limited by the technical specifications of the microscope setup--we achieve the detection of objects of the size of one camera pixel. This method allows us to obtain 3-D re...

  5. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  6. Removing lateral chromatic aberration in bright field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Altamirano, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2015-06-01

    We present an efficient alternative to remove lateral chromatic aberration (LCA) in bright field light microscopy images. Our procedure is based on error calibration using time-sequential acquisition at different wavelengths, and error correction through digital image warping. Measurement of the displacements of fiducial marks in the red and green images relative to blue provide calibration factors that are subsequently used in test images to realign color channels digitally. We demonstrate quantitative improvement in the position and boundaries of objects in target slides and in the color content and morphology of specimens in stained biological samples. Our results show a reduction of LCA content below the 0.1% level.

  7. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    cytotoxic upon appropriate activation. These cells were shown to play a role in different disease states, such as cancer, autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and infection. Although their phenotype and functional properties are well known and have been extensively studied, their lineage relationship with other...

  8. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  9. Graphical Methods for Quantifying Macromolecules through Bright Field Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hang; DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Tlsty, Thea D.; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-08-14

    Bright ?eld imaging of biological samples stained with antibodies and/or special stains provides a rapid protocol for visualizing various macromolecules. However, this method of sample staining and imaging is rarely employed for direct quantitative analysis due to variations in sample fixations, ambiguities introduced by color composition, and the limited dynamic range of imaging instruments. We demonstrate that, through the decomposition of color signals, staining can be scored on a cell-by-cell basis. We have applied our method to Flbroblasts grown from histologically normal breast tissue biopsies obtained from two distinct populations. Initially, nuclear regions are segmented through conversion of color images into gray scale, and detection of dark elliptic features. Subsequently, the strength of staining is quanti?ed by a color decomposition model that is optimized by a graph cut algorithm. In rare cases where nuclear signal is significantly altered as a result of samplepreparation, nuclear segmentation can be validated and corrected. Finally, segmented stained patterns are associated with each nuclear region following region-based tessellation. Compared to classical non-negative matrix factorization, proposed method (i) improves color decomposition, (ii) has a better noise immunity, (iii) is more invariant to initial conditions, and (iv) has a superior computing performance

  10. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-02-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures.

  11. Dual-color ultrasensitive bright-field RNA in situ hybridization with RNAscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Su, Nan; Wang, Li-Chong; Wu, Xingyong; Bui, Son; Nielsen, Allissa; Vo, Hong-Thuy; Luo, Yuling; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) techniques have been important to the study of gene expression signatures in cells and tissues. The ability to detect multiple targets simultaneously is especially valuable, since it allows dissecting gene expression of distinct cell types with precise cellular and subcellular resolution within morphological context. Recently, we have reported using a novel dual-color ultrasensitive bright-field RNA in situ hybridization for detection of clonally restricted immunoglobulin light chain mRNA expression in B cell lymphomas. Here, we present detailed protocols of RNAscope 2-Plex assays for FFPE tissue sections. The protocols describe the tissue preparation, pretreatment, probe hybridization, signal amplification, visualization, and analysis, as well as emphasize the critical steps for ensuring successful staining.

  12. Solar velocity field determined tracking coronal bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajša, R.; Sudar, D.; Skokić, I.; Saar, S. H.; Žic, T.

    Preliminary data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrumenton board Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite were used to determine solar differential rotation and related phenomena. A segmentation algorithm, which uses multiple AIA channels in search for intensity enhancements in EUV and X-ray parts of the spectrum compared to the background intensity, was applied to obtain positional information of coronal bright points (CBPs). More than 60000 position measurements of more than 10000 identified CBPs from the period 1 - 2 January 2011 were analyzed. Rotational and meridional velocities were determined by tracking identified CBPs and various filters were used to exclude erroneous results. Also, proper motions of CBPs were calculated from rotation velocity residuals and meridional velocities. Proper motions of CBPs were investigated using a random walk model and the diffusion constant was calculated. These results were compared with the previous ones obtained by other instruments and methods (especially with the SOHO-EIT and Hinode data) and a striking agreement of the obtained diffusion constant with results from other studies was found.

  13. Self-deflection of bright soliton in a separate bright-dark screening soliton pair based on higher-order space charge field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Hao(郝中华); Jinsong Liu(刘劲松)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the interaction of the separate soliton pair, the self-deflection of the bright screening soliton in a bright-dark pair is studied by taking the higher order space charge field into account. Both numerical and analytical methods are adopted to obtain the result that the higher order of space charge field can enhance the deflection process of the bright soliton and varying the peak intensity of the dark soliton can influence the self-deflection strongly. The expression of the deflection distance with the dark soliton's peak intensity is derived, and some corresponding properties of the self-deflection process are figured out.

  14. Organization Theory: Bright Prospects for a Permanently Failing Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOrganization theory is a paradoxical field of scientific inquiry. It has struggled for more than fifty years to develop a unified theory of organizational effectiveness under girded by a coherent set of assumptions, and it has thus far failed to produce one. Yet, by other standards it is

  15. Dynamics of annular bright field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    We explore the dynamics of image formation in the so-called annular bright field mode in scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereby an annular detector is used with detector collection range lying within the cone of illumination, i.e. the bright field region. We show that this imaging mode allows us to reliably image both light and heavy columns over a range of thickness and defocus values, and we explain the contrast mechanisms involved. The role of probe and detector aperture sizes is considered, as is the sensitivity of the method to intercolumn spacing and local disorder.

  16. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  17. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  18. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Miao, Jingqi [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sato, Yaeko [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mikata, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shogo [Faculty of Education, Miyagi University of Education, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Physics, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Sato, Shuji [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ∼90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ∼30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  19. Bright and durable field emission source derived from refractory taylor cones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2016-12-20

    A method of producing field emitters having improved brightness and durability relying on the creation of a liquid Taylor cone from electrically conductive materials having high melting points. The method calls for melting the end of a wire substrate with a focused laser beam, while imposing a high positive potential on the material. The resulting molten Taylor cone is subsequently rapidly quenched by cessation of the laser power. Rapid quenching is facilitated in large part by radiative cooling, resulting in structures having characteristics closely matching that of the original liquid Taylor cone. Frozen Taylor cones thus obtained yield desirable tip end forms for field emission sources in electron beam applications. Regeneration of the frozen Taylor cones in-situ is readily accomplished by repeating the initial formation procedures. The high temperature liquid Taylor cones can also be employed as bright ion sources with chemical elements previously considered impractical to implement.

  20. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Suran, Swathi; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2015-01-01

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of ...

  1. Automated Analysis and Classification of Infected Macrophages Using Bright-Field Amplitude Contrast Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    we propose  a  sequential  set of  techniques  that will  convert  the bright  field  cytological   image  data  into  relatively high  contrast...purchased from Biological Specialty Corporation (BSC). Monocytes were shipped on dry ice and immediately placed in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for storage

  2. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-Rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    CERN Document Server

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHKs) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim), and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 uG, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 uG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV radiation induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip, and thus increases the str...

  3. Near-Field Analysis of Bright and Dark Modes on Plasmonic Metasurfaces Showing Extraordinary Suppressed Transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Dobmann, Sabine; Ploss, Daniel; Peschel, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic metasurfaces are investigated that consist of a sub wavelength line pattern in an ultrathin (~ 10 nm) silver film, designed for extraordinarily suppressed transmission (EOST) in the visible spectral range. Measurements with a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) demonstrate that far field irradiation creates resonant excitations of antenna like (bright) modes that are localized on the metal ridges. In contrast, bound (dark) surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched from an NSOM tip propagate well across the metasurface, preferentially perpendicular to the grating lines.

  4. On the relationship between G-band bright point dynamics and their magnetic field strengths

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yunfei; Ji, Kaifan; Feng, Song; Deng, Hui; Wang, Feng; Lin, Jiaben

    2016-01-01

    G-band bright points (GBPs) are regarded as good manifestations of magnetic flux concentrations. We aim to investigate the relationship between the dynamic properties of GBPs and their longitudinal magnetic field strengths. High spatial and temporal resolution observations were recorded simultaneously with G-band filtergrams and Narrow-band Filter Imager (NFI) Stokes I and V images with Hinode /Solar Optical Telescope. The GBPs are identified and tracked in the G-band images automatically, and the corresponding longitudinal magnetic field strength of each GBP is extracted from the calibrated NFI magnetograms by a point-to-point method. After categorizing the GBPs into five groups by their longitudinal magnetic field strengths, we analyze the dynamics of GBPs of each group. The results suggest that with increasing longitudinal magnetic field strengths of GBPs correspond to a decrease in their horizontal velocities and motion ranges as well as by showing more complicated motion paths. This suggests that magneti...

  5. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R; Gainer, Christian F; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  6. Controlling the transition of bright and dark states via scanning dressing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiying; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Yiqi; Sun, Jia; Li, Changbiao; Huang, Gaoping; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-03-01

    We report the transitions between the bright and dark states of singly-dressed four-wave mixing (FWM) and doubly-dressed FWMs, and the corresponding probe transmissions by scanning the dressing field frequency detuning in a five-level atomic system. Moreover, doubly-dressed six-wave mixing with avoided-crossing plots and triple-dressed eight-wave mixing with the comparison of scanning probe field and dressing field are studied. Such controlled transitions of the nonlinear optical signals can be realizable not only in atomic vapors but also in solid medium. The investigations maybe have potential applications in optical communication, quantum information processing and optoelectronic devices, and maybe also provide a sensitive probe method to study the dressing effect.

  7. Dispersal of G-band bright points at different longitudinal magnetic field strengths

    CERN Document Server

    Yunfei, Yang; Song, Feng; Hui, Deng; Feng, Wang; Jiaben, Lin

    2015-01-01

    G-band bright points (GBPs) are thought to be the foot-points of magnetic flux tubes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the relation between the diffusion regimes of GBPs and the associated longitudinal magnetic field strengths. Two high resolution observations of different magnetized environments were acquired with the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope. Each observation was recorded simultaneously with G-band filtergrams and Narrow-band Filter Imager (NFI) Stokes I and V images. GBPs are identified and tracked automatically, and then categorized into several groups by their longitudinal magnetic field strengths, which are extracted from the calibrated NFI magnetograms using a point-by-point method. The Lagrangian approach and the distribution of diffusion indices approach are adopted separately to explore the diffusion regime of GBPs for each group. It is found that the values of diffusion index and diffusion coefficient both decrease exponentially with the increasing longitudinal magnetic field strengths...

  8. Next Generation High Brightness Electron Beams From Ultra-High Field Cryogenic Radiofrequency Photocathode Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenzweig, J B; Dolgashev, V; Emma, C; Fukusawa, A; Li, R; Limborg, C; Maxson, J; Musumeci, P; Nause, A; Pakter, R; Pompili, R; Roussel, R; Spataro, B; Tantawi, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of the performance of radio-frequency (RF) copper structures operated at cryogenic temperatures have shown a dramatic increase in the maximum surface electric field that may be reached. We propose to utilize this development to enable a new generation of photoinjectors operated at cryogenic temperatures that may attain, through enhancement of the launch field at the photocathode by a factor of four, well over an order of magnitude increase in peak electron beam brightness. We present detailed studies of the beam dynamics associated with such a system, concentrating on an emittance-compensated S-band photoinjector that may directly substitute that of the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser. We show in this case that the increase in brightness leads directly to a factor of two reduction in gain length, with attendant increase in X-ray radiative efficiency. Extreme low emittance scenarios obtained at low operating charge, appropriate for dramatically pushing performance limits of ultrafast electron dif...

  9. Bright-Field Imaging and Optical Coherence Tomography of the Mouse Posterior Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Mark P; Xiao, Mei; Sheppard, Keith; Hicks, Wanda; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive live imaging has been used extensively for ocular phenotyping in mouse vision research. Bright-field imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two methods that are particularly useful for assessing the posterior mouse eye (fundus), including the retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid, and are widely applied due to the commercial availability of sophisticated instruments and software. Here, we provide a guide to using these approaches with an emphasis on post-acquisition image processing using Fiji, a bundled version of the Java-based public domain software ImageJ. A bright-field fundus imaging protocol is described for acquisition of multi-frame videos, followed by image registration to reduce motion artifacts, averaging to reduce noise, shading correction to compensate for uneven illumination, filtering to improve image detail, and rotation to adjust orientation. An OCT imaging protocol is described for acquiring replicate volume scans, with subsequent registration and averaging to yield three-dimensional datasets that show reduced motion artifacts and enhanced detail. The Fiji algorithms used in these protocols are designed for batch processing and are freely available. The image acquisition and processing approaches described here may facilitate quantitative phenotyping of the mouse eye in drug discovery, mutagenesis screening, and the functional cataloging of mouse genes by individual laboratories and large-scale projects, such as the Knockout Mouse Phenotyping Project and International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

  10. Effects of Magnetic Field and FUV Radiation on the Structures of Bright-rimmed Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Shang, Hsien; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The bright-rimmed cloud SFO 22 was observed with the 45 m telescope of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in the ^{12}CO (J = 1-0), ^{13}CO (J = 1-0), and C^{18}O (J = 1-0) lines, where well-developed head-tail structure and small line widths were found. Such features were predicted by radiation-driven implosion models, suggesting that SFO 22 may be in a quasi-stationary equilibrium state. We compare the observed properties with those from numerical models of a photo-evaporating cloud, which include effects of magnetic pressure and heating due to strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from an exciting star. The magnetic pressure may play a more important role in the density structures of bright-rimmed clouds, than the thermal pressure that is enhanced by the FUV radiation. The FUV radiation can heat the cloud surface to near 30 K, however, its effect is not enough to reproduce the observed density structure of SFO 22. An initial magnetic field of 5 \\mu G in our numerical models produces the best agreement with the ob...

  11. The discovery of seven extremely low surface brightness galaxies in the field of the nearby spiral galaxy M101

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are a key probe of dark matter and of galaxy formation on small scales and of the dark matter halo masses of their central galaxies. They have very low surface brightness, which makes it difficult to identify and study them outside of the Local Group. We used a low surface brightness-optimized telescope, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, to search for dwarf galaxies in the field of the massive spiral galaxy M101. We identify seven large, low surface brightness objects in this field, with effective radii of \\(10 - 30\\) arcseconds and central surface brightnesses of \\(\\mu_{g} \\sim 25.5 - 27.5\\) mag arcsec\\(^{-2}\\). Given their large apparent sizes and low surface brightnesses, these objects would likely be missed by standard galaxy searches in deep fields. Assuming the galaxies are dwarf satellites of M101, their absolute magnitudes are in the range \\(-11.6 \\lesssim M_{V} \\lesssim -9.3\\) and their effective radii are \\(350\\) pc \\(-\\) \\(1.3\\) kpc. Their radial surface brightness profiles ar...

  12. Prospects for lithium imaging using annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott@sigma.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Lugg, N.R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    There is strong interest in lithium imaging, particularly because of its significance in battery materials. However, light atoms only scatter electrons weakly and atomic resolution direct imaging of lithium has proven difficult. This paper explores theoretically the conditions under which lithium columns can be expected to be directly visible using annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy. A detailed discussion is given of the controllable parameters and the conditions most favourable for lithium imaging. -- Highlights: {yields} Optimum conditions to image Li columns in Li-bearing materials with ABF are explored. {yields} Higher accelerating voltages give better contrast at a given resolution. {yields} Aperture size must compromise between resolution and good coupling to the column. {yields} Samples with small along-column interatomic spacing between Li atoms are best. {yields} The trends observed are consistent with prediction based on the s-state model.

  13. Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry in Bright Field Mode for Thin Film Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Priscila M.; Ruz, Jose J.; Malvar, Oscar; Encinar, Mario; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Thickness characterization of thin films is of primary importance in a variety of nanotechnology applications, either in the semiconductor industry, quality control in nanofabrication processes or engineering of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because small thickness variability can strongly compromise the device performance. Here, we present an alternative optical method in bright field mode called Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry that allows rapid and non-destructive characterization of thin films over areas of mm2 and with 1 μm of lateral resolution. We demonstrate an accuracy of 0.1% in the thickness characterization through measurements performed on four microcantilevers that expand an area of 1.8 mm2 in one minute of analysis time. The measured thickness variation in the range of few tens of nm translates into a mechanical variability that produces an error of up to 2% in the response of the studied devices when they are used to measure surface stress variations. PMID:27338398

  14. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  15. Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry in Bright Field Mode for Thin Film Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Pini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thickness characterization of thin films is of primary importance in a variety of nanotechnology applications, either in the semiconductor industry, quality control in nanofabrication processes or engineering of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS because small thickness variability can strongly compromise the device performance. Here, we present an alternative optical method in bright field mode called Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry that allows rapid and non-destructive characterization of thin films over areas of mm2 and with 1 μm of lateral resolution. We demonstrate an accuracy of 0.1% in the thickness characterization through measurements performed on four microcantilevers that expand an area of 1.8 mm2 in one minute of analysis time. The measured thickness variation in the range of few tens of nm translates into a mechanical variability that produces an error of up to 2% in the response of the studied devices when they are used to measure surface stress variations.

  16. Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry in Bright Field Mode for Thin Film Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Priscila M; Ruz, Jose J; Malvar, Oscar; Encinar, Mario; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2016-06-21

    Thickness characterization of thin films is of primary importance in a variety of nanotechnology applications, either in the semiconductor industry, quality control in nanofabrication processes or engineering of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because small thickness variability can strongly compromise the device performance. Here, we present an alternative optical method in bright field mode called Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry that allows rapid and non-destructive characterization of thin films over areas of mm² and with 1 μm of lateral resolution. We demonstrate an accuracy of 0.1% in the thickness characterization through measurements performed on four microcantilevers that expand an area of 1.8 mm² in one minute of analysis time. The measured thickness variation in the range of few tens of nm translates into a mechanical variability that produces an error of up to 2% in the response of the studied devices when they are used to measure surface stress variations.

  17. Blue Laser Imaging-Bright Improves Endoscopic Recognition of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tomie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endoscopic recognition of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC using four different methods (Olympus white light imaging (O-WLI, Fujifilm white light imaging (F-WLI, narrow band imaging (NBI, and blue laser imaging- (BLI- bright. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 superficial ESCCs that had been examined using the four different methods. Subjective evaluation was provided by three endoscopists as a ranking score (RS of each image based on the ease of detection of the cancerous area. For the objective evaluation we calculated the color difference scores (CDS between the cancerous and noncancerous areas with each of the four methods. Results. There was no difference between the mean RS of O-WLI and F-WLI. The mean RS of NBI was significantly higher than that of O-WLI and that of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of F-WLI. Moreover, the mean RS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of NBI. Furthermore, in the objective evaluation, the mean CDS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of O-WLI, F-WLI, and NBI. Conclusion. The recognition of superficial ESCC using BLI-bright was more efficacious than the other methods tested both subjectively and objectively.

  18. Blue Laser Imaging-Bright Improves Endoscopic Recognition of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomie, Akira; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kitae, Hiroaki; Majima, Atsushi; Horii, Yusuke; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Onozawa, Yuriko; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kimura-Tsuchiya, Reiko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endoscopic recognition of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) using four different methods (Olympus white light imaging (O-WLI), Fujifilm white light imaging (F-WLI), narrow band imaging (NBI), and blue laser imaging- (BLI-) bright). Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 superficial ESCCs that had been examined using the four different methods. Subjective evaluation was provided by three endoscopists as a ranking score (RS) of each image based on the ease of detection of the cancerous area. For the objective evaluation we calculated the color difference scores (CDS) between the cancerous and noncancerous areas with each of the four methods. Results. There was no difference between the mean RS of O-WLI and F-WLI. The mean RS of NBI was significantly higher than that of O-WLI and that of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of F-WLI. Moreover, the mean RS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of NBI. Furthermore, in the objective evaluation, the mean CDS of BLI-bright was significantly higher than that of O-WLI, F-WLI, and NBI. Conclusion. The recognition of superficial ESCC using BLI-bright was more efficacious than the other methods tested both subjectively and objectively. PMID:27738428

  19. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Quantum Dynamics of Dark and Dark-Bright Solitons beyond the Mean-Field Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krönke, Sven; Schmelcher, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Dark solitons are well-known excitations in one-dimensional repulsively interacting Bose-Einstein condensates, which feature a characteristical phase-jump across a density dip and form stability in the course of their dynamics. While these objects are stable within the celebrated Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field theory, the situation changes dramatically in the full many-body description: The condensate being initially in a dark soliton state dynamically depletes and the density notch fills up with depleted atoms. We analyze this process in detail with a particular focus on two-body correlations and the fate of grey solitons (dark solitons with finite density in the notch) and thereby complement the existing results in the literature. Moreover, we extend these studies to mixtures of two repulsively interacting bosonic species with a dark-bright soliton (dark soliton in one component filled with localized atoms of the other component) as the initial state. All these many-body quantum dynamics simulations are carried out with the recently developed multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (ML-MCTDHB).

  1. Exploring combined dark and bright field illumination to improve the detection of defects on specular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Paulo M. F.; Felgueiras, P. E. R.; Ferreira, Flávio P.; Sousa, M. A.; Nunes-Pereira, Eduardo J.; Bret, Boris P. J.; Belsley, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    An automatic optical inspection system for detecting local defects on specular surfaces is presented. The system uses an image display to produce a sequence of structured diffuse illumination patterns and a digital camera to acquire the corresponding sequence of images. An image enhancement algorithm, which measures the local intensity variations between bright- and dark-field illumination conditions, yields a final image in which the defects are revealed with a high contrast. Subsequently, an image segmentation algorithm, which compares statistically the enhanced image of the inspected surface with the corresponding image for a defect-free template, allows separating defects from non-defects with an adjusting decision threshold. The method can be applied to shiny surfaces of any material including metal, plastic and glass. The described method was tested on the plastic surface of a car dashboard system. We were able to detect not only scratches but also dust and fingerprints. In our experiment we observed a detection contrast increase from about 40%, when using an extended light source, to more than 90% when using a structured light source. The presented method is simple, robust and can be carried out with short cycle times, making it appropriate for applications in industrial environments.

  2. Characteristics of a high brightness gaseous field ion source employing tungsten-carbon doped NiAl needles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, P.O. Box 7, Al-Karak (Jordan)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the characterization of a high brightness gaseous field ion source using an emitter made of a NiAl needle containing tiny spherical tungsten-carbon precipitates. By field evaporation of such a multiphase alloy, a surface protrusion is formed out of a precipitate, which can act as a small source size field ion emitter. The emission current-voltage characteristics of this emitter were recorded for a variety of parameters. The results obtained suggest that its application as a stable ion source is possible even on long term operation. -- Research highlights: {yields} High brightness gaseous field ion source of precipitation hardened NiAl+W+C emitter. {yields} Emission current-voltage characteristics are recorded for a variety of parameters. {yields} Very small virtual source sizes and energy spreads can be attained. {yields} Results suggest that application as long term stable ion source is possible.

  3. Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High Resolution Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial SOT spectropolarimeter and XRT coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the contentious issue of the relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray intensity. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data are used for this study. We find that there is no pixel-to-pixel correlation between the observed loop brightness and magnetic quantities. However, the X-ray brightness is well correlated with the integrated magnetic quantities such as total unsigned magnetic flux, total unsigned vertical current, area integrated square of the vertical magnetic field and horizontal magnetic fields. Comparing all these quantities we find that the total magnetic flux correlates well with the observed integrated X-ray brightness, though there is some differences in the strength of the correlation when we use the X-ray data from different filters. While we get a good correlation between X-ray brightness and total unsigned vertic...

  4. Ovarian cancer stem cells are enriched in side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase bright overlapping population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Yasuda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiaiting cells (CICs are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity, differentiation potential and high tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs of ovarian cancer have been isolated by side population (SP analysis, ALDEFLUOR assay and using cell surface markers. However, these approaches are not definitive markers for CSCs/CICs, and it is necessary to refine recent methods for identifying more highly purified CSCs/CICs. In this study, we analyzed SP cells and aldehyde dehydrogenese bright (ALDH(Br cells from ovarian cancer cells. Both SP cells and ALDH(Br cells exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability and higher expression level of a stem cell marker, sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2, than those of main population (MP cells and ALDH(Low cells, respectively. We analyzed an SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population (SP/ALDH(Br, and the SP/ALDH(Br population exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability than that of SP cells or ALDH(Br cells, enabling initiation of tumor with as few as 10(2 cells. Furthermore, SP/ADLH(Br population showed higher sphere-forming ability, cisplatin resistance, adipocyte differentiation ability and expression of SOX2 than those of SP/ALDH(Low, MP/ALDH(Br and MP/ALDH(Low cells. Gene knockdown of SOX2 suppressed the tumor-initiation of ovarian cancer cells. An SP/ALDH(Br population was detected in several gynecological cancer cells with ratios of 0.1% for HEC-1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma cells to 1% for MCAS ovary mucinous adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, use of the SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population is a promising approach to isolate highly purified CSCs/CICs and SOX2 might be a novel functional marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs.

  5. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  6. Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from One Novel CD64brightCD31brightCD14neg Population in Human Adult Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barachini, Serena; Montali, Marina; Carnicelli, Vittoria; Fazzi, Rita; Parchi, Paolo; Petrini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been the object of extensive research for decades, due to their intrinsic clinical value. Nonetheless, the unambiguous identification of a unique in vivo MSC progenitor is still lacking, and the hypothesis that these multipotent cells could possibly arise from different in vivo precursors has been gaining consensus in the last years. We identified a novel multipotent cell population in human adult bone marrow that we first named Mesodermal Progenitor Cells (MPCs) for the ability to differentiate toward the mesenchymal lineage, while still retaining angiogenic potential. Despite extensive characterization, MPCs positioning within the differentiation pathway and whether they can be ascribed as possible distinctive progenitor of the MSC lineage is still unclear. In this study, we describe the ex vivo isolation of one novel bone marrow subpopulation (Pop#8) with the ability to generate MPCs. Multicolor flow cytometry in combination with either fluorescence-activated cell sorting or magnetic-activated cell sorting were applied to characterize Pop#8 as CD64brightCD31brightCD14neg. We defined Pop#8 properties in culture, including the potential of Pop#8-derived MPCs to differentiate into MSCs. Gene expression data were suggestive of Pop#8 in vivo involvement in hematopoietic stem cell niche constitution/maintenance. Pop#8 resulted over three logs more frequent than other putative MSC progenitors, corroborating the idea that most of the controversies regarding culture-expanded MSCs could be the consequence of different culture conditions that select or promote particular subpopulations of precursors. PMID:26975798

  7. Evaluating the summer night sky brightness at a research field site on Lake Stechlin in northeastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jechow, Andreas; Hölker, Franz; Kolláth, Zoltán; Gessner, Mark O.; Kyba, Christopher C. M.

    2016-09-01

    We report luminance measurements of the summer night sky at a field site on a freshwater lake in northeastern Germany (Lake Stechlin) to evaluate the amount of artificial skyglow from nearby and distant towns in the context of a planned study on light pollution. The site is located about 70 km north of Berlin in a rural area possibly belonging to one of the darkest regions in Germany. Continuous monitoring of the zenith sky luminance between June and September 2015 was conducted utilizing a Sky Quality Meter. With this device, typical values for clear nights in the range of 21.5-21.7 magSQM/arcsec2 were measured, which is on the order of the natural sky brightness during starry nights. On overcast nights, values down to 22.84 magSQM/arcsec2 were obtained, which is about one third as bright as on clear nights. The luminance measured on clear nights as well as the darkening with the presence of clouds indicates that there is very little influence of artificial skyglow on the zenith sky brightness at this location. Furthermore, fish-eye lens sky imaging luminance photometry was performed with a digital single-lens reflex camera on a clear night in the absence of moonlight. The photographs unravel several distant towns as possible sources of light pollution on the horizon. However, the low level of artificial skyglow makes the field site at Lake Stechlin an excellent location to study the effects of skyglow on a lake ecosystem in a controlled fashion.

  8. High brightness three-dimensional light field display based on the aspheric substrate Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Cao, Xuemei; Chen, Zhidong; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    The brightness and viewing field of the reproductive three-dimensional (3D) image are crucial factors to realize a comfortable 3D perception for the light field display based on the liquid crystal device (LCD). To improve the illuminance of 3D image with sub-image-units with small aperture angles and enlarge the viewing field, the illuminance of the Fresnel-lens combining with the sub-images on LCD is analyzed and designed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the Fresnel-lens-array with eccentric pupil(FAEP) can address above problems. A 3D light field display based on LCD with FAEP and directional diffuser screen are used to reconstruct the target 3D field. 25 parallax sub-images are projected to the directional diffuser screen to verify the improvement of illuminance and viewing field. To reduce eccentric aberration introduced by eccentric pupil, a novel structure of Fresnel-lens-array is presented to reduce the aberration. The illuminance and viewing field are well promoted at the same time. 3D image with the high quality can be achieved.

  9. HIDES spectroscopy of bright detached eclipsing binaries from the Kepler field - I. Single-lined objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Sybilski, P.; Ratajczak, M.; Maehara, H.; Konacki, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of our spectroscopic observations of nine detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), selected from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, that only show one set of spectral lines. Radial velocities (RVs) were calculated from the high-resolution spectra obtained with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph (HIDES) instrument, attached to the 1.88-m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and from the public Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment archive. In our sample, we found five single-lined binaries, with one component dominating the spectrum. The orbital and light-curve solutions were found for four of them, and compared with isochrones, in order to estimate absolute physical parameters and evolutionary status of the components. For the fifth case, we only update the orbital parameters, and estimate the properties of the unseen star. Two other systems show orbital motion with a period known from the eclipse timing variations (ETVs). For these we obtained parameters of outer orbits, by translating the ETVs to RVs of the centre of mass of the eclipsing binary, and combining with the RVs of the outer star. Of the two remaining ones, one is most likely a blend of a faint background DEB with a bright foreground star, which lines we see in the spectra, and the last case is possibly a quadruple bearing a sub-stellar mass object. Where possible, we compare our results with literature, especially with results from asteroseismology. We also report possible detections of solar-like oscillations in our RVs.

  10. KIC 4768731: a bright long-period roAp star in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Smalley, B; Murphy, S J; Lehmann, H; Kurtz, D W; Holdsworth, D L; Cunha, M S; Balona, L A; Briquet, M; Bruntt, H; de Cat, P; Lampens, P; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of 61.45 d^-1 (711.2 mu Hz) oscillations, with amplitudes of 62.6-mu mag, in KIC 4768731 (HD 225914) using Kepler photometry. This relatively bright (V=9.17) chemically peculiar star with spectral type A5 Vp SrCr(Eu) has previously been found to exhibit rotational modulation with a period of 5.21 d. Fourier analysis reveals a simple dipole pulsator with an amplitude that has remained stable over a 4-yr time span, but with a frequency that is variable. Analysis of high-resolution spectra yields stellar parameters of T_eff = 8100 +/- 200 K, log g = 4.0 +/- 0.2, [Fe/H] = +0.31 +/- 0.24 and v sin i = 14.8 +/- 1.6 km/s. Line profile variations caused by rotation are also evident. Lines of Sr, Cr, Eu, Mg and Si are strongest when the star is brightest, while Y and Ba vary in anti-phase with the other elements. The abundances of rare earth elements are only modestly enhanced compared to other roAp stars of similar T_eff and log g. Radial velocities in the literature suggest a significant...

  11. Evaluating the summer night sky brightness at a research field site on Lake Stechlin in northeastern Germany

    CERN Document Server

    Jechow, Andreas; Kolláth, Zoltán; Gessner, Mark O; Kyba, Christopher C M

    2016-01-01

    We report on luminance measurements of the summer night sky at a field site on a freshwater lake in northeastern Germany (Lake Stechlin) to evaluate the amount of artificial skyglow from nearby and distant towns in the context of a planned study on light pollution. The site is located about 70 km north of Berlin in a rural area possibly belonging to one of the darkest regions in Germany. Continuous monitoring of the zenith sky luminance between June and September 2015 was conducted utilizing a Sky Quality Meter. With this device, typical values for clear nights in the range of 21.5-21.7 mag$_{SQM}/$arcsec$^2$ were measured, which is on the order of the natural sky brightness during starry nights. On overcast nights, values down to 22.84 mag$_{SQM}/$arcsec$^2$ were obtained, which is about one third as bright as on clear nights. The luminance measured on clear nights as well as the darkening with the presence of clouds indicate that there is very little influence of artificial skyglow on the zenith sky brightn...

  12. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction: Towards a Bright Future for a Revitalized Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den Egon L.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Conchon, E.; Correia, C.; Fred, A.; Gamboa, H.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-ofthe-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental healt

  13. Biofeedback systems for stress reduction : Towards a bright future for a revitalized field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, E.L. van den; Westerink, J.H.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Stress has recently been baptized as the black death of the 21st century, which illustrates its threat to current health standards. This article proposes biofeedback systems as a means to reduce stress. A concise state-of-the-art introduction on biofeedback systems is given. The field of mental heal

  14. Natural killer cell cytokine response to M. bovis BCG Is associated with inhibited proliferation, increased apoptosis and ultimate depletion of NKp44(+CD56(bright cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Portevin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a live attenuated strain of M. bovis initially developed as a vaccine against tuberculosis, is also used as an adjuvant for immunotherapy of cancers and for treatment of parasitic infections. The underlying mechanisms are thought to rely on its immunomodulatory properties including the recruitment of natural killer (NK cells. In that context, we aimed to study the impact of M. bovis BCG on NK cell functions. We looked at cytotoxicity, cytokine production, proliferation and cell survival of purified human NK cells following exposure to single live particles of mycobacteria. We found that M. bovis BCG mediates apoptosis of NK cells only in the context of IL-2 stimulation during which CD56(bright NK cells are releasing IFN-γ in response to mycobacteria. We found that the presence of mycobacteria prevented the IL-2 induced proliferation and surface expression of NKp44 receptor by the CD56(bright population. In summary, we observed that M. bovis BCG is modulating the functions of CD56(bright NK cells to drive this subset to produce IFN-γ before subsequent programmed cell death. Therefore, IFN-γ production by CD56(bright cells constitutes the main effector mechanism of NK cells that would contribute to the benefits observed for M. bovis BCG as an immunotherapeutic agent.

  15. Probing the IGM/Galaxy Connection IV: The LCO/WFCCD Galaxy Survey of 20 Fields Surrounding UV Bright Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Chen, H -W; Cooksey, K L; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    We publish the survey for galaxies in 20 fields containing ultraviolet bright quasars (with z_em 0.1 to 0.5) that can be used to study the association between galaxies and absorption systems from the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM). The survey is magnitude limited (R~19.5 mag) and highly complete out to 10' from the quasar in each field. It was designed to detect dwarf galaxies (L ~ 0.1 L*) at an impact parameter rho 1Mpc (z=0.1) from a quasar. The complete sample (all 20 fields) includes R-band photometry for 84718 sources and confirmed redshifts for 2800 sources. This includes 1198 galaxies with 0.005 < z < (z_em - 0.01) at a median redshift of 0.18, which may associated with IGM absorption lines. All of the imaging was acquired with cameras on the Swope 40" telescope and the spectra were obtained via slitmask observations using the WFCCD spectrograph on the Dupont 100" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO). This paper describes the data reduction, imaging analysis, photometry, and spectral ana...

  16. The Bright End of the z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 UV Luminosity Functions Using All Five CANDELS Fields*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Oesch, P. A.; Labbé, I.; Illingworth, G. D.; Fazio, G. G.; Coe, D.; Holwerda, B.; Smit, R.; Stefanon, M.; van Dokkum, P. G.; Trenti, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Huang, J.-S.; Spitler, L.; Straatman, C.; Bradley, L.; Magee, D.

    2016-10-01

    The deep, wide-area (˜800-900 arcmin2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high-redshift UV luminosity functions. However, the lack of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 1.05 μm observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z ˜ 9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 μm. Here, we report on the successful identification of many such z ˜ 9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z ˜ 9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 μm, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 μm. The potential z ˜ 9-10 candidates were preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations (CFHTLS-DEEP+HUGS+UltraVISTA+ZFOURGE). We identified 15 credible z ˜ 9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z ˜ 9 and five are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z ˜ 9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5{}-2+3× and {8}-3+9× lower, respectively, than those found at z ˜ 8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., d {{log}}10 {ρ }{UV}/{dz}=-0.29+/- 0.02) in the UV luminosity densities from z ˜ 8 to z ˜ 4 integrated to 0.3{L}z=3* (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are {2.6}-0.9+1.5× and {2.2}-1.1+2.0× lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the “accelerated evolution” scenario at z > 8, consistent with that seen in many models

  17. Evaluation of CD56dim and CD56bright natural killer cells in peripheral blood of women with IVF failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mardanian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is an increasing medical and social problem. In vitro fertilization (IVF has become a common and accessible treatment for a wide variety of indications that have variable outcomes. Natural killer (NK cells have been identified as relevant immunological factors involved in reproductive success or failure. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of peripheral blood CD56+ (CD56dim and CD56bright cells and the level of NK cell in patients with IVF failure with those of successful IVF control women. Materials and Methods: We assessed the level of CD56dim CD16+ and CD56bright CD16- cells in 50 women under IVF treatment and compared between successful IVF and IVF failure with the flowcytometry technique. Results: Of studied women, 68% did not response to IVF therapy and 32% had successful IVF, the level of CD56dim CD16+ cells in women with IVF failure was significantly higher than successful IVF (p<0.0001 but the level of CD56bright CD16- cells was not significantly different between women with IVF failure and successful IVF (p=0.28. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrated that the level of NK cells as a risk factor is associated with pregnancy loss in women with IVF failure. However, number of sample in this study is low and further studies with more sample size are needed to be done. We suggest considering treatment option for women undergoing repeated IVF failure with increased percentage of CD56dim cells and the level of peripheral blood NK cell.

  18. Integral field spectroscopy of selected areas of the Bright bar and Orion-S cloud in the Orion nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Núñez-Díaz, M.; Esteban, C.; López-Martín, L.; García-Rojas, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present integral field spectroscopy of two selected zones in the Orion nebula obtained with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer, covering the optical spectral range from 3500 to 7200 Å and with a spatial resolution of 1 arcsec. The observed zones are located on the prominent Bright bar and on the brightest area at the north-east of the Orion south cloud, both containing remarkable ionization fronts. We obtain maps of emission-line fluxes and ratios, electron density and temperatures, and chemical abundances. We study the ionization structure and morphology of both fields, whose ionization fronts show different inclination angles with respect to the plane of the sky. We find that the maps of electron density, O+/H+ and O/H ratios show a rather similar structure. We interpret this as produced by the strong dependence on density of the [O II] lines used to derive the O+ abundance, and that our nominal values of electron density - derived from the [S II] line ratio - may be slightly higher than the appropriate value for the O+ zone. We measure the faint recombination lines of O II in the field at the north-east of the Orion south cloud, allowing us to explore the so-called abundance discrepancy problem. We find a rather constant abundance discrepancy across the field and a mean value similar to that determined in other areas of the Orion nebula, indicating that the particular physical conditions of this ionization front do not contribute to this discrepancy. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  19. Development of Schistosoma mansoni worms in mice analyzed by bright field and confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Lamare Biolchini

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The blood flukes of mammals (Digenea: Schistosomatidae are among trematodes unique whose adult worms have separeted sexes which are dissimilar in appearance. The developmental features, growth and organogenesis of Schistosoma mansoni were studied in Swiss Webster mice by a digital system for image analysis and confocal microscopy. Data so far obtained showed two phases with significative morphological changes at 3-4 weeks post-infection, and a gradual similar development onwards in the reproductive system and tegument. Our male-dependent phase demonstrated that mating occurs before sexual maturing. At week three, the majority of male worms (59% had formed the gynaecophoric canal although testicular lobes and tegumental tubercles were absent. By this time, 33% females had an incipient ovary (without cellular differentiation. At week four, 77.2% males presented testicular lobes with few germinative cells while 26% had developing tegumental tubercles. The immature ovary was observed in 69% females. Suckers followed different pattern of growth between male and females. The size of oral and ventral suckers from six-week-old male worms grew abruptly (3.0 fold more than that of three-week-old. In female worms, maximum growth was attained at week four, reducing in size thereafter. From sixth week onwards, all specimens showed the fully developed reproductive system. Probably, these features are morphological traits which schistosome has experienced from hermaphrodite to dioecy.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  1. VIMOS-VLT Integral Field Kinematics of the Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxy ESO 323-G064

    CERN Document Server

    Coccato, L; Rubin, V C; D'Odorico, S; McGaugh, S S

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We have studied the bulge and the disk kinematics of the giant low surface brightness galaxy ESO 323-G064 in order to investigate its dynamical properties and the radial mass profile of the dark matter (DM) halo. Methods:We observed the galaxy with integral field spectroscopy (VLT/VIMOS, in IFU configuration), measured the positions of the ionized gas by fitting Gaussian functions to the O[III] and Hbeta emission lines, and fit stellar templates to the galaxy spectra to determine velocity and velocity dispersions. We modeled the stellar kinematics in the bulge with spherical isotropic Jeans models and explored the implications of self consistent and dark matter scenarios for NFW and pseudo isothermal halos. Results:In the bulge-dominated region, r<5", the emission lines show multi-peaked profiles. The disk dominated region of the galaxy, 13"

  2. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  3. Regeneration-associated WNT Signaling Is Activated in Long-term Reconstituting AC133bright Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Beghini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by two molecularly distinct self-renewing leukemic stem cell (LSC populations most closely related to normal progenitors and organized as a hierarchy. A requirement for WNT/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of AML has recently been suggested by a mouse model. However, its relationship to a specific molecular function promoting retention of self-renewing leukemia-initiating cells (LICs in human remains elusive. To identify transcriptional programs involved in the maintenance of a self-renewing state in LICs, we performed the expression profiling in normal (n = 10 and leukemic (n = 33 human long-term reconstituting AC133+ cells, which represent an expanded cell population in most AML patients. This study reveals the ligand-dependent WNT pathway activation in AC133bright AML cells and shows a diffuse expression and release of WNT10B, a hematopoietic stem cell regenerative-associated molecule. The establishment of a primary AC133+ AML cell culture (A46 demonstrated that leukemia cells synthesize and secrete WNT ligands, increasing the levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin in vivo. We tested the LSC functional activity in AC133+ cells and found significant levels of engraftment upon transplantation of A46 cells into irradiated Rag2-/-γc-/- mice. Owing to the link between hematopoietic regeneration and developmental signaling, we transplanted A46 cells into developing zebrafish. This system revealed the formation of ectopic structures by activating dorsal organizer markers that act downstream of the WNT pathway. In conclusion, our findings suggest that AC133bright LSCs are promoted by misappropriating homeostatic WNT programs that control hematopoietic regeneration.

  4. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence I: The early-G star HD 141943 - brightness and magnetic topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Alecian, E; Brown, C J; Carter, B D; Donati, J F; Dunstone, N; Hart, R; Semel, M; Waite, I A

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations of the pre-main sequence early-G star HD 141943 were obtained at four observing epochs (in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010). The observations were undertaken at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope using the UCLES echelle spectrograph and the SEMPOL spectropolarimeter visitor instrument. Brightness and surface magnetic field topologies were reconstructed for the star using the technique of least-squares deconvolution to increase the signal-to-noise of the data. The reconstructed brightness maps show that HD 141943 had a weak polar spot and a significant amount of low latitude features, with little change in the latitude distribution of the spots over the 4 years of observations. The surface magnetic field was reconstructed at three of the epochs from a high order (l <= 30) spherical harmonic expansion of the spectropolarimetric observations. The reconstructed magnetic topologies show that in 2007 and 2010 the surface magnetic field was reasonably balanced betwee...

  5. A Quantitative Method for Comparing the Brightness of Antibody-dye Reagents and Estimating Antibodies Bound per Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Aaron B; Moore, Wayne A; Meehan, Stephen; Parks, David R

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative method for comparing the brightness of antibody-dye reagents and estimating antibodies bound per cell. The method is based on complementary binding of test and fill reagents to antibody capture microspheres. Several aliquots of antibody capture beads are stained with varying amounts of the test conjugate. The remaining binding sites on the beads are then filled with a second conjugate containing a different fluorophore. Finally, the fluorescence of the test conjugate compared to the fill conjugate is used to measure the relative brightness of the test conjugate. The fundamental assumption of the test-fill method is that if it takes X molecules of one test antibody to lower the fill signal by Y units, it will take the same X molecules of any other test antibody to give the same effect. We apply a quadratic fit to evaluate the test-fill signal relationship across different amounts of test reagent. If the fit is close to linear, we consider the test reagent to be suitable for quantitative evaluation of antibody binding. To calibrate the antibodies bound per bead, a PE conjugate with 1 PE molecule per antibody is used as a test reagent and the fluorescence scale is calibrated with Quantibrite PE beads. When the fluorescence per antibody molecule has been determined for a particular conjugate, that conjugate can be used for measurement of antibodies bound per cell. This provides comparisons of the brightness of different conjugates when conducted on an instrument whose statistical photoelectron (Spe) scales are known. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Bright/Arid3A Acts as a Barrier to Somatic Cell Reprogramming through Direct Regulation of Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Popowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here that singular loss of the Bright/Arid3A transcription factor leads to reprograming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs and enhancement of standard four-factor (4F reprogramming. Bright-deficient MEFs bypass senescence and, under standard embryonic stem cell (ESC culture conditions, spontaneously form clones that in vitro express pluripotency markers, differentiate to all germ lineages, and in vivo form teratomas and chimeric mice. We demonstrate that BRIGHT binds directly to the promoter/enhancer regions of Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog to contribute to their repression in both MEFs and ESCs. Thus, elimination of the BRIGHT barrier may provide an approach for somatic cell reprogramming.

  7. Invasive Surgery Impairs the Regulatory Function of Human CD56 bright Natural Killer Cells in Response to Staphylococcus aureus. Suppression of Interferon-γ Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Reinhardt

    Full Text Available Major surgery increases the risk for infectious complications due to the development of immunosuppression. CD56 bright NK cells play a key role in the defense against bacterial infections through the release of Interferon (IFN γ upon stimulation with monocyte-derived Interleukin (IL 12. We investigated whether invasive visceral surgery interferes with the IFN-γ synthesis of human NK cells in response to Staphylococcus aureus. In a prospective pilot study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were isolated from 53 patients before and 1 to 7 d after elective visceral surgery. The release of IL-12 and IFN-γ from PBMC upon exposure to S. aureus in vitro was quantified. The expression of the IL-12 receptor β1 chain on the surface, the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 4, and the synthesis of IFN-γ on/in individual CD56 bright NK cells were investigated using flow cytometry. The modulatory effect of IL-12 on the S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production in CD56 bright NK cells was analyzed. The IFN-γ secretion from purified CD56 bright NK cells was quantified after stimulation with IL-12 and IL-18. After surgery, CD56 bright NK cells among total PBMC were impaired in the release of IFN-γ for at least 5 d. Likewise, the IL-12-induced release of IFN-γ from purified CD56 bright NK cells was abolished. Upon stimulation with S. aureus, PBMC secreted less IL-12 but supplementation with recombinant IL-12 did not restore the capacity of CD56 bright NK cells to produce IFN-γ. CD56 bright NK cells displayed reduced levels of the IL-12Rβ1 chain whereas the phosphorylation of STAT4, the key transcription factor for the Ifng gene was not diminished. In summary, after invasive visceral surgery, CD56 bright NK cells are impaired in S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production and might contribute to the enhanced susceptibility to opportunistic infections.

  8. Cell separation using electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Joseph (Inventor); Eppich, Henry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  9. Monte Carlo electron-trajectory simulations in bright-field and dark-field STEM: Implications for tomography of thick biological sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, A.A.; Hohmann-Marriott, M.F.; Zhang, G. [Laboratory of Bioengineering and Physical Science, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 13, Rm. 3N17, 13 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-5766 (United States); Leapman, R.D. [Laboratory of Bioengineering and Physical Science, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bldg. 13, Rm. 3N17, 13 South Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-5766 (United States)], E-mail: leapmanr@mail.nih.gov

    2009-02-15

    A Monte Carlo electron-trajectory calculation has been implemented to assess the optimal detector configuration for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography of thick biological sections. By modeling specimens containing 2 and 3 at% osmium in a carbon matrix, it was found that for 1-{mu}m-thick samples the bright-field (BF) and annular dark-field (ADF) signals give similar contrast and signal-to-noise ratio provided the ADF inner angle and BF outer angle are chosen optimally. Spatial resolution in STEM imaging of thick sections is compromised by multiple elastic scattering which results in a spread of scattering angles and thus a spread in lateral distances of the electrons leaving the bottom surface. However, the simulations reveal that a large fraction of these multiply scattered electrons are excluded from the BF detector, which results in higher spatial resolution in BF than in high-angle ADF images for objects situated towards the bottom of the sample. The calculations imply that STEM electron tomography of thick sections should be performed using a BF rather than an ADF detector. This advantage was verified by recording simultaneous BF and high-angle ADF STEM tomographic tilt series from a stained 600-nm-thick section of C. elegans. It was found that loss of spatial resolution occurred markedly at the bottom surface of the specimen in the ADF STEM but significantly less in the BF STEM tomographic reconstruction. Our results indicate that it might be feasible to use BF STEM tomography to determine the 3D structure of whole eukaryotic microorganisms prepared by freeze-substitution, embedding, and sectioning.

  10. PECULIARITIES OF NK CELLS DIFFERENTIATION: CD56dim AND CD56bright NK CELLS AT PREGNANCY AND IN NON-PREGNANT STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mikhailova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells represent a lymphocyte subpopulation which is capable of contact cytolysis of virus-infected cells and tumor cells, being a source of cytokines which stimulate other immune cells and promote immune response. NK cell differentiation is connected with a consequent acquisition of specific NK cell receptors by stem cells and formation of functional characteristics inherent to natural killer cells. The aim of this review was to describe the CD56dim and CD56bright populations of NK cells in the course of their differentiation. The authors describe NK surface receptors and expression of transcription factors at various steps of the NK differentiation. We present comparative characteristics of data concerning cytokines and cellular microenvironment influence upon NK cell differentiation, and examine a phenomenon of existing memory-like NK cells. Uterine NK cell differentiation is of special interest, since these cells represent a special NK cell population which prevails among decidual lymphocytes during pregnancy and participates in the process of placental formation and development. This review considers some features of uterine NK cell differentiation, taking into account a possibility of formation of this NK cell population from both peripheral blood NK pool, and in situ proliferation. Moreover, functional studies of the uterine NK cells allow to get closer to understanding the role of NK cells during pregnancy and abnormality of utero-placental bed regulation by NK cells in cases of pregnancy failure.

  11. Proper design of silica nanoparticles combines high brightness, lack of cytotoxicity and efficient cell endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzo, Enrico; Voltan, Rebecca; Petrizza, Luca; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Prodi, Luca; Casciano, Fabio; Zauli, Giorgio; Secchiero, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Silica-based luminescent nanoparticles (SiNPs) show promising prospects in nanomedicine in light of their chemical properties and versatility. In this study, we have characterized silica core-PEG shell SiNPs derivatized with PEG moieties (NP-PEG), with external amino- (NP-PEG-amino) or carboxy-groups (NP-PEG-carbo), both in cell cultures as well as in animal models. By using different techniques, we could demonstrate that these SiNPs were safe and did not exhibit appreciable cytotoxicity in different relevant cell models, of normal or cancer cell types, growing either in suspension (JVM-2 leukemic cell line and primary normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells) or in adherence (human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 and umbilical vein endothelial cells). Moreover, by multiparametric flow cytometry, we could demonstrate that the highest efficiency of cell uptake and entry was observed with NP-PEG-amino, with a stable persistence of the fluorescence signal associated with SiNPs in the loaded cell populations both in vitro and in vivo settings suggesting this as an innovative method for cell traceability and detection in whole organisms. Finally, experiments performed with the endocytosis inhibitor Genistein clearly suggested the involvement of a caveolae-mediated pathway in SiNP endocytosis. Overall, these data support the safe use of these SiNPs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.Silica-based luminescent nanoparticles (SiNPs) show promising prospects in nanomedicine in light of their chemical properties and versatility. In this study, we have characterized silica core-PEG shell SiNPs derivatized with PEG moieties (NP-PEG), with external amino- (NP-PEG-amino) or carboxy-groups (NP-PEG-carbo), both in cell cultures as well as in animal models. By using different techniques, we could demonstrate that these SiNPs were safe and did not exhibit appreciable cytotoxicity in different relevant cell models, of normal or cancer cell types, growing either in suspension (JVM-2

  12. 3D photospheric velocity field of a Supergranular cell

    CERN Document Server

    Del Moro, Dario; Berrilli, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the plasma flow properties inside a Supergranular (SG) cell, in particular its interaction with small scale magnetic field structures. The SG cell has been identified using the magnetic network (CaII wing brightness) as proxy, applying the TST to high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution observations obtained by IBIS. The full 3D velocity vector field for the SG has been reconstructed at two different photospheric heights. In order to strengthen our findings, we also computed the mean radial flow of the SG by means of cork tracing. We also studied the behaviour of the horizontal and Line of Sight plasma flow cospatial with cluster of bright CaII structures of magnetic origin to better understand the interaction between photospheric convection and small scale magnetic features. The SG cell we investigated seems to be organized with an almost radial flow from its centre to the border. The large scale divergence structure is probably created by a compact region of costant up-flow close to the...

  13. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  14. Cross-talk between the cytosolic mevalonate and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Meyer, Odile; Tritsch, Denis; Kagan, Isabelle A; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2003-07-18

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. The key enzyme of the cytoplasmic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway is 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR). Treatment of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cells by the HMGR-specific inhibitor mevinolin led to growth reduction and induction of apparent HMGR activity, in parallel to an increase in protein representing two HMGR isozymes. Maximum induction was observed at 24 h. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose (DX), the dephosphorylated first precursor of the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, complemented growth inhibition by mevinolin in the low millimolar concentration range. Furthermore, DX partially re-established feedback repression of mevinolin-induced HMGR activity. Incorporation studies with [1,1,1,4-2H4]DX showed that sterols, normally derived from MVA, in the presence of mevinolin are synthesized via the MEP pathway. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the second enzyme of the MEP pathway, was utilized to study the reverse complementation. Growth inhibition by fosmidomycin of TBY-2 cells could be partially overcome by MVA. Chemical complementation was further substantiated by incorporation of [2-13C]MVA into plastoquinone, representative of plastidial isoprenoids. Best rates of incorporation of exogenous stably labeled precursors were observed in the presence of both inhibitors, thereby avoiding internal isotope dilution.

  15. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; D'Ai, A; Segreto, A; Tagliaferri, G; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ~1.7 x 10^11 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma onto the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previo...

  16. HAT-P-11b: A Super-Neptune Planet Transiting a Bright K Star in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G Á; Pál, A; Hartman, J; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R W; Latham, D W; Sasselov, D D; Sipőcz, B; Esquerdo, G A; Fischer, D A; Johnson, J A; Marcy, G W; Butler, R P; Isaacson, H; Howard, A; Vogt, S; Kovács, Gábor; Fernández, J; Moór, A; Stefanik, R P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-11b, the smallest radius transiting extrasolar planet (TEP), and the first hot Neptune discovered to date by transit searches. HAT-P-11b orbits the bright (V=9.59) and metal rich ([Fe=H] = +0.31 +/- 0.05) K4 dwarf star GSC 03561-02092 with P = 4.8878162 +/- 0.0000071 days and produces a transit signal with depth of 4.2 mmag; the shallowest found by transit searches that is due to a confirmed planet. We present a global analysis of the available photometric and radial-velocity data that result in stellar and planetary parameters, with simultaneous treatment of systematic variations. The planet, like its near-twin GJ 436b, is somewhat larger than Neptune (17 Mearth, 3.8 Rearth) both in mass Mp = 0.081 +/- 0.009 MJup (25.8 +/- 2.9 Mearth) and radius Rp = 0.422 +/- 0.014 RJup (4.73 +/- 0.16 Rearth). HAT-P-11b orbits in an eccentric orbit with e = 0.198 +/- 0.046 and omega = 355.2 +/- 17.3 deg, causing a reflex motion of its parent star with amplitude 11.6 +/- 1.2 m/s, a challen...

  17. The LBT Bootes Field Survey: I. The Rest-frame UV and Luminosity Functions and Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dave, Romeel

    2013-01-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U-band imaging survey (9 deg2) covering the NOAO Bootes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z~3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by >3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of $z\\sim3$ quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z~3 LBGs based on the R-band and IRAC [4.5 micro m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z~7 and z~3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR),which fo...

  18. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, S.; Geisler, D.A.; Møller, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage...... the H2O2 necessary for NADH oxidation by apoplastic peroxidases, mitochondrial oxygen consumption could be measured in permeabilized cells. Inhibitor-sensitive oxidation of the respiratory substrates succinate, malate and NADH was observed after the addition of the appropriate coenzymes (ATP, NAD...

  19. Development of TEM and SEM high brightness electron guns using cold-field emission from a carbon nanotip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdellier, F.; Knoop, L. de; Gatel, C.; Masseboeuf, A. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Mamishin, S.; Taniguchi, Y. [Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Delmas, M.; Monthioux, M.; Hÿtch, M.J.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-04-15

    A newly developed carbon cone nanotip (CCnT) has been used as field emission cathode both in low voltage SEM (30 kV) electron source and high voltage TEM (200 kV) electron source. The results clearly show, for both technologies, an unprecedented stability of the emission and the probe current with almost no decay during 1 h, as well as a very small noise (rms less than 0.5%) compared to standard sources which use tungsten tips as emitting cathode. In addition, quantitative electric field mapping around the FE tip have been performed using in situ electron holography experiments during the emission of the new tip. These results show the advantage of the very high aspect ratio of the new CCnT which induces a strong enhancement of the electric field at the apex of the tip, leading to very small extraction voltage (some hundred of volts) for which the field emission will start. The combination of these experiments with emission current measurements has also allowed to extract an exit work function value of 4.8 eV. - Highlights: • We develop a new field emission cathode based on carbon material. • We determine the exit work function of this new cathode using a combination of in situ electron holography and finite element modeling. • We show that the stability of cold-field emitted current can be improved with no decay during one hour of emission with a lower emission noise (less than 0.5%). • We used this cathode both for 200 kV TEM and 30 kV SEM cold field emission source. • As a TEM source, we also observe an increase of the spatial coherence using Fresnel fringes contrast.

  20. CD56(bright)perforin(low) noncytotoxic human NK cells are abundant in both healthy and neoplastic solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via afferent lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrega, Paolo; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Di Carlo, Emma; Morandi, Barbara; Paul, Petra; Rizzello, Valeria; Cipollone, Giuseppe; Navarra, Giuseppe; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2014-04-15

    As limited information is available regarding the distribution and trafficking of NK cells among solid organs, we have analyzed a wide array of tissues derived from different human compartments. NK cells were widely distributed in most solid tissues, although their amount varied significantly depending on the tissue/organ analyzed. Interestingly, the distribution appeared to be subset specific, as some tissues were preferentially populated by CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells, with others by the CD56(dim)perforin(high) cytotoxic counterpart. Nevertheless, most tissues were highly enriched in CD56(bright)perforin(low) cells, and the distribution of NK subsets appeared in accordance with tissue gene expression of chemotactic factors, for which receptors are differently represented in the two subsets. Remarkably, chemokine expression pattern of tissues was modified after neoplastic transformation. As a result, although the total amount of NK cells infiltrating the tissues did not significantly change upon malignant transformation, the relative proportion of NK subsets infiltrating the tissues was different, with a trend toward a tumor-infiltrating NK population enriched in noncytotoxic cells. Besides solid tissues, CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells were also detected in seroma fluids, which represents an accrual of human afferent lymph, indicating that they may leave peripheral solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via lymphatic vessels. Our results provide a comprehensive mapping of NK cells in human tissues, demonstrating that discrete NK subsets populate and recirculate through most human tissues and that organ-specific chemokine expression patterns might affect their distribution. In this context, chemokine switch upon neoplastic transformation might represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  1. Perturbation of the natural killer cell compartment during primary human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection primarily involving the CD56bright subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegani, Paola; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Galli, Laura; Din, Chiara Tassan; Lazzarin, Adriano; Fortis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of natural killer (NK) cell subsets, their activating and inhibitory receptors, and their cytolytic potential, in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHI) individuals at baseline and during 1 year of follow-up with or without antiretroviral therapy, and compared the results with those obtained in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-infected (CHI) individuals, and HIV-seronegative (HN) healthy individuals. The proportion of the CD56dim and CD56bright subsets decreased with disease progression, whereas that of the CD56− CD16+ subset increased. In the CD56dim subset, the proportion of cells with natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) decreased with disease progression, and their cytolytic potential was reduced. Conversely, the CD56bright subset was characterized by a high proportion of NCR-positive, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-positive NKG2A+ cells in both CHI and PHI individuals, which was associated with an increase in their cytolytic potential. During the 1 year of follow-up, the PHI individuals with high viraemia levels and low CD4+ T-cell counts who received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a similar proportion of NK subsets to CHI individuals, while patients with low viraemia levels and high CD4+ T-cell counts who remained untreated had values similar to those of the HN individuals. Our results indicate a marked perturbation of the NK cell compartment during HIV-1 infection that is multifaceted, starts early and is progressive, primarily involves the CD56bright subset, and is partially corrected by effective HAART. PMID:19824914

  2. The ESO key-programme "a homogeneous bright QSO survey"; 1, the methods and the "deep" fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, S; Andreani, P; Gemmo, A; Goldschmidt, P; Miller, L; Vio, R; Barbieri, C; Bodini, L; Iovino, A; Lazzarin, M; Clowes, R G; MacGillivray, H T; Gouiffes, C; Lissandrini, C; Savage, A

    1995-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series aimed at defining a statistically significant sample of QSOs in the range 15 < B < 18.75 and 0.3 < z < 2.2. The selection is carried out using direct plates obtained at the ESO and UK Schmidt Telescopes, scanned with the COSMOS facility and searched for objects with an ultraviolet excess. Follow-up spectroscopy, carried out at ESO La Silla, is used to classify each candidate. In this initial paper, we describe the scientific objectives of the survey; the selection and observing techniques used. We present the first sample of 285 QSOs (M_B < -23) in a 153 deg^2 area, covered by the six ``deep'' fields, intended to obtain significant statistics down B \\simeq 18.75 with unprecedented photometric accuracy. From this database, QSO counts are determined in the magnitude range 17 < B < 18.75.

  3. The ESO key-programme "A homogeneous bright QSO survey". I. The methods and the "deep" fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.; Andreani, P.; Gemmo, A.; Goldschmidt, P.; Miller, L.; Vio, R.; Barbieri, C.; Bodini, L.; Iovino, A.; Lazzarin, M.; Clowes, R.; MacGillivray, H.; Gouiffes, C.; Lissandrini, C.; Savage, A.

    1995-09-01

    This is the first paper in a series aimed at defining a statistically significant sample of QSOs in the range 15fields, intended to obtain significant statistics down B=~18.75 with unprecedented photometric accuracy. From this database, QSO counts are determined in the magnitude range 17

  4. The 2MASS Wide-Field T Dwarf Search. I. Discovery of a Bright T Dwarf Within 10 pc of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; McElwain, M W; Cutri, R M; Burgasser, A J; Skrutskie, M F; Burgasser, Adam J.; Elwain, Michael W. Mc; Cutri, Roc M.; Burgasser, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    We present the discovery of a bright (J = 13.94$\\pm$0.03) T dwarf, 2MASS 1503+2525, identified in a new, wide-field search for T dwarfs using the recently completed Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The 1--2.5 $\\micron$ spectrum of this object exhibits the strong H$_2$O and CH$_4$ bands characteristic of mid- and late-type T dwarfs, and we derive a spectral type of T5.5 using both the Burgasser et al. and the Geballe et al. classification schemes. Based on its spectral type and the absolute magnitudes of known T dwarfs, we estimate the distance of this object as 8$\\pm$3 pc if it is single, likely within 10 pc of the Sun. Our new 2MASS search, which covers 74% of the sky and greatly expands on earlier color constraints, should identify 15--25 new T dwarfs with J $\\leq$ 16. Combined with the 20 known members of this class that already fall within our search criteria, our new sample will provide improved statistics for such key quantities as the binary fraction and the field substellar mass function. Furthermor...

  5. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies at z>1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Haojing; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, Steven; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew; Dave, Romeel; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha

    2013-01-01

    Optical counterpart identification is a critical link in maximizing the science returns of the Herschel very wide-field survey data. Currently, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas. However a large number of very bright FIR sources are not detected in the SDSS, and their true nature remains to be determined. Using the public HerMES data, we studied seven such sources that are within the CANDELS fields. To deal with the source blending problem, we used the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors and decomposed these FIR sources. This new appraoch is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the position priors are derived from the mid-IR data that still suffer from the source blending problem in the first place, and can be applied to the regions where the mid-IR data are not available. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that may or may not b...

  6. Maintenance therapy with histamine plus IL-2 induces a striking expansion of two CD56bright NK cell subpopulations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and supports their activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Gleixner, Karoline V.; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Basilio, Jose; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Brons, Nicolaas H.C.; Casanova, Emilio; Zimmer, Jacques; Valent, Peter; Hofer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) plus IL-2 has been proposed as a novel maintenance-immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We analyzed the immunophenotype and function of natural killer (NK) cells in blood of AML patients treated after chemotherapy with HDC plus IL-2. The treatment caused a striking expansion of CD56brightCD16neg and CD56brightCD16low NK cell subpopulations. A reduced NK cell fraction recovered and high proportions of cells expressed the activating receptors NKG2D, NKp30, and NKp46. Concomitantly, KIR-expressing NK cells were reduced and NK cells with inhibitory NKG2A/CD94 receptors increased beyond normal levels. In addition, the immunotherapy-induced NK cells exhibited high capacity to produce IFN-γ and to degranulate. Furthermore, we provide evidence from subsequent in vitro studies that this is caused in part by direct effects of IL-2 on the CD56bright cells. IL-2 specifically induced proliferation of both CD56bright subpopulations, but not of CD56dim cells. It further preserved the expression of activating receptors and the capacity to produce IFN-γ and to degranulate. These data suggest that therapy with HDC plus IL-2 supports the reconstitution of a deficient NK cell fraction through the specific amplification of CD56bright NK cells giving rise to a functional NK cell compartment with high potential to combat leukemic disease. PMID:27341131

  7. Increase in Peripheral CD3-CD56brightCD16- Natural Killer Cells in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Associated with HHV-6 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Rotola, Antonella; Cassai, Enzo; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Di Luca, Dario; Caselli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is a very common autoimmune disease of the thyroid. In addition to genetic background, several viruses, including herpesviruses, have been suggested to play a role as possible environmental triggers of disease, but conclusive data are still lacking. Previous results showed that HT patients have an increased cellular immune response directed against the HHV-6 U94 protein and increased NK activity directed against HHV-6 infected thyrocytes.In this study, we characterized the antiviral antibody response and the NK cells activity and subtype in HHV-6 infected HT patients. The results showed that HT subjects have increased prevalence and titer of anti-U94 antibodies and a higher amount of CD3-CD56(bright)CD16(-)NK cell percentages compared to controls. Furthermore, the cell activation of CD3(-)CD56(bright) NK cells in HT patients significantly correlates with TPO and Tg Ab levels.The results suggest that HHV-6 might contribute to HT development, increasing NK cell secretion of inflammatory cytokines that could sustain the persistence of an inflammatory status in HT patients.

  8. Asymmetric cancer-cell filopodium growth induced by electric-fields in a microfluidic culture chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Kao, Yu-Chiu; Chi, Pei-Yin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chou, Chia-Fu; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2011-02-21

    We combine a micro-fluidic electric-field cell-culture (MEC) chip with structured-illumination nano-profilometry (SINAP) to quantitatively study the variations of cancer cell filopodia under external direct-current electric field (dcEF) stimulations. Because the lateral resolution of SINAP is better than 150 nm in bright-field image modality, filopodia with diameters smaller than 200 nm can be observed clearly without fluorescent labeling. In the MEC chip, a homogeneous EF is generated inside the culture area that simulates the endogenous EF environment. With this MEC chip-SINAP system, we directly observe and quantify the biased growth of filopodia of lung cancer cells toward the cathode. The epidermal growth factor receptors around the cell edges are also redistributed to the cathodal side. These results suggest that cancer-cell filopodia respond to the changes in EFs in the microenvironment.

  9. The optical spectra of Spitzer 24 micron galaxies in the COSMOS field: II. Faint infrared sources in the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Caputi, K I; Aussel, H; Le Floc'h, E; Sanders, D; Maier, C; Frayer, D; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; Le Fèvre, O; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Scodeggio, M; Scoville, N; Zamorani, G; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Kampczyk, P; Kartaltepe, J; Knobel, C; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Mignoli, M; Peng, Y; Pérez-Montero, E; Ricciardelli, E; Salvato, M; Silverman, Joseph; Surace, J; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Capak, P; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Cimatti, A; Elvis, M; Hasinger, G; Koekemoer, A M; Leauthaud, A; MacCagni, D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Pellò, R; Porciani, C; Pozzetti, L; Scaramella, R; Scarlata, C; Schiminovich, D; Taniguchi, Y; Zamojski, M

    2009-01-01

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24-micron-selected galaxies with 0.06< S(24um)< 0.50 mJy and I(AB)<22.5, over 1.5 deg^2 of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2

  10. Detection of an ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC/ASTE

    CERN Document Server

    Ikarashi, S; Aguirre, J E; Aretxaga, I; Arumugam, V; Austermann, J E; Bock, J J; Bradford, C M; Cirasuolo, M; Earle, L; Ezawa, H; Furusawa, H; Furusawa, J; Glenn, J; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Iono, D; Ivison, R J; Johnson, S; Kamenetzky, J; Kawabe, R; Lupu, R; Maloney, P; Matsuhara, H; Mauskopf, P D; Motohara, K; Murphy, E J; Nakajima, K; Nakanishi, K; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Perera, T A; Scott, K S; Takagi, T; Takata, T; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, K; Tsukagoshi, T; Wilner, D J; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of an extremely bright ($\\sim$34 mJy at 1100 $\\mu$m and $\\sim$73 mJy at 880 $\\mu$m) submillimeter galaxy (SMG), AzTEC-ASTE-SXDF1100.001 (hereafter referred to as SXDF1100.001), discovered in 1100 $\\mu$m observations of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC on ASTE. Subsequent CARMA 1300 $\\mu$m and SMA 880 $\\mu$m observations successfully pinpoint the location of SXDF1100.001 and suggest that it has two components, extended (FWHM of $\\sim$4^{\\prime\\prime}) and compact (unresolved) ones. Z-Spec on CSO has also been used to obtain a wide band spectrum from 190 to 308 GHz, although no significant emission/absorption lines are found. The derived upper limit to the line-to-continuum flux ratio is 0.1--0.3 (2 $\\sigma$) across the Z-Spec band. Based on the analysis of the derived spectral energy distribution from optical to radio wavelengths of possible counterparts near the SMA/CARMA peak position, we suggest that SXDF1100.001 is a lensed, optically dark SMG lying at $z \\sim 3.4$ behin...

  11. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  12. A bright water-compatible sugar-rhodamine fluorescence sensor for selective detection of Hg2+ in natural water and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhou, Peng; Yan, Wenbo; He, Cheng; Xiong, Liqin; Li, Fuyou; Duan, Chunying

    2009-02-01

    By combination of a sugar group and a rhodamine group into one molecule, a bright and specific fluorescent sensor for Hg(2+) in natural water and living cells was achieved. RG1 features the high quantum efficiency for a Hg(2+)-bound sensor in natural water and sensitivity to environmentally relevant mercury in complex natural samples. The limit of detection of Hg(2+) of 1 ppb level suggests that RG1 is capable of distinguishing between the safe and toxic levels of inorganic mercury in drinking water. RG1 also establishes excellent Hg(2+)-ion specificity over alkali-, alkaline-earth metals and the first-row transition metals as well as Pb(2+) and Ag(+). Investigation on the fluorescence imaging of Hg(2+) in living cells demonstrates that RG1 might be used for monitoring Hg(2+) within biological samples.

  13. Ideal near-field thermophotovoltaic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Molesky, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We ask the question, what are the ideal characteristics of a near-field thermophotovoltaic cell? Our search leads us to a reexamination of near-field photonic heat transfer in terms of the joint density of electronic states. This form reveals that the presence of matched van Hove singularities resulting from quantum-confinement in the emitter and converter of a thermophotovoltaic cell boosts both the magnitude and spectral selectivity of photonic heat transfer; dramatically improving energy conversion efficiency. We provide a model near-field thermophotovoltaic design making use of this idea by employing the van Hove singularities present in carbon nanotubes. Shockely Queisser analysis shows that the predicted heat transfer characteristics of this model device are fundamentally better than existing thermophotovoltaic designs. Our work paves the way for the use of quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional materials as future materials for thermophotovoltaic near-field energy conversion devices.

  14. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  15. Bright fluorescence monitoring system utilizing Zoanthus sp. green fluorescent protein (ZsGreen for human G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in microbial yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are currently the most important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery because they regulate a wide variety of physiological processes. Consequently, simple and convenient detection systems for ligands that regulate the function of GPCR have attracted attention as powerful tools for new drug development. We previously developed a yeast-based fluorescence reporter ligand detection system using flow cytometry. However, using this conventional detection system, fluorescence from a cell expressing GFP and responding to a ligand is weak, making detection of these cells by fluorescence microscopy difficult. We here report improvements to the conventional yeast fluorescence reporter assay system resulting in the development of a new highly-sensitive fluorescence reporter assay system with extremely bright fluorescence and high signal-to-noise (S/N ratio. This new system allowed the easy detection of GPCR signaling in yeast using fluorescence microscopy. Somatostatin receptor and neurotensin receptor (implicated in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively were chosen as human GPCR(s. The facile detection of binding to these receptors by cognate peptide ligands was demonstrated. In addition, we established a highly sensitive ligand detection system using yeast cell surface display technology that is applicable to peptide screening, and demonstrate that the display of various peptide analogs of neurotensin can activate signaling through the neurotensin receptor in yeast cells. Our system could be useful for identifying lead peptides with agonistic activity towards targeted human GPCR(s.

  16. [Bright light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R; Cambron, L

    2007-01-01

    Bright light therapy is a treatment that emerged in the eighties of the last century. It can be used in different pathologies such as seasonal affective disorders, major depressions, and many disorders of the wake-sleep rhythm, whether they are of primary or secondary origin. Important progress made at the basic neuroscience levels, allows today a sound understanding of the bright light mode of action. Moreover, the main indications are now the subject of consensus reports and meta-analyses which show good levels of evidence-based medicine. Bright light therapy constitutes a first choice indication in seasonal affective disorder. It is also perfectly possible to prescribe bright light therapy in the major depression disorders. It has been demonstrated that the effect size is the same as with antidepressants of reference. It is admitted nowadays that bright light therapy may be at least, an adjunct to pharmacotherapy, in order to accelerate the antidepressant effect onset, or to prolong this effect after withdrawal of the drug. Bright light therapy can also be viewed as an alternative to the pharmacological approach especially when this one is impossible, not tolerated or not accepted by the patient. The contraindications are rare.

  17. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  18. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  19. How can Fuel Cell Vehicles bring a bright future for this Dragon? Answer by Multi-criteria Decision Making Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Yu, Jing; Ren, Jingzheng;

    2016-01-01

    . By using Fishbone Diagram, field survey and workshop discussions, this paper proposes a group of factors that may affect customers’ preferences on FCVs. Furthermore, Fuzzy AHP and Pareto Analysis are employed to prioritize these factors, and identify the critical ones. The results indicate that fuel...

  20. How can Fuel Cell Vehicles bring a bright future for this Dragon? Answer by Multi-criteria Decision Making Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Yu, Jing; Ren, Jingzheng;

    2016-01-01

    Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) has been introduced to the market around the world in recent years. As the largest automobile market of the world, China is also one of the potential FCVs market. However, a series of factors and barriers influence the willingness of China’s customers to accept FCVs...

  1. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. I. Selection and Follow-up Observations from 329 Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, A; Norris, J E; Beers, T C; Bessell, M S; Rhee, J; Fechner, C; Marsteller, B; Rossi, S; Thom, C; Wisotzki, L; Reimers, D

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of 1777 bright (91.0) metal-poor ([Fe/H]20%) and higher values with increasing distance from the Galactic plane. Although the numbers of stars at low metallicity are falling rapidly at the lowest metallicities, there is evidence that the fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars is increasing rapidly as a function of declining metallicity. For ~60 objects, high-resolution data have already been obtained; one of these, HE 1327-2326, is the new record holder for the most iron-deficient star known.

  2. Research on Brightness Measurement of Intense Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Huang; Yang, GuoJun; Li, YiDing; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The mostly research fasten on high emission density of injector to study electron beam's brightness in LIA. Using the injector(2MeV) was built to research brightness of multi-pulsed high current(KA) electron beam, and researchs three measurement method (the pepper-pot method, beam collimator without magnetic field, beam collimator with magnetic field method) to detect beam's brightness with time-resolved measurement system.

  3. Flow-driven cell migration under external electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this paper, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  4. A stilbene that binds selectively to transthyretin in cells and remains dark until it undergoes a chemoselective reaction to create a bright blue fluorescent conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwook; Ong, Derrick Sek Tong; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2010-11-17

    We describe a non-fluorescent, second generation stilbene that very selectively binds to transthyretin in complex biological environments and remains dark until it chemoselectively reacts with the pK(a)-perturbed Lys-15 ε-amino group of transthyretin to form a bright blue fluorescent conjugate. Stilbene A2 is mechanistically unusual in that it remains non-fluorescent in cell lysates lacking transthyretin, even though there is likely some proteome binding. Thus, it is especially useful for cellular imaging, as background fluorescence is undetectable until A2 reacts with transthyretin. The mechanistic basis for the effective lack of environment-sensitive fluorescence of A2 when bound to, but before reacting with, transthyretin is reported. Stilbene A2 exhibits sufficiently rapid transthyretin conjugation kinetics at 37 °C to enable pulse-chase experiments to be performed, in this case demonstrating that transthyretin is secreted from HeLa cells. As the chase compound, we employed C1, a cell-permeable, highly selective, non-covalent, transthyretin-binding dihydrostilbene that cannot become fluorescent. The progress reported is viewed as a first and necessary step toward our long-term goal of creating a one-chain, one-binding-site transthyretin tag, whose fluorescence can be regulated by adding A2 or an analogous molecule. Fusing proteins of interest to a one-chain, one-binding-site transthyretin tag regulated by A2 should be useful for studying folding, trafficking, and degradation in the cellular secretory pathway, utilizing pulse-chase experiments. Immediate applications of A2 include utilizing its conjugate fluorescence to quantify transthyretin concentration in human plasma, reflecting nutritional status, and determining the binding stoichiometry of kinetic stabilizer drugs to transthyretin in plasma.

  5. The role of the Fraunhofer lines in solar brightness variability

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Tagirov, R V; Schmutz, W K

    2015-01-01

    The solar brightness varies on timescales from minutes to decades. A clear identification of the physical processes behind such variations is needed for developing and improving physics-based models of solar brightness variability and reconstructing solar brightness in the past. This is, in turn, important for better understanding the solar-terrestrial and solar-stellar connections. We estimate the relative contributions of the continuum, molecular, and atomic lines to the solar brightness variations on different timescales. Our approach is based on the assumption that variability of the solar brightness on timescales greater than a day is driven by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. We calculated the solar brightness variations employing the solar disc area coverage of magnetic features deduced from the MDI/SOHO observations. The brightness contrasts of magnetic features relative to the quiet Sun were calculated with a non-LTE radiative transfer code as functions of disc position and waveleng...

  6. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  7. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance.

  8. Brightness discrimination in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Lind

    Full Text Available Birds have excellent spatial acuity and colour vision compared to other vertebrates while spatial contrast sensitivity is relatively poor for unknown reasons. Contrast sensitivity describes the detection of gratings of varying spatial frequency. It is unclear whether bird brightness discrimination between large uniform fields is poor as well. Here we show that budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus need a Michelson contrast of 0.09 to discriminate between large spatially separated achromatic fields in bright light conditions. This is similar to the peak contrast sensitivity of 10.2 (0.098 Michelson contrast for achromatic grating stimuli established in earlier studies. The brightness discrimination threshold described in Weber fractions is 0.18, which is modest compared to other vertebrates.

  9. CA BrightStor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CA推出的BrightStor系列存储管理解决方案已经成为企业电子商务体系架构管理战略中举足轻重的组成部分。BrightStor是一整套企业级的智能化存储管理解决方案,定位在存储硬件设备和上层应用之间,通过各种集成化的产品和工具为驻留在企业任何位置的数据提供全方位的、有效的存储管理和保护。

  10. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  11. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [School of Biosystem and Biomedical Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Eui Kwan [Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  12. The influence of electric field and confinement on cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Samorajski, Justin; Kreimer, Rachel; Searson, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense and respond to endogenous electric fields is important in processes such as wound healing, development, and nerve regeneration. In cell culture, many epithelial and endothelial cell types respond to an electric field of magnitude similar to endogenous electric fields by moving preferentially either parallel or antiparallel to the field vector, a process known as galvanotaxis. Here we report on the influence of dc electric field and confinement on the motility of fibroblast cells using a chip-based platform. From analysis of cell paths we show that the influence of electric field on motility is much more complex than simply imposing a directional bias towards the cathode or anode. The cell velocity, directedness, as well as the parallel and perpendicular components of the segments along the cell path are dependent on the magnitude of the electric field. Forces in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are in competition with one another in a voltage-dependent manner, which ultimately govern the trajectories of the cells in the presence of an electric field. To further investigate the effects of cell reorientation in the presence of a field, cells are confined within microchannels to physically prohibit the alignment seen in 2D environment. Interestingly, we found that confinement results in an increase in cell velocity both in the absence and presence of an electric field compared to migration in 2D.

  13. The influence of electric field and confinement on cell motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ja Huang

    Full Text Available The ability of cells to sense and respond to endogenous electric fields is important in processes such as wound healing, development, and nerve regeneration. In cell culture, many epithelial and endothelial cell types respond to an electric field of magnitude similar to endogenous electric fields by moving preferentially either parallel or antiparallel to the field vector, a process known as galvanotaxis. Here we report on the influence of dc electric field and confinement on the motility of fibroblast cells using a chip-based platform. From analysis of cell paths we show that the influence of electric field on motility is much more complex than simply imposing a directional bias towards the cathode or anode. The cell velocity, directedness, as well as the parallel and perpendicular components of the segments along the cell path are dependent on the magnitude of the electric field. Forces in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are in competition with one another in a voltage-dependent manner, which ultimately govern the trajectories of the cells in the presence of an electric field. To further investigate the effects of cell reorientation in the presence of a field, cells are confined within microchannels to physically prohibit the alignment seen in 2D environment. Interestingly, we found that confinement results in an increase in cell velocity both in the absence and presence of an electric field compared to migration in 2D.

  14. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  15. The dark side of solar photospheric G-band bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    Bright, small-scale magnetic elements found mainly in intergranular lanes at the solar surface are named bright points (BPs). They show high contrasts in Fraunhofer G-band observations and are described by nearly vertical slender flux tubes or sheets. A recent comparison between BP observations in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectral range recorded with the balloon-borne observatory Sunrise and state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations revealed a kilogauss magnetic field for 98% of the synthetic BPs. Here we address the opposite question, namely which fraction of pixels hosting kilogauss fields coincides with an enhanced G-band brightness. We carried out 3D radiation MHD simulations for three magnetic activity levels (corresponding to the quiet Sun, weak and strong plage) and performed a full spectral line synthesis in the G-band. Only 7% of the kilogauss pixels in our quiet-Sun simulation coincide with a brightness lower than the mean quiet-Sun intensity, while 23% of the pixels in the weak-plage simulation and even 49% in the strong-plage simulation are associated with a local darkening. Dark strong-field regions are preferentially found in the cores of larger flux patches that are rare in the quiet Sun, but more common in plage regions, often in the vertices of granulation cells. The significant brightness shortfall in the core of larger flux patches coincides with a slight magnetic field weakening. Kilogauss elements in the quiet Sun are, on average, brighter than similar features in plage regions. Almost all strong-field pixels display a more or less vertical magnetic field orientation. Hence, in the quiet Sun, G-band BPs correspond almost one-to-one with kilogauss elements. In weak plage, the correspondence is still very good, but not perfect.

  16. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Kwang-Ho; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-01-01

    The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  17. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  18. Most Luminous z=9-10 Galaxies: A First Determination of the Bright End of the z~9 and z~10 UV Luminosity Functions using all five CANDELS Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwens, R J; Labbe, I; Illingworth, G D; Fazio, G; Coe, D; Holwerda, B; Smit, R; Stefanon, M; van Dokkum, P G; Trenti, M; Ashby, M; Huang, J; Spitler, L; Straatman, C; Bradley, L; Magee, D

    2015-01-01

    The deep, wide-area (900 arcmin**2) near-IR/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS program represents a significant resource for constraining the bright end of the z~9 and z~10 luminosity functions (LFs) in the UV. We recently reported the discovery of 6 luminous z~9-10 candidates over the GOODS-North+South fields, but extending this search to the full CANDELS program was limited due to the lack of HST-depth 1.05-micron observations in the other 3 CANDELS fields. Here we attempt to significantly realize the potential of CANDELS for z=9-10 science by combining a search over all 5 fields with results from a new HST program (B9-CANDELS) designed to follow up the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns. The targeted z~9-10 candidates are preselected by taking advantage of the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-IR observations. With our follow-up program now 91% complete, we identify 4 new high-prob...

  19. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  20. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  1. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  2. Coupled computation method of physics fields in aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周乃君; 梅炽; 姜昌伟; 周萍; 李劼

    2003-01-01

    Considering importance of study on physics fields and computer simulation for aluminum reduction cells so as to optimize design on aluminum reduction cells and develop new type of cells, based on analyzing coupled relation of physics fields in aluminum reduction cells, the mathematics and physics models were established and a coupled computation method on distribution of electric current and magnetic field, temperature profile and metal velocity in cells was developed. The computational results in 82kA prebaked cells agree well with the measured results, and the errors of maxium value calculated for three main physics property fields are less than 10%, which proves that the model and arithmetic are available. So the software developed can be not only applied to optimization design on traditional aluminum reduction cells, but also to establishing better technology basis to develop new drained aluminum reduction cells.

  3. Directed cell movement in pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, K; Gruler, H

    1994-01-01

    Human granulocytes exposed to pulsed electric guiding fields were investigated. The trajectories were determined from digitized pictures (phase contrast). The basic results are: (i) No directed response was induced by pulsed electric guiding fields having a zero averaged field. (ii) A directed response was induced by pulsed electric guiding fields having a non-zero averaged field. (iii) The directed response was enhanced for pulse sequences having a repetition time of 8 s. (iv) The lag-time between signal recognition and cellular response was 8-10 s. The results are discussed in the framework of a self-ignition model.

  4. HAT-P-56b: A bright highly inflated massive Hot Jupiter around An F star in K2.0 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b, a transiting high inflated hot-jupiter orbiting a F type star in the field 0 of the NASA K2 mission, by the HATNet survey. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with the highprecision photometry obervation by the K2 mission, as well as radial velocity to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass around ~2.2 Mjunp, a radius of ~1.5 Rjup, and transits its host star with a period of 2.79d. The host star has a V band magnitude of 10.9, Mass of 1.29 Msun, and radius of 1.433 Rsun. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among one of the largest compare to planets with similar mass, making it an interesting target for following up atmospherical observations.

  5. The Influence of Brightness on Functional Assessment by mfERG: A Study on Scaffolds Used in Retinal Cell Transplantation in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Christiansen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of membrane brightness on multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs, we implanted poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA membranes in the subretinal space of 11 porcine eyes. We compared membranes with their native shiny white color with membranes that were stained with a blue dye (Brilliant Blue. Histological and electrophysiological evaluation of the overlying retina was carried out 6 weeks after implantation. Histologically, both white and blue membranes degraded in a spongiform manner leaving a disrupted outer retina with no preserved photoreceptor segments. Multifocal ERG revealed the white membranes to have a significantly higher P1-amplitude ratio than the blue (P=0.027, and a correlation between brightness ratio and P1-amplitude ratio was found (r=0.762. Based on our findings, we conclude that bright subretinal objects can produce normal mfERG amplitude ratios even when the adjacent photoreceptors are missing. Functional assessment with mfERG in scaffold implant studies should therefore be evaluated with care.

  6. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  7. Nanotomography of Cell Surfaces with Evanescent Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM and its application to nanotomography of cell surfaces are described. Present applications include (1 3D imaging of chromosomes in their metaphase to demonstrate axial resolution in the nanometre range, (2 measurements of cell-substrate topology, which upon cholesterol depletion shows some loosening of cell-substrate contacts, and (3 measurements of cell topology upon photodynamic therapy (PDT, which demonstrate cell swelling and maintenance of focal contacts. The potential of the method for in vitro diagnostics, but also some requirements and limitations are discussed.

  8. Video Field Studies with your Cell Phone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Fraser, Euan

    2010-01-01

    Many researchers and practitioners in HCI, Interaction Design, Design Anthropology swear to video when dung field studies of potential users. This is due to the power of the media for capturing practices and contexts, conveying empathy, and engaging audiences. Newcomers to the field, and in parti......Many researchers and practitioners in HCI, Interaction Design, Design Anthropology swear to video when dung field studies of potential users. This is due to the power of the media for capturing practices and contexts, conveying empathy, and engaging audiences. Newcomers to the field...

  9. How Bright Is the Sun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sequence of activities designed to allow eighth grade students to deal with one of the fundamental relationships that govern energy distribution. Activities guide students to measure light bulb brightness, discover the inverse square law, compare light bulb light to candle light, and measure sun brightness. (two references) (MCO)

  10. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Hazmin Sabri, Nor; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  11. Effect of Magnetic Field on L-Strain Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ulakoglu, G; Atak, C; Rzakoulieva, A; Danilov, V I; Alikamanoglu, S

    2000-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic and magnetic fields are currently being made useful in many fields, especially in medicine. In this research work, L-Strain cells which are a type of fibrosarcoma cells were exposed to a magnetic flow of 2-26 mT in periods of 1, 2, 3 and 4 minutes. The L-Strain cells, which were exposed to the magnetic field for these periods, were counted after 24 and 48 hours, when compared with the controls, it was observed that in groups of 1 and 4 minutes exposure a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the number of cells occurred. The per cent of labelling index of L-Strain cells exposed to the magnetic field for 1 and 4 minutes decreased significantly also in comparison to the controls.

  12. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  13. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    .]. -- Working Group 1. Summary of working group 1 on electron sources / M. Ferrario and G. Gatti. Design and RF measurements of an X-band accelerating structure for the SPARC project / D. Alesini ... [et al.]. Mitigation of RF gun breakdown by removal of tuning rods in high field regions / A.M. Cook... [et al.]. Measurements of quantum efficiency of Mg films produced by pulsed laser ablation deposition for application to bright electron sources / G. Gatti ... [et al.]. The S-band 1.6 cell RF gun correlated energy spread dependence on Pi and 0 mode relative amplitude / F. Schmerge ... [et al.]. RF gun photo-emission model for metal cathodes including time dependent emission / J.F. Schmerge ... [et al.]. Superconducting photocathodes / J. Smedley ... [et al.]. -- Working Group 2. Summary of Working Group 2: diagnostics and beam manipulation / G. Travish. Observation of coherent edge radiation emitted by a 100 Femtosecond compressed electron beam / G. Andonian, M, Dunning, E. Hemsing, J. B. Rosenzweig ... [et al.]. PARMELA simulations for PITZ: first machine studies and interpretation of measurements / M. Boscolo ... [et al.]. The LCLS single-shot relative bunch length monitor system / M.P. Dunning ... [et al.]. Beam shaping and permanent magnet quadrupole focusing with applications to the plasma wakefield accelerator / R.J. England ... [et al.]. Commissioning of the SPARC movable emittance meter and its first operation at PITZ / D. Filippetto... [et al.]. Experimental testing of dynamically optimized photoelectron beams / J.B. Rosenzweig ... [et al.]. Synchronization between the laser and electron beam in a photocathode RF gun / A. Sakumi ... [et al.]. Method of bunch radiation photochronography with 10 Femtosecond and less resolution / A. Tron and I. Merinov -- Working Group 3. New challenges in theory and modeling-summary for working group 3. L. Giannessi. Resonant modes in a 1.6 cells RF gun / M. Ferrario and C. Ronsivalle. Emittance degradation due to wake fields in a high

  14. The LBT Boötes Field Survey. I. The Rest-frame Ultraviolet and Near-infrared Luminosity Functions and Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies at Z ~ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fuyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard F.; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Davé, Romeel

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U spec-band imaging survey (9 deg2) covering the NOAO Boötes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by >=3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z ~ 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z ~ 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 μm]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z ~ 7 and z ~ 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University

  15. On the origin of facular brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Kostik, R

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the CaIIH line core brightness on the strength and inclination of photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the solar disc center. We use three simultaneous datasets obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of BaII 4554 A line registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in FeI 1.56 $\\mu$m lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in CaIIH that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the CaIIH brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, that propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature min...

  16. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M; Grygar, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Hrabovsk'y, M; Mandat, D; Nosek, D; Palatka, M; Pandey, S B; Pech, M; Schovanek, P; De Postigo, A U; Vítek, S; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin; R}\\'idk\\'y, Jan {; Grygar, Ji{r}\\'i; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hrabovsk\\'y, Miroslav; Mand\\'at, Du{s}an; Nosek, Dalibor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pandey, Shashi B.; Pech, Miroslav; Schov\\'anek, Petr; S}m\\'ida, Radom\\'ir {; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; V\\'itek, Stanislav

    2006-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ~ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  17. Emittance measurement of high-brightness microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Yuriko (Fukuoka Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, S.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-09-01

    Arrays of microtriodes have recently become available due to the development of microfabricated field-emission electron sources. Computer simulation has shown that the brightness of beams emitted by them is significantly higher than that of the common microbeams, and possible application of the accelerated beam to free electron lasers has been discussed. Experimentation on beam generation has started, but methods for diagnosing the beam have not yet been established. Difficulty is predicted, because of the high brightness, in applying the conventional methods of emittance measurement. In this paper we propose a new method that determines the emittance without using apertures. The cross section of a converging beam is elongated by a quadrupole lens, and parameters of the emittance ellipse are obtained from the beam size on a screen when changing either the strength or the axial position of the quadrupole lens. (author).

  18. Variations in the Bivariate Brightness Distribution with different galaxy types

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, N; Lemon, D; Liske, J; Cross, Nicholas; Driver, Simon; Lemon, David; Liske, Jochen

    2002-01-01

    We present Bivariate Brightness Distributions (BBDs) for four spectral types discriminated by the 2dFGRS. We discuss the photometry and completeness of the 2dFGRS using a deep, wide-field CCD imaging survey. We find that there is a strong luminosity-surface brightness correlation amongst galaxies with medium to strong emission features, with gradient $\\beta_{\\mu}=0.25\\pm0.05$ and width $\\sigma_{\\mu}=0.56\\pm0.01$. Strong absorption line galaxies, show a bimodal distribution, with no correlation between luminosity and surface brightness.

  19. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    OpenAIRE

    Xinguang Cao; Hiroyuki Ito

    2011-01-01

    Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours) for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of t...

  20. Bright new world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroó, Norbert; Rácz, Péter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, Pf. 49 (Hungary); Varró, Sándor [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, Pf. 49 (Hungary); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nonprofit Kft., Dugonics tér 13, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2016-02-15

    Surface plasmons (SPOs) have been excited by intense femtosecond laser pulses on a gold film at room temperature and their near field has been analyzed by the intensity dependent response of an STM and by studying the spectra of multiplasmon emitted electrons. Around 80 GW/cm{sup 2} laser intensity, anomalies have been found in both cases, interpreted as the stepping in of electron pairing, transition to a diamagnetic state, and by anomalous Faraday rotation.

  1. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: flow field for efficient air operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F.N.; Tsukada, A.; Haas, O.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A new flow field was designed for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack with an active area of 200 cm{sup 2} for operation at low air stoichiometry and low air over pressure. Optimum of gas flow and channel dimensions were calculated based on the required pressure drop in the fluid. Single cells and a bi-cell stack with the new flow field show an improved current/voltage characteristic when operated at low air stoichiometries as compared to that of the previous non optimized design. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  2. Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation of heat flux mitigation using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüskow, Karl Felix; Kemnitz, S.; Bandelow, G.; Duras, J.; Kahnfeld, D.; Matthias, P.; Schneider, R.; Konigorski, D.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-in-cell (PIC) method was used to simulate heat flux mitigation experiments with partially ionised argon. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of reducing heat flux towards a target using magnetic fields. Modelling using the PIC method is able to reproduce the heat flux mitigation qualitatively. This is driven by modified electron transport. Electrons are magnetised and react directly to the external magnetic field. In addition, an increase of radial turbulent transport is also needed to explain the experimental observations in the model. Close to the target an increase of electron density is created. Due to quasi-neutrality, ions follow the electrons. Charge exchange collisions couple the dynamics of the neutrals to the ions and reduce the flow velocity of neutrals by radial momentum transport and subsequent losses. By this, the dominant heat-transport channel by neutrals gets reduced and a reduction of the heat deposition, similar to the experiment, is observed. Using the simulation a diagnostic module for optical emission is developed and its results are compared with spectroscopic measurements and photos from the experiment. The results of this study are in good agreement with the experiment. Experimental observations such as a shrank bright emission region close to the nozzle exit, an additional emission in front of the target and an overall change in colour to red are reproduced by the simulation.

  3. Field-flow fractionation of cells with chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Dora; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Roda, Aldo

    2004-11-12

    Field-flow fractionation is a separation technique characterized by a retention mechanism which makes it suitable for sorting cells over a short analysis time, with low sample carry-over and preserving cell viability. Thanks to its high sensitivity, chemiluminescence detection is suitable for the quantification of just a few cells expressing chemiluminescence or bioluminescence. In this work, different formats for coupling gravitational field-flow fractionation and chemiluminescence detection are explored to achieve ultra-sensitive cell detection in the framework of cell sorting. The study is carried out using human red blood cells as model sample. The best performance is obtained with the on-line coupling format, performed in post-column flow-injection mode. Red cells are isolated from diluted whole human blood in just a few minutes and detected using the liquid phase chemiluminescent reaction of luminol catalysed by the red blood cell heme. The limit of detection is a few hundred injected cells. This is lower than the limit of detection usually achieved by means of conventional colorimetric/turbidimetric methods, and it corresponds to a red blood cell concentration in the injected sample of five orders of magnitude lower than in whole blood.

  4. Electrical field manipulation of cancer cell behavior monitored by whole cell biosensing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Melnick, Steven J; Zhang, Xueji; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    All living cells possess electrical characteristics and are thus responsive to, and even generate electric fields and currents. It has been shown that the electrical properties of cancer cells differ from normal proliferating cells, thus electric fields may induce differential effects in normal and cancer cells. Manipulation of these electrical properties may provide a powerful direct and/or adjuvant therapeutic option for cancer. A whole cell impedance-based biosensor to monitor the effects of a range of different frequencies (50 kHz-2 MHz) at low-intensity (growth rate of human SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous HUVECs is reported. Rapid real-time monitoring of the SKOV3 behavior was observed as the alternating electric fields were applied and the impedimetric response of the cells was recorded. The cells were also labeled with propidium iodide to examine morphological changes and cell viability with fluorescence microscopy with trypan blue for comparison. A noticeable decrease in the growth profile of the SKOV3 was observed with the application of 200 kHz alternating electric fields indicating specific inhibitory effects on dividing cells in culture in contrast to the HUVECs. The outcome of this research will improve our fundamental understanding of the behavior of cancer cells when exposed to alternating electric fields at specific frequencies and foster the development strategies and optimal parameters for alternating electric field therapies for clinical and drug delivery applications.

  5. High-brightness ultra-cold metastable neon-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents detailed characteristics of an ultra-cold bright metastable neon atomic beam which we have been using for atom-interferometric applications. The basis of the device is an atomic beam released from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) which is operated with a high intensity trapping laser, high magnetic quadrupole field, and large laser detuining. Mainly due to the complex structure of three dimensional magnetic field and laser beams, a bright small spot of atoms is formed near the center of the quadrupole magnetic field under an appropriate operating condition. We obtained the minimum trap diameter of 50 micron meter, the atomic density nearly 10^{13}cm^{-3}, and the atomic temperature slightly less than the Doppler limited temperature of 200 micro-K. By releasing trapped atoms we obtained an bright cold atomic beam which is not far from the collision limited atomic density.

  6. Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinka, Marek, E-mail: mag@iq.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Gawron, Stanisław, E-mail: s.gawron@komel.katowice.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Sieroń, Aleksander, E-mail: sieron1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Pawłowska–Góral, Katarzyna, E-mail: kgoral@sum.edu.pl [Department of Food and Nutrition in Sosnowiec. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 8 Jednosci Street, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Cieślar, Grzegorz, E-mail: cieslar1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Sieroń–Stołtny, Karolina [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland)

    2013-04-15

    Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2–4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells′ cultures margins). -- Highlights: ► We present test chamber to be used for in vitro cell culture in static magnetic field. ► The technical data of the chamber construction was presented. ► 2D versus 3D simulation of static magnetic field distribution in chamber was reported. ► We report the accuracy of 2D calculation than 3D.

  7. Transient electrical field across cellular membranes: pulsed electric field treatment of microbial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timoshkin, I V [High Voltage Technologies Group, Institute for Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); MacGregor, S J [High Voltage Technologies Group, Institute for Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Fouracre, R A [High Voltage Technologies Group, Institute for Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Crichton, B H [High Voltage Technologies Group, Institute for Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Anderson, J G [Robertson Trust Laboratory for Electronic Sterilization Technologies (ROLEST), Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-07

    The pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of liquid and pumpable products contaminated with microorganisms has attracted significant interest from the pulsed power and bioscience research communities particularly because the inactivation mechanism is non-thermal, thereby allowing retention of the original nutritional and flavour characteristics of the product. Although the biological effects of PEF have been studied for several decades, the physical mechanisms of the interaction of the fields with microorganisms is still not fully understood. The present work is a study of the dynamics of the electrical field both in a PEF treatment chamber with dielectric barriers and in the plasma (cell) membrane of a microbial cell. It is shown that the transient process can be divided into three physical phases, and models for these phases are proposed and briefly discussed. The complete dynamics of the time development of the electric field in a spherical dielectric shell representing the cellular membrane is then obtained using an analytical solution of the Ohmic conduction problem. It was found that the field in the membrane reaches a maximum value that could be two orders of magnitude higher than the original Laplacian electrical field in the chamber, and this value was attained in a time comparable to the field relaxation time in the chamber. Thus, the optimal duration of the field during PEF treatment should be equal to such a time.

  8. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  9. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  10. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Chuan Mo; Zi-Jian Zhang; Dong-Liang Wang; Ying Liu; Bartlett, Perry F.; Rong-Qiao He

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expres...

  11. Consecutive Bright Pulses in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Palfreyman, Jim L; Dickey, John M; Young, Timothy G; Hotan, Claire E; 10.1088/2041-8205/735/1/L17

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  12. Rapid microwave synthesis of N-doped carbon nanodots with high fluorescence brightness for cell imaging and sensitive detection of iron (III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Lu, Jingbo; Zhou, Xiaoli; Guo, Chunyan; Wang, Chuanhu

    2017-02-01

    We rapidly prepared N-doped photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CNDs) with the one-step microwave irradiation method using diammonium hydrogen citrate as the carbon source. The as-prepared CNDs possessed quasispherical morphology and a high quantum yield of about 26.8%, which was higher than the CNDs obtained by most other microwave-assisted methods. Moreover, the luminescent CNDs could be efficiently uptaken by BGC-823 cells and CT26.WT cells, and exhibited low cytotoxicity and favorable biocompatibility, making them suitable candidates for cell imaging. In addition, the CNDs could be utilized for Fe3+ ions sensitive detection with a detection limit of 180 nM.

  13. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy & its application in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    There are many powerful microscopy technologies available for the investigation of bulk materials as well as for thin film samples. Nevertheless, for imaging an interface, especially live cells on a substrate and ultra thin-films, only Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is available. This TIRF microscopy allows imaging without interference of the bulk. Various approaches are employed in fluorescence microscopy applications to restrict the excitation and detection of fluorophores to a thin region of the specimen. Elimination of background fluorescence from outside the focal plane can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and consequently, the spatial resolution of the features or events of interest. TIRF microscopy is an evanescent field based microscopy. In this method, fluorescent dyes are only excited within an evanescent field: roughly within 100 nm above a glass coverslip. This will allow imaging surface and interfacial issues of the glass coverslip and an adjacent material. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) microscopy is a new development for imaging cell-substrate interactions in real time and in vitro. It is an alternative to TIRF microscopy. In this method the light is coupled into a waveguide via an optical grating. The coupled light propagates as a waveguide mode and exhibits an evanescent field on top of the waveguide. This can be used as a surface-bound illumination source to excite fluorophores. This evanescent field serves as an extremely powerful tool for quality control of thin films, to study cell-substrate contacts, and investigating the effect of external agents and drugs on the cell-substrate interaction in real time and in vitro. This new method has been established and optimized to minimize non-uniformity, scattering and photo bleaching issues. Visualizing and quantifying of the cell-substrates and solid thin films have been carried out by WEFF microscopy. The images of the cell-substrate interface

  14. Expansion of circulating CD56bright natural killer cells in patients with JAK2-positive chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms during treatment with interferon-α

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Caroline H; Hansen, Morten; Brimnes, Marie K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, major molecular remissions have been observed in patients with JAK2-positive chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) after therapy with IFN-α. IFN-α is known to have altering effects on immune cells involved in immune surveillance and might consequently enhance anti-tumor imm......In recent years, major molecular remissions have been observed in patients with JAK2-positive chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) after therapy with IFN-α. IFN-α is known to have altering effects on immune cells involved in immune surveillance and might consequently enhance anti......-tumor immune response against the JAK2-mutated clone. The objective of this study was to investigate circulating levels and phenotype of natural killer cells in 29 JAK2-positive MPN patients during IFN-α treatment. Furthermore, functional studies of NK cells upon target-cell recognition and cytokine...... with IFN-α skews the human NK population toward a helper type that may assist in CD8(+) T cell priming in lymphoid tissues at the expense of their immediate cytotoxic functions in peripheral blood and tissues....

  15. Graphene-on-Silicon Near-Field Thermophotovoltaic Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    A graphene layer on top of a dielectric can dramatically influence the ability of the material for radiative heat transfer. This property of graphene is used to improve the performance and reduce costs of near-field thermophotovoltaic cells. Instead of low-band-gap semiconductors it is proposed to u

  16. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  17. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  18. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Milgrom-Hoffman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1 in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1 along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  19. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  20. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  1. The input-output transformation of the hippocampal granule cells: from grid cells to place fields

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Grid cells in the rat medial entorhinal cortex fire (periodically) over the entire environment. These cells provide input to hippocampal granule cells whose output is characterized by one or more small place fields. We sought to understand how this input-output transformation occurs. Available information allows simulation of this process with no freely adjustable parameters. We first examined the spatial distribution of excitation in granule cells produced by the convergence of excitatory in...

  2. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  3. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  4. High gradient magnetic field microstructures for magnetophoretic cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced magnetic blood fractionation by making integrated miniature devices possible. A ferromagnetic microstructure array that is integrated with a microfluidic channel rearranges an applied magnetic field to create a high gradient magnetic field (HGMF). By leveraging the differential magnetic susceptibilities of cell types contained in a host medium, such as paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs) and diamagnetic white blood cells (WBCs), the resulting HGMF can be used to continuously separate them without attaching additional labels, such as magnetic beads, to them. We describe the effect of these ferromagnetic microstructure geometries have on the blood separation efficacy by numerically simulating the influence of microstructure height and pitch on the HGMF characteristics and resulting RBC separation. Visualizations of RBC trajectories provide insight into how arrays can be optimized to best separate these cells from a host fluid. Periodic microstructures are shown to moderate the applied field due to magnetic interference between the adjacent teeth of an array. Since continuous microstructures do not similarly weaken the resultant HGMF, they facilitate significantly higher RBC separation. Nevertheless, periodic arrays are more appropriate for relatively deep microchannels since, unlike continuous microstructures, their separation effectiveness is independent of depth. The results are relevant to the design of microfluidic devices that leverage HGMFs to fractionate blood by separating RBCs and WBCs.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  6. Spectral evolution of bright NS LMXBs

    CERN Document Server

    Paizis, A; Mainardi, L I; Titarchuk, L

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical and observational support suggests that the spectral evolution of neutron-star LMXBs, including transient hard X-ray tails, may be explained by the interplay between thermal and bulk motion Comptonization. In this framework, we developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting XSPEC package which takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e. bulk) Comptonization, CompTB. Using data from the INTEGRAL satellite, we tested our model on broad band spectra of a sample of persistently low magnetic field bright neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binaries, covering different spectral states. The case of the bright source GX 5-1 is presented here. Particular attention is given to the transient powerlaw-like hard X-ray (above 30 keV) tail that we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process, qualitatively describing the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system.

  7. Transient expression in tobacco Bright Yellow 2 cells and pollen grains: A fast, efficient and reliable system for functional promoter analysis of plant genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratić Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression is mediated by DNA sequences directly upstream from the coding sequences, recruited transcription factors and RNA polymerase in a spatially-defined manner. Understanding promoter strength and regulation would enhance our understanding of gene expression. The goal of this study was to develop a fast, efficient and reliable method for testing basal promoter activity and identifying core sequences within its pollen specific elements. In this paper we examined the functionality of buckwheat metallothionein promoter by a histochemical GUS assay in two transient expression systems: BY2 cells and pollen grains. Strong promoter activity was observed in both systems.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of 8-O-Carboxymethylpyranine (CM-Pyranine as a Bright, Violet-Emitting, Fluid-Phase Fluorescent Marker in Cell Biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Legenzov

    Full Text Available To avoid spectral interference with common fluorophores in multicolor fluorescence microscopy, a fluid-phase tracer with excitation and emission in the violet end of the visible spectrum is desirable. CM-pyranine is easily synthesized and purified. Its excitation and emission maxima at 401.5 nm and 428.5 nm, respectively, are well suited for excitation by 405-nm diode lasers now commonly available on laser-scanning microscopes. High fluorescence quantum efficiency (Q = 0.96 and strong light absorption (ε405 > 25,000 M-1cm-1 together make CM-pyranine the brightest violet aqueous tracer. The fluorescence spectrum of CM-pyranine is invariant above pH 4, which makes it a good fluid-phase marker in all cellular compartments. CM-pyranine is very photostable, is retained for long periods by cells, does not self-quench, and has negligible excimer emission. The sum of its properties make CM-pyranine an ideal fluorescent tracer. The use of CM-pyranine as a fluid-phase marker is demonstrated by multicolor confocal microscopy of cells that are also labeled with lipid and nuclear markers that have green and red fluorescence emission, respectively.

  9. Cancer stem cells and field cancerization of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple, M; Suresh, Amritha; Das, Debashish; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2015-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a high propensity for local failure, which is attributed to recurrence at the primary site or the development of second primary tumors (SPT). Field cancerization that refers to the existence of transformed cells in areas adjacent to the primary tumor, has been attributed to be one of the probable reasons underlying disease relapse. The carcinogenic process necessitates multiple molecular events for the transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. This implies that only the long-time residents of the epithelium, such as the stem cells, might be the candidates capable of accumulating these genetic hits. These transformed stem cells- the 'Cancer stem cells' (CSCs), are further known to be equipped with the properties of tumor initiation and migration, both of which are essential for orchestrating field cancerization. The concept that the CSCs might be responsible for field cancerization in OSCC has not been explored extensively. If the role of CSCs as the primary units of field cancerization process is established, their presence in the mucosa adjacent to the tumor may be an indicator for local recurrence and/or development of second primary tumors. In this review, we examine the available evidence in literature exploring the possibilities of CSCs driving the process of field cancerization and thereby being the underlying mechanism for disease recurrence and development of SPT.

  10. Simulation and Optimization of Silicon Solar Cell Back Surface Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souad TOBBECHE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, TCAD Silvaco (Technology Computer Aided Design software has been used to study the Back Surface Field (BSF effect of a p+ silicon layer for a n+pp+ silicon solar cell. To study this effect, the J-V characteristics and the external quantum efficiency (EQE are simulated under AM 1.5 illumination for two types of cells. The first solar cell is without BSF (n+p structure while the second one is with BSF (n+pp+ structure. The creation of the BSF on the rear face of the cell results in efficiency h of up to 16.06% with a short-circuit current density Jsc = 30.54 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage Voc = 0.631 V, a fill factor FF = 0.832 and a clear improvement of the spectral response obtained in the long wavelengths range. An electric field and a barrier of potential are created by the BSF and located at the junction p+/p with a maximum of 5800 V/cm and 0.15 V, respectively. The optimization of the BSF layer shows that the cell performance improves with the p+ thickness between 0.35 – 0.39 µm, the p+ doping dose is about 2 × 1014 cm-2, the maximum efficiency up to 16.19 %. The cell efficiency is more sensitive to the value of the back surface recombination velocity above a value of 103 cm/s in n+p than n+pp+ solar cell.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9565

  11. Evidence that pulsed electric field treatment enhances the cell wall porosity of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeva, Valentina; Galutzov, Bojidar; Teissie, Justin

    2014-02-01

    The application of rectangular electric pulses, with 0.1-2 ms duration and field intensity of 2.5-4.5 kV/cm, to yeast suspension mediates liberation of cytoplasmic proteins without cell lysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pulsed electric field with similar parameters on cell wall porosity of different yeast species. We found that electrically treated cells become more susceptible to lyticase digestion. In dependence on the strain and the electrical conditions, cell lysis was obtained at 2-8 times lower enzyme concentration in comparison with control untreated cells. The increase of the maximal lysis rate was between two and nine times. Furthermore, when applied at low concentration (1 U/ml), the lyticase enhanced the rate of protein liberation from electropermeabilized cells without provoking cell lysis. Significant differences in the cell surface of control and electrically treated cells were revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Data presented in this study allow us to conclude that electric field pulses provoke not only plasma membrane permeabilization, but also changes in the cell wall structure, leading to increased wall porosity.

  12. Thermal fields and saturation discussion in a PEMFC single cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramousse, J. [Quebec Univ., Trois-Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O.; Maillet, D. [Nancy-Univ., Vandoeuvre (France). Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee

    2007-07-01

    Water condensation in a fuel cell can imply drastic cell voltage drops. This is caused by flooding the electrodes or by forming water caps in the feeding channels. For high current densities, water condensation is an important point worth studying. Saturation mechanisms significantly depend on temperature fields through the saturation pressure. Vapour water partial pressure as well as thermal fields have to be known to analyse water condensation preferential sites. In order to get the temperature distribution for any operating condition, using numerical simulations, this paper presented the results of a study on the nature of heat sources and of the thermal properties of each element in the cell including: membrane, gas diffusion layers, and bipolar plates. The study then evaluated water saturation pressure and compared it to vapour water pressure to predict water condensation conditions. Vapour water pressure was obtained from a mass transport model. The paper provided a detailed discussion about heat source quantification and localization. A two-dimensional steady state thermal model that relied on a previous model of charge and mass transfer was then presented. A discussion about water condensation in the cell was also provided. It was concluded that the good thermal conductivity of the bipolar plates improved thermal transfer near the ribs. Temperatures were therefore lower at this location than near the gas channels. 52 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. A simple theory of back surface field /BSF/ solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Roos, O.

    1978-01-01

    A theory of an n-p-p/+/ junction is developed, entirely based on Shockley's depletion layer approximation. Under the further assumption of uniform doping the electrical characteristics of solar cells as a function of all relevant parameters (cell thickness, diffusion lengths, etc.) can quickly be ascertained with a minimum of computer time. Two effects contribute to the superior performance of a BSF cell (n-p-p/+/ junction) as compared to an ordinary solar cell (n-p junction). The sharing of the applied voltage among the two junctions (the n-p and the p-p/+/ junction) decreases the dark current and the reflection of minority carriers by the builtin electron field of the p-p/+/ junction increases the short-circuit current. The theory predicts an increase in the open-circuit voltage (Voc) with a decrease in cell thickness. Although the short-circuit current decreases at the same time, the efficiency of the cell is virtually unaltered in going from a thickness of 200 microns to a thickness of 50 microns. The importance of this fact for space missions where large power-to-weight ratios are required is obvious.

  14. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [Back Surface Field solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the influence of fabrication processes and bulk material properties on the behavior of back surface field (BSF) cells is reported. It is concluded that a photovoltage is generated at the p(+), p back junction of the cell. The concept of majority carrier collection is proposed as a possible mechanism for this generation. Advantages accruing to the advent of BSF cells are outlined.

  15. Automated Detection and Tracking of Solar Magnetic Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Crockett, P J; Mathioudakis, M; Keenan, F P

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Bright Points (MBPs) in the internetwork are among the smallest objects in the solar photosphere and appear bright against the ambient environment. An algorithm is presented that can be used for the automated detection of the MBPs in the spatial and temporal domains. The algorithm works by mapping the lanes through intensity thresholding. A compass search, combined with a study of the intensity gradient across the detected objects, allows the disentanglement of MBPs from bright pixels within the granules. Object growing is implemented to account for any pixels that might have been removed when mapping the lanes. The images are stabilized by locating long-lived objects that may have been missed due to variable light levels and seeing quality. Tests of the algorithm employing data taken with the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), reveal that ~90% of MBPs within a 75"x 75" field of view are detected.

  16. Coupling Bright and Dark Plasmonic Lattice Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, S R K; Maes, B; Janssen, O T A; Vecchi, G; Rivas, J Gomez

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of bright and dark Surface Lattice Resonances (SLRs), which are collective Fano resonances in 2D plasmonic crystals. As a result of this coupling, a frequency stop-gap in the dispersion relation of SLRs is observed. The different field symmetries of the low and high frequency SLR bands lead to pronounced differences in their coupling to free space radiation. Standing waves of very narrow spectral width compared to localized surface plasmon resonances are formed at the high frequency band edge, while subradiant damping onsets at the low frequency band edge leading the resonance into darkness. We introduce a coupled oscillator analog to the plasmonic crystal, which serves to elucidate the physics of the coupled plasmonic resonances and to estimate very high quality factors (Q>700) for SLRs, which are the highest known for any 2D plasmonic crystal.

  17. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-03-31

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation.

  18. Origin of first cells at terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y; Bychkov, Andrew Yu; Dibrova, Daria V; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-04-01

    All cells contain much more potassium, phosphate, and transition metals than modern (or reconstructed primeval) oceans, lakes, or rivers. Cells maintain ion gradients by using sophisticated, energy-dependent membrane enzymes (membrane pumps) that are embedded in elaborate ion-tight membranes. The first cells could possess neither ion-tight membranes nor membrane pumps, so the concentrations of small inorganic molecules and ions within protocells and in their environment would equilibrate. Hence, the ion composition of modern cells might reflect the inorganic ion composition of the habitats of protocells. We attempted to reconstruct the "hatcheries" of the first cells by combining geochemical analysis with phylogenomic scrutiny of the inorganic ion requirements of universal components of modern cells. These ubiquitous, and by inference primordial, proteins and functional systems show affinity to and functional requirement for K(+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), and phosphate. Thus, protocells must have evolved in habitats with a high K(+)/Na(+) ratio and relatively high concentrations of Zn, Mn, and phosphorous compounds. Geochemical reconstruction shows that the ionic composition conducive to the origin of cells could not have existed in marine settings but is compatible with emissions of vapor-dominated zones of inland geothermal systems. Under the anoxic, CO(2)-dominated primordial atmosphere, the chemistry of basins at geothermal fields would resemble the internal milieu of modern cells. The precellular stages of evolution might have transpired in shallow ponds of condensed and cooled geothermal vapor that were lined with porous silicate minerals mixed with metal sulfides and enriched in K(+), Zn(2+), and phosphorous compounds.

  19. The possible origin of facular brightness in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies the dependence of the Ca ii H line core brightness on the strength and inclination of the photospheric magnetic field, and on the parameters of convective and wave motions in a facular region at the center of the solar disc. We use three simultaneous data sets that were obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife): (1) spectra of Ba ii 4554 Å line, registered with the instrument TESOS to measure the variations of intensity and velocity through the photosphere up to the temperature minimum; (2) spectropolarimetric data in Fe i 1.56 μm lines (registered with the instrument TIP II) to measure photospheric magnetic fields; (3) filtergrams in Ca ii H that give information about brightness fluctuations in the chromosphere. The results show that the Ca ii H brightness in the facula strongly depends on the power of waves with periods in the 5-min range, which propagate upwards, and also on the phase shift between velocity oscillations at the bottom photosphere and around the temperature minimum height that is measured from Ba ii line. The Ca ii H brightness is maximum at locations where the phase shift between temperature and velocity oscillations lies within 0°-100°. There is an indirect influence of convective motions on the Ca ii H brightness. The higher the amplitude of convective velocities is and the greater the height is where they change their direction of motion, the brighter the facula. In summary, our results lead to conclusions that facular regions appear bright not only because of the Wilson depression in magnetic structures, but also owing to real heating.

  20. Electrochemical cells: linking fields and currents with products and reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    The interplay between the electromagnetism and chemistry within an electrochemical cell (a ‘battery’) is modelled in such a way so as to describe both open and closed circuit conditions. It is found that a classical field theory coupled with a generic model of the chemistry can consistently explain the behaviour of the cell and reproduce standard results. But this model also reveals an interesting interplay between time scales (field and chemical) that leads to a capacitive impedance within the cell. The assumption that the stasis associated with the emf results from the inability of ions to overcome the potential barriers near each electrode is abandoned. Rather, the equilibrium is viewed as dynamic and results from a balance between forward and reverse chemical reactions. Ions are able borrow enough energy to overcome the barriers as predicted by quantum theory to fuel the forward reactions. The probability of transmission (i.e. ‘tunnelling’) is calculated using a method based on the energy-time uncertainty principle.

  1. The influence of electric fields on hippocampal neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Carlos Atico; Fleury, Asha T; Tormos, Christian J; Petruk, Vadim; Chawla, Sagar; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2010-12-01

    The differentiation and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) depend on various in vivo environmental factors or cues, which may include an endogenous electrical field (EF), as observed during nervous system development and repair. In this study, we investigate the morphologic, phenotypic, and mitotic alterations of adult hippocampal NPCs that occur when exposed to two EFs of estimated endogenous strengths. NPCs treated with a 437 mV/mm direct current (DC) EF aligned perpendicularly to the EF vector and had a greater tendency to differentiate into neurons, but not into oligodendrocytes or astrocytes, compared to controls. Furthermore, NPC process growth was promoted perpendicularly and inhibited anodally in the 437 mV/mm DC EF. Yet fewer cells were observed in the DC EF, which in part was due to a decrease in cell viability. The other EF applied was a 46 mV/mm alternating current (AC) EF. However, the 46 mV/mm AC EF showed no major differences in alignment or differentiation, compared to control conditions. For both EF treatments, the percent of mitotic cells during the last 14 h of the experiment were statistically similar to controls. Reported here, to our knowledge, is the first evidence of adult NPC differentiation affected in an EF in vitro. Further investigation and application of EFs on stem cells is warranted to elucidate the utility of EFs to control phenotypic behavior. With progress, the use of EFs may be engineered to control differentiation and target the growth of transplanted cells in a stem cell-based therapy to treat nervous system disorders.

  2. VERITAS Observations under Bright Moonlight

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The presence of moonlight is usually a limiting factor for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes due to the high sensitivity of the camera photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In their standard configuration, the extra noise limits the sensitivity of the experiment to gamma-ray signals and the higher PMT currents also accelerates PMT aging. Since fall 2012, observations have been carried out with VERITAS under bright moonlight (Moon illumination $> 35\\%$), in two observing modes, by reducing the voltage applied to the PMTs and with UV bandpass filters, which allow observations up to $\\sim80\\%$ Moon illumination resulting in $29\\%$ more observing time over the course of the year. In this presentation, we provide details of these new observing modes and their performance relative to the standard VERITAS observations.

  3. Decline of cell viability and mitochondrial activity in mouse skeletal muscle cell in a hypomagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing-Peng; Mo, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Hypomagnetic field (HMF), one of the key environmental risk factors for astronauts traveling in outer space, has previously been shown to repress locomotion of mammalians. However, underlying mechanisms of how HMF affects the motor system remains poorly understood. In this study, we created an HMF (<3 μT) by eliminating geomagnetic field (GMF, ∼50 μT) and exposed primary mouse skeletal muscle cells to this low magnetic field condition for a period of three days. HMF-exposed cells showed a decline in cell viability relative to GMF control, even though cells appeared normal in terms of morphology and survival rate. After a 3-day HMF-exposure, glucose consumption of skeletal muscle cells was significantly lower than GMF control, accompanied by less adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) content and higher ADP/ATP ratio. In agreement with these findings, mitochondrial membrane potential of HMF-exposed cells was also lower, whereas levels of cellular Reactive Oxygen Species were higher. Moreover, viability and membrane potential of isolated mitochondria were reduced after 1 h HMF-exposure in vitro. Our results indicate that mitochondria can directly respond to HMF at functional level, and suggest that HMF-induced decline in cell functionality results from a reduction in energy production and mitochondrial activity.

  4. The input-output transformation of the hippocampal granule cells: from grid cells to place fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E

    2009-06-10

    Grid cells in the rat medial entorhinal cortex fire (periodically) over the entire environment. These cells provide input to hippocampal granule cells whose output is characterized by one or more small place fields. We sought to understand how this input-output transformation occurs. Available information allows simulation of this process with no freely adjustable parameters. We first examined the spatial distribution of excitation in granule cells produced by the convergence of excitatory inputs from randomly chosen grid cells. Because the resulting summation depends on the number of inputs, it is necessary to use a realistic number (approximately 1200) and to take into consideration their 20-fold variation in strength. The resulting excitation maps have only modest peaks and valleys. To analyze how this excitation interacts with inhibition, we used an E%-max (percentage of maximal suprathreshold excitation) winner-take-all rule that describes how gamma-frequency inhibition affects firing. We found that simulated granule cells have firing maps that have one or more place fields whose size and number approximates those observed experimentally. A substantial fraction of granule cells have no place fields, as observed experimentally. Because the input firing rates and synaptic properties are known, the excitatory charge into granule cells could be calculated (2-3 pC) and was found to be only somewhat larger than required to fire granule cells (1 pC). We conclude that the input-output transformation of dentate granule does not depend strongly on synaptic modification; place field formation can be understood in terms of simple summation of randomly chosen excitatory inputs, in conjunction with a winner-take-all network mechanism.

  5. The influence of cell and nanoparticle properties on heating and cell death in a radiofrequency field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeyev, Yuri; Mark, Colette; Kumar, Natasha; Serda, Rita E

    2017-02-05

    The use of non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) energy to induce mild thermal and non-thermal effects in cancer tissue is under study as an adjuvant to chemo, radio or immuno therapy. This study examines cell specific sensitivities to RF exposure and the potential of nanoparticles to elevate heating rates or enhance biological effects. Increases in the heating rate of water in an RF field operating at 13.56MHz (0.004-0.028°C/s) were positively correlated with concentration of hybrid nanoparticles (1-10mg/ml) consisting of water soluble malonodiserinolamide [60]fullerene (C60-ser) conjugated to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SiO2-C60). The heating rate of highly conductive cell culture media (0.024°C/s) was similar to that of the highest concentration of nanoparticles in water, with no significant increase due to addition of nanoparticles at relevant doses (cell viability, anionic (SiO2 and SiO2-C60) or neutral (C60) nanoparticles did not influence RF-induced cell death, however, cationic nanoparticles (4-100μg/ml) caused dose-dependent increases in RF-induced cell death (24-42% compared to RF only). The effect of cell type, size and immortalization on sensitivity of cells to RF fields was examined in endothelial (HUVEC and HMVEC), fibroblast (primary dermal and L939) and cancer cells (HeLa and 4T1). While the state of cellular immortalization itself did not consistently influence the rate of RF-induced cell death compared to normal cell counter parts, cell size (ranging from 7 to 30μm) negatively correlated with cell sensitivity to RF (21-97% cell death following 6min irradiation). In summary, while nanoparticles do not alter the heating rate of biologically-relevant solutions, they can increase RF-induced cell death based on intrinsic cytotoxicity; and cells with smaller radii, and thereby greater surface membrane, are more susceptible to cell damage in an RF field than larger cells.

  6. Entropic and Near-Field Improvements of Thermoradiative Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan K.; Liao, Bolin; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2016-10-01

    A p-n junction maintained at above ambient temperature can work as a heat engine, converting some of the supplied heat into electricity and rejecting entropy by interband emission. Such thermoradiative cells have potential to harvest low-grade heat into electricity. By analyzing the entropy content of different spectral components of thermal radiation, we identify an approach to increase the efficiency of thermoradiative cells via spectrally selecting long-wavelength photons for radiative exchange. Furthermore, we predict that the near-field photon extraction by coupling photons generated from interband electronic transition to phonon polariton modes on the surface of a heat sink can increase the conversion efficiency as well as the power generation density, providing more opportunities to efficiently utilize terrestrial emission for clean energy. An ideal InSb thermoradiative cell can achieve a maximum efficiency and power density up to 20.4% and 327 Wm‑2, respectively, between a hot source at 500 K and a cold sink at 300 K. However, sub-bandgap and non-radiative losses will significantly degrade the cell performance.

  7. Aftereffect of Adaptation to Illusory Brightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguang Cao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several figures are known to induce illusory brightness. We tested whether adaptation to illusory brightness produced an aftereffect in brightness. After viewing a gray square area having illusory brightness (e.g., due to brightness contrast or illusory contours for ten seconds, the illusion-inducing surround vanished. After three seconds, subjects reported whether the square area was seen as brighter than, darker than, or the same brightness as a control gray square area. The luminance of the tested square area was physically unchanged. The results show that when the black surround inducing brightness contrast suddenly became gray (i.e., vanished, the center gray square tended to look darker than a control gray square. Similarly, after viewing a subjective square consisting of black-line terminations, the square area tended to look darker than the control even though the afterimage of the lines could not be seen. These results indicate that induced or illusory brightness causes an aftereffect in brightness regardless of the appearance of negative afterimages of the illusion-inducing components.

  8. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  9. Self-Sealing Wet Chemistry Cell for Field Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Soto, Juancarlos; Lasnik, James; Roark, Shane

    2012-01-01

    In most analytical investigations, there is a need to process complex field samples for the unique detection of analytes, especially when detecting low concentration organic molecules that may identify extraterrestrial life. Wet chemistry based instruments are the techniques of choice for most laboratory- based analysis of organic molecules due to several factors including less fragmentation of fragile biomarkers, and ability to concentrate target species resulting in much lower limits of detection. Development of an automated wet chemistry preparation system that can operate autonomously on Earth and is also designed to operate under Martian ambient conditions will demonstrate the technical feasibility of including wet chemistry on future missions. An Automated Sample Processing System (ASPS) has recently been developed that receives fines, extracts organics through solvent extraction, processes the extract by removing non-organic soluble species, and delivers sample to multiple instruments for analysis (including for non-organic soluble species). The key to this system is a sample cell that can autonomously function under field conditions. As a result, a self-sealing sample cell was developed that can autonomously hermetically seal fines and powder into a container, regardless of orientation of the apparatus. The cap is designed with a beveled edge, which allows the cap to be self-righted as the capping motor engages. Each cap consists of a C-clip lock ring below a crucible O-ring that is placed into a groove cut into the sample cap.

  10. Transcriptome profile of human neuroblastoma cells in the hypomagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, WeiChuan; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, RongQiao

    2014-04-01

    Research has shown that the hypomagnetic field (HMF) can affect embryo development, cell proliferation, learning and memory, and in vitro tubulin assembly. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which the HMF exerts its effect, by comparing the transcriptome profiles of human neuroblastoma cells exposed to either the HMF or the geomagnetic field. A total of 2464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, 216 of which were up-regulated and 2248 of which were down-regulated after exposure to the HMF. These DEGs were found to be significantly clustered into several key processes, namely macromolecule localization, protein transport, RNA processing, and brain function. Seventeen DEGs were verified by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression levels of nine of these DEGs were measured every 6 h. Most notably, MAPK1 and CRY2, showed significant up- and down-regulation, respectively, during the first 6 h of HMF exposure, which suggests involvement of the MAPK pathway and cryptochrome in the early bio-HMF response. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed biological effects of the HMF.

  11. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  12. Induction of Cell Activation Processes by Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtill Simkó

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields (EMF such as those from electric power transmission and distribution lines (50/60 Hz have been associated with increased risk of childhood leukemia, cancer of the nervous system, and lymphomas. Several in vitro studies on EMF effects were performed to clarify the existing controversies, define the risks, and determine the possible mechanisms of adverse effects. In some of these reports, the effects were related to other mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Modification in cell proliferation was observed after EMF exposure and a few reports on cytotoxic effects have also been published. This limited review gives an overview of the current results of scientific research regarding in vitro studies on the effects of power line frequency EMF, but also cell biological mechanisms and their potential involvement in genotoxicity and cytotoxicity are discussed. Cell cycle control and signal transduction processes are included to elucidate the biochemical background of possible interactions. Exposure to EMF has been also linked to the incidence of leukemia and other tumors in some epidemiological studies and is considered as “possibly carcinogenic to humans”, but there is no well-established biological mechanism that explains such a relation. Furthermore, EMF is also shown as a stimulus for immune relevant cells (e.g., macrophages to release free radicals. It is known that chronic activation of macrophages is associated with the onset of phagocytosis and leads to increased formation of reactive oxygen species, which themselves may cause DNA damage and are suggested to lead to carcinogenesis. To demonstrate a possible interaction between EMF and cellular systems, we present a mechanistic model describing cell activation as a major importance for cellular response.

  13. Bright-Dark Vector Screening-Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons in Biased Photorefractive-Photovoltaic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢克清; 钱士雄; 窦春升; 吴振森

    2002-01-01

    We show that the vector beam evolution equations in properly oriented biased photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals can exhibit bright-dark vector solitons, which result from both the bulk photovoltaic effect and the spatially non-uniform screening of the external bias field. By adjusting the polarization of the incident beam to obtain the appropriate ratio of two orthogonal components, these vector solitons can be established. When the bulk photovoltaic effect is negligible, these vector solitons are bright-dark vector screening solitons. When the external field is absent, these vector solitons predict bright-dark vector photovoltaic solitons.

  14. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Campos, I; AsIn, L; Torres, T E; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Mariano Esquillor s/n, CP 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, C, E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Condensed Matter Department, Sciences Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2011-05-20

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH{sub 2}{sup +}) or negative (COOH{sup -}) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  15. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  16. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  17. Bright Star Astrometry with URAT

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) is observing the northern sky since April 2012 for an astrometric survey. Multiple overlaps per year are performed in a single bandpass (680$-$750 nm) using the "redlens" 20 cm aperture astrograph and a mosaic of large CCDs. Besides the regular, deep survey to magnitude 18.5, short exposures with an objective grating are taken to access stars as bright as 3rd magnitude. A brief overview of the program, observing and reductions is given. Positions on the 8 to 20 mas level are obtained of 66,202 Hipparcos stars at current epochs. These are compared to the Hipparcos Catalog to investigate its accuracy. About 20\\% of the observed Hipparcos stars are found to have inconsitent positions with the Hipparcos Catalog prediction on the 3 sigma level or over (about 75 mas or more discrepant position offsets). Some stars are now seen at an arcsec (or 25 sigma) off their Hipparcos Catalog predicted position.

  18. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D) space varying from bright to dark. The

  19. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies. Th

  20. Variations in the Fe mineralogy of bright Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John; Erard, Stephane; Geissler, Paul; Singer, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Bright regions on Mars are interpreted as 'soil' derived by chemical alteration of crustal rocks, whose main pigmentary component is ferric oxide or oxyhydroxide. The mineralogy and mineralogic variability of ferric iron are important evidence for the evolution of Martian soil: mineralogy of ferric phases is sensitive to chemical conditions in their genetic environments, and the spatial distributions of different ferric phases would record a history of both chemical environments and physical mixing. Reflectance spectroscopic studies provide several types of evidence that discriminate possible pigmentary phases, including the position of a crystal field absorption near 0.9 microns and position and strengths of absorptions in the UV-visible wavelength region. Recent telescopic spectra and laboratory measurements of Mars soil analogs suggest that spectral features of bright soil can be explained based on a single pigmentary phase, hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), occurring in both 'nanophase' and more crystalline forms. Here we report on a systematic investigation of Martian bright regions using ISM imaging spectrometer data, in which we examined spatial variations in the position and shape of the approximately 0.9 microns absorption. We found both local and regional heterogeneities that indicate differences in Fe mineralogy. These results demonstrate that bright soils do not represent a single lithology that has been homogenized by eolian mixing, and suggest that weathering of soils in different geologic settings has followed different physical and chemical pathways.

  1. Galaxy selection and the surface brightness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, S S; Schombert, J M

    1995-01-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney (1976) suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman (1970) was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (\\ie approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity ...

  2. Multimillion-cell SAGD models, opportunity for detailed field analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, F. [Schlumberger Canada Limited (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a new thermal oil recovery process used to enhance oil recovery. However, operators have trouble reaching their objectives. A better understanding of reservoir response is necessary to reach the desired production rates. The aim of this paper is to present a new methodology for carrying out a reservoir simulation study. A multimillion-cell model was developed with realistic properties, structural complexity and heterogeneities; both full field and thermal simulations were conducted. Results showed that the computing technology thus developed offers greater accuracy in less time than is required when using conventional techniques. In addition, this methodology provides a higher degree of confidence in the results by bridging the gap between geology and engineering. The paper is a first step in producing a framework and the methodology presented herein will need to be further tested to confirm its benefits over conventional techniques.

  3. Experimental study and comparison of various designs of gas flow fields to PEM fuel cells and cell stack performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to PEM fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells all have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm2. The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still favorable, giving the best single fuel cell performance amongst all the studied flow channel designs. A novel symmetric serpentine flow field was proposed for relatively large size fuel cell application. Four fuel cell stacks each including four cells were assembled using different designs of serpentine flow channels. The output power performances of fuel cell stacks were compared and the novel symmetric serpentine flow field design is recommended for its very good performance.

  4. Field effect passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberle, A.G. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)); Glunz, S. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)); Warta, W. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    In this paper effective surface recombination velocities S[sub eff] at the rear Si-SiO[sub 2] interface of the presently best one-sun silicon solar cell structure are calculated on the basis of measured oxide parameters. A new cell design is proposed allowing for a control of the surface space charge region by a gate voltage. It is shown that the electric field introduced by the positive fixed oxide charge density typically found at thermally oxidized silicon surfaces and the favorable work function difference between the gate metal aluminum and silicon leads to a reduction of S[sub eff] to values well below 1 cm/s at AM1.5 illumination for n-type as well as p-type silicon. At low illumination levels, however, oxidized n-type silicon has much better surface passivation properties than p-type silicon due to the small hole capture cross section ([sigma][sub n]/[sigma][sub p][approx]1000 at midgap). Only at small illumination intensities for p-type substrates or in the case of poor Si-SiO[sub 2] interface quality the incorporation of a gate electrode on the rear surface is a promising tool for further reducing surface recombination losses. (orig.)

  5. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, N.; Santhana Raman, P. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Kan, J. A. van, E-mail: phyjavk@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Khursheed, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore)

    2016-02-15

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  6. Bright Streaks and Dark Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The south polar region of Mars is covered every year by a layer of carbon dioxide ice. In a region called the 'cryptic terrain,' the ice is translucent and sunlight can penetrate through the ice to warm the surface below. The ice layer sublimates (evaporates) from the bottom. The dark fans of dust seen in this image come from the surface below the layer of ice, carried to the top by gas venting from below. The translucent ice is 'visible' by virtue of the effect it has on the tone of the surface below, which would otherwise have the same color and reflectivity as the fans. Bright streaks in this image are fresh frost. The CRISM team has identified the composition of these streaks to be carbon dioxide. Observation Geometry Image PSP_003113_0940 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 26-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.8 degrees latitude, 106.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.9 km (153.0 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.0 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 147 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:20 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 79 degrees, thus the sun was about 11 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 207.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  7. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  8. Space Brightness Evaluation for a Daylit Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maruyama

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems for lighting design is how to reduce an electric energy. One way to solve this problem is use of daylight, but little is known how to perceive a brightness of a room illuminated by daylight come in through a window and artificial light. Although the horizontal illuminance increases because of daylight, we would not perceive the room as bright as brightness estimated by the illuminance. The purpose of this study is to measure the space brightness for daylit room and to propose a evaluation method. The experiment was conducted with a couple of miniature office rooms, standard room and test room. Test room has several types of windows and standard room has no window. Subject was asked to evaluate the brightness of the test room relative to the standard room with method of magnitude estimation. It was found that brightness of daylit room did not increase simply with horizontal illuminance. Subject perceived a daylit room darker than a room illuminated only by the artificial light even if horizontal illuminance of these room was same. The effect of daylight on space brightness would vary with the window size and intensity of daylight or artificial light.

  9. Landcover Based Optimal Deconvolution of PALS L-band Microwave Brightness Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Njoku, Eni G.

    2004-01-01

    An optimal de-convolution (ODC) technique has been developed to estimate microwave brightness temperatures of agricultural fields using microwave radiometer observations. The technique is applied to airborne measurements taken by the Passive and Active L and S band (PALS) sensor in Iowa during Soil Moisture Experiments in 2002 (SMEX02). Agricultural fields in the study area were predominantly soybeans and corn. The brightness temperatures of corn and soybeans were observed to be significantly different because of large differences in vegetation biomass. PALS observations have significant over-sampling; observations were made about 100 m apart and the sensor footprint extends to about 400 m. Conventionally, observations of this type are averaged to produce smooth spatial data fields of brightness temperatures. However, the conventional approach is in contrast to reality in which the brightness temperatures are in fact strongly dependent on landcover, which is characterized by sharp boundaries. In this study, we mathematically de-convolve the observations into brightness temperature at the field scale (500-800m) using the sensor antenna response function. The result is more accurate spatial representation of field-scale brightness temperatures, which may in turn lead to more accurate soil moisture retrieval.

  10. SKYMONITOR: A Global Network for Sky Brightness Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald R.; Mckenna, D.; Pulvermacher, R.; Everett, M.

    2010-01-01

    We are implementing a global network to measure sky brightness at dark-sky critical sites with the goal of creating a multi-decade database. The heart of this project is the Night Sky Brightness Monitor (NSBM), an autonomous 2 channel photometer which measures night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths (Mckenna et al, AAS 2009). Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The NSBM consists of two parts, a remote unit and a base station with an internet connection. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with daytime recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the base unit is transmitted via email protocol to IDA offices in Tucson where it will be collected, archived and made available to the user community via a web interface. Two other versions of the NSBM are under development: one for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber link and the second that reads data directly to a laptop for sites without internet access. NSBM units are currently undergoing field testing at two observatories. With support from the National Science Foundation, we will construct and install a total of 10 units at astronomical observatories. With additional funding, we will locate additional units at other sites such as National Parks, dark-sky preserves and other sites where dark sky preservation is crucial. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We anticipate that the SKYMONITOR network will be functioning by the end of 2010.

  11. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging with Optical-Quality Curved Microfluidic Chamber for Absolute Cell Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Khan Shourav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Field curvature and other aberrations are encountered inevitably when designing a compact fluorescence imaging system with a simple lens. Although multiple lens elements can be used to correct most such aberrations, doing so increases system cost and complexity. Herein, we propose a wide field-of-view (FOV fluorescence imaging method with an unconventional optical-quality curved sample chamber that corrects the field curvature caused by a simple lens. Our optics simulations and proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that a curved substrate with lens-dependent curvature can reduce greatly the distortion in an image taken with a conventional planar detector. Following the validation study, we designed a curved sample chamber that can contain a known amount of sample volume and fabricated it at reasonable cost using plastic injection molding. At a magnification factor of approximately 0.6, the curved chamber provides a clear view of approximately 119 mm2, which is approximately two times larger than the aberration-free area of a planar chamber. Remarkably, a fluorescence image of microbeads in the curved chamber exhibits almost uniform intensity over the entire field even with a simple lens imaging system, whereas the distorted boundary region has much lower brightness than the central area in the planar chamber. The absolute count of white blood cells stained with a fluorescence dye was in good agreement with that obtained by a commercially available conventional microscopy system. Hence, a wide FOV imaging system with the proposed curved sample chamber would enable us to acquire an undistorted image of a large sample volume without requiring a time-consuming scanning process in point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  13. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  14. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  15. Reduction of the Earth's magnetic field inhibits growth rates of model cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Carlos F; Portelli, Lucas; McCabe, Kevin; Hernandez, Mark; Barnes, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Small alterations in static magnetic fields have been shown to affect certain chemical reaction rates ex vivo. In this manuscript, we present data demonstrating that similar small changes in static magnetic fields between individual cell culture incubators results in significantly altered cell cycle rates for multiple cancer-derived cell lines. This change as assessed by cell number is not a result of apoptosis, necrosis, or cell cycle alterations. While the underlying mechanism is unclear, the implications for all cell culture experiments are clear; static magnetic field conditions within incubators must be considered and/or controlled just as one does for temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide concentration.

  16. Bright Times for an Ancient Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, K.; Chini, R.

    2017-01-01

    Field stars of Population II are among the oldest sources in the Galaxy. Most of their solar-type dwarfs are non-single and, given their extreme age, a significant fraction is accompanied by stellar remnants. Here we report the discovery of the bright F7V star 49 Lib as a massive and very metal-rich Population II field blue straggler, along with evidence for a white dwarf as its dark and unseen companion. 49 Lib is known as a relatively fast-rotating, single-lined spectroscopic binary in a 3 year orbit and with an apparent age of about τ ≃ 2.3 Gyr. Its chemistry and kinematics, however, both consistently imply that 49 Lib must be an ancient Population II star at τ ≃ 12 Gyr. With reference to the inclination from the astrometric orbit, leading to a {M}{WD}={0.50}-0.04+0.03 M⊙ low-mass white dwarf, and in view of the {M}{BS}={1.55}-0.13+0.07 M⊙ massive, evolved F-type blue straggler star, we demonstrate that 49 Lib must have been the subject of a mostly conservative mass transfer with a near-equal-mass M ≃ 1.06 + 1.00 M⊙ G-type binary at birth. For its future evolution, we point to the possibility as a progenitor system toward a type Ia supernova. Most importantly, however, we note that the remarkable metal enrichment of 49 Lib at [Mg/H] = +0.23 and [Fe/H] = ‑0.11 has principally very relevant implications for the early epoch when the Milky Way came into being.

  17. Responses of human normal osteoblast cells and osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, to pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttatip Kamolmatyakul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this in vitro study is to investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF on cellular proliferation and osteocalcin production of osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, and human normal osteoblast cells (NHOC obtained from surgical bone specimens. The cells were placed in 24-well culture plates in the amount of 3x104 cell/wells with 2 ml αMEM media supplemented with 10% FBS. The experimental plates were placed between a pair of Helmoltz coils powered by a pulse generator (PEMF, 50 Hz, 1.5 mV/cm in the upper compartment of a dual incubator (Forma. The control plates were placed in the lower compartment of the incubator without Helmotz coils. After three days, the cell proliferation was measured by the method modified from Mossman (J. Immunol Methods 1983; 65: 55-63. Other sets of plates were used for osteocalcin production assessment. Media from these sets were collected after 6 days and assessed for osteocalcin production using ELISA kits. The data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The results showed that MG-63 cells from the experimental group proliferated significantly more than those from the control group (20% increase, p<0.05. No significant difference in osteocalcin production was detected between the two groups. On the other hand, NHOC from the experimental group produced larger amount of osteocalcin (25% increase, p<0.05 and proliferated significantly more than those from the control group (100% increase, p<0.05. In conclusion, PEMF effect on osteoblasts might depend on their cell type of origin. For osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63 cells, PEMF increased proliferation rate but not osteocalcin production of the cells. However, PEMF stimulation effect on human normal osteoblast cells was most likely associated with enhancement of both osteocalcin production and cell proliferation.

  18. Electric field measurement of organic photovoltaic cell model using electrooptic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryo; Yabe, Yoko; Suzuki, Akito; Shinagawa, Mitsuru; Sugino, Hiroyuki; Katsuyama, Jun; Matsumoto, Yoshinori

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the use of a transverse electrooptic probe to measure the electric field of an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell model. It is necessary to measure the voltage of each OPV cell in order to diagnose failure of the OPV. An electric field is generated by the OPV cell voltage, so measuring the electric field is effective for obtaining a failure diagnosis of the OPV. We use a transverse electrooptic probe as an instrumentation tool for measuring the electric field over the OPV. We confirmed the principle of superposition for the electric field strength from each OPV cell model. These results show that the calibration of each OPV cell voltage can be accomplished by measuring the electric field strength over the OPV cells.

  19. A ROSAT Bright Source Catalog Survey with the Swift Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, D B

    2004-01-01

    We consider the prospects for a complete survey of the 18,811 sources of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (BSC) with NASA's Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission. By observing each BSC source for 500 s with the satellite's imaging X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, this "Swift Bright (Source) Catalog Survey" (Swift-BCS) would derive ~20 mCrab, 10-100 keV) with the wide-field Burst Alert Telescope (BAT); and a two-year all-sky BAT survey down to >~1 mCrab. The resulting expansion of the catalog of identified X-ray sources from 2000 to 18,000 will provide a greatly-enriched set of targets for observation by XMM-Newton, Chandra, and future high-energy observatories.

  20. 高亮度金刚石薄膜场发射荧光管的制作%The Implementation of High Brightness Field Emission Display of Globe-like Diamond Microcrystalline-aggregate Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金海; 李桢; 张武勤; 张兵临

    2013-01-01

    利用微波等离子化学气相沉积法,制备出类球状微米金刚石聚晶薄膜作为场发射阴极材料.通过采用低熔点玻璃粉烧结工艺,从器件封装、器件烧结、器件排气和器件烤消等方面进行了探索和创新,实现了场致发射荧光管的高真空封装.综合采用这套技术,已经研发出的真空场致发射荧光管,在5.45 V/μm电场下,光的亮度达到了11 000 cd/m2.为将来设计制作矩阵寻址场发射平板显示器件奠定了基础.%Field emission display is a new vacuum flat panel display device. The globe-like diamond microcrystalline-aggregates, as a field emission cathode, were fabricated by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). Through the use of low temperature melting glass powder sintering process,and innovations in the device package, sintering, consuming such as exhaust and baking exploration, the field emission display of high vacuum package is implemented. Integrated use of this technology has led to a secondary structure, three-pole structure of the field emission display,obtained in 5. 45 V/μm field, and the light intensity of the samples reached 11 000 cd/m2 This consolidates a strong base for the future design of field emission flat panel display of matrix addressing.

  1. Unveiling the nature of bright z ~ 7 galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, R A A; McLure, R J; McLeod, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging of 25 extremely luminous (-23.2 600A). We find that irregular, multiple-component morphologies suggestive of clumpy or merging systems are common (f_multi > 0.4) in bright z ~ 7 galaxies, and ubiquitous at the very bright end (M_UV 1000 similarly bright galaxies at z ~ 7. Our new HST imaging suggests that the vast majority of these galaxies will be spatially resolved by Euclid, mitigating concerns over dwarf star contamination.

  2. The analogy between stereo depth and brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, A; Stevens, K A

    1989-01-01

    Apparent depth in stereograms exhibits various simultaneous-contrast and induction effects analogous to those reported in the luminance domain. This behavior suggests that stereo depth, like brightness, is reconstructed, ie recovered from higher-order spatial derivatives or differences of the original signal. The extent to which depth is analogous to brightness is examined. There are similarities in terms of contrast effects but dissimilarities in terms of the lateral inhibition effects traditionally attributed to underlying spatial-differentiation operators.

  3. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianchi, A., E-mail: alessandro.cianchi@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN-Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V. [INFN-LNF, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  4. Experimental studies on ultralow frequency pulsed gradient magnetic field inducing apoptosis of cancer cell and inhibiting growth of cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾繁清; 郑从义; 张新晨; 李宗山; 李朝阳; 王川婴; 张新松; 黄晓玲; 张沪生

    2002-01-01

    The morphology characteristics of cell apoptosis of the malignant tumour cells in magnetic field-treated mouse was observed for the first time. The apoptotic cancer cell contracted, became rounder and divorced from adjacent cells; the heterochromatin condensed and coagulated together along the inner side of the nuclear membrane; the endoplasmic reticulums(ER) expanded and fused with the cellular membrane; many apoptotic bodies which were packed by the cellular membrane appeared and were devoured by some lymphocytes and plasma. Apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated in situ nick end labeling(TUNEL). It was found that the number of apoptosis cancer cells of the sample treated by the magnetic field is more than that of the control sample. The growth of malignant tumour in mice was inhibited and the ability of immune cell to dissolve cancer cells was improved by ultralow frequency(ULF) pulsed gradient magnetic field; the nuclei DNA contents decreased, indicating that magnetic field can block DNA replication and inhibit mitosis of cancer cells. It was suggested that magnetic field could inhibit the metabolism of cancer cell, lower its malignancy, and restrain its rapid and heteromorphic growth. Since ULF pulsed gradient magnetic field can induce apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibit the growth of malignant tumour, it could be used as a new method to treat cancer.

  5. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is

  6. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncato, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges. The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP). Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP). The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different gray shades. These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in is blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this "solution" by the visual system.

  7. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRoncato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges.The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP. Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP. The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different grey shades.These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in are blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this solution by the visual system

  8. Guided migration of neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells by an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun-Feng; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Nolta, Jan; Zhao, Min

    2012-02-01

    Small direct current (DC) electric fields (EFs) guide neurite growth and migration of rodent neural stem cells (NSCs). However, this could be species dependent. Therefore, it is critical to investigate how human NSCs (hNSCs) respond to EF before any possible clinical attempt. Aiming to characterize the EF-stimulated and guided migration of hNSCs, we derived hNSCs from a well-established human embryonic stem cell line H9. Small applied DC EFs, as low as 16 mV/mm, induced significant directional migration toward the cathode. Reversal of the field polarity reversed migration of hNSCs. The galvanotactic/electrotactic response was both time and voltage dependent. The migration directedness and distance to the cathode increased with the increase of field strength. (Rho-kinase) inhibitor Y27632 is used to enhance viability of stem cells and has previously been reported to inhibit EF-guided directional migration in induced pluripotent stem cells and neurons. However, its presence did not significantly affect the directionality of hNSC migration in an EF. Cytokine receptor [C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)] is important for chemotaxis of NSCs in the brain. The blockage of CXCR4 did not affect the electrotaxis of hNSCs. We conclude that hNSCs respond to a small EF by directional migration. Applied EFs could potentially be further exploited to guide hNSCs to injured sites in the central nervous system to improve the outcome of various diseases.

  9. Can Lucifer Yellow Indicate Correct Permeability of Biological Cell Membrane under An Electric and Magnetic Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Pourmirjafari Firoozabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of external magnetic and electric fields, in the range of electroporation and magnetoporation, on Lucifer Yellow (LY fluorescence in the absence of cells is studied. Electric-field-induced quenching and magnetic field-induced increase are observed for fluorescence intensity of LY. Regard to the fact that the variation of field-induced fluorescence, even in the absence of cells, can be observed, the application of LY, as a marker, is debatable in electroporation and magnetoporation techniques.

  10. Nanoscale cell membrane organization : a near-field optical view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Marjolein

    2006-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is a lipid bi-layer that separates the cell cytosol from the extracellular environment. The composition and organization of proteins and lipids within this bi-layer have a direct impact on many cellular processes, since they form the senses of the cell. T

  11. Perspectives and controversies in the field of stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Gaetano

    2006-09-01

    The fourth annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research focused on a number of pressing issues, including: (I) the need to better characterize the biology of stem cells; (II) the need to exploit and optimize the great therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration; (III) ethical and safety considerations related to the use of human embryonic stem cells; (IV) the contribution of adult stem cells to carcinogenesis; (V) the need to investigate the biology of cancer stem cells. The purpose of this report is to summarize the current status of stem cell research, as surmised by the proceedings of this meeting.

  12. Cryopreservation of periodontal ligament cells with magnetic field for tooth banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, M; Kamada, H; Kawata, T; Koseki, H; Abedini, S; Kojima, S; Motokawa, M; Fujita, T; Ohtani, J; Tsuka, N; Matsuda, Y; Sunagawa, H; Hernandes, R A M; Ohwada, N; Tanne, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a long-term tooth cryopreservation method that can be used for tooth autotransplantation. Human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells were frozen in 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) using a programmed freezer with a magnetic field. Cells were cryopreserved for 7 days at -150 degrees C. Immediately after thawing, the number of surviving cells was counted and the cells were cultured; cultured cells were examined after 48 h. Results indicated that a 0.01 mT of a magnetic field, a 15-min hold-time, and a plunging temperature of -30 degrees C led to the greatest survival rate of PDL cells. Based on these findings, whole teeth were cryopreserved under the same conditions for 1 year. The organ culture revealed that the PDL cells of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field could proliferate as much as a fresh tooth, although the cells did not appear in the cryopreserved tooth without a magnetic field. Histological examination and the transmission electron microscopic image of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field did not show any destruction of cryopreserved cells. In contrast, severe cell damage was seen in cells frozen without a magnetic field. These results indicated that a magnetic field programmed freezer is available for tooth cryopreservation.

  13. Protein-Sized Bright Fluorogenic Nanoparticles Based on Cross-Linked Calixarene Micelles with Cyanine Corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulov, Ievgen; Rodik, Roman V; Arntz, Youri; Reisch, Andreas; Kalchenko, Vitaly I; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-12-19

    The key challenge in the field of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for biological applications is to achieve superior brightness for sizes equivalent to single proteins (3-7 nm). We propose a concept of shell-cross-linked fluorescent micelles, in which PEGylated cyanine 3 and 5 bis-azides form a covalently attached corona on micelles of amphiphilic calixarene bearing four alkyne groups. The fluorescence quantum yield of the obtained monodisperse NPs, with a size of 7 nm, is a function of viscosity and reached up to 15 % in glycerol. In the on-state they are circa 2-fold brighter than quantum dots (QD-585), which makes them the smallest PEGylated organic NPs of this high brightness. FRET between cyanine 3 and 5 cross-linkers at the surface of NPs suggests their integrity in physiological media, organic solvents, and living cells, in which the NPs rapidly internalize, showing excellent imaging contrast. Calixarene micelles with a cyanine corona constitute a new platform for the development of protein-sized ultrabright fluorescent NPs.

  14. Asymmetries of Dark and Bright Negative Afterimages Are Paralleled by Subcortical ON and OFF Poststimulus Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Xu; Andolina, Ian M; Li, Xiaohong; Lu, Yiliang; Spillmann, Lothar; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-22

    Humans are more sensitive to luminance decrements than increments, as evidenced by lower thresholds and shorter latencies for dark stimuli. This asymmetry is consistent with results of neurophysiological recordings in dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and primary visual cortex (V1) of cat and monkey. Specifically, V1 population responses demonstrate that darks elicit higher levels of activation than brights, and the latency of OFF responses in dLGN and V1 is shorter than that of ON responses. The removal of a dark or bright disc often generates the perception of a negative afterimage, and here we ask whether there also exist asymmetries for negative afterimages elicited by dark and bright discs. If so, do the poststimulus responses of subcortical ON and OFF cells parallel such afterimage asymmetries? To test these hypotheses, we performed psychophysical experiments in humans and single-cell/S-potential recordings in cat dLGN. Psychophysically, we found that bright afterimages elicited by luminance decrements are stronger and last longer than dark afterimages elicited by luminance increments of equal sizes. Neurophysiologically, we found that ON cells responded to the removal of a dark disc with higher firing rates that were maintained for longer than OFF cells to the removal of a bright disc. The ON and OFF cell asymmetry was most pronounced at long stimulus durations in the dLGN. We conclude that subcortical response strength differences between ON and OFF channels parallel the asymmetries between bright and dark negative afterimages, further supporting a subcortical origin of bright and dark afterimage perception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Afterimages are physiological aftereffects following stimulation of the eye, the study of which helps us to understand how our visual brain generates visual perception in the absence of physical stimuli. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, asymmetries between bright and dark negative afterimages elicited by

  15. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-07-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  16. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Borish, J.; Crawford, S. B.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Jackson, L.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Prager, B.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Walker, L.; Whelan, D. G.; Zucker, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to engage young children's natural excitement and curiosity, the outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to elementary schools in Virginia. We hope to enhance children's view and understanding of science while exploring the Universe using fun activities. DSBK focuses on rural and underserved schools in Albemarle County and offers a semester-long astronomy club for third through fifth grade students. We believe regular interactions foster personal relationships between students and volunteers that encourage a life-long interest in science. In our fourth year of hosting clubs, we returned to Ivy Creek Elementary School, where we saw wonderful responses from a special group of students with `low-incidence' disabilities. DSBK has grown to realize a broader reach beyond local astronomy clubs; we hope to ignite a spark of interest in astronomy and science more widely- in more children, their families, and their teachers. We also hosted the Second Annual Central Virginia Star Party with an open invitation to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Throughout the year, DSBK now holds 'one-off' programs (akin to astronomy field days) for elementary schools and children's groups throughout Virginia. Furthermore, we are in the final stages of a project to create two bilingual astronomy books called "Snapshots of the Universe", in Spanish and French with English translations. This art book will be made available online and we are working to get a copy in every elementary school in the state. DSBK has begun to reach out to elementary school teachers in order to provide them with useful and engaging classroom material. We have adapted our volunteer-created activities into useful and ready-to-use lessons, available online. After improvements based on research through interactions and feedback from teachers, we have explicitly identified the learning goals in terms of Virginia's Standards of Learning

  17. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.

  18. BRITE-Constellation: nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Moffat, A F J; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Zwintz, K; CCD,

    2014-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, the brightness and temperature variations of stars generally brighter than mag(V) ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of six nanosats (hence Constellation): two from Austria, two from Canada, and two from Poland. Each 7 kg nanosat carries an optical telescope of aperture 3 cm feeding an uncooled CCD. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter, the other with a red filter. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~24 degrees), so up to about 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously, sampled in 32 pixel x 32 pixel sub-rasters. Photometry of additional fainter targets, with reduced precision but thorough time sampling, will be possible through onboard data processing. The BRITE sample is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all e...

  19. Investigating cell sorting and analysis of the proprietary cell-BOCS platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrissemoux, Caro; Beunis, Filip; Glückstad, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    of cells and upgrading the optical manipulation system. Detection is done by bright-field imaging but there is a specific need to expand the detection criteria to other fields, for example fluorescence. Positively identified particles are sorted out by means of “optical catapulting” with a spatially...

  20. Cell ageing: a flourishing field for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Brites

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is viewed as an irreversible cell-cycle arrest mechanism involving a complexity of biological progressive processes and the acquisition of diverse cellular phenotypes. Several cell-intrinsic and extrinsic causes (stresses may lead to diverse cellular signaling cascades that include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, excessive accumulation of misfolded proteins, impaired microRNA processing and inflammation. Here we review recent advances in the causes and consequences of brain cell ageing, including the senescence of endothelial cells at the central nervous system barriers, as well as of neurons and glial cells. We address what makes ageing an important risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we highlight the importance of defects in mitochondrial dynamics, in the cathepsin activity imbalance, in cell-cell communication, in the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins and in the microRNA profiling as having potential impact on cellular ageing processes. Another important aspect is that the absence of specific senescence biomarkers has hampered the characterization of senescent cells in ageing and age-associated diseases. In accordance, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP or secretome was shown to vary in distinct cell types and upon different stressors, and SASP heterogeneity is believed to create subsets of senenescent cells. In addition to secreted proteins, we then place extracellular vesicles (exosomes and ectosomes as important mediators of intercellular communication with pathophysiological roles in disease spreading, and as emerging targets for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the application of engineered extracellular vesicles as vehicles for drug delivery. Finally, we summarize current knowledge on methods to rejuvenate senescent cells

  1. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    This thesis explores the use of ultrashort bunches generated by a radiofrequency electron photoinjector driven by a femtosecond laser. Rf photoinjector technology has been developed to generate ultra high brightness beams for advanced accelerators and to drive advanced light source applications. The extremely good quality of the beams generated by this source has played a key role in the development of 4th generation light sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, thus opening the way to studies of materials science and biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. At the Pegasus Photoinjector Lab, we have developed the application of a BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell rf photoinjector as a tool for ultrafast science in its own right. It is the aim of this work to explore the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, give descriptions of the novel ultrafast diagnostics developed to be able to characterize the electron bunch and synchronize it with a pump laser, and share some of the scientific results that were obtained with this technology at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. This dissertation explains the requirements of the drive laser source and describes the principles of rf photoinjector design and operation necessary to produce electron bunches with an rms longitudinal length < 100 femtoseconds containing 107 - 108 electrons per bunch. In this condition, when the laser intensity is sufficiently high, multiphoton photoemission is demonstrated to be more efficient in terms of charge yield than single photon photoemission. When a short laser pulse hits the cathode the resulting beam dynamics are dominated by a strong space charge driven longitudinal expansion which leads to the creation of a nearly ideal uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution. These beam distributions are characterized by linear space charge forces and hence by high peak brightness and small transverse emittances. This regime of operation of the RF photoinjector is also termed the

  2. How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Polyakova, Tatyana; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-11-01

    The biological effects of high-gradient magnetic fields (HGMFs) have steadily gained the increased attention of researchers from different disciplines, such as cell biology, cell therapy, targeted stem cell delivery and nanomedicine. We present a theoretical framework towards a fundamental understanding of the effects of HGMFs on intracellular processes, highlighting new directions for the study of living cell machinery: changing the probability of ion-channel on/off switching events by membrane magneto-mechanical stress, suppression of cell growth by magnetic pressure, magnetically induced cell division and cell reprograming, and forced migration of membrane receptor proteins. By deriving a generalized form for the Nernst equation, we find that a relatively small magnetic field (approximately 1 T) with a large gradient (up to 1 GT/m) can significantly change the membrane potential of the cell and thus have a significant impact on not only the properties and biological functionality of cells but also cell fate.

  3. Study of interactions between cells and microbubbles in high speed centrifugation field for biomolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecule delivery has a very wide range of applications in biology and medicine. In this study, a microbubble based delivery method was developed. In a high centrifugation field, cells deform and collide with microbubbles to induce intracellular pathways on cell membranes. As a result, biomaterials can then easily enter cells. Experimental results show that this delivery method can achieve high delivery efficiency. Simulation results showed that cells with more deformed structure experienced higher strain on cell membranes than cells with less deformed structure. The models can help explain how centrifugation affects cell membrane permeability. By controlling cell morphology and its mechanical properties, high biomolecule delivery efficiency can be achieved.

  4. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J. E-mail: masdingj@nus.edu.sg; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y.M

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38{+-}0.06 compared to 1.91{+-}0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  5. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  6. A New Rotation Phenomena of Cells Induced by Homegeneous Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Toyomasa; Yagi, Hiroshi

    1990-05-01

    When at least two plant protoplasts are located close to each other under homogeneous electric field, almost all of the cells rotate in the vicinity of its frequency of 10 kHz and specific cells in the vicinity of 10 MHz. The first rotation occurs in the plane constituted by the connecting line between two cells and the applied electric field line. This angular velocity increases with the square of the field strength. On the other hand, the second rotation or new rotation occurs in any plane and its angular velocity complicatedly depends on the field strength. Furthermore, when two cells are arranged in such a way that their connecting line is parallel to the applied field, the second rotation occurs but the first does not. The distinctive feature of the second rotation can be explained by the anisotropic dielectric in the cell due to the shape of its vacuole.

  7. Bright stars observed by FIMS/SPEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Young-Soo; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Choi, Yeon-Ju; Lim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Yeo-Myeong; Edelstein, Jerry; Han, Wonyong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a catalogue of the spectra of bright stars observed during the sky survey using the Far-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS), which was designed primarily to observe diffuse emissions. By carefully eliminating the contamination from the diffuse background, we obtain the spectra of 70 bright stars observed for the first time with a spectral resolution of 2--3 {\\AA} over the wavelength of 1370--1710 {\\AA}. The far-ultraviolet spectra of an additional 139 stars are also extracted with a better spectral resolution and/or higher reliability than those of the previous observations. The stellar spectral type of the stars presented in the catalogue spans from O9 to A3. The method of spectral extraction of the bright stars is validated by comparing the spectra of 323 stars with those of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations.

  8. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  9. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of a ferrofluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreman, Wietze [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Molho, Pierre [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: molho@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Neveu, Sophie [LI2C, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2005-03-15

    We have studied the effects of a magnetic field on viscous fingering when a ferrofluid is pushed in a more viscous liquid in a circular Hele-Shaw cell. The main effect of the magnetic field, as already known, is to stabilize interfaces parallel to the field and to destabilize interfaces normal to the field. Depending on the growth regime (quasi static, fingering, dendritic growth), which depends on parameters like the cell thickness and oil viscosity, the combination of field effect and anisotropy is analyzed through the various observed patterns.

  10. Imaging of apoptotic HeLa cells by using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), HeLa cells in apoptosis process are imaged with a higher optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Since SNOM provides both topographic and transmitted light intensity information of a cell, it can correlate the structural characteristics and optical properties with the spatial position of the apoptotic cells. Wavelength imaging by using near-field spectroscopy shows that there is a great difference in light propagation and absorption in the cell. This unique technique can be applied to the super high resolution imaging of different components in the cell. The observations by near-field optical imaging and near-field spectroscopy indicate an inhomogeneous aggregation of the inner structure in the apoptotic HeLa cells and the change of transmission intensity of light with the apoptosis status.

  11. Statics and dynamics of atomic dark-bright solitons in the presence of impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achilleos, V.; Frantzeskakis, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens GR-157 84 (Greece); Kevrekidis, P. G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-4515 (United States); Rothos, V. M. [Department of Mathematics, Physics Computational Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece)

    2011-11-15

    Adopting a mean-field description for a two-component atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, we study the statics and dynamics of dark-bright solitons in the presence of localized impurities. We use adiabatic perturbation theory to derive an equation of motion for the dark-bright soliton center. We show that, counterintuitively, an attractive (repulsive) delta-like impurity, acting solely on the bright-soliton component, induces an effective localized barrier (well) in the effective potential felt by the soliton; this way, dark-bright solitons are reflected from (transmitted through) attractive (repulsive) impurities. Our analytical results for the small-amplitude oscillations of solitons are found to be in good agreement with results obtained via a Bogoliubov-de Gennes analysis and direct numerical simulations.

  12. The historical investigation of cometary brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W.

    1998-12-01

    The interpretation of the way in which the brightness of a comet varied as a function of both its heliocentric and geocentric distance was essentially started by Isaac Newton in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Astronomers have argued about the form of this variability ever since, and for many years it was regarded as an important clue as to the physical nature of the cometary nucleus and its decay process. This paper reviews our understanding of the causes of cometary brightness variability between about 1680 and the 1950s.

  13. Continuous variable quantum communication with bright entangled optical beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chang-de; ZHANG Jing; PAN Qing; JIA Xiao-jun; PENG Kun-chi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we briefly introduce the basic concepts and protocols of continuous variable quantum communication,and then summarize the experimental researches accomplished by our group in this field.The main features of quantum communication systems used in our experiments are:(1) The bright entangled optical beams with the anticorrelated amplitude quadratures and the correlated phase quadratures that serve as the entanglement resources and (2) The Bell-state direct detection systems are utilized in the measurements of quantum entanglement and transmitted signals instead of the usually balanced homodyne detectors.

  14. Experimental Study and Comparison of Various Designs of Gas Flow Fields to PEM Fuel Cells and Cell Stack Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hong; Li, Peiwen; Juarez-Robles, Daniel; Wang, Kai; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm2. The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still ...

  15. Experimental study and comparison of various designs of gas flow fields to PEM fuel cells and cell stack performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hong eLiu; Peiwen eLi; Daniel eJuarez-Robles; Kai eWang; Abel eHernandez-Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a significant number of experimental tests to PEM fuel cells were conducted to investigate the effect of gas flow fields on fuel cell performance. Graphite plates with various flow field or flow channel designs, from literature survey and also novel designs by the authors, were used for the PEM fuel cell assembly. The fabricated fuel cells all have an effective membrane area of 23.5 cm2. The results showed that the serpentine flow channel design is still favorable, giving the b...

  16. Non-magnetic photospheric bright points in 3D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F.; Steiner, O.; Freytag, B.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Small-scale bright features in the photosphere of the Sun, such as faculae or G-band bright points, appear in connection with small-scale magnetic flux concentrations. Aims: Here we report on a new class of photospheric bright points that are free of magnetic fields. So far, these are visible in numerical simulations only. We explore conditions required for their observational detection. Methods: Numerical radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of the Sun were carried out. The magnetic field-free simulations show tiny bright points, reminiscent of magnetic bright points, only smaller. A simple toy model for these non-magnetic bright points (nMBPs) was established that serves as a base for the development of an algorithm for their automatic detection. Basic physical properties of 357 detected nMBPs were extracted and statistically evaluated. We produced synthetic intensity maps that mimic observations with various solar telescopes to obtain hints on their detectability. Results: The nMBPs of the simulations show a mean bolometric intensity contrast with respect to their intergranular surroundings of approximately 20%, a size of 60-80 km, and the isosurface of optical depth unity is at their location depressed by 80-100 km. They are caused by swirling downdrafts that provide, by means of the centripetal force, the necessary pressure gradient for the formation of a funnel of reduced mass density that reaches from the subsurface layers into the photosphere. Similar, frequently occurring funnels that do not reach into the photosphere, do not produce bright points. Conclusions: Non-magnetic bright points are the observable manifestation of vertically extending vortices (vortex tubes) in the photosphere. The resolving power of 4-m-class telescopes, such as the DKIST, is needed for an unambiguous detection of them. The movie associated to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R P; Ghiorso, W; Staples, J; Huang, T M; Sannibale, F; Kramasz, T D

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  18. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  19. Bright Future for Petroleum Development Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhenqing

    1996-01-01

    @@ China's oil prospects look bright, since reform and opening speed up. The oil production of 1995 is 148 million tons and the confirmed reserves of oil and gas only occupy one-fifth of those possible to be verified, the petroleum exploration will be deepened to locate and confirm the remaining reserves.

  20. Dark Matter in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that L

  1. Dark matter in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; Persic, M; Salucci, P

    1997-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that LSB galaxie

  2. A photometric investigation of a bright Geminid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degewij, J.; Diggelen, Johannes van

    1968-01-01

    Photographic observations of meteors in the Netherlands started with a bright Geminid of photographic magnitude −8 observed on December 11, 1955, 21h39m55s by M. Alberts. From the assumed radiant and velocity we have constructed the trajectory of the bolide. The luminosity of the trail has been dete

  3. Alberta Associations for Bright Children Members' Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Association for Bright Children, Edmonton.

    This handbook is designed to provide information to parents of gifted children in Alberta, Canada. The handbook outlines the mission and objectives of the Alberta Associations for Bright Children and describes the structure of the non-profit organization. The booklet then addresses: (1) the characteristics of gifted children; (2) the rights of…

  4. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Vladusich

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D space varying from bright to dark. The results of many previous psychophysical studies suggest, by contrast, that achromatic colors are represented as points in a color space composed of two or more perceptual dimensions. The nature of these perceptual dimensions, however, presently remains unclear. Here we provide direct evidence that brightness and darkness form the dimensions of a two-dimensional (2-D achromatic color space. This color space may play a role in the representation of object surfaces viewed against natural backgrounds, which simultaneously induce both brightness and darkness signals. Our 2-D model generalizes to the chromatic dimensions of color perception, indicating that redness and greenness (blueness and yellowness also form perceptual dimensions. Collectively, these findings suggest that human color space is composed of six dimensions, rather than the conventional three.

  5. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  6. Development and Fielding of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    fuel cell to power operational test instrumentation in support of the future combat systems test and evaluation. This unit also has application by the German Bundeswehr as a battery-charging station and auxiliary power unit. The direct methanol fuel cell is characterized by its low noise emission, minimal thermal signature, and high fuel efficiency that will enable continuously sustained operation for long duration missions in the

  7. Tumour Cell Membrane Poration and Ablation by Pulsed Low-Intensity Electric Field with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can potentially act like “lighting rods” or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs, the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field/15 V/cm (alignment field at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses.

  8. Variations in Cell Surfaces of Estrogen Treated Breast Cancer Cells Detected by A Combined Instrument for Far-Field and Near-Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Perner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of single breast cancer cells (cell line T‐47D to 17β‐estradiol (E2 under different concentrations was studied by using an instrument that allows to combine far‐field light microscopy with high resolution scanning near‐field (AFM/SNOM microscopy on the same cell. Different concentrations of E2 induce clearly different effects as well on cellular shape (in classical bright‐field imaging as on surface topography (atomic force imaging and absorbance (near‐field light transmission imaging. The differences range from a polygonal shape at zero via a roughly spherical shape at physiological up to a spindle‐like shape at un‐physiologically high concentrations. The surface topography of untreated control cells was found to be regular and smooth with small overall height modulations. At physiological E2 concentrations the surfaces became increasingly jagged as detected by an increase in membrane height. After application of the un‐physiological high E2 concentration the cell surface structures appeared to be smoother again with an irregular fine structure. The general behaviour of dose dependent differences was also found in the near‐field light transmission images. In order to quantify the treatment effects, line scans through the normalised topography images were drawn and a rate of co‐localisation between high topography and high transmission areas was calculated. The cell biological aspects of these observations are, so far, not studied in detail but measurements on single cells offer new perspectives to be empirically used in diagnosis and therapy control of breast cancers.

  9. Vertical electric field stimulated neural cell functionality on porous amorphous carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to support neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation in electric field mediated culture conditions. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon substrate electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm(2)) and low impedance (3.3 kΩ at 1 kHz). The optimal window of electric field stimulation for better cell viability and neurite outgrowth is established. When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (≤ 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). While the cell viability was assessed by two complementary biochemical assays (MTT and LDH), the differentiation was studied by indirect immunostaining. Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to either enhance or to restrict neurite outgrowth respectively at lower or higher field strengths, when neuroblastoma cells are cultured on porous glassy carbon electrodes having a desired combination of electrochemical properties.

  10. The kinetics of inactivation of spheroidal microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    The nature of non-exponential kinetics in microbial cells inactivation by pulsed electric fields (PEF) is discussed. It was demonstrated that possible mechanism of non-exponential kinetics can be related to orientational disorder in suspension of microbial cells of anisotropic form. A numerical studies of spheroidal cell suspensions was carried out. The most pronounced deviations from the exponential kinetics were observed for disordered suspensions of prolate spheroids at small electric field strength $E$ or at large aspect ratio $a$. For partially oriented suspensions, efficiency of inactivation enhances with increasing of order parameter and field strength. A possibility of the PEF-induced orientational ordering in microbial suspensions is discussed.

  11. Immunohistochemical staining of human sperm cells in smears from sexual assault cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, S.

    2011-01-01

    sperm cells. In this work the goal was to develop a procedure to rapidly visualize human sperm cells in smear slides with the use of bright-field microscopy. Using SPERM HY-LITER (TM) by Independent Forensics, human sperm cells are visualized using a fluorescently labeled mouse antibody which...... significantly decreases the time used to screen smears. By further using an EnVision+ (DAKO) protocol, it was possible to create an immunohistochemical staining method to visualize sperm cells in bright-field microscopy with the same level of certainty as when using SPERM HY-LITER (TM)....

  12. Thermal Field Analysis and Simulation of an Infrared Belt Furnace Used for Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bai Lu; Liang Zongcun; Shen Hui

    2014-01-01

    During solar cell firing, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and a small number of metal particles were removed using the gas flow. When the gas flow was disturbed by the thermal field of infrared belt furnace and structure, the metal particles in the discharging gas flow randomly adhered to the surface of solar cell, possibly causing contamination. Meanwhile, the gas flow also affected the thermal uniformity of the solar cell. In this paper, the heating mechanism of the solar cell caused by ra...

  13. Noise induced calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Yafei; Yuan, Changqing; Zhan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of noise on the calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields are described by a dynamic model. Noise is a very important factor to be considered in the dynamic research on the calcium oscillations in a cell exposed to electromagnetic fields. Some meaningful results have been obtained here based on the discussion. The results show that the pattern of intracellular calcium oscillations exposure to electromagnetic fields can be influenced by noise. Furthermore, the intracellular calcium oscillations exposure to electromagnetic fields can also be induced by noise. And the work has also studied the relationships between the voltage sensitive calcium channel's open probability and electromagnetic field. The result can provide new insights into constructive roles and potential applications of selecting appropriate electromagnetic field frequency during the research of biological effect of electromagnetic field.

  14. System for the exposure of cell suspensions to power-frequency electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaune, W T; Frazier, M E; King, A J; Samuel, J E; Hungate, F P; Causey, S C

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that uses an oscillating magnetic field to produce power-frequency electric fields with strengths in excess of those produced in an animal or human standing under a high-voltage electric-power transmission line. In contrast to other types of exposure systems capable of generating fields of this size, no electrodes are placed in the conducting growth media: the possibility of electrode contamination of the exposed suspension is thereby eliminated. Electric fields in the range 0.02-3.5 V/m can be produced in a cell culture with total harmonic distortions less than 1.5%. The magnetic field used to produce electric fields for exposure is largely confined within a closed ferromagnetic circuit, and experimental and control cells are exposed to leakage magnetic flux densities less than 5 microT . The temperatures of the experimental and control cell suspensions are held fixed within +/- 0.1 degrees C by a water bath. Special chambers were developed to hold cell cultures during exposure and sham exposure. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells incubated in these chambers grew for at least 48 h and had population doubling times of 16-17 h, approximately the same as for CHO cells grown under standard cell-culture conditions.

  15. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  16. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  17. Key action items for the stem cell field: looking ahead to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepfler, Paul S

    2013-12-01

    The stem cell field is at a critical juncture in late 2013. We find ourselves buoyed by building momentum for both transformative basic science discoveries and clinical translation of stem cells. Cellular reprogramming has given the field exciting new avenues as well. The overall prospect of novel stem cell-based therapies becoming a reality for patients in the coming years has never seemed higher. At the same time, we face serious challenges. Some of these challenges, such as stem cell tourism, are familiar to us, although even those are evolving in ways that require adaptability and action by the stem cell field. Other new challenges are also emerging, including an urgent need for formal physician training in stem cells, regulatory compliance balanced with innovation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration reform, and savvy educational outreach. Looking ahead to 2014, both the challenges and opportunities for the stem cell field require a proactive, thoughtful approach to maximize the potential for a positive impact from stem cell advances. In this study, I discuss the key action items for the field as we look ahead to the coming year and beyond.

  18. Magnetic field enhanced cell uptake efficiency of magnetic silica mesoporous nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-06-01

    The advantages of using magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (M-MSNs) in biomedical applications have been widely recognized. However, poor uptake efficiency may hinder the potential of M-MSNs in many applications, such as cell tracking, drug delivery, fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. An external magnetic field may improve the cellular uptake efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a magnetic field on the uptake of M-MSNs. We found that the internalization of M-MSNs by A549 cancer cells could be accelerated and enhanced by a magnetic field. An endocytosis study indicated that M-MSNs were internalized by A549 cells mainly through an energy-dependent pathway, namely clathrin-induced endocytosis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that M-MSNs were trafficked into lysosomes. With the help of a magnetic field, anticancer drug-loaded M-MSNs induced elevated cancer cell growth inhibition.

  19. Signal amelioration of electrophoretically deposited whole-cell biosensors using external electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Amzel, Tal [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Belkin, Shimshon [Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Rubin, Adi [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > We present an electrochemical whole-cell biochip that can apply electric fields. > We examine the integration of cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition. > The effect of electric fields on the whole-cell biosensor has been demonstrated. > Relatively short DC electric pulse improves the performance of whole-cell biosensors. > Prolonged AC electric fields deteriorated the whole-cell biosensor performance. - Abstract: This paper presents an integrated whole-cell biochip system where functioning cells are deposited on the solid micro-machined surfaces while specially designed indium tin oxide electrodes that can be used to apply controllable electric fields during various stages; for example during cell deposition. The electrodes can be used also for sensing currents associated with the sensing mechanisms of electrochemical whole-cell biosensors. In this work a new approach integrating live bacterial cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition is presented. The biomaterial deposition technique was characterized under various driving potentials and chamber configurations. An analytical model of the electrophoretic deposition kinetics was developed and presented here. The deposited biomass included genetically engineered bacterial cells that may respond to toxic material exposure by expressing proteins that react with specific analytes generating electrochemically active byproducts. In this study the effect of external electric fields on the whole-cell biochips has been successfully developed and tested. The research hypothesis was that by applying electric fields on bacterial whole-cells, their permeability to the penetration of external analytes can be increased. This effect was tested and the results are shown here. The effect of prolonged and short external electric fields on the bioelectrochemical signal generated by sessile bacterial whole-cells in response to the presence of toxins was studied. It was demonstrated that relatively

  20. The Light-Induced Field-Effect Solar Cell Concept - Perovskite Nanoparticle Coating Introduces Polarization Enhancing Silicon Cell Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yusheng; Xia, Zhouhui; Liu, Lijia; Xu, Weidong; Yuan, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yupeng; Sirringhaus, Henning; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Lee, Shui-Tong; Bao, Qiaoliang; Sun, Baoquan

    2017-03-03

    Solar cell generates electrical energy from light one via pulling excited carrier away under built-in asymmetry. Doped semiconductor with antireflection layer is general strategy to achieve this including crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell. However, loss of extra energy beyond band gap and light reflection in particular wavelength range is known to hinder the efficiency of c-Si cell. Here, it is found that part of short wavelength sunlight can be converted into polarization electrical field, which strengthens asymmetry in organic-c-Si heterojunction solar cell through molecule alignment process. The light harvested by organometal trihalide perovskite nanoparticles (NPs) induces molecular alignment on a conducting polymer, which generates positive electrical surface field. Furthermore, a "field-effect solar cell" is successfully developed and implemented by combining perovskite NPs with organic/c-Si heterojunction associating with light-induced molecule alignment, which achieves an efficiency of 14.3%. In comparison, the device with the analogous structure without perovskite NPs only exhibits an efficiency of 12.7%. This finding provides a novel concept to design solar cell by sacrificing part of sunlight to provide "extra" asymmetrical field continuously as to drive photogenerated carrier toward respective contacts under direct sunlight. Moreover, it also points out a method to combine promising perovskite material with c-Si solar cell.

  1. Model Based Iterative Reconstruction for Bright Field Electron Tomography (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are applied to the data. Model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) provides a powerful framework for tomographic...the reconstruction when the typical algorithms such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are

  2. EGF receptor signalling is essential for electric-field-directed migration of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jin; McCaig, Colin D; Cao, Lin; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Segall, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Min

    2007-10-01

    The mechanisms by which cancer cells migrate to metastasise are not fully understood. Breast cancers are accompanied by electrical depolarisation of tumour epithelial cells. The electrical changes can be detected on the skin and are used to differentiate malignant from benign breast tumours. Could the electrical signals play a role in metastasis by promoting tumour cell migration? We report that electric fields stimulate and direct migration of human breast cancer cells. Importantly, these effects were more significant in highly metastatic tumour cells than in low metastatic tumour cells. Electric-field-enhanced directional migration correlates well with the expression level of EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1). To confirm this, we transfected low metastatic clone MTC cells with human ErbB1, which significantly increased the electrotactic response. Inhibition of ErbB1 completely abolished the directional response of MTLn3 cells to an electric field. Transfection of MTLn3 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells with expression vectors for ErbB family members ErbB1, ErbB2 and ErbB3 also significantly enhanced EF-induced migration. These results suggest that electric signals might play a role in metastasis of breast cancers by enhancing cell migration through the ErbB-signalling pathway.

  3. Effects of Potassium Currents upon Action Potential of Cardiac Cells Exposed to External Electric fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Ying Zhang; Xiao-Feng Pang

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to high-voltage electric fields would influence the electro cardiogram both in experimental animate and human beings. The effects of the external electric fields upon action potential of cardiac cells are studied in this paper based on the dynamical model, LR91. Fourth order Runger-Kuta is used to analyze the change of potassium ion channels exposed to external electric fields in detail. Results indicate that external electric fields could influence the current of potassium ion by adding an induced component voltage on membrane. This phenomenon might be one of the reasons of heart rate anomaly under the high-voltage electric fields.

  4. Pulsed Direct Current Electric Fields Enhance Osteogenesis in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hammerick, Kyle E.; James, Aaron W.; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B.; Michael T. Longaker

    2009-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fie...

  5. Sample cell for in-field X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Höglin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample cell making it possible to perform synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction experiments in a magnetic field of 0.35 T has been constructed. The device is an add-on to an existing sample cell and contains a strong permanent magnet of NdFeB-type. Experiments have shown that the setup is working satisfactory making it possible to perform in-field measurements.

  6. Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz brightness temperatures of several tactical-scene clutter types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.; Pizzillo, Thomas J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present 94-GHz radiometric brightness temperatures of various clutter materials at nadir. The clutter materials measured include field vegetation, asphalt pavement, and an asphalt shingle roof and data is presented for each clutter type. We also report measurements that quantify the effect of water on the brightness temperature of metal. These measurements were made by adding calibrated quantities of water to a metal plate while recording the plate's millimeter-wave brightness temperature. Off-nadir data out to 45 deg is also presented for the field vegetation and asphalt pavement. Using a simple rough scattering model for the materials, we made estimates of the emissivity of the field vegetation and asphalt. The emissivity of the roof was determined by measuring its brightness temperature as it was heated.

  7. Improving sodium laser guide star brightness by polarization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingwei; Zhou, Tianhua; Feng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Optical pumping with circularly polarized light has been used to enhance the brightness of sodium laser guide star. But the benefit is reduced substantially due to the precession of sodium atoms in geomagnetic field. Switching the laser between left and right circular polarization at the Larmor frequency is proposed to improve the return. With ESO’s laser guide star system at Paranal as example, numerical simulation shows that the return flux is increased when the angle between geomagnetic field and laser beam is larger than 60°, as much as 50% at 90°. The proposal is significant since most astronomical observation is at angle between 60° and 90° and it only requires a minor addition to the delivery optics of present laser system. PMID:26797503

  8. Electric-Field-Induced Degradation of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soohyun; Kim, Seongtak; Lee, Sang-Won; Cho, Kyung Jin; Park, Sungeun; Lee, Seunghun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2016-08-18

    Perovskite solar cells have great potential for high efficiency generation but are subject to the impact of external environmental conditions such as humidity, UV and sun light, temperature, and electric fields. The long-term stability of perovskite solar cells is an important issue for their commercialization. Various studies on the stability of perovskite solar cells are currently being performed; however, the stability related to electric fields is rarely discussed. Here the electrical stability of perovskite solar cells is studied. Ion migration is confirmed using the temperature-dependent dark current decay. Changes in the power conversion efficiency according to the amount of the external bias are measured in the dark, and a significant drop is observed only at an applied voltage greater than 0.8 V. We demonstrate that perovskite solar cells are stable under an electric field up to the operating voltage.

  9. Assessment of the electrochemical effects of pulsed electric fields in a biological cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafai, Djamel Eddine; Mehle, Andraž; Tilmatine, Amar; Maouche, Bachir; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2015-12-01

    Electroporation of cells is successfully used in biology, biotechnology and medicine. Practical problems still arise in the electroporation of cells in suspension. For example, the determination of cell electroporation is still a demanding and time-consuming task. Electric pulses also cause contamination of the solution by the metal released from the electrodes and create local enhancements of the electric field, leading to the occurrence of electrochemical reactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. In our study, we investigated the possibility of assessing modifications to the cell environment caused by pulsed electric fields using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We designed an experimental protocol to elucidate the mechanism by which a pulsed electric field affects the electrode state in relation to different electrolyte conductivities at the interface. The results show that a pulsed electric field affects electrodes and its degree depends on the electrolyte conductivity. Evolution of the electrochemical reaction rate depends on the initial free charges and those generated by the pulsed electric field. In the presence of biological cells, the initial free charges in the medium are reduced. The electrical current path at low frequency is longer, i.e., conductivity is decreased, even in the presence of increased permeability of the cell membrane created by the pulsed electric field.

  10. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  12. [Effects of hypomagnetic fields on motility of the cilia of ependymal cells in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandodze, V Ia; Svanidze, I K; Didimova, E V

    1995-01-01

    The effect of reduced vertical component of geomagnetic field on motor activity of ciliate apparatus of ependymal cells in newborn rats in vivo has been studied. In has been shown that hypomagnetic field causes the inhibitory effect on the activity of ciliate apparatus up to absolute stoppage.

  13. Enhancing the driving field for plasmonic nanoparticles in thin-film solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santbergen, R.; Hairen, T.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The scattering cross-section of a plasmonic nanoparticle is proportional to the intensity of the electric field that drives the plasmon resonance. In this work we determine the driving field pattern throughout a complete thin-film silicon solar cell. Our simulations reveal that by tuning of the thic

  14. The Bright SHARC Survey The Cluster Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Romer, A K; Holden, B P; Ulmer, M P; Pildis, R A; Merrelli, A J; Adami, C; Burke, D J; Collins, C A; Metevier, A J; Kron, Richard G; Commons, K

    1999-01-01

    We present the Bright SHARC (Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster) Survey, which is an objective search for serendipitously detected extended X-ray sources in 460 deep ROSAT PSPC pointings. The Bright SHARC Survey covers an area of 178.6 sq.deg and has yielded 374 extended sources. We discuss the X-ray data reduction, the candidate selection and present results from our on-going optical follow-up campaign. The optical follow-up concentrates on the brightest 94 of the 374 extended sources and is now 97% complete. We have identified thirty-seven clusters of galaxies, for which we present redshifts and luminosities. The clusters span a redshift range of 0.0696Bright SHARC clusters have not been listed in any previously ...

  15. Brightness illusion in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    A long-standing debate surrounds the issue of whether human and nonhuman species share similar perceptual mechanisms. One experimental strategy to compare visual perception of vertebrates consists in assessing how animals react in the presence of visual illusions. To date, this methodological approach has been widely used with mammals and birds, while few studies have been reported in distantly related species, such as fish. In the present study we investigated whether fish perceive the brightness illusion, a well-known illusion occurring when 2 objects, identical in physical features, appear to be different in brightness. Twelve guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were initially trained to discriminate which rectangle was darker or lighter between 2 otherwise identical rectangles. Three different conditions were set up: neutral condition between rectangle and background (same background used for both darker and lighter rectangle); congruent condition (darker rectangle in a darker background and lighter rectangle in a lighter background); and incongruent condition (darker rectangle in a lighter background and lighter rectangle in a darker background). After reaching the learning criterion, guppies were presented with the illusory pattern: 2 identical rectangles inserted in 2 different backgrounds. Guppies previously trained to select the darker rectangle showed a significant choice of the rectangle that appears to be darker by human observers (and vice versa). The human-like performance exhibited in the presence of the illusory pattern suggests the existence of similar perceptual mechanisms between humans and fish to elaborate the brightness of objects.

  16. Keratocyte fragments and cells utilize competing pathways to move in opposite directions in an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaohui; Do, Hao; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Ren; Zhao, Min; Mogilner, Alex

    2013-04-08

    Sensing of an electric field (EF) by cells-galvanotaxis-is important in wound healing [1], development [2], cell division, nerve growth, and angiogenesis [3]. Different cell types migrate in opposite directions in EFs [4], and the same cell can switch the directionality depending on conditions [5]. A tug-of-war mechanism between multiple signaling pathways [6] can direct Dictyostelium cells to either cathode or anode. Mechanics of motility is simplest in fish keratocytes, so we turned to keratocytes to investigate their migration in EFs. Keratocytes sense electric fields and migrate to the cathode [7, 8]. Keratocyte fragments [9, 10] are the simplest motile units. Cell fragments from leukocytes are able to respond to chemotactic signals [11], but whether cell fragments are galvanotactic was unknown. We found that keratocyte fragments are the smallest motile electric field-sensing unit: they migrate to the anode, in the opposite direction of whole cells. Myosin II was essential for the direction sensing of fragments but not for parental cells, while PI3 kinase was essential for the direction sensing of whole cells but not for fragments. Thus, two signal transduction pathways, one depending on PI3K, another on myosin, compete to orient motile cells in the electric field. Galvanotaxis is not due to EF force and does not depend on cell or fragment size. We propose a "compass" model according to which protrusive and contractile actomyosin networks self-polarize to the front and rear of the motile cell, respectively, and the electric signal orients both networks toward cathode with different strengths.

  17. Cell death induced by application of time-varying magnetic fields on nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Campos, I; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the capability of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to take Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), keeping their viability. To provoke cell death on these MNPs-loaded DCs using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF). Material & methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from normal blood and platelets removed by centrifugation. Immunoselected CD14+ cells were cultured for 5 days, and the resulting cell phenotype was determined against several markers using flow cytometry. Co-cultures of DCs and MNPs were done overnight. The amount of Fe3O4 nanoparticles incorporated by DCs was quantified by magnetization measurements. MNPs-loaded DCs were exposed to AMF for 30 min and then cell viability was measured using trypan blue and FACS (annexin-propidium iodide) protocols. Morphological changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results: No significant decrease in cell viability of MNP/loaded DCs was observed up to five days, as compared against control sam...

  18. Nanoparticle mediated thermal ablation of breast cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Christopher D; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D; Boriraksantikul, Nattaphong; Whiteside, Paul J D; Robertson, Benjamin P; Peth, Sarah M; Islam, Naz E; Viator, John A

    2013-06-01

    In the past, ablation of cancer cells using radiofrequency heating techniques has been demonstrated, but the current methodology has many flaws, including inconsistent tumor ablation and significant ablation of normal cells. Other researchers have begun to develop a treatment that is more selective for cancer cells using metallic nanoparticles and constant electric field exposure. In these studies, cell necrosis is induced by heating antibody functionalized metallic nanoparticles attached to cancer cells. Our approach to studying this phenomenon is to use similarly functionalized metallic nanoparticles that are specific for the T47D breast cancer cell line, exposing these nanoparticle cell conjugates to a nanosecond pulsed electric field. Using fluorescent, polystyrene-coated, iron-oxide nanoparticles, the results of our pilot study indicated that we were able to ablate up to approximately 80% of the cells using 60 ns pulses in increasing numbers of pulses and up to approximately 90% of the cells using 300 ns pulses in increasing numbers of pulses. These quantities of ablated cells were achieved using a cumulative exposure time 6 orders of magnitude less than most in vitro constant electric field studies.

  19. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ interdigitated flow field design and using completely dry inlet gases. A case study...

  20. Effect of internal electric field on InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Aiko; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    We studied time-resolved carrier recombination in InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells. The electric field in a p-i-n diode structure spatially separates photoexcited carriers in QDs, strongly affecting the conversion efficiency of intermediate-band solar cells. The radiative decay lifetime is dramatically reduced in a strong electric field (193 kV/cm) by efficient recombination due to strong carrier localization in each QD and significant tunneling-assisted electron escape. Conversely, an electric field of the order of 10 kV/cm maintains electronic coupling in the stacked QDs and diminishes tunneling-assisted electron escape.

  1. Integrated Field Testing of Fuel Cells and Micro-Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerome R. Temchin; Stephen J. Steffel

    2005-11-01

    A technical and economic evaluation of the prospects for the deployment of distributed generation on Long Beach Island, New Jersey concluded that properly sited DG would defer upgrading of the electric power grid for 10 years. This included the deployment of fuel cells or microturbines as well as reciprocating engines. The implementation phase of this project focused on the installation of a 120 kW CHP microturbine system at the Harvey Cedars Bible Conference in Harvey Cedars, NJ. A 1.1 MW generator powered by a gas-fired reciprocating engine for additional grid support was also installed at a local substation. This report contains installation and operation issues as well as the utility perspective on DG deployment.

  2. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  3. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on Differentiation of HUES-17 Human Embryonic Stem Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Lin Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields are considered to potentially affect embryonic development, but the mechanism is still unknown. In this study, human embryonic stem cell (hESC line HUES-17 was applied to explore the mechanism of exposure on embryonic development to pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF for 400 pulses at different electric field intensities and the differentiation of HUES-17 cells was observed after PEMF exposure. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP, stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and the mRNA level and protein level of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog in HUES-17 cells remained unchanged after PEMF exposure at the electric field intensities of 50, 100, 200 or 400 kV/m. Four hundred pulses PEMF exposure at the electric field intensities of 50, 100, 200 or 400 kV/m did not affect the differentiation of HUES-17 cells. The reason why electromagnetic fields affect embryonic development may be due to other mechanisms rather than affecting the differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

  4. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  5. Differential effects in cells exposed to ultra-short, high intensity electric fields: cell survival, DNA damage, and cell cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, M; Stickley, J; Fox, P; Statler, V; Schoenbach, K; Beebe, S J; Buescher, S

    2003-12-09

    High power, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) effects have been focused on bacterial decontamination, but the impact on mammalian cells is now being revealed. During nsPEF applications, electrical pulses of 10, 60 or 300 ns durations were applied to cells using electric field amplitudes as high as 300 kV/cm. Because of the ultra-short pulse durations, the energy transferred to cells is negligible, and only non-thermal effects are observed. We investigated the genotoxicity of nsPEF on adherent and non-adherent cell lines including 10 human lines and one mouse cell line with different origin and growth characteristics. We present data examining the effects of nsPEF exposure on cell survival assessed by clonogenic formation or live cell count; DNA damage determined by the comet assay and chromosome aberrations; and cell cycle parameters by measuring the mitotic indices of exposed cells. Using each of these indicators, we observed differential effects among cell types with non-adherent cells being more sensitive to the genotoxic effects of nsPEF exposures than adherent cells. Non-adherent cultures showed a rapid decrease in cell viability (90%), induction of DNA damage, and a decrease in the number of cells reaching mitosis after one 60 ns pulse with an electric field intensity of 60 kV/cm. These effects were not observed in cells grown as adherent cultures, with the exception of the mouse 3T3 cell line, which showed survival characteristics similar to non-adherent cultures. These data suggest that nsPEF genotoxicity may be cell type specific, and therefore have potential applications in the selective removal of one cell type from another, for example, in diseased states.

  6. High-k Dielectric Passivation: Novel Considerations Enabling Cell Specific Lysis Induced by Electric Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Klemens J; Barth, Sven; Keplinger, Franz; Noehammer, Christa; Peham, Johannes R

    2016-08-24

    A better understanding of the electrodynamic behavior of cells interacting with electric fields would allow for novel scientific insights and would lead to the next generation of cell manipulation, diagnostics, and treatment. Here, we introduce a promising electrode design by using metal oxide high-k dielectric passivation. The thermally generated dielectric passivation layer enables efficient electric field coupling to the fluid sample comprising cells while simultaneously decoupling the electrode ohmically from the electrolyte, allowing for better control and adjustability of electric field effects due to reduced electrochemical reactions at the electrode surface. This approach demonstrates cell-size specific lysis with electric fields in a microfluidic flow-through design resulting in 99.8% blood cell lysis at 6 s exposure without affecting the viability of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial spike-ins. The advantages of this new approach can support next-generation investigations of electrodynamics in biological systems and their exploitation for cell manipulation in multiple fields of medicine, life science, and industry.

  7. Effects of high-gradient magnetic fields on living cell machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V.; Lunov, O.; Kubinova, S.; Polyakova, T.; Sykova, E.; Dejneka, A.

    2016-12-01

    A general interest in biomagnetic effects is related to fundamental studies of the influence of magnetic fields on living objects on the cellular and whole organism levels. Emerging technologies offer new directions for the use of high-gradient magnetic fields to control cell machinery and to understand the intracellular biological processes of the emerging field of nanomedicine. In this review we aim at highlighting recent advances made in identifying fundamental mechanisms by which magnetic gradient forces act on cell fate specification and cell differentiation. The review also provides an analysis of the currently available magnetic systems capable of generating magnetic fields with spatial gradients of up to 10 MT m-1, with the focus on their suitability for use in cell therapy. Relationships between experimental factors and underlying biophysical mechanisms and assumptions that would ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cell machinery and the development of more predictive models for the evaluation of the effects of magnetic fields on cells, tissue and organisms are comprehensively discussed.

  8. Properties of Galaxies in the Disc Central Surface Brightness Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Sorce, Jenny G; Libeskind, Noam I

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the S4G survey, complete down to M_B=-16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10% probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbors), the mass and mu_0 are correlated at 2.5 (2) sigma more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is sma...

  9. Properties of galaxies in the disc central surface brightness gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Creasey, Peter; Libeskind, Noam I.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies survey, complete down to MB = -16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10 per cent probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbours), the mass and μ0 are correlated at 2.5 (2)σ more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is smaller than where HSBs and LSBs live, a result at more than 50 per cent significance. ISBs may exist as an unstable transition state between LSBs and HSBs, the low flow activity environment maximally encouraging their formation. Interaction events altering the central baryon fraction could happen at a lower rate in these less dense environment, whilst in the higher density environments the LSBs are primarily satellite galaxies, whose accretion is sufficiently constrained that it fails to promote them to HSBs.

  10. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  11. Ultra Low Surface Brightness Imaging with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Roberto G

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, a robotic imaging system optimized for the detection of extended ultra low surface brightness structures. The array consists of eight Canon 400mm f/2.8 telephoto lenses coupled to eight science-grade commercial CCD cameras. The lenses are mounted on a common framework and are co-aligned to image simultaneously the same position on the sky. The system provides an imaging capability equivalent to a 0.4m aperture f/1.0 refractor with a 2.6 deg X 1.9 deg field of view. The system has no obstructions in the light path, optimized baffling, and internal optical surfaces coated with a new generation of anti-reflection coatings based on sub-wavelength nanostructures. As a result, the array's point spread function has a factor of ~10 less scattered light at large radii than well-baffled reflecting telescopes. The Dragonfly Telephoto Array is capable of imaging extended structures to surface brightness levels below 30 mag/arcsec^2 in 10h integrations (without binning or foregro...

  12. Enrichment of putative stem cells from adipose tissue using dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykoukal, Jody; Vykoukal, Daynene M.; Freyberg, Susanne; Alt, Eckhard U.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the microfluidic cell separation method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) to the enrichment of a putative stem cell population from an enzyme-digested adipose tissue derived cell suspension. A DEP-FFF separator device was constructed using a novel microfluidic-microelectronic hybrid flex-circuit fabrication approach that is scaleable and anticipates future low-cost volume manufacturing. We report the separation of a nucleated cell fraction from cell debris and the bulk of the erythrocyte population, with the relatively rare (<2% starting concentration) NG2-positive cell population (pericytes and/or putative progenitor cells) being enriched up to 14-fold. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application for DEP-FFF and further establishes the utility of the method for achieving label-free fractionation of cell subpopulations. PMID:18651083

  13. Growth stimulation of biological cells and tissue by electromagnetic fields and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides systems for growing two or three dimensional mammalian cells within a culture medium facilitated by an electromagnetic field, and preferably, a time varying electromagnetic field. The cells and culture medium are contained within a fixed or rotating culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from at least one electrode. In one embodiment, the electrode is spaced from the vessel. The invention further provides methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in the claimed system. In one embodiment, neuronal cells are grown within longitudinally extending tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time varying electrical current is conducted, the conductive channels being positioned within a culture medium.

  14. A synergetic application of surface plasmon and field effect to improve Si solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Wang, Liang-Xing; Shi, Wei; Sun, Shu-Lin; Lu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We report a synergetic application of surface plasmon (SP) and field effect (FE) to improve crystalline Si solar cell performance. The SPs are supported by small-sized Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 36.7 nm. The localized SP electromagnetic field from Ag nanoparticles excites extra electron-hole pairs at the surface region of the Si solar cell emitter, and meanwhile, the electron-hole pairs are detached by the electrostatic field that crosses the emitter surface. This synergism of SP and FE produces extra charges and enhances the Si solar cell efficiency. As compared to a Si solar cell applying SP and FE independently, a more than 10% efficiency enhancement is achieved by using them synergistically.

  15. Pulsed direct current electric fields enhance osteogenesis in adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerick, Kyle E; James, Aaron W; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fields in concert with and without osteogenic factors, we demonstrated increased early osteoblast-specific markers. We were also able to establish that commonly reported artifacts of electric field stimulation are not the primary mediators of the observed effects. The electric fields caused marked changes in the cytoskeleton. We used atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy to record an increase in the cytoskeletal tension after treatment with electric fields. We abolished the increased cytoskeletal stresses with the rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y27632, and did not see any decrease in osteogenic gene expression, suggesting that the pro-osteogenic effects of the electric fields are not transduced via cytoskeletal tension. Electric fields may show promise as candidate enhancers of osteogenesis of ASCs and may be incorporated into cell-based strategies for skeletal regeneration.

  16. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  17. Evaluation of biological effects of intermediate frequency magnetic field on differentiation of embryonic stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yoshie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryotoxic effect of intermediate frequency (IF magnetic field (MF was evaluated using murine embryonic stem (ES cells and fibroblast cells based on the embryonic stem cell test (EST. The cells were exposed to 21 kHz IF–MF up to magnetic flux density of 3.9 mT during the cell proliferation process (7 days or the cell differentiation process (10 days during which an embryonic body differentiated into myocardial cells. As a result, there was no significant difference in the cell proliferation between sham- and IF–MF-exposed cells for both ES and fibroblast cells. Similarly, the ratio of the number of ES-derived cell aggregates differentiated to myocardial cells to total number of cell aggregates was not changed by IF–MF exposure. In addition, the expressions of a cardiomyocytes-specific gene, Myl2, and an early developmental gene, Hba-x, in the exposed cell aggregate were not altered. Since the magnetic flux density adopted in this study is much higher than that generated by an inverter of the electrical railway, an induction heating (IH cooktop, etc. in our daily lives, these results suggested that IF–MF in which the public is exposed to in general living environment would not have embryotoxic effect.

  18. Exciton Distribution between the Bright and Dark States in Single Carbon Nanotubes Studied by Magneto-Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    We have performed micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy for single carbon nanotubes under magnetic fields at various temperatures. Sharp PL spectra of single carbon nanotubes allow us to directly observe the dark exciton PL peak a few meV below the bright exciton PL peak due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect [1]. From the PL intensity ratio of the dark to the bright excitons under magnetic fields, we found that the non-equilibrium (non-Boltzmann) distribution occurs between the bright and dark states, because phonons cannot scatter excitons between the two states with different parities [2]. Furthermore, we discuss the diameter dependence of the exciton population of the bright and dark states in single carbon nanotubes. [1] R. Matsunaga, K. Matsuda, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 147404 (2008). [2] V. Perebeinos, J. Tersoff, and Ph. Avouris, Nano Lett. 5, 2495 (2005).

  19. Cell death induced by AC magnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles: current state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, Gerardo F; Asín, Laura; Ibarra, M Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    This review analyses the advances in the field of magnetically induced cell death using intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Emphasis has been given to in vitro research results, discussing the action of radiofrequency (RF) waves on biological systems as well as those results of thermally induced cell death in terms of MNP cell interactions. Our main goal has been to provide a unified depiction of many recent experiments and theoretical models relevant to the effect of applied electromagnetic fields on MNPs after cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity assessment of MNPs. We have addressed the effects of RF waves used for in vitro magnetic hyperthermia on eukaryotic cells regarding physical modifications of the cellular local environment and cell viability.

  20. Dynamic effects and applications for nanosecond pulsed electric fields in cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J.; Blackmore, Peter F.; Hall, Emily; White, Jody A.; Willis, Lauren K.; Fauntleroy, Laura; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2005-04-01

    Nanosecond, high intensity pulsed electric fields [nsPEFs] that are below the plasma membrane [PM] charging time constant have decreasing effects on the PM and increasing effects on intracellular structures and functions as the pulse duration decreases. When human cell suspensions were exposed to nsPEFs where the electric fields were sufficiently intense [10-300ns, platelets. These included Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores [endoplasmic reticulum] and subsequently through store-operated Ca2+ channels in the PM. In addition, platelet activation measured as aggregation responses were observed in human platelets. Finally, when nsPEF conditions followed classical electroporation-mediated transfection, the expression intensity and number of GFP-expressing cells were enhanced above cells exposed to electroporation conditions alone. These studies demonstrate that application of nsPEFs to cells or tissues can modulate cell-signaling mechanisms with possible applications as a new basic science tool, cancer treatment, wound healing, and gene therapy.

  1. Thermal Field Analysis and Simulation of an Infrared Belt Furnace Used for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During solar cell firing, volatile organic compounds (VOC and a small number of metal particles were removed using the gas flow. When the gas flow was disturbed by the thermal field of infrared belt furnace and structure, the metal particles in the discharging gas flow randomly adhered to the surface of solar cell, possibly causing contamination. Meanwhile, the gas flow also affected the thermal uniformity of the solar cell. In this paper, the heating mechanism of the solar cell caused by radiation, convection, and conduction during firing was analyzed. Afterward, four 2-dimensional (2D models of the furnace were proposed. The transient thermal fields with different gas inlets, outlets, and internal structures were simulated. The thermal fields and the temperature of the solar cell could remain stable and uniform when the gas outlets were installed at the ends and in the middle of the furnace, with the gas inlets being distributed evenly. To verify the results, we produced four types of furnaces according to the four simulated results. The experimental results indicated that the thermal distribution of the furnace and the characteristics of the solar cells were consistent with the simulation. These experiments improved the efficiency of the solar cells while optimizing the solar cell manufacturing equipment.

  2. Second heart field cardiac progenitor cells in the early mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Alexandre; Saint-Michel, Edouard; Mesbah, Karim; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Rana, M Sameer; Christoffels, Vincent M; Kelly, Robert G

    2013-04-01

    At the end of the first week of mouse gestation, cardiomyocyte differentiation initiates in the cardiac crescent to give rise to the linear heart tube. The heart tube subsequently elongates by addition of cardiac progenitor cells from adjacent pharyngeal mesoderm to the growing arterial and venous poles. These progenitor cells, termed the second heart field, originate in splanchnic mesoderm medial to cells of the cardiac crescent and are patterned into anterior and posterior domains adjacent to the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. Perturbation of second heart field cell deployment results in a spectrum of congenital heart anomalies including conotruncal and atrial septal defects seen in human patients. Here, we briefly review current knowledge of how the properties of second heart field cells are controlled by a network of transcriptional regulators and intercellular signaling pathways. Focus will be on 1) the regulation of cardiac progenitor cell proliferation in pharyngeal mesoderm, 2) the control of progressive progenitor cell differentiation and 3) the patterning of cardiac progenitor cells in the dorsal pericardial wall. Coordination of these three processes in the early embryo drives progressive heart tube elongation during cardiac morphogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  3. Effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) on the cell cycle of CHO and Jurkat cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, Megan A.; Navara, Christopher; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    Exposure to nano-second pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. Variations between cell lines in membrane and cytoskeletal structure as well as in survival of nsPEF exposure should correspond to unique line-dependent cell cycle effects. Additionally, phase of cell cycle during exposure may be linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations recovered similarly to sham populations postnsPEF exposure and did not exhibit a phase-specific change in response. Jurkat cells exhibited considerable apoptosis/necrosis in response to nsPEF exposure and were unable to recover and proliferate in a manner similar to sham exposed cells. Additionally, Jurkat cells appear to be more sensitive to nsPEFs in G2/M phases than in G1/S phases. Recovery of CHO populations suggests that nsPEFs do not inhibit proliferation in CHO cells; however, inhibition of Jurkat cells post-nsPEF exposure coupled with preferential cell death in G2/M phases suggest that cell cycle phase during exposure may be an important factor in determining nsPEF toxicity in certain cell lines. Interestingly, CHO cells have a more robust and rigid cytoskeleton than Jurkat cells which is thought to contribute to their ability to

  4. The effect of electric and magnetic fields on the operation of a photovoltaic cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erel, Serafettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Letters, Kirikkale University, 71450 Yahsihan, Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2002-02-01

    In this work, we have investigated the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the operation of a CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} photovoltaic cell. Various electric field intensities changing from 0 to 35000V{sub dc}/m, were applied to the sample while it was irradiated by a He-Ne laser with a wavelength {lambda}=670nm. As a result, the typical values for the open circuit voltage of the photovoltaic cell significantly changed with various intensities of the electric field E{sub dc}. We also applied magnetic fields varying from 0.003 to 0.079T using a solenoid with an inductance of 10.55mH and the response of the sample was observed. In the third step of the experiment, instead of the laser beam, various intensities of white light of 50, 100,150 and also 250lux were utilised. 250lux was measured to be equivalent to the radiation power of He-Ne laser beam on the surface of the photovoltaic cell. The effect of electric fields from 0 up to 3x10{sup 5}V{sub dc} was applied and some significant experimental results were obtained. As a result of the illumination of the photovoltaic cell by the stimulated and spontaneous light emission sources under the effect of various intensities of electric field E{sub dc}, different electrical behaviours were observed.

  5. In vitro stimulation with a strongly pulsed electromagnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J. W.; Shin, S. C.; Kim, S.; Chung, E. R.; Bang, J. H.; Cho, G. I.; Choi, S. D.; Park, Y. S.; Jang, T. S.; Yoo, Y. M.; Lee, S. S.; Hwang, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation with a strong magnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells were investigated to confirm the efficacy of the magnetic stimulator for biomedical applications. The maximum intensity of the magnetic field generated from the stimulation coil was 0.203 T, and the transition time was 126 μs. The oscillation time and frequency of the pulsed field were almost 0.1 ms and 8 kHz, respectively. The cell count as well as the mRNA expression and DNA sequence of the cytokine genes, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), of the stimulated RBL-2H3 cells were analyzed with a hemocytometer and via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to determine the physiological response under a strong pulse field. After 12 h stimulation, cell death was observed at an increasing scale with the increase in the stimulation time. On the other hand, the cells that were stimulated for 10 min almost doubled as the interval time between the stimulations was extended.

  6. Evolution of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X.; Hammer, F.; Yang, Y. B.; Liang, Y. C.

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology, and stellar population of bulgeless low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and M r LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics, including mergers rather than by their large-scale environment.

  7. The radio properties of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M.; Bertotti, G. (Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica e la Cosmologia (Italy) Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics (Italy))

    1990-03-01

    The radio properties of a sample of 69 bright spectroscopically selected Seyfert galaxies, which suffers from little bias toward Markarian galaxies with strong UV excess. At variance with most of the earlier results, generally based on galaxy samples which are strongly biased toward the inclusion of Markarian objects, there is no clear evidence of a significant difference in the major radio properties (radio power, radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, radio spectral index and radio size) of type 1 and type 2 Seyferts. The resulting observational scenario appears now to be more consistent than before with the idea that Seyfert 2 galaxies are simply Seyfert 1 obscured objects. 70 refs.

  8. The Morphological and Molecular Changes of Brain Cells Exposed to Direct Current Electric Field Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Simon J.; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Methods: Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. Results: In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. Conclusion: We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. PMID:25522422

  9. Electroporation of cells using EM induction of ac fields by a magnetic stimulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Robinson, M P [Department of Electronics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Evans, J A [Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Smye, S W [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); O' Toole, P [Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-21

    This paper describes a method of effectively electroporating mammalian cell membranes with pulsed alternating-current (ac) electric fields at field strengths of 30-160 kV m{sup -1}. Although many in vivo electroporation protocols entail applying square wave or monotonically decreasing pulses via needles or electrode plates, relatively few have explored the use of pulsed ac fields. Following our previous study, which established the effectiveness of ac fields for electroporating cell membranes, a primary/secondary coil system was constructed to produce sufficiently strong electric fields by electromagnetic induction. The primary coil was formed from the applicator of an established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system, while the secondary coil was a purpose-built device of a design which could eventually be implanted into tissue. The effects of field strength, pulse interval and cumulative exposure time were investigated using microscopy and flow cytometry. Results from experiments on concentrated cell suspensions showed an optimized electroporation efficiency of around 50%, demonstrating that electroporation can be practicably achieved by inducing such pulsed ac fields. This finding confirms the possibility of a wide range of in vivo applications based on magnetically coupled ac electroporation.

  10. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nonthermal exposures of cells of the immune system to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes that might be relevant to in vivo immune activity. A similar responsiveness to nonionizing electromagnetic energy in this frequency range has also been documented for tissues of the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal system. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which such fields can induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca[sup 2+]-regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells and then closely examines new results that suggest a role for Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca[sup 2+] signaling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 69 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Some tests of flat plate photovoltaic module cell temperatures in simulated field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Rathod, M. S.; Paslaski, J.

    1981-01-01

    The nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important characteristic. Typically, the power output of a PV module decreases 0.5% per deg C rise in cell temperature. Several tests were run with artificial sun and wind to study the parametric dependencies of cell temperature on wind speed and direction and ambient temperature. It was found that the cell temperature is extremely sensitive to wind speed, moderately so to wind direction and rather insensitive to ambient temperature. Several suggestions are made to obtain data more typical of field conditions.

  12. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  13. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  14. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2016-12-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  15. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  16. The control of cell orientation using biodegradable alginate fibers fabricated by near-field electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Wu, Yun-Chung; He, Zhe-Yu; Huang, Zih-Ming; Hu, Wei-Wen

    2016-05-01

    For spatially controlling cell alignment, near field electrospinning (NFES) was developed to direct-write alginate fiber patterns. Compared to randomly electrospun fibers, NFES fibers guided the extension of HEK 293T cells and the levels of cell alignment increased with decreasing fiber distances. However, these guiding fibers were unfavorable for cell adhesion and limited cell growth. To preserve cell alignment ability and improve biocompatibility, the stability of patterned alginate fibers was adjusted by regulating the level of ion crosslinking. These partially crosslinked NFES fibers demonstrated parallel line-patterns in the initial stage while gradually degraded with time. The reduction of fiber density increased the available area for cell growth and enhanced cell viability. On the other hand, aligned cells were still found on these degraded patterns, suggesting that cell morphologies were mainly guided during cell seeding. This dynamically controlled fiber pattern system fulfilled the need of controlling cell orientation and biocompatibility, thus was potential to modify scaffold surfaces for tissue engineering application.

  17. Nanosecond pulsed electric field induced cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage adversely impact cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, M; Fox, P; Buescher, S; Kolb, J

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) on three human cell lines and demonstrated cell shrinkage, breakdown of the cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and chromosomal telomere damage. There was a differential response between cell types coinciding with cell survival. Jurkat cells showed cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage that severely impacted cell survival compared to two adherent cell lines. Interestingly, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in adherent cells prior to nsPEF exposure significantly reduced cell survival. We conclude that nsPEF applications are able to induce damage to the cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane. Telomere sequences, regions that tether and stabilize DNA to the nuclear membrane, are severely compromised as measured by a pan-telomere probe. Internal pore formation following nsPEF applications has been described as a factor in induced cell death. Here we suggest that nsPEF induced physical changes to the cell in addition to pore formation need to be considered as an alternative method of cell death. We suggest nsPEF electrochemical induced depolymerization of actin filaments may account for cytoskeleton and nuclear membrane anomalies leading to sensitization.

  18. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Lacoste-Collin MD, PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response.

  19. Nonlinearity in MCF7 Cell Survival Following Exposure to Modulated 6 MV Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiella, Marion; Franceries, Xavier; Cassol, Emmanuelle; Vieillevigne, Laure; Pereda, Veronica; Bardies, Manuel; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique

    2015-01-01

    The study of cell survival following exposure to nonuniform radiation fields is taking on particular interest because of the increasing evidence of a nonlinear relationship at low doses. We conducted in vitro experiments using the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. A 2.4 × 2.4 cm2 square area of a T25 flask was irradiated by a Varian Novalis accelerator delivering 6 MV photons. Cell survival inside the irradiation field, in the dose gradient zone and in the peripheral zone, was determined using a clonogenic assay for different radiation doses at the isocenter. Increased cell survival was observed inside the irradiation area for doses of 2, 10, and 20 Gy when nonirradiated cells were present at the periphery, while the cells at the periphery showed decreased survival compared to controls. Increased survival was also observed at the edge of the dose gradient zone for cells receiving 0.02 to 0.01 Gy when compared with cells at the periphery of the same flask, whatever the isocenter dose. These data are the first to report cell survival in the dose gradient zone. Radiotherapists must be aware of this nonlinearity in dose response. PMID:26740805

  20. Coupled electric fields in photorefractive driven liquid crystal hybrid cells - theory and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszczyński, P.; Walczak, A.; Marciniak, P.

    2016-12-01

    In cyclic articles previously published we described and analysed self-organized light fibres inside a liquid crystalline (LC) cell contained photosensitive polymer (PP) layer. Such asymmetric LC cell we call a hybrid LC cell. Light fibre arises along a laser beam path directed in plane of an LC cell. It means that a laser beam is parallel to photosensitive layer. We observed the asymmetric LC cell response on an external driving field polarization. Observation has been done for an AC field first. It is the reason we decided to carry out a detailed research for a DC driving field to obtain an LC cell response step by step. The properly prepared LC cell has been built with an isolating layer and garbage ions deletion. We proved by means of a physical model, as well as a numerical simulation that LC asymmetric response strongly depends on junction barriers between PP and LC layers. New parametric model for a junction barrier on PP/LC boundary has been proposed. Such model is very useful because of lack of proper conductivity and charge carriers of band structure data on LC material.

  1. Cell cycle behavior of laboratory and field populations of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dolah, Frances M.; Leighfield, Tod A.; Kamykowski, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    As a component of the ECOHAB Florida Regional Field Program, this study addresses cell cycle behavior and its importance to bloom formation of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. The cell cycle of K. brevis was first studied by flow cytometry in laboratory batch cultures, and a laboratory mesocosm column, followed by field populations over the 5-year course of the ECOHAB program. Under all conditions studied, K. brevis displayed diel phased cell division with S-phase beginning a minimum of 6 h after the onset of light and continuing for 12-14 h. Mitosis occurred during the dark, and was generally completed by the start of the next day. The timing of cell cycle phases relative to the diel cycle did not differ substantially in bloom populations displaying radically different growth rates ( μmin 0.17-0.55) under different day lengths and temperature conditions. The rhythm of cell cycle progression is independent from the rhythm controlling vertical migration, as similar cell cycle distributions are found at all depths of the water column in field samples. The implications of these findings are discussed in light of our current understanding of the dinoflagellate cell cycle and the development of improved models for K. brevis bloom growth.

  2. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  3. Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

  4. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  5. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ZengWei; ZHU Di; QU NingSong

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed,and nanocrystal-line nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents.Unlike traditional methods,the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing.Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits,pinholes and nodules.Furthermore,comparing with the deposit prepared by tradi-tional methods,the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm.Every diffraction peak's intensity of the deposit was reduced,the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased.The microhardness notably increased.The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force.It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.Key.words:electrodeposition,electroforming,hard particle,nanocrystalline,bright nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  6. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  7. Subjective comparison of brightness preservation methods for local backlight dimming displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Jari; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Local backlight dimming is a popular technology in high quality Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs). In those displays, the backlight is composed of contributions from several individually adjustable backlight segments, set at different backlight luminance levels in different parts of the screen......, according to the luma of the target image displayed on LCD. Typically, transmittance of the liquid crystal cells (pixels) located in the regions with dimmed backlight is increased in order to preserve their relative brightness with respect to the pixels located in the regions with bright backlight...... ordering to compare the relevant methods on a real-life LCD with a local backlight dimming capability. In general, our results show that locally adapted brightness preservation methods produce more preferred visual outcome than global methods, but dependency on the content is also observed. Based...

  8. A possible low-level explanation of "temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion"

    CERN Document Server

    Karmakar, Subhajit

    2009-01-01

    Based upon physiological observation on time dependent orientation selectivity in the cells of macaque's primary visual cortex together with the psychophysical studies on the tuning of orientation detectors in human vision we suggest that time dependence in brightness perception can be accommodated through the time evolution of cortical contribution to the orientation tuning of the ODoG filter responses. A set of Difference of Gaussians functions has been used to mimic the time dependence of orientation tuning. The tuning of orientation preference and its inversion at a later time have been considered in explaining qualitatively the temporal dynamics of brightness perception observed in "Brief presentations reveal the temporal dynamics of brightness induction and White's illusion" for 58 and 82 ms of stimulus exposure.

  9. Analysis of Electric Fields inside Microchannels and Single Cell Electrical Lysis with a Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofy Mussivand

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of electric fields generated inside the microchannels of a microfluidic device for electrical lysis of biological cells along with experimental verification are presented. Electrical lysis is the complete disintegration of cell membranes, due to a critical level of electric fields applied for a critical duration on a biological cell. Generating an electric field inside a microchannel of a microfluidic device has many advantages, including the efficient utilization of energy and low-current requirement. An ideal microchannel model was compared with a practical microchannel model using a finite element analysis tool that suggests that the overestimation error can be over 10%, from 2.5 mm or smaller, in the length of a microchannel. Two analytical forms are proposed to reduce this overestimation error. Experimental results showed that the high electric field is confined only inside the microchannel that is in agreement with the simulation results. Single cell electrical lysis was conducted with a fabricated microfluidic device. An average of 800 V for seven seconds across an 8 mm-long microchannel with the dimension of 100 μm × 20 μm was required for lysis, with electric fields exceeding 100 kV/m and consuming 300 mW.

  10. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Exposure Reduces Hypoxia and Inflammation Damage in Neuron-Like and Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of low-frequency, low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been investigated by using different cell lines derived from neuron-like cells and microglial cells. In particular, the primary aim was to evaluate the effect of PEMF exposure in inflammation- and hypoxia-induced injury in two different neuronal cell models, the human neuroblastoma-derived SH-SY5Y cells and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in N9 microglial cells. In neuron-like cells, live/dead and apoptosis assays were performed in hypoxia conditions from 2 to 48 h. Interestingly, PEMF exposure counteracted hypoxia damage significantly reducing cell death and apoptosis. In the same cell lines, PEMFs inhibited the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), the master transcriptional regulator of cellular response to hypoxia. The effect of PEMF exposure on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in both neuron-like and microglial cells was investigated considering their key role in ischemic injury. PEMFs significantly decreased hypoxia-induced ROS generation in PC12, SH-SY5Y, and N9 cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation. Moreover, PEMFs were able to reduce some of the most well-known pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 release in N9 microglial cells stimulated with different concentrations of LPS for 24 or 48 h of incubation time. These results show a protective effect of PEMFs on hypoxia damage in neuron-like cells and an anti-inflammatory effect in microglial cells suggesting that PEMFs could represent a potential therapeutic approach in cerebral ischemic conditions. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1200-1208, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  12. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats (hence ``Constellation'') from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes (3 cm aperture) and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats (funded by Austria) are UniBRITE, designed and built by UTIAS-SFL (University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies-Space Flight Laboratory) and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz (TUG) with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency, under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~ 24 degrees), so up to 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously in 32 × 32 sub-rasters. Photometry (with reduced precision but thorough time sampling) of additional fainter targets will be possible through on-board data processing. A critical technical element of the BRITE mission is the three-axis attitude control system to stabilize a nanosat with very low inertia. The pointing stability is better than 1.5 arcminutes rms, a significant advance by UTIAS-SFL over any previous nanosatellite. BRITE-Constellation will primarily measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology. The BRITE sample of many of the brightest stars in the night sky is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases (cool giants and AGB stars). The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars brighter than mag V=4 from which the BRITE-Constellation sample

  13. Electromagnetic field effects on cells of the immune system: The role of calcium signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walleczek, J.

    1991-07-01

    During the past decade considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating the exposures of cells of the immune system to relatively weak extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (< 300 Hz) can elicit cellular changes which might be relevant to in-vivo immune activity. However, knowledge about the underlying biological mechanisms by which weak fields induce cellular changes is still very limited. It is generally believed that the cell membrane and Ca{sup 2+} regulated activity is involved in bioactive ELF field-coupling to living systems. This article begins with a short review of the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of nonthermal levels of ELF electromagnetic fields on the biochemistry and activity of immune cells, and then closely examines new results which suggest a role for Ca{sup 2+} in the induction of these cellular field effects. Based on these findings it is proposed that membrane-mediated Ca{sup 2+} signalling processes are involved in the mediation of field effects on the immune system. 64 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Corona field effect surface passivation of n-type IBC cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla, RS; Wilshaw, PR; Reichel, C; Hermle, M.

    2016-01-01

    Passivation of silicon surfaces is an important requirement in achieving high energy conversion efficiencies in interdigitated back contact cells. Surface passivation, commonly achieved by dielectric coatings, can be greatly improved by extrinsic addition of chemical and field effect components. In particular, cell performance is strongly dependent on front surface passivation. In this work device modelling is used to show that 200% relatively better performance can be achieved using charge e...

  15. INVESTIGATION ON THE CAUSES OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP BRIGHTNESS REVERSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia M. M. Eiras

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Some high brightness eucalyptus Kraft pulps have shown poor brightness stability. In most cases, the causes have notbeen identified and permanent solutions have not been found. This work focused on evaluating the brightness stability profile of pulpsbleached by in sequences such as O(DC(PODD, O(DC(PODP, OD(PODD, OD(PODP, ODHT(PODD, ODHT(PODP, OA/D(PODD, OA/D(PODP, OAD(PODD and O(ZeD(PO. Brightness stability tests induced by according to Tappi UM200 procedureon samples bleached to 90±0.5% ISO. Brightness stability was measured after each bleaching stage of the various sequences andexpressed as brightness loss in % ISO. The results indicate that pulps bleached with sequences ending with a peroxide stage havehigher brightness stability compared to those ending with a chlorine dioxide stage. Pulps bleached with a standard sequence, initiatingwith a (DC stage, show brightness stability similar to that of pulp bleached by an ECF (Elementary chlorine free sequence initiatingwith a regular D0 stage. ECF sequences, initiated with hot stages produce pulps with higher brightness stability than sequencesinitiating with a regular D0 stage. The profile across the bleaching sequences shows a tendency of increased brightness stability inalkaline stages containing peroxide and decreased stability in those stages containing chlorine and/or chlorine dioxide, parallelingpulp carbonyl group content.

  16. Induction of growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells in magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Ezatti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue engineering is generally defined as developing and changing the laboratory growth of molecules and cells in tissues or organs to replace and repair the damaged part of body. This study was carried out to stimulate the growth of cultured fibroblast cells by a physical electromagnetic method. Methods: First, an air-core coil was prepared and the cell culture plate was placed comfortably into the mold, then the plate containing the culture medium and human fibroblast cell along with air-core coil were placed in an incubator and then connected to the power supply. Thus, the sample underwent electromagnetic field at different times, and cell proliferation was studied by MTTassay. Results: Microscopic images indicated that the cells undergoing electromagnetic field (0.35 amps had a significant growth compared to the cells in control group in a definit range of stimulation. Conclusion: In conclusion, electromagnetic stimulation in a definite range led to cell proliferation and could be used as a positive factor in tissue engineering.

  17. Proliferation and differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells by 400μT electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Manouchehr; Jadidi, Majid; Baghian, Atefeh; Hasanzadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-26

    The interaction between environment electromagnetic field (EMF) and cells can effect on various physiological processes. EMF as an external inducing factor, could effect on proliferation or differentiation of cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the electromagnetic field on the viability, proliferation and differentiation rate of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) to neuron. BMSCs were obtained from 42 adult male rats. The cells incubated and cultured in 96-wells and 6-wells plates and exposed to electromagnetic field (40 or 400μT) with a selected waveform: AC (alternative current), rectified half wave (RHW) and rectified full wave (RFW), for a week. To assess the viability and proliferation rate of treated cells, MTT assay was done, and then immunocytochemistry staining Neu N was used to evaluate cell differentiation to neuron. Results showed that EMF decreases the viability and proliferation in treated groups. But in AC group's reduction was significant. Minimum viability and proliferation rate was observed in RHW 400μT group compared with sham. Immunocytochemistry showed that EMF can induce BMSC differentiation into neuron in AC 400μT and RFW 400μT. Evidences of this research support the hypothesis that EMF can induce differentiation of BMSCs to neuron.

  18. Sterilization of Escherichia coli cells by the application of pulsed magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei; QU Jiu-hui; PENG Yong-zhen

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of microorganisms by pulsed magnetic field was studied. It was improved that theapplication of electromagnetic pulses evidently causes a lethal effect on E. coli cells suspended in phosphate buffersolution Na2 HPO4 / NaH2 PO4 (0.334/0.867 mmol/L). Experimental results indicated that the survivability( N/N0; whereN0 and N are the number of cells survived per milliliter before and after electromagnetic pulses application,respectively) of E. coli decreased with magnetic field intensity B and treatment time t. It was also found that themedium temperatures, the frequencies of pulse f, and the initial bacterial cell concentrations have determinateinfluences in destruction of E. coli cells by the application of magnetic pulses. The application of an magneticintensity B = 160 mT at pulses frequency f = 62 kHz and treatment time t = 16 h result in a considerable destructionlevels of E. coli cells ( N/N0 = 10-4 ). Possible mechanisms involved in sterilization of the magnetic field treatmentwere discussed. In order to shorten the treatment time, many groups of parallel inductive coil were used. Thepracticability test showed that the treatment time was shortened to 4 h with the application of three groups of parallelcoil when the survivability of E. coli cells was less than 0.01%; and the power consumption was about 0.2 kWh/m3 .

  19. Intense picosecond pulsed electric fields inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Xiong, Zheng-Ai; Chen, Wen-Juan; Yao, Cheng-Guo; Zhao, Zhong-Yong; Hua, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    A picosecond pulsed electric field (psPEF) is a localized physical therapy for tumors that has been developed in recent years, and that may in the future be utilized as a targeted non‑invasive treatment. However, there are limited studies regarding the biological effects of psPEF on cells. Electric field amplitude and pulse number are the main parameters of psPEF that influence its biological effects. In this study, we exposed HeLa cells to a psPEF with a variety of electric field amplitudes, from 100 to 600 kV/cm, and various pulse numbers, from 1,000 to 3,000. An MTT assay was used to detect the growth inhibition, while flow cytometry was used to determine the occurrence of apoptosis and the cell cycle of the HeLa cells following treatment. The morphological changes during cell apoptosis were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results demonstrated that the cell growth inhibition rate gradually increased, in correlation with the increasing electric field amplitude and pulse number, and achieved a plateau of maximum cell inhibition 12 h following the pulses. In addition, typical characteristics of HeLa cell apoptosis in the experimental groups were observed by TEM. The results demonstrated that the rate of apoptosis in the experimental groups was significantly elevated in comparison with the untreated group. In the treatment groups, the rate of apoptosis was greater in the higher amplitude groups than in the lower amplitude groups. The same results were obtained when the variable was the pulse number. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the cell cycle of the HeLa cells was arrested at the G2/M phase following psPEF treatment. Overall, our results indicated that psPEF inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis, and that these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the results demonstrated that the growth of the HeLa cells was arrested at the G2/M phase following treatment. This study may provide a

  20. Frequency-Tunable Microwave Field Detection in an Atomic Vapor Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Horsley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the sigma+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high resolution microwave imaging system, this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  1. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  2. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pingping; YIN Ruochun; CHEN Zhiyou; WU Lifang; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation.The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0,1,3,5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1,3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla.The seeds were germinated at 23℃ after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field.The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method.The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN),chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs.Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups,a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome,triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla,respectively.The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration,but no linear relationship was observed.Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  3. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  4. How electromagnetic fields can influence adult stem cells: positive and negative impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Aleksandra; Kocan, Beata; Bester, Mariusz; Budzik, Sylwia; Cholewa, Marian; Ochiya, Takahiro; Banas, Agnieszka

    2016-04-18

    The electromagnetic field (EMF) has a great impact on our body. It has been successfully used in physiotherapy for the treatment of bone disorders and osteoarthritis, as well as for cartilage regeneration or pain reduction. Recently, EMFs have also been applied in in vitro experiments on cell/stem cell cultures. Stem cells reside in almost all tissues within the human body, where they exhibit various potential. These cells are of great importance because they control homeostasis, regeneration, and healing. Nevertheless, stem cells when become cancer stem cells, may influence the pathological condition. In this article we review the current knowledge on the effects of EMFs on human adult stem cell biology, such as proliferation, the cell cycle, or differentiation. We present the characteristics of the EMFs used in miscellaneous assays. Most research has so far been performed during osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. It has been demonstrated that the effects of EMF stimulation depend on the intensity and frequency of the EMF and the time of exposure to it. However, other factors may affect these processes, such as growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and so forth. Exploration of this research area may enhance the development of EMF-based technologies used in medical applications and thereby improve stem cell-based therapy and tissue engineering.

  5. Hybrid quantum repeater using bright coherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loock, P; Ladd, T D; Sanaka, K; Yamaguchi, F; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, W J; Yamamoto, Y

    2006-06-23

    We describe a quantum repeater protocol for long-distance quantum communication. In this scheme, entanglement is created between qubits at intermediate stations of the channel by using a weak dispersive light-matter interaction and distributing the outgoing bright coherent-light pulses among the stations. Noisy entangled pairs of electronic spin are then prepared with high success probability via homodyne detection and postselection. The local gates for entanglement purification and swapping are deterministic and measurement-free, based upon the same coherent-light resources and weak interactions as for the initial entanglement distribution. Finally, the entanglement is stored in a nuclear-spin-based quantum memory. With our system, qubit-communication rates approaching 100 Hz over 1280 km with fidelities near 99% are possible for reasonable local gate errors.

  6. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  7. Substructure of Quiet Sun Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra; Goode, Phillip R

    2010-01-01

    Since photospheric bright points (BPs) were first observed, there has been a question as to how are they structured. Are they just single flux tubes or a bundle of the flux-tubes? Surface photometry of the quiet Sun (QS) has achieved resolution close to 0.1" with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. This resolution allowed us to detect a richer spectrum of BPs in the QS. The smallest BPs we observed with TiO 705.68 nm were 0.13", and we were able to resolve individual components in some of the BPs clusters and ribbons observed in the QS, showing that they are composed of the individual BPs. Average size of observed BPs was 0.22".

  8. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Wenger, Trey; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Angell, Dylan; Burkhardt, Andrew; Davis, Blair; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Richardson, Whitney; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Matthews, Allison; McNair, Shunlante; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Troup, Nicholas William

    2017-01-01

    We present activities from the eighth year of Dark Skies Bright Kids (DSBK), an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. Over the past seven years, our primary focus has been hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools, and over the past several years, we have partnered with local businesses to host our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows. This past summer we expanded our reach through a new initiative to bring week-long summer day camps to south and southwest Virginia, home to some of the most underserved communities in the commonwealth.

  9. Tunneling Dynamics Between Atomic Bright Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Yang, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling behavior between two bright solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate with attractive contact interactions between atoms. The explicit tunneling properties including tunneling particles and oscillation period are described analytically, which indicates that the periodic tunneling form is a nonlinear Josephson type oscillation. The results suggest that the breathing behavior of solitons comes from the tunneling mechanism in an effective double-well potential, which is quite different from the modulational instability mechanism for Akhmediev breather and K-M breather. Furthermore, we obtain a phase diagram for two soliton interaction which admits tunneling property, particle-like property, interference property, and a resonant interaction case. The explicit conditions for them are clarified based on the defined critical distance $d_c$ and spatial interference period $D$.

  10. A one-dimensional model for the quantum efficiency of front-surface-field solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yernaux, M. I.; Battochio, C.; Verlinden, P.; van de Wiele, F.

    1984-11-01

    A one-dimensional analytical model is proposed to calculate the photocurrent generated in interdigitated back contact solar cells with a high-low junction at the front illuminated surface. The high-low junction is simulated by constant doping levels, mobilities and lifetimes. A study of the quantum efficiency of front-surface-field (FSF) solar cells is made and the computer results are compared with experimental results. A method of determining the real and the effective surface recombination velocity of FSF solar cells is proposed.

  11. Analysis of the influence of the cell geometry, orientation and cell proximity effects on the electric field distribution from direct RF exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, J. L.; Muñoz, S.; Sancho, M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows the importance of using a cell model with the proper geometry, orientation and internal structure to study possible cellular effects from direct radiofrequency exposure. For this purpose, the electric field intensity is calculated, using the finite element numerical technique, in single- and multilayer spherical, cylindrical and ellipsoidal mammalian cell models exposed to linearly polarized electromagnetic plane waves of frequencies 900 and 2450 MHz. An extensive analysis is performed on the influence that the cell geometry and orientation with respect to the external field have in the value of the electric field induced in the membrane and cytoplasm. We also show the significant role that the cytoplasmic and extracellular bound water layers play in determining the electric field intensity for the cylindrical and ellipsoidal cell models. Finally, a study of the mutual interactions between cells shows that polarizing effects between cells significantly modify the values of field intensity within the cell.

  12. Two modes of cell death caused by exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga N Pakhomova

    Full Text Available High-amplitude electric pulses of nanosecond duration, also known as nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF, are a novel modality with promising applications for cell stimulation and tissue ablation. However, key mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of nsPEF have not been established. We show that the principal cause of cell death induced by 60- or 300-ns pulses in U937 cells is the loss of the plasma membrane integrity ("nanoelectroporation", leading to water uptake, cell swelling, and eventual membrane rupture. Most of this early necrotic death occurs within 1-2 hr after nsPEF exposure. The uptake of water is driven by the presence of pore-impermeable solutes inside the cell, and can be counterbalanced by the presence of a pore-impermeable solute such as sucrose in the medium. Sucrose blocks swelling and prevents the early necrotic death; however the long-term cell survival (24 and 48 hr does not significantly change. Cells protected with sucrose demonstrate higher incidence of the delayed death (6-24 hr post nsPEF. These cells are more often positive for the uptake of an early apoptotic marker dye YO-PRO-1 while remaining impermeable to propidium iodide. Instead of swelling, these cells often develop apoptotic fragmentation of the cytoplasm. Caspase 3/7 activity increases already in 1 hr after nsPEF and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage is detected in 2 hr. Staurosporin-treated positive control cells develop these apoptotic signs only in 3 and 4 hr, respectively. We conclude that nsPEF exposure triggers both necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The early necrotic death prevails under standard cell culture conditions, but cells rescued from the necrosis nonetheless die later on by apoptosis. The balance between the two modes of cell death can be controlled by enabling or blocking cell swelling.

  13. Two modes of cell death caused by exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Olga N; Gregory, Betsy W; Semenov, Iurii; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2013-01-01

    High-amplitude electric pulses of nanosecond duration, also known as nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF), are a novel modality with promising applications for cell stimulation and tissue ablation. However, key mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of nsPEF have not been established. We show that the principal cause of cell death induced by 60- or 300-ns pulses in U937 cells is the loss of the plasma membrane integrity ("nanoelectroporation"), leading to water uptake, cell swelling, and eventual membrane rupture. Most of this early necrotic death occurs within 1-2 hr after nsPEF exposure. The uptake of water is driven by the presence of pore-impermeable solutes inside the cell, and can be counterbalanced by the presence of a pore-impermeable solute such as sucrose in the medium. Sucrose blocks swelling and prevents the early necrotic death; however the long-term cell survival (24 and 48 hr) does not significantly change. Cells protected with sucrose demonstrate higher incidence of the delayed death (6-24 hr post nsPEF). These cells are more often positive for the uptake of an early apoptotic marker dye YO-PRO-1 while remaining impermeable to propidium iodide. Instead of swelling, these cells often develop apoptotic fragmentation of the cytoplasm. Caspase 3/7 activity increases already in 1 hr after nsPEF and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage is detected in 2 hr. Staurosporin-treated positive control cells develop these apoptotic signs only in 3 and 4 hr, respectively. We conclude that nsPEF exposure triggers both necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The early necrotic death prevails under standard cell culture conditions, but cells rescued from the necrosis nonetheless die later on by apoptosis. The balance between the two modes of cell death can be controlled by enabling or blocking cell swelling.

  14. Low stoichiometry operation of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, Madeleine; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cell operation on dry reactant gases under low stoichiometry conditions employing the interdigitated flow field is investigated using a multi-fluid model. It is assumed that the MEA contains a water uptake layer which facilitates water absorption to the membrane and hence prevents the anode...

  15. Alkali-vapor cell with metal coated windows for efficient application of an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Sarkisyan, A. S.; Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M.-A.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no magnetic part. The use of this kind of cell has resulted in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of parity violation in cesium vapor underway at ENS, Paris. The technique can be applied to other situations where a brazed assembly would give rise to unacceptably large birefringence in the windows.

  16. Stability of Bright Solitons in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hui-You; YAN Jia-Ren; XIE Qiong-Tao

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the stability of bright solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates by including a feeding term and a loss one in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Based on the direct approach of perturbation theory for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation, we give the explicit dependence of the height and other related quantities of bright solitons on the feeding and loss term. It is found that the three-body recombination loss plays a crucial role in stabilizing bright solitons.

  17. Hysteresis analysis in dye-sensitized solar cells based on external bias field effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Li, Xiaoyi; Tong, Yanhua; Zhang, Tiansheng

    2017-02-01

    The current density-voltage (J-V) hysteresis phenomenon occurs in perovskite solar cells as well as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs); however, it has received little attention in DSCs. We consider that the trapping-detrapping-induced variation of the charge collection efficiency might cause J-V hysteresis. Therefore, we conduct a systematic study on the influence of an external bias field during and before J-V measurements in typical DSCs. We find that the J-V performance of DSCs significantly depends on the scan bias direction and the external bias field before and during measurements. Our results indicate that the external-bias-field-modulated charge injection, trapping-detrapping, and accumulation processes in DSCs are possible causes for the anomalous J-V behavior.

  18. Electric-field-enhanced nutrient consumption in dielectric biomaterials that contain anchorage-dependent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, Laurence A; Floren, Michael L; Belfiore, Carol J

    2012-02-01

    This research contribution addresses electric-field stimulation of intra-tissue mass transfer and cell proliferation in viscoelastic biomaterials. The unsteady state reaction-diffusion equation is solved according to the von Kármán-Pohlhausen integral method of boundary layer analysis when nutrient consumption and tissue regeneration occur in response to harmonic electric potential differences across a parallel-plate capacitor in a dielectric-sandwich configuration. The partial differential mass balance with diffusion and electro-kinetic consumption contains the Damköhler (Λ(2)) and Deborah (De) numbers. Zero-field and electric-field-sensitive Damköhler numbers affect nutrient boundary layer growth. Diagonal elements of the 2nd-rank diffusion tensor are enhanced in the presence of weak electric fields, in agreement with the formalism of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Induced dipole polarization density within viscoelastic biomaterials is calculated via the real and imaginary components of the complex dielectric constant, according to the Debye equation, to quantify electro-kinetic stimulation. Rates of nutrient consumption under zero-field conditions are described by third-order kinetics that include local mass densities of nutrients, oxygen, and attached cells. Thinner nutrient boundary layers are stabilized at shorter dimensionless diffusion times when the zero-field intra-tissue Damköhler number increases above its initial-condition-sensitive critical value [i.e., {Λ(2)(zero-field)}(critical)≥53, see Eq. (23)], such that the biomaterial core is starved of essential ingredients required for successful proliferation. When tissue regeneration occurs above the critical electric-field-sensitive intra-tissue Damköhler number, the electro-kinetic contribution to nutrient consumption cannot be neglected. The critical electric-field-sensitive intra-tissue Damköhler number is proportional to the Deborah number.

  19. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  20. Cell Wall Regeneration by Protoplasts in the Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena; Bogatina, Nina; Kordyum, Elizabeth; Ovcharenko, Yu.; Vorobyeva, T.

    2008-06-01

    Role of gravity on growth of high plants has been studied for many years, but many questions on biogenesis of plant cell wall are investigated insufficiently, and require new experiments. We have studied regeneration of cell wall in the fused and separate protoplasts of tobacco and soyabean in the presence of the weak, alternating magnetic field that consisted of frequency of 32 Hz (for Ca2+ ; F=40 μT) or 75 Hz (for Mg2+; F=60 μT) in side μ-metal shield. We discovered that the combined magnetic field that was adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ or Mg2+ is changed the rate of cell wall regeneration. Light and confocal laser microscopy were used for the investigations.

  1. Effects of magnetic field configuration on rf sputtering for CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Shao, M.; Fischer, A.; Grecu, D.; Jayamaha, U.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Bohn, R.G. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The authors report studies of solar cells prepared by rf planar magnetron sputtering in which the films were deposited using magnetic field structures ranging from approximately balanced to strongly unbalanced in the type II configuration. For films grown with the unbalanced configurations, they find much stronger photoluminescence and much better cell performance than for the balanced configuration. The CdTe films show differences in electrical performance depending on magnetic field as well. These effects are interpreted as arising from the enhanced electron and ion bombardment of the film growth interface for the unbalanced magnetrons. Using two unbalanced magnetrons the authors have fabricated an all-rf-sputtered cell with NREL-verified efficiency of 11.6% at air mass 1.5 illumination.

  2. Induction of Cell Death Mechanisms and Apoptosis by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields (nsPEFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nova M. Sain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse power technology using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs offers a new stimulus to modulate cell functions or induce cell death for cancer cell ablation. New data and a literature review demonstrate fundamental and basic cellular mechanisms when nsPEFs interact with cellular targets. NsPEFs supra-electroporate cells creating large numbers of nanopores in all cell membranes. While nsPEFs have multiple cellular targets, these studies show that nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm closely parallels deterioration in cell viability. Increases in intracellular Ca2+ alone were not sufficient for cell death; however, cell death depended of the presence of Ca2+. When both events occur, cell death ensues. Further, direct evidence supports the hypothesis that pulse rise-fall times or high frequency components of nsPEFs are important for decreasing ΔΨm and cell viability. Evidence indicates in Jurkat cells that cytochrome c release from mitochondria is caspase-independent indicating an absence of extrinsic apoptosis and that cell death can be caspase-dependent and –independent. The Ca2+ dependence of nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm suggests that nanoporation of inner mitochondria membranes is less likely and effects on a Ca2+-dependent protein(s or the membrane in which it is embedded are more likely a target for nsPEF-induced cell death. The mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP complex is a likely candidate. Data demonstrate that nsPEFs can bypass cancer mutations that evade apoptosis through mechanisms at either the DISC or the apoptosome.

  3. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When viewing three-dimensional (3D images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the photographic principle is used in this study to measure metering values by capturing 2D and 3D images on television screens. By analyzing these images with statistical product and service solutions (SPSS software, the image brightness values can be estimated using the statistical regression model, which can also indicate the impact of various environmental factors or hardware on the image brightness. In analysis of the experimental results, comparison of the image brightness between 2D and 3D images indicates 60.8% degradation in the 3D image brightness amplitude. The experimental values, from 52.4% to 69.2%, are within the 95% confidence interval

  4. Receptive Field Vectors of Genetically-Identified Retinal Ganglion Cells Reveal Cell-Type-Dependent Visual Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Katz

    Full Text Available Sensory stimuli are encoded by diverse kinds of neurons but the identities of the recorded neurons that are studied are often unknown. We explored in detail the firing patterns of eight previously defined genetically-identified retinal ganglion cell (RGC types from a single transgenic mouse line. We first introduce a new technique of deriving receptive field vectors (RFVs which utilises a modified form of mutual information ("Quadratic Mutual Information". We analysed the firing patterns of RGCs during presentation of short duration (~10 second complex visual scenes (natural movies. We probed the high dimensional space formed by the visual input for a much smaller dimensional subspace of RFVs that give the most information about the response of each cell. The new technique is very efficient and fast and the derivation of novel types of RFVs formed by the natural scene visual input was possible even with limited numbers of spikes per cell. This approach enabled us to estimate the 'visual memory' of each cell type and the corresponding receptive field area by calculating Mutual Information as a function of the number of frames and radius. Finally, we made predictions of biologically relevant functions based on the RFVs of each cell type. RGC class analysis was complemented with results for the cells' response to simple visual input in the form of black and white spot stimulation, and their classification on several key physiological metrics. Thus RFVs lead to predictions of biological roles based on limited data and facilitate analysis of sensory-evoked spiking data from defined cell types.

  5. Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Moon, Joung-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kang, Seung-Gul; Geum, Dongho; Son, Gi-Hoon; Lim, Jong-Min; Kim, Leen; Lee, Eun-Il; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2016-08-22

    This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.

  6. Global Properties of M31's Stellar Halo from the SPLASH Survey. I. Surface Brightness Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Beaton, Rachael L.; Bullock, James; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-01

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 ± 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least ~175 kpc (~2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California

  7. Macroion solutions in the cell model studied by field theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Leo; Linse, Per

    2011-12-14

    Aqueous solutions of charged spherical macroions with variable dielectric permittivity and their associated counterions are examined within the cell model using a field theory and Monte Carlo simulations. The field theory is based on separation of fields into short- and long-wavelength terms, which are subjected to different statistical-mechanical treatments. The simulations were performed by using a new, accurate, and fast algorithm for numerical evaluation of the electrostatic polarization interaction. The field theory provides counterion distributions outside a macroion in good agreement with the simulation results over the full range from weak to strong electrostatic coupling. A low-dielectric macroion leads to a displacement of the counterions away from the macroion.

  8. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Global Relativistic Jets with Helical Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Duţan, Ioana; Mizuno, Yosuke; Niemiec, Jacek; Kobzar, Oleh; Pohl, Martin; Gómez, Jose L; Pe'er, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob T; Nordlund, Åke; Meli, Athina; Sol, Helene; Hardee, Philip E; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2016-01-01

    We study the interaction of relativistic jets with their environment, using 3-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations for two cases of jet composition: (i) electron-proton ($e^{-}-p^{+}$) and (ii) electron-positron ($e^{\\pm}$) plasmas containing helical magnetic fields. We have performed simulations of "global" jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Mushroom instability. We have found that these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. For the $e^{-}-p^{+}$ jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed, whereas for the $e^{\\pm}$ jet, a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without a helical magnetic field. We plan to perform further simulations using much larger sys...

  9. Induction of Oxidation in Living Cells by Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We are studying how biological systems can harness quantum effects of time varying electromagnetic (EM) waves as the time-setting basis for universal biochemical organization via the redox cycle. The effects of extremely weak EM field on the biochemical redox cycle can be monitored through real-time detection of oxidation-induced light emissions of reporter molecules in living cells. It has been shown that EM fields can also induce changes in fluid transport rates through capillaries (approximately 300 microns inner diameter) by generating annular proton gradients. This effect may be relevant to understanding cardiovascular dis-function in spaceflight, beyond the ionosphere. Importantly, we show that these EM effects can be attenuated using an active EM field cancellation device. Central for NASA's Human Research Program is the fact that the absence of ambient EM field in spaceflight can also have a detrimental influence, namely via increased oxidative damage, on DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  10. An Alkali-Vapor Cell with Metal Coated Windows for Efficient Application of an Electric Field

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkisyan, D; Guena, J; Lintz, M; Bouchiat, M A; Sarkisyan, David; Gu\\'{e}na, Jocelyne; Lintz, Michel; Bouchiat, Marie-Anne

    2005-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2 kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no ...

  11. Physiological and Molecular Genetic Effects of Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields on Human Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The present investigation details the development of model systems for growing two- and three-dimensional human neural progenitor cells within a culture medium facilitated by a time-varying electromagnetic field (TVEMF). The cells and culture medium are contained within a two- or three-dimensional culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from an electrode or coil. These studies further provide methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in either configuration. Grown in two dimensions, neuronal cells extended longitudinally, forming tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time-varying electrical current was conducted. In the three-dimensional aspect, exposure to TVEMF resulted in the development of three-dimensional aggregates, which emulated organized neural tissues. In both experimental configurations, the proliferation rate of the TVEMF cells was 2.5 to 4.0 times the rate of the non-waveform cells. Each of the experimental embodiments resulted in similar molecular genetic changes regarding the growth potential of the tissues as measured by gene chip analyses, which measured more than 10,000 human genes simultaneously.

  12. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, logg. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure logg to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex (Bastien et al. 2013). Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag<13) candidate planet-hosting stars with Teff=4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, an astrophysical bias exists that contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50%...

  13. Root responses to soil physical conditions; growth dynamics from field to cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Bransby, M Fraser; Hans, Joachim; McKenna, Stephen J; Roberts, Tim J; Valentine, Tracy A

    2006-01-01

    Root growth in the field is often slowed by a combination of soil physical stresses, including mechanical impedance, water stress, and oxygen deficiency. The stresses operating may vary continually, depending on the location of the root in the soil profile, the prevailing soil water conditions, and the degree to which the soil has been compacted. The dynamics of root growth responses are considered in this paper, together with the cellular responses that underlie them. Certain root responses facilitate elongation in hard soil, for example, increased sloughing of border cells and exudation from the root cap decreases friction; and thickening of the root relieves stress in front of the root apex and decreases buckling. Whole root systems may also grow preferentially in loose versus dense soil, but this response depends on genotype and the spatial arrangement of loose and compact soil with respect to the main root axes. Decreased root elongation is often accompanied by a decrease in both cell flux and axial cell extension, and recent computer-based models are increasing our understanding of these processes. In the case of mechanical impedance, large changes in cell shape occur, giving rise to shorter fatter cells. There is still uncertainty about many aspects of this response, including the changes in cell walls that control axial versus radial extension, and the degree to which the epidermis, cortex, and stele control root elongation. Optical flow techniques enable tracking of root surfaces with time to yield estimates of two-dimensional velocity fields. It is demonstrated that these techniques can be applied successfully to time-lapse sequences of confocal microscope images of living roots, in order to determine velocity fields and strain rates of groups of cells. In combination with new molecular approaches this provides a promising way of investigating and modelling the mechanisms controlling growth perturbations in response to environmental stresses.

  14. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  15. Design and simulation of novel flow field plate geometry for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hanxia; Wu, Chaoqun; Liu, Shuliang; Chen, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Bipolar plate is one of the many important components of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks as it supplies fuel and oxidant to the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA), removes water, collects produced current and provides mechanical support for the single cells in the stack. The flow field design of a bipolar plate greatly affects the performance of a PEMFC. It must uniformly distribute the reactant gases over the MEA and prevent product water flooding. This paper aims at improving the fuel cell performance by optimizing flow field designs and flow channel configurations. To achieve this, a novel biomimetic flow channel for flow field designs is proposed based on Murray's Law. Computational fluid dynamics based simulations were performed to compare three different designs (parallel, serpentine and biomimetic channel, respectively) in terms of current density distribution, power density distribution, pressure distribution, temperature distribution, and hydrogen mass fraction distribution. It was found that flow field designs with biomimetic flow channel perform better than that with convectional flow channel under the same operating conditions.

  16. Effect of weak static magnetic fields on the development of cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surma, Sergei V; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Shchegolev, Boris F; Stefanov, Vasily E

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effect produced on the development and functional activity of skeletal muscle cells from newborn Wistar rats in primary culture by weak static magnetic fields (WSMF; 60-400 µT) with a high capacity of penetrating the biological media. To reduce the impact of external magnetic fields, cells were cultured at 37 °C in a multilayered shielding chamber with the attenuation coefficient equal to 160. WSMF inside the chamber was created by a circular permanent magnet. We found that the application of WSMF with the magnetic field strength only a few times that of the geomagnetic field can accelerate the development of skeletal muscle cells, resulting in the formation of multinuclear hypertrophied myotubes. WSMF was shown to induce 1.5- to 3.5-fold rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i due to the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through ryanodine receptors (RyR), which increases in the maturation of myotubes. We also found that fully differentiated myotubes at late stages of development were less sensitive to WSMF, manifesting a gradual decrease in the frequency of contractions. However, myotubes at the stage when electromechanical coupling was forming dramatically reduced the frequency of contractions during the first minutes of their exposure to WSMF.

  17. Galvanotactic migration of EA.Hy926 endothelial cells in a novel designed electric field bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Haiyan; Yang, Gang; Wang, Zhengrong

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous direct current electric fields (dcEFs) play a significant role in major biological processes such as embryogenesis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In this study, the galvanotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cell line EA.Hy926 was investigated by using a novel designed bioreactor. The physical features of the bioreactor were discussed and analyzed by both numerical simulation method and equivalent circuit model method. EA.Hy926 cells were cultured in the bioreactor for 10-24 h under 50-250 mV/mm dcEFs. Cell migration direction, distance, and velocity were recorded under an online time-lapse microscope. The effects of serum and growth factor on cell galvanotatic migration were investigated. To further explore the role of dcEFs in regulating endothelial cells, we analyzed the endothelial cell proliferation and secretion of nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1) in response to dcEFs of physiological strength. Our results showed that EA.Hy926 cells had an obvious directional migration to the cathode, and the EF-directed migration was voltage dependent. The results also showed dcEFs did not affect cell proliferation, but affected the productions of NO and ET-1. Our study also showed the novel bioreactor, with a compact and planar style, makes it more convenient and more reasonable for EF stimulation experiments than earlier chamber designs.

  18. The Effect of 217 Hz Magnetic Field of Cell Phone with Different Intensities on Apoptosis of Normal and Cancerous Cells Treated with Chemotherapy Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Mansourian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the increasing development of home and business electronic equipment in today's world, the biological effects of ELF magnetic fields have been studied at two molecular-cellular and animal- human levels. Considering the therapeutic viewpoint of this study regarding the effects of low-frequency fields of mobile phone, the effect of acute exposure to this field on chemotherapy will be studied.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, based on measurement of the intensity of the magnetic fields from mobile phones in another research, flux densities of magnetic field of 159.44, 93.25 and 120µ tesla with frequency of 217Hz was generated in magnetic field generator system, and the apoptosis level in K562 cancer cells and healthy cells of lymphocytes was assessed after exposure to field using flow cytometry method. This evaluation method was also performed for the cells treated with bleomycin after exposure to this field.Results: 217 Hz magnetic field exposure significantly increases the rate of apoptosis percentage (p > 0.05 in K562 cancer cells and in two intensities of 120 and 159.44µ tesla compared to the control group, but such effect is not observed in lymphocyte cells. Bleomycin-induced apoptosis percentage following exposure to the mentioned magnetic field shows no significant difference compared to the group of treatment with drug and without field exposure. This lack of significant difference is observed between the groups of drug after field exposure and field alone as well as between groups exposed to field and groups treated with bleomycin.Conclusion: Study results showed that 217 Hz magnetic field of mobile phone can induce apoptosis on cancer cells, but it has no effect on healthy cells. Thus, in order to use mobile phone as an effective factor in their treatment, some studies should be conducted at animal-human level.

  19. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  20. Low and High Surface Brightness Galaxies at Void Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ceccarelli, L; Lambas, D G; Galaz, G; Padilla, N D

    2012-01-01

    We study the relative fraction of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs and HSBGs) at void walls in the SDSS DR7. We focus on galaxies in equal local density environments. We assume that the host dark-matter halo mass (for which we use SDSS group masses) is a good indicator of local density. This analysis allows to examine the behavior of the abundance of LSBG and HSBG galaxies at a fixed local density and distinguish the large-scale environment defined by the void geometry. We compare galaxies in the field, and in the void walls; the latter are defined as the volume of void shells of radius equal to that of the void. We find a significant decrement, a factor $\\sim 4$, of the relative fraction of blue, active star-forming LSBGs in equal mass groups at the void walls and the field. This decrement is consistent with an increase of the fraction of blue, active star-forming HSBGs. By contrast, red LSBGs and HSBGs show negligible changes. We argue that these results are consistent with a scenario where L...

  1. QUIET-SUN NETWORK BRIGHT POINT PHENOMENA WITH SIGMOIDAL SIGNATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Orange, N. B. [OrangeWave Innovative Science, LLC, Moncks Corner, SC 29461 (United States); Champey, P. R. [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous solar atmospheric coronal and transition region bright points (BPs) are compact features overlying strong concentrations of magnetic flux. Here, we utilize high-cadence observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to provide the first observations of extreme ultraviolet quiet-Sun (QS) network BP activity associated with sigmoidal structuring. To our knowledge, this previously unresolved fine structure has never been associated with such small-scale QS events. This QS event precedes a bi-directional jet in a compact, low-energy, and low-temperature environment, where evidence is found in support of the typical fan-spine magnetic field topology. As in active regions and micro-sigmoids, the sigmoidal arcade is likely formed via tether-cutting reconnection and precedes peak intensity enhancements and eruptive activity. Our QS BP sigmoid provides a new class of small-scale structuring exhibiting self-organized criticality that highlights a multi-scaled self-similarity between large-scale, high-temperature coronal fields and the small-scale, lower-temperature QS network. Finally, our QS BP sigmoid elevates arguments for coronal heating contributions from cooler atmospheric layers, as this class of structure may provide evidence favoring mass, energy, and helicity injections into the heliosphere.

  2. Quiet-Sun Network Bright Point Phenomena with Sigmoidal Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.; Champey, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous solar atmospheric coronal and transition region bright points (BPs) are compact features overlying strong concentrations of magnetic flux. Here, we utilize high-cadence observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to provide the first observations of extreme ultraviolet quiet-Sun (QS) network BP activity associated with sigmoidal structuring. To our knowledge, this previously unresolved fine structure has never been associated with such small-scale QS events. This QS event precedes a bi-directional jet in a compact, low-energy, and low-temperature environment, where evidence is found in support of the typical fan-spine magnetic field topology. As in active regions and micro-sigmoids, the sigmoidal arcade is likely formed via tether-cutting reconnection and precedes peak intensity enhancements and eruptive activity. Our QS BP sigmoid provides a new class of small-scale structuring exhibiting self-organized criticality that highlights a multi-scaled self-similarity between large-scale, high-temperature coronal fields and the small-scale, lower-temperature QS network. Finally, our QS BP sigmoid elevates arguments for coronal heating contributions from cooler atmospheric layers, as this class of structure may provide evidence favoring mass, energy, and helicity injections into the heliosphere.

  3. Bright Transients from Black Hole - Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazio, Daniel J; Murray, Norman W; Price, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Direct detection of black hole-neutron star (BHNS) pairs is anticipated with the advent of aLIGO. Electromagnetic counterparts may be crucial for a confident gravitational-wave detection as well as for extraction of astronomical information. Yet BHNS star pairs are notoriously dark and so inaccessible to telescopes. Contrary to this expectation, a bright electromagnetic transient can occur in the final moments before merger as long as the neutron star is highly magnetized. The orbital motion of the neutron star magnet creates a Faraday flux and corresponding power available for luminosity. A spectrum of curvature radiation ramps up until the rapid injection of energy ignites a fireball, which would appear as an energetic blackbody peaking in the X-ray to gamma-rays for neutron star field strengths ranging from $10^{12}$G to $10^{16}$G respectively and a $10M_{\\odot}$ black hole. The fireball event may last from a few milliseconds to a few seconds depending on the NS magnetic field strength, and may be observa...

  4. Dynamic changes of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granule cells exposed to pulsed electric fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in embryonic chick cerebellar granule cells loaded with fluo-3/AM and exposed to a single pulsed electric field was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and fluorescent microscope equipped with CCD video imaging system.The results showed that [Ca2+]i increased immediately and rose to the peak rapidly as the cells exposed to a single pulsed electric field.The amplitude and rate of the increases of [Ca2+]i depend on the intensity of external electric field.In the presence of Ca2+ chelant EGTA or Ca2+ channels blocker La3+ in the pulsation solutions,the increase of [Ca2+]i was still observable.It was also observed that [Ca2+]i of different intracellular areas in the cell elevated simultaneously while the peak of the increase of [Ca2+]i in the poles of the cell preceded to the peak in its somata and recovered to a plateau within a short time.

  5. Dynamic changes of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granule cells exposed to pulsed electric fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雅; 王彦; 孙彤; 张锦珠; 景向红; 李瑞午

    2000-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in embryonic chick cerebellar granule cells loaded with fluo-3/AM and exposed to a single pulsed electric field was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and fluorescent microscope equipped with CCD video imaging system. The results showed that [Ca2+]i increased immediately and rose to the peak rapidly as the cells exposed to a single pulsed electric field. The amplitude and rate of the increases of [Ca2+]i depend on the intensity of external electric field. In the presence of Ca2+ chelant EGTA or Ca2+ channels blocker La3+ in the pulsation solutions, the increase of [Ca2+]i was still observable. It was also observed that [Ca2+]i of different intracellular areas in the cell elevated simultaneously while the peak of the increase of [Ca2+]i in the poles of the cell preceded to the peak in its somata and recovered to a plateau within a short time.

  6. Modulating chemotaxis of lung cancer cells by using electric fields in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chiu; Hsieh, Meng-Hua; Liu, Chung-Chun; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Liao, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Kuo, Po-Ling; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-03-01

    We employed direct-current electric fields (dcEFs) to modulate the chemotaxis of lung cancer cells in a microfluidic cell culture device that incorporates both stable concentration gradients and dcEFs. We found that the chemotaxis induced by a 0.5 μM/mm concentration gradient of epidermal growth factor can be nearly compensated by a 360 mV/mm dcEF. When the effect of chemical stimulation was balanced by the electrical drive, the cells migrated randomly, and the path lengths were largely reduced. We also demonstrated electrically modulated chemotaxis of two types of lung cancer cells with opposite directions of electrotaxis in this device.

  7. Hyperlayer hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Roda, Barbara; Cinque, Leonardo; Melucci, Dora; Min, Byung Ryul; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2003-01-24

    Interest in low-cost, analytical-scale, highly efficient and sensitive separation methods for cells, among which bacteria, is increasing. Particle separation in hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF FlFFF) has been recently improved by the optimization of the HF FIFFF channel design. The intrinsic simplicity and low cost of this HF FlFFF channel allows for its disposable usage. which is particularly appealing for analytical bio-applications. Here, for the first time, we present a feasibility study on high-performance, hyperlayer HF FIFFF of micrometer-sized bacteria (Escherichia coli) and of different types of cells (human red blood cells, wine-making yeast from Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Fractionation performance is shown to be at least comparable to that obtained with conventional, flat-channel hyperlayer FIFFF of cells, at superior size-based selectivity and reduced analysis time.

  8. Nonlinear chemical imaging microscopy: near-field third harmonic generation imaging of human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, R D; Johnson, J C; Saykally, R J

    2000-11-01

    Third harmonic generation (THG) imaging using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) is demonstrated for the first time. A femtosecond, tunable near-infrared laser was used to generate both nonresonant and resonantly enhanced third harmonic radiation in human red blood cells. We show that resonantly enhanced THG is a chemically specific bulk probe in NSOM imaging by tuning the excitation source onto and off of resonance with the Soret transition of oxyhemoglobin. Additionally, we provide evidence that tightly focused, nonresonant, far-field THG imaging experiments do not produce contrast that is truly surface specific.

  9. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-01

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  10. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  11. GOMOS bright limb ozone data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tukiainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have created a daytime ozone profile data set from the measurements of the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS instrument on board the Envisat satellite. This so-called GOMOS bright limb (GBL data set contains ~ 358 000 stratospheric daytime ozone profiles measured by GOMOS in 2002–2012. The GBL data set complements the widely used GOMOS night-time data based on stellar occultation measurements. The GBL data set is based on the GOMOS daytime occultations but instead of the transmitted star light, we use limb scattered solar light. The ozone profiles retrieved from these radiance spectra cover 18–60 km tangent height range and have approximately 2–3 km vertical resolution. We show that these profiles are generally in better than 10% agreement with the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change ozone sounding profiles and with the GOMOS night-time, MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder, and OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph, and InfraRed Imaging System satellite measurements. However, there is a 10–13% negative bias at 40 km tangent height and a 10–50% positive bias at 50 km when the solar zenith angle > 75°. These biases are most likely caused by stray light which is difficult to characterize and remove entirely from the measured spectra. Nevertheless, the GBL data set approximately doubles the amount of useful GOMOS ozone profiles and improves coverage of the summer pole.

  12. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed, and nanocrystalline nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents. Unlike traditional methods, the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing. Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits, pinholes and nodules. Furthermore, comparing with the deposit prepared by traditional methods, the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm. Every diffraction peak’s intensity of the deposit was reduced, the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased. The microhardness notably increased. The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force. It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  13. Surface photometry of bulge dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM

    1999-01-01

    We present results of broad band BVRI observations of a sample of galaxies with a low surface brightness (LSB) disk and a bulge. These galaxies are well described as exponential disks and exponential bulges with no preferred value for either scale length or central surface brightness. The median B b

  14. Lamp spectrum and spatial brightness at photopic levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Atli, Deniz; Cheal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Light sources are available in a variety of spectral power distributions (SPDs) and this affects spatial brightness in a manner not predicted by quantities such as illuminance. Tuning light source SPD to better match the sensitivity of visual perception may allow the same spatial brightness but a...

  15. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nangle, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  16. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell research trends: complementation and diversification of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobold, Sabine; Guhr, Anke; Kurtz, Andreas; Löser, Peter

    2015-05-12

    Research in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is rapidly developing and there are expectations that this research may obviate the need to use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), the ethics of which has been a subject of controversy for more than 15 years. In this study, we investigated approximately 3,400 original research papers that reported an experimental use of these types of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and were published from 2008 to 2013. We found that research into both cell types was conducted independently and further expanded, accompanied by a growing intersection of both research fields. Moreover, an in-depth analysis of papers that reported the use of both cell types indicates that hESCs are still being used as a "gold standard," but in a declining proportion of publications. Instead, the expanding research field is diversifying and hESC and hiPSC lines are increasingly being used in more independent research and application areas.

  17. Switching Characteristics of Phase Change Memory Cell Integrated with Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Cheng; CHEN Bomy; LIU Bo; CHEN Yi-Feng; LIANG Shuang; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin; WAN Xu-Dong; YANG Zuo-Ya; XIE Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A Ge2Sb2Te5 based phase change memory device cell integrated with metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) is fabricated using standard 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor process technology.It shows steady switching characteristics in the dc current-voltage measurement.The phase changing phenomenon from crystalline state to amorphous state with a voltage pulse altitude of 2.0 V and pulse width of 50 ns is also obtained.These results show the feasibility of integrating phase change memory cell with MOSFET.

  18. Bright patches on chernozems - from space to surface and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanova, Anna; Burian, Libor; Holec, Juraj; Minár, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    The bright patches on chernozems can be easily visually distinguished in the aerial images, due to their bright colour contrasting with the dark colour of the surrounding chernozems. They present a typical feature of the loess hilly lands in the Danube Lowland. They reffer predominantely to the areas where (i) the soil substrate - loess is tilled, (ii) the transitional AC horizon of chernozems is tilled, (iii) or one of them, or both are mixed into the plough layer during tillage. They are usually categorized as eroded chernozems or regosols. To the lower extent, the accumulation patches might occur, if the loess material redeposited from upper part of the slope in the colluvium is tilled. This study focuses on uncovering the soil properties of bright patches, identified on different scales - spatial and temporal, combining three methods - the remote sensing, morphometric analysis and soil mapping. In the area of 31 km² (located in the Trnavska pahorkatina Hilly Land, south of Trnava), the bright patches were identified using visual analysis of georeferenced aerial images from 1949 and 2004, representing two types of landscape structure characteristic for the 20th Century. In 1949 small, in one direction elongated fields, with mean size 0.008 km2 prevailed, while in 2004 the mean size of a field was 0.28 km2. The morphometric analysis was performed based on DEM derived from topographical maps (scale 1:10 000). Soil sampling in the first phase of the project was performed in a subset of the patches in small agriculture catchment (0.28 km2), situated in one single field (in 2004). The percussion drilling or hand augering (with undisturbed structure) were used in order to describe the depth of the soil horizons and the soil properties. Together 365 bright patches covering 3.2% of the study area (31 km²) were identified in 1949; while it was twice more in 2004 (776 patches), when they covered approximately 12% of the same area. The bright patches were predominantly

  19. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Dai Zigao, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  20. MODIS BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE DATA ASSIMILATION UNDER CLOUDY CONDITIONS: METHODS AND IDEAL TESTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wei-yu; WAN Qi-lin; ZHANG Chen-zhong; CHEN Zi-tong; HUANG Yan-yan

    2010-01-01

    Clouds have important effects on the infrared radiances transmission in that the inclusion of cloud effects in data assimilation can not only improve the quality of the assimilated atmospheric parameters greatly, but also minimize the initial error of cloud parameters by adjusting part of the infrared radiances data. On the basis of the Grapes-3D-var (Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction Enhanced System), cloud liquid water, cloud ice water and cloud cover are added as the governing variables in the assimilation. Under the conditions of clear sky, partly cloudy cover and totally cloudy cover, the brightness temperature of 16 MODIS channels are assimilated respectively in ideal tests. Results show that when the simulated background brightness temperatures are lower than the observation, the analyzed field will increase the simulated brightness temperature by increasing its temperature and reducing its moisture, cloud liquid water, cloud ice water, and cloud cover. The simulated brightness temperature can be reduced if adjustment is made in the contrary direction. The adjustment of the temperature and specific humidity under the clear sky conditions conforms well to the design of MODIS channels, but it is weakened for levels under cloud layers. The ideal tests demonstrate that by simultaneously adding both cloud parameters and atmospheric parameters as governing variables during the assimilation of infrared radiances, both the cloud parameters and atmospheric parameters can be adjusted using the observed infrared radiances and conventional meteorological elements to make full use of the infrared observations.

  1. Interpreting Central Surface Brightness and Color Profiles in Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David R.; Wise, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope imagery has revealed dust features in the central regions of many (50%--80%) nearby bright elliptical galaxies. If these features are an indication of an underlying smooth diffuse dust distribution, then the interpretation of central surface brightness and color profiles in elliptical galaxies becomes significantly more difficult. In this Letter, diagnostics for constraining the presence of such an underlying central dust distribution are presented. We show that easily detectable central color gradients and flattened central surface brightness profiles can be induced by even small amounts of smoothly distributed dust (~100 M⊙). Conversely, combinations of flat surface brightness profiles and flat color gradients or steep surface brightness profiles and steep color gradients are unlikely to be caused by dust. Taken as a whole, these results provide a simple observational tautology for constraining the existence of smooth diffuse dust distributions in the central regions of elliptical galaxies.

  2. Directing migration of endothelial progenitor cells with applied DC electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Qin, Lu; Reid, Brian; Pu, Jin; Hara, Takahiko; Zhao, Min

    2012-01-01

    Naturally-occurring, endogenous electric fields (EFs) have been detected at skin wounds, damaged tissue sites and vasculature. Applied EFs guide migration of many types of cells, including endothelial cells to migrate directionally. Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to an injury site is important for repair of vasculature and also for angiogenesis. However, it has not been reported whether EPCs respond to applied EFs. Aiming to explore the possibility to use electric stimulation to regulate the progenitor cells and angiogenesis, we tested the effects of direct-current (DC) EFs on EPCs. We first used immunofluorescence to confirm the expression of endothelial progenitor markers in three lines of EPCs. We then cultured the progenitor cells in EFs. Using time-lapse video microscopy, we demonstrated that an applied DC EF directs migration of the EPCs toward the cathode. The progenitor cells also align and elongate in an EF. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor signaling completely abolished the EF-induced directional migration of the progenitor cells. We conclude that EFs are an effective signal that guides EPC migration through VEGF receptor signaling in vitro. Applied EFs may be used to control behaviors of EPCs in tissue engineering, in homing of EPCs to wounds and to an injury site in the vasculature.

  3. Rapid Brightness Variations as a Tool to Enhance Satellite Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas-Bourez, Myrtille; Klotz, Alain; Ducrotte, Etienne; Boer, Michel; Blanchet, Gwendoline

    2009-03-01

    To preserve the space environment for future generations and ensure the safety of space missions, we have to improve our knowledge of the debris at all altitudes. Since 2004, we have started to observe and study satellites and debris on the geostationary orbit. We use a network of robotic telescopes called TAROT (Télescopes Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires - Rapid Action Telescope for Transient Objects) which are located in France and Chile. This system processes the data in real time. Its wide field of view is useful for detection, systematic survey and to follow both catalogued and uncatalogued objects. The TAROTs are 25 cm telescopes with a wide field of view of 1.86deg x 1.86deg. It can detect objects up to 17th magnitude with an integration time of 30 seconds, corresponding to an object of 50cm in the geostationary belt with a 0.2 albedo. Tiny debris are also dangerous for space mission and satellites. To detect them, we need either to increase the TAROT sensitivity or to observe them in optimal light conditions.Last year we detected very important magnitude variations from several geostationary satellites during observations close to equinoxes. The brightness of a geostationary satellite evolves during the night and during the year, depending on the angle between the observer, the satellite and the sun. Geostationary satellites will be brighter near March 1st and of October 10th, at their exit of the shade. In this period the sun crosses the equatorial plan of the Earth, the enlightened surface will reach a maximum during a limited periods of time (about 30 minutes), provoking a short, bright flash. This phenomenon is used in two ways: first, it allows to detect smaller objects, which are usually below the detection limit, enhancing the sensitivity of the survey. Secondly, for longer objects the light curve during and outside the °ash contains information on the object intrinsic geometry and reflectivity. In this paper we discuss how the various

  4. Optimization of the recovery efficiency in an axial HGMF cell with bounded flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, V.; Murariu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Rezlescu, N.

    1996-09-01

    This work presents a method to optimize the recovery efficiency of fine paramagnetic particles from a liquid suspension in an axial HGMF cell. The cell has the flow field bounded by a circular cylindrical wall. It has only one ferromagnetic wire mounted outside the flow field, parallel with its axis and in `paramagnetic capture mode'. The optimization criterion was deduced from the analysis of the particles' trajectories inside the magnetic active space. It is based on the relationship between the geometrical 0022-3727/29/9/042/img1 and operational 0022-3727/29/9/042/img2 parameters for which the filtration efficiency is 100%. The work also presents some experimental data which are in good agreement with theoretical results.

  5. 60 Hz electric field changes the membrane potential during burst phase in pancreatic β-cells: in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Gesilda F; Silva, José R F; Moraes, Renato B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Tenorio, Bruno M; Nogueira, Romildo A

    2014-06-01

    The production, distribution and use of electricity can generate low frequency electric and magnetic fields (50-60 Hz). Considering that some studies showed adverse effects on pancreatic β-cells exposed to these fields; the present study aimed to analyze the effects of 60 Hz electric fields on membrane potential during the silent and burst phases in pancreatic β-cells using a mathematical model. Sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields with amplitude ranging from 0.5 to 4 mV were applied on pancreatic β-cells model. The sinusoidal electric field changed burst duration, inter-burst intervals (silent phase) and spike sizes. The parameters above presented dose-dependent response with the voltage amplitude applied. In conclusion, theoretical analyses showed that a 60 Hz electric field with low amplitudes changes the membrane potential in pancreatic β-cells.

  6. [Influence of "zero" magnetic field on the growth of embryonic cells and primary embryos of mouse in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenko, M A; Mezhevikina, L M; Krasts, I V; Iashin, V A; Novikov, V V; Fesenko, E E

    2008-01-01

    The present investigation reveals that a 250-fold screening of the geomagnetic field ("zero" geomagnetic fields, 200 nT) is a biologically active factor that adversely affects embryonic cells and the processes of early embryogenesis as a whole. In particular, the cultivation of primary embryonic fibroblasts in "zero" geomagnetic fields causes reduces the capacity for adhesion and proliferation, changes the monolayer morphology and increases cell death. In a more highly organized experimental model, two-celled mouse embryos, the exposure to the "zero" field results in an increase of plasma membrane permeability for dyes, a reorganization of the cytoskeleton because of alpha-actin redistribution, and the disturbance of the spatial orientation of blastomeres. As a result, the development of two-celled mouse embryos stops, and they do not reach the stage of blastocyst. These data show the significant role of geomagnetic fields in the normal growth of embryonic cells in vitro and the regulation of mammalian embryogenesis.

  7. Study of the selective effect on cells induced by nanosecond pulsed electric field with the resistor-capacitor circuit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Fei; Xiao Dengming; Li Zhaozhi

    2009-01-01

    A resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit model is proposed to study the effect of nanosecond pulsed electric field on cells according to the structure and electrical parameters of cells. After a nanosecond step field has been applied, the variation of voltages across cytomembrane and mitochondria membrane both in normal and in malignant cells are studied with this model. The time for selectively targeting the mitochondria membrane and malignant cell can be evaluated much easily with curves that show the variation of voltage across each membrane with time. Ramp field is the typical field applied in electrobiology. The voltages across each membrane induced by ramp field are analyzed with this model. To selectively target the mitochondria membrane, proper range of ramp slope is needed. It is relatively difficult to decide the range of a slope to selectively affect the malignant cell. Under some conditions, such a range even does not exist.

  8. Effect of piezoelectric field on carrier dynamics in InGaN-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunga; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To understand the effect of piezoelectric fields on carrier dynamics, we numerically investigated a simple p-GaN/i-\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}x}\\text{G}{{\\text{a}}1-x}\\text{N} /n-GaN solar cell structure. A reliable simulation model was obtained by comparing the experimental and simulated results in advance. The same p-i-n InGaN structures were re-simulated with and without the piezoelectric field effect, as spontaneous polarization remained unchanged. The sample with the piezoelectric field effect showed higher short current density ({{J}\\text{sc}} ), a staircase-like feature in its I-V curve, and higher open circuit voltage ({{V}\\text{oc}} ) with a lower fill factor (F.F.) and reduced conversion efficiency (C.E.) than the sample with no piezoelectric fields. In addition, with increasing In fraction (x), the {{V}\\text{oc}} value gradually increased while the {{J}\\text{sc}} value significantly decreased, correspondingly leading to a reduction in C.E. and F.F. values of the structure with the piezoelectric field effect. To solve the current loss problem, we applied various piezoelectric field elimination techniques to the simulated structures.

  9. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhongyang Liu,1,* Liangliang Huang,1,* Liang Liu,1,* Beier Luo,2,* Miaomiao Liang,3 Zhen Sun,1 Shu Zhu,1 Xin Quan,1 Yafeng Yang,1 Teng Ma,1 Jinghui Huang,1 Zhuojing Luo1 1Department of Orthopaedics, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Schwann cells (SCs are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and

  10. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF-exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed.

  11. Coulomb interactions between cytoplasmic electric fields and phosphorylated messenger proteins optimize information flow in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Gatenby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell function requires timely and accurate transmission of information from receptors on the cell membrane (CM to the nucleus. Movement of messenger proteins in the cytoplasm is thought to be dependent on random walk. However, Brownian motion will disperse messenger proteins throughout the cytosol resulting in slow and highly variable transit times. We propose that a critical component of information transfer is an intracellular electric field generated by distribution of charge on the nuclear membrane (NM. While the latter has been demonstrated experimentally for decades, the role of the consequent electric field has been assumed to be minimal due to a Debye length of about 1 nanometer that results from screening by intracellular Cl- and K+. We propose inclusion of these inorganic ions in the Debye-Huckel equation is incorrect because nuclear pores allow transit through the membrane at a rate far faster than the time to thermodynamic equilibrium. In our model, only the charged, mobile messenger proteins contribute to the Debye length. FINDINGS: Using this revised model and published data, we estimate the NM possesses a Debye-Huckel length of a few microns and find this is consistent with recent measurement using intracellular nano-voltmeters. We demonstrate the field will accelerate isolated messenger proteins toward the nucleus through Coulomb interactions with negative charges added by phosphorylation. We calculate transit times as short as 0.01 sec. When large numbers of phosphorylated messenger proteins are generated by increasing concentrations of extracellular ligands, we demonstrate they generate a self-screening environment that regionally attenuates the cytoplasmic field, slowing movement but permitting greater cross talk among pathways. Preliminary experimental results with phosphorylated RAF are consistent with model predictions. CONCLUSION: This work demonstrates that previously unrecognized Coulomb interactions

  12. Cutaneous papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma therapy utilizing nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yin

    Full Text Available Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF induce apoptotic pathways in human cancer cells. The potential therapeutic effective of nsPEF has been reported in cell lines and in xenograft animal tumor model. The present study investigated the ability of nsPEF to cause cancer cell death in vivo using carcinogen-induced animal tumor model, and the pulse duration of nsPEF was only 7 and 14 nano second (ns. An nsPEF generator as a prototype medical device was used in our studies, which is capable of delivering 7-30 nanosecond pulses at various programmable amplitudes and frequencies. Seven cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and five other types of cancer cell lines were used to detect the effect of nsPEF in vitro. Rate of cell death in these 12 different cancer cell lines was dependent on nsPEF voltage and pulse number. To examine the effect of nsPEF in vivo, carcinogen-induced cutaneous papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas in mice were exposed to nsPEF with three pulse numbers (50, 200, and 400 pulses, two nominal electric fields (40 KV/cm and 31 KV/cm, and two pulse durations (7 ns and 14 ns. Carcinogen-induced cutaneous papillomas and squamous carcinomas were eliminated efficiently using one treatment of nsPEF with 14 ns duration pulses (33/39 = 85%, and all remaining lesions were eliminated after a 2nd treatment (6/39 = 15%. 13.5% of carcinogen-induced tumors (5 of 37 were eliminated using 7 ns duration pulses after one treatment of nsPEF. Associated with tumor lysis, expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xl and Bcl-2 were markedly reduced and apoptosis increased (TUNEL assay after nsPEF treatment. nsPEF efficiently causes cell death in vitro and removes papillomas and squamous cell carcinoma in vivo from skin of mice. nsPEF has the therapeutic potential to remove human squamous carcinoma.

  13. Effect of Static Magnetic Fields on the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; García-Cantú, R.; Cañedo, L.; Rodríguez-Segura, M. A.; Serrano, G.; Alvarado-Alvarez, R.; Toledo-Ramos, F.

    2002-08-01

    In this article the role of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the generation of Ca2+ currents in peripheral blood mononuclear-like cells (PBMLC) is described. Using the sensitivity of Ca2+ channels and pumps to membrane potential and ion concentration we propose a method which uses the conductivity as a dynamical coefficient in the Onsager's reciprocity relations, and the dynamics of the calcium ions described by the electrodiffusion equation deduced by Pelce. The enhanced influx of calcium ion in PBMLC was studied parametrizing the static magnetic fields effects on the conductivity by the coefficients γ, ρ and κ. The parametrization was made according to the symmetry properties of Onsager's reciprocity relations using the most simple expressions. As an example we used available experimental data over chromaffin cell and employing physical considerations concerning to PBMLC, an order of magnitude for the value of ρ ≈ O(-10-5 mol/(Vm2s)), κ = 0, γ ≈ O(-10-3 mol/(VT2m2s) was obtained. The γ parameter was found graphically. With this parametrization, the time to induce calcium current in the cell was always less than the situation without magnetic field application.

  14. Elimination of the geomagnetic field stimulates the proliferation of mouse neural progenitor and stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Peng Fu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Living organisms are exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF throughout their lifespan. Elimination of the GMF, resulting in a hypogeomagnetic field (HMF, leads to central nervous system dysfunction and abnormal development in animals. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been identified so far. Here, we show that exposure to an HMF (<200 nT, produced by a magnetic field shielding chamber, promotes the proliferation of neural progenitor/stem cells (NPCs/NSCs from C57BL/6 mice. Following seven-day HMF-exposure, the primary neurospheres (NSs were significantly larger in size, and twice more NPCs/NSCs were harvested from neonatal NSs, when compared to the GMF controls. The self-renewal capacity and multipotency of the NSs were maintained, as HMF-exposed NSs were positive for NSC markers (Nestin and Sox2, and could differentiate into neurons and astrocyte/glial cells and be passaged continuously. In addition, adult mice exposed to the HMF for one month were observed to have a greater number of proliferative cells in the subventricular zone. These findings indicate that continuous HMF-exposure increases the proliferation of NPCs/NSCs, in vitro and in vivo. HMF-disturbed NPCs/NSCs production probably affects brain development and function, which provides a novel clue for elucidating the cellular mechanisms of the bio-HMF response.

  15. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010 for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz, overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  16. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  17. Induction of heat shock gene expression in RAT1 primary fibroblast cells by ELF electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Paul; Li, Gloria C; McLeod, Kenneth; Laramee, Craig B

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the Ku70 gene fragment can be placed in the anti-sense orientation under the control of a heat-inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) promoter and activated through heat shock exposure. This results in attenuation of the Ku70 protein expression, inhibiting cellular repair processes, and sensitizing the transfected cells to exposures such as the ionizing radiation exposures used clinically. However, achieving the tissue temperatures necessary to thermally induce the HSP70 response presents significant limitations to the clinical application of this strategy. Previous findings suggest an alternative approach to inducing a heat shock response, specifically through the use of extremely low frequency (ELF) electrical field stimulation. To further pursue this approach, we investigated HSP70 responses in transfected rat primary fibroblast (RAT1) cells exposed to 10 Hz electric fields at intensities of 20-500 V/m. We confirmed that low frequency electric fields can induce HSP70 heat shock expression, with peak responses obtained at 8 h following a 2 h field exposure. However, the approximate threefold increase in expression is substantially lower than that obtained using thermal stimulation, raising questions of the clinical utility of the response.

  18. Photometry of Very Bright Stars with Kepler and K2 Smear Data

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Benjamin; Huber, Daniel; Murphy, Simon; Bedding, Tim; Caldwell, Douglas; Sarai, Aleksa; Aigrain, Suzanne; Barclay, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    High-precision time series photometry with the Kepler satellite has been crucial to our understanding both of exoplanets, and via asteroseismology, of stellar physics. After the failure of two reaction wheels, the Kepler satellite has been repurposed as Kepler-2 (K2), observing fields close to the ecliptic plane. As these fields contain many more bright stars than the original Kepler field, K2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study nearby objects amenable to detailed follow-up with ground-based instruments. Due to bandwidth constraints, only a small fraction of pixels can be downloaded, with the result that most bright stars which saturate the detector are not observed. We show that engineering data acquired for photometric calibration, consisting of collateral `smear' measurements, can be used to reconstruct light curves for bright targets not otherwise observable with Kepler/K2. Here we present some examples from Kepler Quarter 6 and K2 Campaign 3, including the delta Scuti variables HD 178875 and 7...

  19. [Fluorescence polarization used to investigate the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zeng, Xin-An; Wen, Qi-Biao; Li, Lin

    2008-01-01

    To know the lethal mechanism of microorganisms under pulsed electric field treatment, the relationship between the inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CICC1308) cell and the permeability and fluidity changes of its cell membrane treated by pulsed electric field (0-25 kV x cm(-1), 0-266 ms) was investigated. With 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) used as a probe, the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field was expressed by fluorescence polarization. Results showed that the cell membrane fluidity decreases when the electric flied strength is up to 5 kV x cm(-1), and decreases with the increase in electric field strength and treatment time. The plate counting method and ultraviolet spectrophotometer were used to determine the cell viability and to investigate the cell membrane permeability, respectively, treated by pulsed electric field. Results showed that the lethal ratio and the content of protein and nucleic acid leaked from intracellular plasma increased with the increase in the electric field strength and the extension of treatment time. Even in a quite lower electric field of 5 kV x cm(-1) with a tiny microorganism lethal level, the increase in UV absorption value and the decrease in fluidity were significant. It was demonstrated that the cell membrane fluidity decreases with the increase in lethal ratio and cell membrane permeability. The viscosity of cell membrane increases with the decrease in fluidity. These phenomena indicated that cell membrane is one of the most key sites during the pulsed electric field treatment, and the increased membrane permeability and the decreased cell membrane fluidity contribute to the cell death.

  20. Dark Skies, Bright Kids: Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Johnson, K.; Lynch, R.; Walker, L.; Beaton, R.; Corby, J.; de Messieres, G.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Jackson, L.; Kingery, A.; Layman, S.; Murphy, E.; Richardson, W.; Ries, P.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G.; Sokal, K.; Trammell, G.; Whelan, D.; Yang, A.; Zasowski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) outreach program brings astronomy education into local elementary schools in central Virginia's Southern Albemarle County through an after-school club. Taking advantage of the unusually dark night skies in the rural countryside, DSBK targets economically disadvantaged schools that tend to be underserved due to their rural locale. The goals of DSBK are to foster children's natural curiosity, demonstrate that science is a fun and creative process, challenge students' conceptions of what a scientist is and does, and teach some basic astronomy. Furthermore, DSBK works to assimilate families into students' education by holding family observing nights at the school. Now in its third semester, DSBK has successfully run programs at two schools with very diverse student populations. Working with these students has helped us to revise our activities and to create new ones. A by-product of our work has been the development of lesson plans, complete with learning goals and detailed instructions, that we make publically available on our website. This year we are expanding our repertoire with our new planetarium, which allows us to visualize topics in novel ways and supplements family observing on cloudy nights. The DSBK volunteers have also created a bilingual astronomy artbook --- designed, written, and illustrated by UVa students --- that we will publish and distribute to elementary schools in Virginia. Our book debuted at the last AAS winter meeting, and since then it has been extensively revised and updated with input from many individuals, including parents, professional educators, and a children's book author. Because the club is currently limited to serving a few elementary schools, this book will be part of our efforts to broaden our impact by bringing astronomy to schools we cannot go to ourselves and reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities at the same time.

  1. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R. L.; Borish, J.; Corby, J. F.; Dorsey, G.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Prager, B. J.; Ries, P. A.; Romero, C. E.; Sokal, K. R.; Tang, X.; Walker, L. M.; Yang, A. J.; Zasowski, G.

    2012-01-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a program that brings astronomy education to elementary schools throughout central Virginia. In a relaxed, out-of-classroom atmosphere, we are able to foster the innate curiosity that young students have about science and the world around them. We target schools that are under-served due to their rural locale or special needs students, demonstrating that science is a fun and creative process to a segment of the population that might not otherwise be exposed to astronomy. Families are included in the learning experience during semi-annual `star parties'. Since last January, we have expanded the breadth and depth of our educational capabilities. We have developed new programs for use in our digital planetarium. We held the first Central Virginia Star Party, providing an atmosphere where local children from multiple schools were able to share their love for astronomy. Local government and University officials were also invited so that they could experience our focused science outreach. Most recently, we have become part of Ivy Creek School's Club Day activities, bringing our program to a new segment of the elementary school system in Albemarle County: those that have `low-incidence' disabilities, requiring special attention. We continue to develop a curriculum for after-school programs that functions as either a series of one-time activities or several months of focused outreach at one school. Many of these activities are provided on our website, http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/, for the wider astronomical community, including the new planetarium work. We have extended our book project to include two bilingual astronomy books called `Snapshots of the Universe,' one in Spanish and English, the other in French and English. These books introduce young people to some of the many wonders of the Universe through art and captions developed by DSBK volunteers.

  2. Effects of static magnetic field on human umbilical vessel endothelial cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; XU Ke-wei; WANG Hai-chang; GUO Wen-yi; HAN Yong; LIU Bing; ZHANG Rong-qing

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of static magnetic field(SMF) on the viability,adhesion molecule expression of human umbilical vessel endothelial cell.Methods:Magnetic flux intensity was 0.1 mT,1 mT,10 mT.Cell viability and proliferation were measured with 3H-TdR and MTT methods; and apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) was studied by flow cytometry and transmission electric microscopy.ELISA was used to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on endothelium.Results:0.1 mT SMF had no effects on the growth of HUVEC,however,SMF of 1 mT,10 mT attenuated growth of HUVEC.10 mT static magnetic field could induce apoptosis and necrosis of HUVEC.10 mT SMF enhanced the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on endothelium.Conclusion:The effect of SMF depends on the intensity of SMF.10 mT SMF has adverse effects on human umbilical vessel endothelial cell.

  3. Effects of ELF magnetic fields on protein expression profile of human breast cancer cell MCF7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Han; ZENG Qunli; WENG Yu; LU Deqiang; JIANG Huai; XU Zhengping

    2005-01-01

    Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF MF) has been considered as a "possible human carcinogen" by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) while credible mechanisms of its carcinogenicity remain unknown. In this study, a proteomics approach was employed to investigate the changes of protein expression profile induced by ELF MF in human breast cancer cell line MCF7, in order to determine ELF MF-responsive proteins. MCF7 cells were exposed to 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF for 24 h and the changes of protein profile were examined using two dimensional electrophoresis. Up to 6 spots have been statistically significantly altered (their expression levels were changed at least 5 fold up or down) compared with sham-exposed group. 19 ones were only detected in exposure group while 19 ones were missing. Three proteins were identified by LC-IT Tandem MS as RNA binding protein regulatory subunit、Proteasome subunit beta type 7 precursor and Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein. Our finding showed that 50 Hz, 0.4 mT ELF MF alternates the protein profile of MCF7 cell and may affect many physiological functions of normal cell and 2-DE coupled with MS is a promising approach to elucidating cellular effects of electromagnetic fields.

  4. Evaluation of cell-disruption effects of pulsed-electric-field treatment of Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Vannela, Raveender; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-04-15

    In order to use Synechocystis PCC 6803 as feedstock of nonpetroleum-based diesel fuel, pulsed electric field (PEF) technology was used for cell disruption prior to extraction of intracellular lipids. Severe cell disruption was evident after PEF treatment, especially with treatment intensity (TI) > 35 kWh/m(3). Temperature increase during the treatment brought about most of the destruction of autofluorescence compounds, as well as a fraction of inactivation and the destruction of the plasma and thylakoid membranes. However, the forces associated with the pulsing electric field caused significant damage to the plasma membrane, cell wall, and thylakoid membrane, and it even led to complete disruption of some cells into fragments, which resulted in biomass loss. Treatment by PEF enhanced the potential for the low-toxicity solvent isopropanol to access lipid molecules during subsequent solvent extraction, leading to lower usage of isopropanol for the same extraction efficiency. Thus, PEF shows promise for lowering the costs and environmental effects of the lipid-extraction step.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells that located in the electromagnetic fields improves rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Jadidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The main characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is their ability to produce other cell types. Electromagnetic field (EMF stimulates differentiation of MSCs into other cells. In this study, we investigated whether EMF can effect on the differentiation of MSCs into dopaminergic (DA neurons. Materials and Methods: An EMF with a frequency of 50 Hz and two intensities of 40 and 400 µT 1hr/day was generated around the cells for a week. Afterwards, these cells were injected into the left ventricle of Parkinsonian rats. The rats survived for 2 weeks, and then sampling was performed. Results: The injected cells differentiated into DA neurons and sporadically settled in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. Transplanted rats exhibited significant partial correction apomorphine-induced rotational behavior compared to Parkinsonian rats (5.0±0.1 vs 7.57±0.08. Results demonstrated that endogenous serum and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were altered in all experimental groups. The greatest increase was in group of 400 µT EMF in comparison with Parkinsonian rats (398±15 vs. 312±11.79 pg ⁄ mg. Current study have shown that 6-Hydroxydopamine can cause severe loss of dopaminergic neurons (68±6.58, but injected MSCs that exposed to 40 and 400 µT EMF increased dopaminergic neurons in SNpc ( 108±2.33  & 126±3.89 (P

  6. Emergence of Complex-Like Cells in a Temporal Product Network with Local Receptive Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, Karo

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new neural architecture and an unsupervised algorithm for learning invariant representations from temporal sequence of images. The system uses two groups of complex cells whose outputs are combined multiplicatively: one that represents the content of the image, constrained to be constant over several consecutive frames, and one that represents the precise location of features, which is allowed to vary over time but constrained to be sparse. The architecture uses an encoder to extract features, and a decoder to reconstruct the input from the features. The method was applied to patches extracted from consecutive movie frames and produces orientation and frequency selective units analogous to the complex cells in V1. An extension of the method is proposed to train a network composed of units with local receptive field spread over a large image of arbitrary size. A layer of complex cells, subject to sparsity constraints, pool feature units over overlapping local neighborhoods, which causes the feat...

  7. Double-Cell Type Solar Meridional Circulation Based on Mean-Field Hydrodynamic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Yuto

    2016-01-01

    The main object of the paper is to present the condition of the non-diffusive part of the Reynolds stress for driving the double-cell structure of the solar meridional circulation, which has been revealed by recent helioseismic observations. By conducting a set of mean-field hydrodynamic simulations, we confirm for the first time that the double-cell meridional circulation can be achieved along with the solar-like differential rotation when the Reynolds stress transports the angular momentum upward in the lower part and downward in the upper part of the convection zone. It is concluded that, in a stationary state, the accumulated angular momentum via the Reynolds stress in the middle layer is advected to both the upper and lower parts of the convection zone by each of the two meridional circulation cells, respectively.

  8. Unconventional Specimen Preparation Techniques Using High Resolution Low Voltage Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy to Study Cell Motility, Host Cell Invasion, and Internal Cell Structures in Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide; Ris, Hans

    2002-04-01

    Apicomplexan parasites employ complex and unconventional mechanisms for cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division that are only poorly understood. While immunofluorescence and conventional transmission electron microscopy have been used to answer questions about the localization of some cytoskeletal proteins and cell organelles, many questions remain unanswered, partly because new methods are needed to study the complex interactions of cytoskeletal proteins and organelles that play a role in cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division. The choice of fixation and preparation methods has proven critical for the analysis of cytoskeletal proteins because of the rapid turnover of actin filaments and the dense spatial organization of the cytoskeleton and its association with the complex membrane system. Here we introduce new methods to study structural aspects of cytoskeletal motility, host cell invasion, and cell division of Toxoplasma gondii, a most suitable laboratory model that is representative of apicomplexan parasites. The novel approach in our experiments is the use of high resolution low voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy (LVFESEM) combined with two new specimen preparation techniques. The first method uses LVFESEM after membrane extraction and stabilization of the cytoskeleton. This method allows viewing of actin filaments which had not been possible with any other method available so far. The second approach of imaging the parasite's ultrastructure and interactions with host cells uses semithick sections (200 nm) that are resin de-embedded (Ris and Malecki, 1993) and imaged with LVFESEM. This method allows analysis of structural detail in the parasite before and after host cell invasion and interactions with the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole as well as parasite cell division.

  9. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, The Hong Phong; Pham, Vy T H; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T.

  10. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Hong Phong Nguyen

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMFwere studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure, independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm. Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T.

  11. Magnetophotocurrent in Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells at Low Temperatures and High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, B.; Devir-Wolfman, A. H.; Tzabari, L.; Tessler, N.; Vardeny, Z. V.; Ehrenfreund, E.

    2016-04-01

    We study high-field (up to B ˜8.5 T ) magnetophotocurrent (MPC) related to photogenerated polaron pairs (PPs) in the temperature range T =10 - 320 K in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. We find that in the high-field regime (B >1 T ), MPC (B ) response increases with B for temperature T >200 K but decreases with B at T <200 K . MPC (B ) response does not saturate even at the highest field studied, at all T . We attribute the observed high-field MPC (B ) response to two competing mechanisms within the PP spin states: (a) a spin-mixing mechanism caused by the difference in the donor-acceptor (or positive-negative polarons) g factors (the so-called "Δ g mechanism"), and (b) the spin polarization induced by thermal population of the PP Zeeman split levels. The nonsaturating MPC (B ) response at high fields and high temperatures indicates that there exist charge-transfer excitons (CTEs) with decay time in the subnanosecond time domain. With decreasing temperature, the CTE decay time sharply increases, thereby promoting an increase of the thermal spin-polarization contribution to the MPC (B ) response.

  12. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    CERN Document Server

    Leurini, S; Walmsley, C M

    2016-01-01

    Class I CH$_3$OH masers trace interstellar shocks. They have received little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities; this situation has changed recently and Class I masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflows. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain information on magnetic fields in shocks. We make use of newly calculated collisional rates to investigate the excitation of Class I masers and to reconcile their observed properties with model results. We performed LVG calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate, the loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of Class I masers on the physics of the gas. Bright Class I masers are mainly high-temperature high-density structures with maser emission measures corresponding to high CH$_3$OH abundances close...

  13. Kinematics of Magnetic Bright Features in the Solar Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Solanki, S. K.; Cameron, R. H.; Barthol, P.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Knölker, M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Schmidt, W.; van Noort, M.

    2017-03-01

    Convective flows are known as the prime means of transporting magnetic fields on the solar surface. Thus, small magnetic structures are good tracers of turbulent flows. We study the migration and dispersal of magnetic bright features (MBFs) in intergranular areas observed at high spatial resolution with Sunrise/IMaX. We describe the flux dispersal of individual MBFs as a diffusion process whose parameters are computed for various areas in the quiet-Sun and the vicinity of active regions from seeing-free data. We find that magnetic concentrations are best described as random walkers close to network areas (diffusion index, γ =1.0), travelers with constant speeds over a supergranule (γ =1.9{--}2.0), and decelerating movers in the vicinity of flux emergence and/or within active regions (γ =1.4{--}1.5). The three types of regions host MBFs with mean diffusion coefficients of 130 km2 s‑1, 80–90 km2 s‑1, and 25–70 km2 s‑1, respectively. The MBFs in these three types of regions are found to display a distinct kinematic behavior at a confidence level in excess of 95%.

  14. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

  15. Temporal development of open-circuit bright photovoltaic solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Lu Ke-Qing; Zhang Mei-Zhi; Liu Xue-Ming; Zhang Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the temporal behaviour of open-circuit bright photovoltaic spatial solitons by using numerical techniques. It shows that when the intensity ratio of the soliton, the ratio between the soliton peak intensity and the dark irradiance, is small, the quasi-steady-state soliton width decreases monotonically with the increase of τ, where τis the parameter correlated with the time, that when the intensity ratio of the soliton is big, the quasi-steady-state soliton width decreases with the increase of τ and then increases with τ and that the formation time of the steady-state solitons is not correlated with the intensity ratio of the soliton. It finds that the local nonlinear effect increases with the photovoltaic field, which behaves as that the width of soliton beams is small and the self-focusing quasi-period is short. On the other hand, we also discuss that both the time and the temperature have an effect on the beam bending.

  16. An Ultraviolet imager to study bright UV sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A G; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and developed a compact ultraviolet imaging payload to fly on a range of possible platforms such as high altitude balloon experiments, cubesats, space missions, etc. The primary science goals are to study the bright UV sources (mag < 10) and also to look for transients in the Near UV (200 - 300 nm) domain. Our first choice is to place this instrument on a spacecraft going to the Moon as part of the Indian entry into Google lunar X-Prize competition. The major constraints for the instrument are, it should be lightweight (< 2Kg), compact (length < 50cm) and cost effective. The instrument is an 80 mm diameter Cassegrain telescope with a field of view of around half a degree designated for UV imaging. In this paper we will discuss about the various science cases that can be performed by having observations with the instrument on different platforms. We will also describe the design, development and the current state of implementation of the instrument. This includes opto-mechanical and e...

  17. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Falchi, Fabio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75{\\deg}N and 60{\\deg}S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

  18. Kinematics of magnetic bright features in the solar photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Cameron, R H; Barthol, P; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knoelker, M; Pillet, V Martinez; Suarez, D Orozco; Riethmueller, T L; Schmidt, W; van Noort, M

    2016-01-01

    Convective flows are known as the prime means of transporting magnetic fields on the solar surface. Thus, small magnetic structures are good tracers of the turbulent flows. We study the migration and dispersal of magnetic bright features (MBFs) in intergranular areas observed at high-spatial resolution with Sunrise/IMaX. We describe the flux dispersal of individual MBFs as a diffusion process whose parameters are computed for various areas in the quiet Sun and the vicinity of active regions from seeing-free data. We find that magnetic concentrations are best described as random walkers close to network areas (diffusion index, gamma=1.0), travelers with constant speeds over a supergranule (gamma=1.9-2.0), and decelerating movers in the vicinity of flux-emergence and/or within active regions (gamma=1.4-1.5). The three types of regions host MBFs with mean diffusion coefficients of 130 km^2/s, 80-90 km^2/s, and 25-70 km^2/s, respectively. The MBFs in these three types of regions are found to display a distinct ki...

  19. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic field exposure on testicular germ cell apoptosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinSangLee; SangSeokAhn; KyeongCheonJung; Yoon-WonKim; SangKonLee

    2004-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effects of 60 Hz extremely low frequency (ELF) elelctromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on germ cell apoptosis in the testis of mice.Methods:Adult male BALB/c mice (7 weeks of age) were exposed to a 60 Hz EMF of 0.1 mT or 0.5 mT for 24 h/day.A sham-exposed group served as the control.After 8 weeks of exposure,the mice were sacrificed.Germ cell apoptosis in the testis was assessed by histopathological examination,the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay (TUNEL) and flow cytometric examination of isolated spermatogenic cells stained with 7 aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD).Results:EMF exposure did not significantly affect the body and testis weights,but significantly increased the incidence of germ cell death.The distinguishing morphological feature of EMF exposure was a decrement in the number of well organized seminiferous tubules.Quantitative analysis of TUNEL-positive germ cells showed a significantly higher apoptotic rate in the 0.5 mT exposed mice than that in the sham controls (P<0.05),while the difference between the two exposed groups was insignificant.The TUNEL-positive cells were mainly spermatogonia.In flow cytometryanalysis,the percentage of live cells [forward scatter count (FSC)hgh7-AAD-] was lower in the exposed groups than that in the controls (Figure 5A),but the decrease in viability was not statistically significant.Conclusion:Continuousexposure to ELF EMF may induce testicular germ cell apoptosis in mice.(Asian J Androl 2004 Mar;6:29-34)

  20. Outlook Bright for Computers in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the recent decision to close down the National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC), implications of that decision, and various alternatives in the field of computational chemistry. (CS)

  1. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan;

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... for cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared...

  2. High Brightness, High Average Current Injector Development at Cornell

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, C K

    2005-01-01

    Cornell University is constructing a 100 mA average current, high brightness electron injector for a planned Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) hard X-ray synchrotron radiation source. This injector will employ a very high voltage DC gun with a negative electron affinity photoemission cathode. Relatively long duration electron pulses from the photocathode will be drift bunched, and accelerated to 5-15 MeV with five two-cell, 1300 MHz superconducting cavities. The total beam power will be limited to 575 kW by the DC and RF power sources. A genetic algorithm based computational optimization of this injector has resulted in simulated rms normalized emittances of 0.1 mm-mrad at 80 pC/bunch, and 0.7 mm-mrad at 1 nC/bunch. The many technical issues and their design solutions will be discussed. Construction of the gun and the SRF cavities is well underway. The schedule for completion, and the planned measurements, will be presented.

  3. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  4. Super-resolution imaging of multiple cells by optimized flat-field epi-illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Kyle M.; Sieben, Christian; Archetti, Anna; Lambert, Ambroise; Manley, Suliana

    2016-11-01

    Biological processes are inherently multi-scale, and supramolecular complexes at the nanoscale determine changes at the cellular scale and beyond. Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques have been established as important tools for studying cellular features with resolutions of the order of around 10 nm. However, in their current form these modalities are limited by a highly constrained field of view (FOV) and field-dependent image resolution. Here, we develop a low-cost microlens array (MLA)-based epi-illumination system—flat illumination for field-independent imaging (FIFI)—that can efficiently and homogeneously perform simultaneous imaging of multiple cells with nanoscale resolution. The optical principle of FIFI, which is an extension of the Köhler integrator, is further elucidated and modelled with a new, free simulation package. We demonstrate FIFI's capabilities by imaging multiple COS-7 and bacteria cells in 100 × 100 μm2 SMLM images—more than quadrupling the size of a typical FOV and producing near-gigapixel-sized images of uniformly high quality.

  5. Near-field scanning optical microscopy in cell biology and cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Michael; Perner, Birgit; Rapp, Alexander; Wollweber, Leo; Scherthan, Harry; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    2006-01-01

    Light microscopy has proven to be one of the most versatile analytical tools in cell biology and cytogenetics. The growing spectrum of scientific knowledge demands a continuous improvement of the optical resolution of the instruments. In far-field light microscopy, the attainable resolution is dictated by the limit of diffraction, which, in practice, is about 250 nm for high-numerical-aperture objective lenses. Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) was the first technique that has overcome this limit up to about one order of magnitude. Typically, the resolution range below 100 nm is accessed for biological applications. Using appropriately designed scanning probes allows for obtaining an extremely small near-field light excitation volume (some tens of nanometers in diameter). Because of the reduction of background illumination, high contrast imaging becomes feasible for light transmission and fluorescence microscopy. The height of the scanning probe is controlled by atomic force interactions between the specimen surface and the probe tip. The control signal can be used for the production of a topographic (nonoptical) image that can be acquired simultaneously. In this chapter, the principle of NSOM is described with respect to biological applications. A brief overview of some requirements in biology and applications described in the literature are given. Practical advice is focused on instruments with aperture-type illumination probes. Preparation protocols focussing on NSOM of cell surfaces and chromosomes are presented.

  6. Near-field dosimetry for in vitro exposure of human cells at 60 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Augustine, Robin; Le Quément, Catherine; Le Dréan, Yves; Thouroude, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Due to the expected mass deployment of millimeter-wave wireless technologies, thresholds of potential millimeter-wave-induced biological and health effects should be carefully assessed. The main purpose of this study is to propose, optimize, and characterize a near-field exposure configuration allowing illumination of cells in vitro at 60 GHz with power densities up to several tens of mW/cm(2) . Positioning of a tissue culture plate containing cells has been optimized in the near-field of a standard horn antenna operating at 60 GHz. The optimal position corresponds to the maximal mean-to-peak specific absorption rate (SAR) ratio over the cell monolayer, allowing the achievement of power densities up to 50 mW/cm(2) at least. Three complementary parameters have been determined and analyzed for the exposed cells, namely the power density, SAR, and temperature dynamics. The incident power density and SAR have been computed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The temperature dynamics at different locations inside the culture medium are measured and analyzed for various power densities. Local SAR, determined based on the initial rate of temperature rise, is in a good agreement with the computed SAR (maximal difference of 5%). For the optimized exposure setup configuration, 73% of cells are located within the ±3 dB region with respect to the average SAR. It is shown that under the considered exposure conditions, the maximal power density, local SAR, and temperature increments equal 57 mW/cm(2) , 1.4 kW/kg, and 6 °C, respectively, for the radiated power of 425 mW.

  7. Growth and apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by intense picosecond pulsed electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan HUA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the growth and apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by intense picosecond pulsed electric field(PEF in vitro.Methods HeLa cells cultured in vitro were divided into experimental group and control group(with or without intense picosecond PEF.With constant pulse width,frequency and voltage,the cells in experimental group were divided into 6 sub-groups according to the number of pulse(100,200,500,1000,1500,2000,the growth inhibition of HeLa cells by PEF and the dose-effect relationship were analyzed by MTT.Caspase 3 protein activity was detected in the cells in 500,1000 and 2000 sub-groups.Mitochondrial transmembrane potential was detected by rhodamine 123 staining with the cells in 2000 sub-groups.Results MTT assay demonstrated that intense picosecond PEF significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in dose-dependent manner.The survival rates of cells declined along with the increase in pulse number,and were 96.23%±0.76%,94.11%±2.42%,90.31%±1.77%,64.59%±1.59%,32.95%±0.73%,23.85%±2.38% and 100%,respectively,in 100,200,500,1000,1500,2000 sub-groups and control group(P < 0.01.The Caspase 3 protein activity was significantly enhanced by intense picosecond PEF,and the absorbancy indexes(A were 0.174±0.012,0.232±0.017,0.365±0.016 and 0.122±0.011,respectively,in 500,1000,2000 sub-groups and control group(P < 0.05.The mitochondrial transmembrane potential of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by intense picosecond PEF,and the fluorescence intensity in 2000 sub-group(76.66±13.38 was much lower than that in control group(155.81±2.33,P < 0.05.Conclusion Intense picosecond PEF may significantly inhibit the growth of HeLa cells,and induce cell apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway.

  8. Potential therapeutic mechanism of extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka-Eun; Park, Soon-Kwon; Nam, Sang-Yun; Han, Tae-Jong; Cho, Il-Young

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this survey was to provide background theory based on previous research to elucidate the potential pathway by which medical devices using extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields (ELF-HVEF) exert therapeutic effects on the human body, and to increase understanding of the AC high-voltage electrotherapeutic apparatus for consumers and suppliers of the relevant devices. Our review revealed that an ELF field as weak as 1-10 μ V/m can induce diverse alterations of membrane proteins such as transporters and channel proteins, including changes in Ca + + binding to a specific site of the cell surface, changes in ion (e.g., Ca + + ) influx or efflux, and alterations in the ligand-receptor interaction. These alterations then induce cytoplasmic responses within cells (Ca + + , cAMP, kinases, etc.) that can have impacts on cell growth, differentiation, and other functional properties by promoting the synthesis of macromolecules. Moreover, increased cytoplasmic Ca + + involves calmodulin-dependent signaling and consequent Ca + + /calmodulin-dependent stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. This event in turn induces the nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway, which may be an essential factor in the observed physiological and therapeutic responses.

  9. Calcium signalling in human neutrophil cell lines is not affected by low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Philippi, John G M; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-09-01

    We are increasingly exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) by electrical devices and power lines, but if and how these fields interact with living cells remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of LF EMF exposure on calcium signalling in neutrophils. In neutrophilic granulocytes, activation of G-protein coupled receptors leads to efflux of calcium from calcium stores and influx of extracellular calcium via specialised calcium channels. The cytoplasmic rise of calcium induces cytoskeleton rearrangements, modified gene expression patterns, and cell migration. If LF EMF modulates intracellular calcium signalling, this will influence cellular behaviour and may eventually lead to health problems. We found that calcium mobilisation upon chemotactic stimulation was not altered after a short 30 min or long-term LF EMF exposure in human neutrophil-like cell lines HL-60 or PLB-985. Neither of the two investigated wave forms (Immunent and 50 Hz sine wave) at three magnetic flux densities (5 μT, 300 μT, and 500 μT) altered calcium signalling in vitro. Gene-expression patterns of calcium-signalling related genes also did not show any significant changes after exposure. Furthermore, analysis of the phenotypical appearance of microvilli by scanning electron microscopy revealed no alterations induced by LF EMF exposure. The findings above indicate that exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal or Immunent LF EMF will not affect calcium signalling in neutrophils in vitro.

  10. Occurrence of BOOP outside radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamanishi, Tohru; Oida, Kazukiyo [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan); Morimatu, Takafumi (and others)

    2001-09-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) that occurred outside the radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer. A 74-year-old woman received chemotherapy and a total of 60 Gy of radiation therapy to the right hilum and mediastinum for small cell carcinoma of the suprahilar area of the right lung. Radiation pneumonitis developed within the radiation port 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy. She complained of cough and was admitted 7 months after completion of the radiation therapy. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated peripheral alveolar opacities outside the radiation field on the side contralateral to that receiving the radiation therapy. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed that the total cell count was increased, with a markedly increased percentage of lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed a histologic pattern consistent with BOOP. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of the symptoms and complete resolution of the radiographic abnormalities of the left lung. Although some cases of BOOP following radiation therapy for breast cancer have been reported, none of BOOP after radiation therapy for lung cancer have appeared in the literature. (author)

  11. Preliminary study on direct assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Guan, Li

    2017-02-01

    Direct assimilation of cloud-affected microwave brightness temperatures from AMSU-A into the GSI three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation system is preliminarily studied in this paper. A combination of cloud microphysics parameters retrieved by the 1D-Var algorithm (including vertical profiles of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) and atmospheric state parameters from objective analysis fields of an NWP model are used as background fields. Three cloud microphysics parameters (cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) are applied to the control variable. Typhoon Halong (2014) is selected as an example. The results show that direct assimilation of cloud-affected AMSU-A observations can effectively adjust the structure of large-scale temperature, humidity and wind analysis fields due to the assimilation of more AMSU-A observations in typhoon cloudy areas, especially typhoon spiral cloud belts. These adjustments, with temperatures increasing and humidities decreasing in the movement direction of the typhoon, bring the forecasted typhoon moving direction closer to its real path. The assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures can provide better analysis fields that are more similar to the actual situation. Furthermore, typhoon prediction accuracy is improved using these assimilation analysis fields as the initial forecast fields in NWP models.

  12. The Bright Ages Survey. I. Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Rich, R M; Frogel, J A; Salim, S; Teplitz, H; Colbert, James W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Salim, Samir; Teplitz, Harry

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series presenting and analyzing data for a K-selected sample of galaxies collected in order to identify and study galaxies at moderate to high redshift in rest-wavelength optical light. The sample contains 842 objects over 6 separate fields covering 75.6 arcmin^2 down to K=20-20.5. We combine the K-band with UBVRIzJH multi-band imaging, reaching depths of R~26. Two of the fields studied also have deep HST WFPC2 imaging, totaling more than 60 hours in the F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W filters. Using artificial galaxy modeling and extraction we measure 85% completeness limits down to K=19.5-20, depending on the field examined. The derived K-band number counts are in good agreement with previous studies. We find a density for Extremely Red Objects(EROs; R-K>5) of 1.55+/-0.16 arcmin^{-2} for K<19.7, dominated by the 1714+5015 field (centered on 53w002), with an ERO number density more than 3 times that of the other sample fields. If we exclude the counts for 1714+5015, our density...

  13. Response Properties of a Newly Identified Tristratified Narrow Field Amacrine Cell in the Mouse Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Newkirk

    Full Text Available Amacrine cells were targeted for whole cell recording using two-photon fluorescence microscopy in a transgenic mouse line in which the promoter for dopamine receptor 2 drove expression of green fluorescent protein in a narrow field tristratified amacrine cell (TNAC that had not been studied previously. Light evoked a multiphasic response that was the sum of hyperpolarizing and depolarization synaptic inputs consistent with distinct dendritic ramifications in the off and on sublamina of the inner plexiform layer. The amplitude and waveform of the response, which consisted of an initial brief hyperpolarization at light onset followed by recovery to a plateau potential close to dark resting potential and a hyperpolarizing response at the light offset varied little over an intensity range from 0.4 to ~10^6 Rh*/rod/s. This suggests that the cell functions as a differentiator that generates an output signal (a transient reduction in inhibitory input to downstream retina neurons that is proportional to the derivative of light input independent of its intensity. The underlying circuitry appears to consist of rod and cone driven on and off bipolar cells that provide direct excitatory input to the cell as well as to GABAergic amacrine cells that are synaptically coupled to TNAC. Canonical reagents that blocked excitatory (glutamatergic and inhibitory (GABA and glycine synaptic transmission had effects on responses to scotopic stimuli consistent with the rod driven component of the proposed circuit. However, responses evoked by photopic stimuli were paradoxical and could not be interpreted on the basis of conventional thinking about the neuropharmacology of synaptic interactions in the retina.

  14. Satellite SAR observation of the sea surface wind field caused by rain cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xiaomin; LIN Mingsen; YUAN Xinzhe; DING Jing; XIE Xuetong; ZHANG Yi; XU Ying

    2016-01-01

    Rain cells or convective rain, the dominant form of rain in the tropics and subtropics, can be easy detected by satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images with high horizontal resolution. The footprints of rain cells on SAR images are caused by the scattering and attenuation of the rain drops, as well as the downward airflow. In this study, we extract sea surface wind field and its structure caused by rain cells by using a RADARSAT-2 SAR image with a spatial resolution of 100 m for case study. We extract the sea surface wind speeds from SAR image by using CMOD4 geophysical model function with outside wind directions of NCEP final operational global analysis data, Advance Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard European MetOp-A satellite and microwave scatterometer onboard Chinese HY-2 satellite, respectively. The root-mean-square errors (RMSE) of these SAR wind speeds, validated against NCEP, ASCAT and HY-2, are 1.48 m/s, 1.64 m/s and 2.14 m/s, respectively. Circular signature patterns with brighter on one side and darker on the opposite side on SAR image are interpreted as the sea surface wind speed (or sea surface roughness) variety caused by downdraft associated with rain cells. The wind speeds taken from the transect profile which superposes to the wind ambient vectors and goes through the center of the circular footprint of rain cell can be fitted as a cosine or sine curve in high linear correlation with the values of no less than 0.80. The background wind speed, the wind speed caused by rain cell and the diameter of footprint of the rain cell with kilometers or tens of kilometers can be acquired by fitting curve. Eight cases interpreted and analyzed in this study all show the same conclusion.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Novel Back Surface Field for High Efficiency Ultrathin CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Matin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically explores the possibility of high efficiency, ultrathin, and stable CdTe cells with different back surface field (BSF using well accepted simulator AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronics and photonic structures. A modified structure of CdTe based PV cell SnO2/Zn2SnO4/CdS/CdTe/BSF/BC has been proposed over reference structure SnO2/Zn2SnO4/CdS/CdTe/Cu. Both higher bandgap materials like ZnTe and Cu2Te and low bandgap materials like As2Te3 and Sb2Te3 have been used as BSF to reduce minority carrier recombination loss at the back contact in ultra-thin CdTe cells. In this analysis the highest conversion efficiency of CdTe based PV cell without BSF has been found to be around 17% using CdTe absorber thickness of 5 μm. However, the proposed structures with different BSF have shown acceptable efficiencies with an ultra-thin CdTe absorber of only 0.6 μm. The proposed structure with As2Te3 BSF showed the highest conversion efficiency of 20.8% ( V,  mA/cm2, and . Moreover, the proposed structures have shown improved stability in most extents, as it was found that the cells have relatively lower negative temperature coefficient. However, the cell with ZnTe BSF has shown better overall stability than other proposed cells with temperature coefficient (TC of −0.3%/°C.

  16. The Oriented Difference of Gaussians (ODOG) model of brightness perception: Overview and executable Mathematica notebooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Barbara; Cope, Davis; McCourt, Mark E

    2016-03-01

    The Oriented Difference of Gaussians (ODOG) model of brightness (perceived intensity) by Blakeslee and McCourt (Vision Research 39:4361-4377, 1999), which is based on linear spatial filtering by oriented receptive fields followed by contrast normalization, has proven highly successful in parsimoniously predicting the perceived intensity (brightness) of regions in complex visual stimuli such as White's effect, which had been believed to defy filter-based explanations. Unlike competing explanations such as anchoring theory, filling-in, edge-integration, or layer decomposition, the spatial filtering approach embodied by the ODOG model readily accounts for the often overlooked but ubiquitous gradient structure of induction which, while most striking in grating induction, also occurs within the test fields of classical simultaneous brightness contrast and the White stimulus. Also, because the ODOG model does not require defined regions of interest, it is generalizable to any stimulus, including natural images. The ODOG model has motivated other researchers to develop modified versions (LODOG and FLODOG), and has served as an important counterweight and proof of concept to constrain high-level theories which rely on less well understood or justified mechanisms such as unconscious inference, transparency, perceptual grouping, and layer decomposition. Here we provide a brief but comprehensive description of the ODOG model as it has been implemented since 1999, as well as working Mathematica (Wolfram, Inc.) notebooks which users can employ to generate ODOG model predictions for their own stimuli.

  17. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the High Surface Brightness Hotspot in PKS1421-490

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, L E H; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Gelbord, J; Schwartz, D A; Marshall, H L; Birkinshaw, M; Georganopoulos, M; Murphy, D W; Perlman, E S; Worrall, D M

    2009-01-01

    Long Baseline Array imaging of the z=0.663 broad line radio galaxy PKS1421-490 reveals a 400 pc diameter high surface brightness hotspot at a projected distance of approximately 40kpc from the active galactic nucleus. The isotropic X-ray luminosity of the hotspot, L_{2-10 keV} = 3 10^{44} ergs/s, is comparable to the isotropic X-ray luminosity of the entire X-ray jet of PKS0637-752, and the peak radio surface brightness is hundreds of times greater than that of the brightest hotspot in Cygnus A. We model the radio to X-ray spectral energy distribution using a one-zone synchrotron self Compton model with a near equipartition magnetic field strength of 3 mG. There is a strong brightness asymmetry between the approaching and receding hotspots and the hot spot spectrum remains flat (alpha ~ 0.5) well beyond the predicted cooling break for a 3 mG magnetic field, indicating that the hotspot emission may be Doppler beamed. A high plasma velocity beyond the terminal jet shock could be the result of a dynamically impo...

  18. Photocarrier Transport in Nonuniform Field Based on Schottky Cell for the Time of Flight Measurement in Poly(3-alkylthiopehene) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Pandey, Shyam S.; Takashima, Wataru

    2001-08-01

    The photocarrier transport measured by the time of flight (TOF) method in the Schottky junction cell of poly(3-alkylthiophene) (PAT) films/Al are studied taking the nonuniform field into consideration. The cell exhibits an excellent rectification characteristic, indicating the formation of a Schottky-type junction. When photocarriers are assumed to transit under a uniform field the mobility shows negative field dependence at the low field region. A simple model of nonuniform field distribution accounting for the apparent negative field dependence is proposed. The model is based on the finding that the bias is dominantly applied to the thin insulating depletion layer, and that the transit time is determined by the carrier migration at the low field bulk region.

  19. Brookhaven Lab physicists Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin win 'Brightness Award' for achievement in ion source physics and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have been awarded the Ion Source Prize, known as the "Brightness Award," which recognizes and encourages innovative and significant recent achievements in the fields of ion source physics and technology" (1 page).

  20. Beam dynamics in an initial part of a high Brightness electron linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I; Dovbnya-Kushnir, V A

    2001-01-01

    The paper is focused on problems of obtained a bright electron beam in a system that includes a grid-controlled electron gun,a klystron type type subharmonical buncher, a standing wave fundamental buncher with increasing accelerating field and a short travelling wave accelerating section. Beam focusing is provided by a longitudinal solenoidal magnetic field.It was shown that the proposed system can provide electron bunches with a peak current more than 100 A and normalized r.m.s. emittance no more than phi centre dot mm centre dot mrad.

  1. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  2. Visible Color and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, S. E.; Li, J. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) collected images of the surface of Vesta at a pixel scale of 70 m in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase through its clear and seven color filters spanning from 430 nm to 980 nm. The surface of Vesta displays a large diversity in its brightness and colors, evidently related to the diverse geology [1] and mineralogy [2]. Here we report a detailed investigation of the visible colors and photometric properties of the apparently bright materials on Vesta in order to study their origin. The global distribution and the spectroscopy of bright materials are discussed in companion papers [3, 4], and the synthesis results about the origin of Vestan bright materials are reported in [5].

  3. Bright Prospect for the Polyester Industrial Filament Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Some large companies from Americaand Europe have constructed plantsin China or established long-termstable cooperation relationship withChinese enterprises. A bright devel-opment prospect has therefore beenbrought to the polyester industrial fila-ment sector in China.

  4. An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Basri, Gibor; Pepper, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Surface gravity is one of a star's basic properties, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25-50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90-150 per cent photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about two per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for >150,000 stars provides an opportunity to investigate whether the variations can be used to determine surface gravities. The Fourier power of granulation on a star's surface correlates physically with surface gravity; if brightness variations on timescales of hours arise from granulation, then such variations should correlate with surface gravity. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an observational correlation between surface gravity and the root-mean-square brightness variations on timescales of less than eight hours for stars with temperatures ...

  5. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  6. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  7. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  8. Microbial electricity generation in rice paddy fields: recent advances and perspectives in rhizosphere microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use living microbes for the conversion of organic matter into electricity. MFC systems can be applied to the generation of electricity at water/sediment interfaces in the environment, such as bay areas, wetlands, and rice paddy fields. Using these systems, electricity generation in paddy fields as high as ∼80 mW m(-2) (based on the projected anode area) has been demonstrated, and evidence suggests that rhizosphere microbes preferentially utilize organic exudates from rice roots for generating electricity. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses have been conducted to identify the microbial species and catabolic pathways that are involved in the conversion of root exudates into electricity, suggesting the importance of syntrophic interactions. In parallel, pot cultures of rice and other aquatic plants have been used for rhizosphere MFC experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The findings from these studies have demonstrated the potential of electricity generation for mitigating methane emission from the rhizosphere. Notably, however, the presence of large amounts of organics in the rhizosphere drastically reduces the effect of electricity generation on methane production. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential of these systems for mitigating methane emission from rice paddy fields. We suggest that paddy-field MFCs represent a promising approach for harvesting latent energy of the natural world.

  9. Experimental generation of tripartite polarization entangled states of bright optical beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Yan, Zhihui; Liu, Yanhong; Deng, Ruijie; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2016-04-01

    The multipartite polarization entangled states of bright optical beams directly associating with the spin states of atomic ensembles are one of the essential resources in the future quantum information networks, which can be conveniently utilized to transfer and convert quantum states across a network composed of many atomic nodes. In this letter, we present the experimental demonstration of tripartite polarization entanglement described by Stokes operators of optical field. The tripartite entangled states of light at the frequency resonant with D1 line of Rubidium atoms are transformed into the continuous variable polarization entanglement among three bright optical beams via an optical beam splitter network. The obtained entanglement is confirmed by the extended criterion for polarization entanglement of multipartite quantized optical modes.

  10. Analysis of the effect of a 60 Hz AC field on histamine release by rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J A; Strattan, R D

    1998-01-01

    Reports have indicated effects of electromagnetic fields on inflammatory processes in vivo. To begin a systematic approach toward separating and examining the many components of such responses, we created and tested a temperature-controlled device to develop 5 mT 60 Hz magnetic fields for studies of the effects of fields on mast cells, a key component in acute inflammatory responses. Such fields have been reported to modulate cell activity, including changes in membrane function, in various systems. The magnetic field was generated using a solenoid and calibrated with an induction probe. Tests of mast cell function were determined by histamine release response to stimulation by compound 48/80, using both an "expose then test" and a "test during exposure" protocol. Aliquots not treated with 48/80 were used to evaluate field treatment effects on spontaneous histamine release. Freshly harvested rat peritoneal mast cells were exposed to the magnetic field for periods of 30 min to 2 h at 37 degrees C. They showed no significant degranulation during treatment, nor did they show reduced sensitivity to the degranulating agent 48/80. These observations are consistent with a model in which such processes are exclusively reflexive by the cells using field-independent membrane systems. This observation is very useful and was needed before examining longer term exposures in which gene expression in the cells might be influenced; this is the first such report of in vitro exposure of purified mast cells under these conditions and will further the study of the effects of electromagnetic fields on cell types active in acute inflammation.

  11. Effects of Magnetic Nanoparticles and External Magnetostatic Field on the Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yi, Chao; Liu, Chang; Hu, Xiaowen; Chuang, Steven; Gong, Xiong

    2015-03-01

    The price of energy to separate tightly bound electron-hole pair (or charge-transfer state) and extract freely movable charges from low-mobility materials represents fundamental losses for many low-cost photovoltaic devices. In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs), approximately 50% of the total efficiency lost among all energy loss pathways is due to the photogenerated charge carrier recombination within PSCs and low charge carrier mobility of disordered organic materials. To address these issues, we introduce magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and orientate these MNPS within BHJ composite by an external magnetostatic field. Over 50% enhanced efficiency was observed from BHJ PSCs incorporated with MNPs and an external magnetostatic field alignment when compared to the control BHJ PSCs. The optimization of BHJ thin film morphology, suppression of charge carrier recombination, and enhancement in charge carrier collection result in a greatly increased short-circuit current density and fill factor, as a result, enhanced power conversion efficiency.

  12. Effects of magnetic nanoparticles and external magnetostatic field on the bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yi, Chao; Liu, Chang; Hu, Xiaowen; Chuang, Steven; Gong, Xiong

    2015-03-18

    The price of energy to separate tightly bound electron-hole pair (or charge-transfer state) and extract freely movable charges from low-mobility materials represents fundamental losses for many low-cost photovoltaic devices. In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs), approximately 50% of the total efficiency lost among all energy loss pathways is due to the photogenerated charge carrier recombination within PSCs and low charge carrier mobility of disordered organic materials. To address these issues, we introduce magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and orientate these MNPS within BHJ composite by an external magnetostatic field. Over 50% enhanced efficiency was observed from BHJ PSCs incorporated with MNPs and an external magnetostatic field alignment when compared to the control BHJ PSCs. The optimization of BHJ thin film morphology, suppression of charge carrier recombination, and enhancement in charge carrier collection result in a greatly increased short-circuit current density and fill factor, as a result, enhanced power conversion efficiency.

  13. Supercontinuum generation with bright and dark solitons in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Milián, Carles; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically and experimentally supercontinuum generation in optical fibers with dark and bright solitons simultaneously contributing into the spectral broadening and dispersive wave generation. We report a novel type of weak trapped radiation arising due to interaction of bright solitons with the dark soliton background. This radiation expresses itself as two pulses with the continuously shifting spectra constituting the short and long wavelength limits of the continuum. Our theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement.

  14. On the origin of the deviation from the first order kinetics in inactivation of microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, N I

    2003-01-01

    A computer model was developed for estimation of the kinetics of microbial inactivation by pulsed electric field. The model is based on the electroporation theory of individual membrane damage, where spherical cell geometry and distribution of cell sizes are assumed. The variation of microbial cell sizes was assumed to follow a statistical probability distribution of the Gaussian type. Surviving kinetics was approximated by Weibull equation. The dependencies of two Weibull parameters (shape textit{n} and time $tau $, respectively) versus electric field intensity E and width of cell diameters distribution was studied.

  15. Quantum dots for multiplexed detection and characterisation of prostate cancer cells using a scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Ann D Walker

    Full Text Available In this study scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM has been utilised in conjunction with quantum dot labelling to interrogate the biomolecular composition of cell membranes. The technique overcomes the limits of optical diffraction found in standard fluorescence microscopy and also yields vital topographic information. The technique has been applied to investigate cell-cell adhesion in human epithelial cells. This has been realised through immunofluorescence labelling of the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin. Moreover, a dual labelling protocol has been optimised to facilitate a comparative study of the adhesion mechanisms and the effect of aberrant adhesion protein expression in both healthy and cancerous epithelial cells. This study reports clear differences in the morphology and phenotype of healthy and cancerous cells. In healthy prostate epithelial cells (PNT2, E-cadherin was predominantly located around the cell periphery and within filopodial extensions. The presence of E-cadherin appeared to be enhanced when cell-cell contact was established. In contrast, examination of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3 revealed no E-cadherin labelling around the periphery of the cells. This lack of functional E-cadherin in PC-3 cells coincided with a markedly different morphology and PC-3 cells were not found to form close cell-cell associations with their neighbours. We have demonstrated that with a fully optimised sample preparation methodology, multiplexed quantum dot labelling in conjunction with SNOM imaging can be successfully applied to interrogate biomolecular localisation within delicate cellular membranes.

  16. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan-glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  17. Investigation of tunnel field-effect transistors as a capacitor-less memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Arnab; Dagtekin, Nilay; Grabinski, Wladyslaw; Bazigos, Antonios; Le Royer, Cyrille; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Tabone, Claude; Vinet, Maud; Ionescu, Adrian M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report experimental results on the use of tunnel field-effect transistors as capacitorless dynamic random access memory cells, implemented as double-gate fully depleted silicon-on-insulator devices. The devices have an asymmetric design, with a partial overlap of the top gate (LG) and with a total overlap of the back gate over the channel region (LG + LIN). A potential well is created by biasing the back gate (VBG) in accumulation, while the front gate (VFG) is in inversion. Holes from the p+ source are injected by the forward-biased p+ i junction and stored in the electrically induced potential well.

  18. Electric field induced domain formation in surface stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dierking, Ingo; Gießelmann, Frank; Schacht, Jochen; Zugenmaier, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Two types of domains have been observed for S sub(C) ferroelectric liquid crystals in surface stabilized cells (SSFLC) by application of a high electric field with the smectic layers tilted by the amount of the chevron angle with respect to the normal of the rubbing direction in the substrate plane. The layer structure resembles that of a chevron configuration in the plane of the substrate similar to the recently reported stripe-shaped SSFLC structure. The two domain types 'appear' to switch ...

  19. Numerical Analysis of Novel Back Surface Field for High Efficiency Ultrathin CdTe Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Matin, M.A.; Tomal, M. U.; A. M. Robin; N. Amin

    2013-01-01

    This paper numerically explores the possibility of high efficiency, ultrathin, and stable CdTe cells with different back surface field (BSF) using well accepted simulator AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronics and photonic structures). A modified structure of CdTe based PV cell SnO2/Zn2SnO4/CdS/CdTe/BSF/BC has been proposed over reference structure SnO2/Zn2SnO4/CdS/CdTe/Cu. Both higher bandgap materials like ZnTe and Cu2Te and low bandgap materials like As2Te3 and Sb2Te3 have been used as BSF ...

  20. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.