WorldWideScience

Sample records for bridged nucleic acid

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  8. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  9. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  10. Calorimetry of Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozners, Eriks; Pilch, Daniel S; Egli, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This unit describes the application of calorimetry to characterize the thermodynamics of nucleic acids, specifically, the two major calorimetric methodologies that are currently employed: differential scanning (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DSC is used to study thermally induced order-disorder transitions in nucleic acids. A DSC instrument measures, as a function of temperature (T), the excess heat capacity (C(p)(ex)) of a nucleic acid solution relative to the same amount of buffer solution. From a single curve of C(p)(ex) versus T, one can derive the following information: the transition enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), free energy (ΔG), and heat capacity (ΔCp); the state of the transition (two-state versus multistate); and the average size of the molecule that melts as a single thermodynamic entity (e.g., the duplex). ITC is used to study the hybridization of nucleic acid molecules at constant temperature. In an ITC experiment, small aliquots of a titrant nucleic acid solution (strand 1) are added to an analyte nucleic acid solution (strand 2), and the released heat is monitored. ITC yields the stoichiometry of the association reaction (n), the enthalpy of association (ΔH), the equilibrium association constant (K), and thus the free energy of association (ΔG). Once ΔH and ΔG are known, ΔS can also be derived. Repetition of the ITC experiment at a number of different temperatures yields the ΔCp for the association reaction from the temperature dependence of ΔH.

  11. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  12. Nucleic Acid Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Anew method of immunization was discovered in the early 1990s. Several research groups independently demonstrated that direct inoculation of DNA plasmids coding for a specific protein antigen could elicit immune responses against that antigen[1-4].Since in theory the mRNA molecules also have the potential to be translated into the protein antigen, this vaccination approach was officially named by WHO as the nucleic acid vaccination even though the term DNA vaccine has been used more commonly in the literature. This novel approach is considered the fourth generation of vaccines after live attenuated vaccines, killed or inactivated vaccines and recombinant protein based subunit vaccines.

  13. Cycloadditions for Studying Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kath-Schorr, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    Cycloaddition reactions for site-specific or global modification of nucleic acids have enabled the preparation of a plethora of previously inaccessible DNA and RNA constructs for structural and functional studies on naturally occurring nucleic acids, the assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures, therapeutic applications, and recently, the development of novel aptamers. In this chapter, recent progress in nucleic acid functionalization via a range of different cycloaddition (click) chemistries is presented. At first, cycloaddition/click chemistries already used for modifying nucleic acids are summarized, ranging from the well-established copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction to copper free methods, such as the strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, tetrazole-based photoclick chemistry and the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction between strained alkenes and tetrazine derivatives. The subsequent sections contain selected applications of nucleic acid functionalization via click chemistry; in particular, site-specific enzymatic labeling in vitro, either via DNA and RNA recognizing enzymes or by introducing unnatural base pairs modified for click reactions. Further sections report recent progress in metabolic labeling and fluorescent detection of DNA and RNA synthesis in vivo, click nucleic acid ligation, click chemistry in nanostructure assembly and click-SELEX as a novel method for the selection of aptamers. PMID:27572987

  14. Origin of nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearance of nucleic acids is the first event after the birth of membranes which made it possible to assure the perenniality of information. The complexity of these molecules has led some scientists to propose that they were not prebiotic but rather derived a more simple and achiral primitive ancestor. This hypothesis suggests that ribose possesses properties that allowed the formation of certain polysaccharides which evolved to RNA. The first step of the hypothesis is the selection and concentration of ribofuranose. This sugar has chelating properties and its alpha-ribofuranose is favoured in the chelating position. The density of the sugar with a heavy cation is greater than water and thus the complex can escape the UV radiation at the surface of the ocean. The particularity of ribose is to be able to form a homochiral regular array of these basic chelating structures with pyrophosphite. These arrays evolve towards the formation of polysaccharides (poly ribose phosphate) which have a very organized structure. These polysaccharides in turn evolve to RNA by binding of adenine and deoxyguanine which are HCN derivatives that can react with the polysaccharides. The primitive RNA is methylated and oxidized to form prebiotic RNA with adenosine, cytidine, 7methyl-guanosine and ribothymidine as nucleic bases. The pathway of biosynthesis of DNA form RNA will be studied. I suggest that the appearance of DNA results form the interaction between prebiotic double stranded RNA and proteins. DNA could be a product of RNA degradation by proteins. The catabolism of RNA to DNA requires a source of free radicals, protons and hydrides. RNA cannot produce free radicals, which are provided by the phenol group of the amino acid tyrosien. Protons are provided by the medium and hydrides are provided by 7-methyl-guanosine which can fix hydrides coming from hydrogen gas and donate them for the transformation of a riboside to a deoxyriboside. This pathway suggests that DNA appeared at

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids Complexes of Two Peptide Nucleic Acid Strands and One

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  16. [Circulating nucleic acids and infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, E; Mullet, T; Ferrières Hoa, A; Gala, A; Loup, V; Anahory, T; Belloc, S; Hamamah, S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART. PMID:26298813

  17. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø;

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing......-specifically, for instance with vastly different affinities to zymogen and active enzyme forms. Furthermore, aptamers can be selected to inhibit the enzyme activity of the target proteases, but also to inhibit functionally important exosite interactions, for instance cofactor binding. Several protease-inhibiting aptamers...... strategies and of new principles for regulating the activity of the inhibitory action of aptamers of general interest to researchers working with nucleic acid aptamers...

  18. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  19. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  20. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Andreasen, P A

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing small molecule protease inhibitors of sufficient specificity has proved a daunting task. Aptamers seem to represent a promising alternative. In our review, we concentrate on biochemical mechanisms of...

  1. Nucleic acid delivery with microbubbles and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychak, Joshua J; Klibanov, Alexander L

    2014-06-01

    Nucleic acid-based therapy is a growing field of drug delivery research. Although ultrasound has been suggested to enhance transfection decades ago, it took a combination of ultrasound with nucleic acid carrier systems (microbubbles, liposomes, polyplexes, and viral carriers) to achieve reasonable nucleic acid delivery efficacy. Microbubbles serve as foci for local deposition of ultrasound energy near the target cell, and greatly enhance sonoporation. The major advantage of this approach is in the minimal transfection in the non-insonated non-target tissues. Microbubbles can be simply co-administered with the nucleic acid carrier or can be modified to carry nucleic acid themselves. Liposomes with embedded gas or gas precursor particles can also be used to carry nucleic acid, release and deliver it by the ultrasound trigger. Successful testing in a wide variety of animal models (myocardium, solid tumors, skeletal muscle, and pancreas) proves the potential usefulness of this technique for nucleic acid drug delivery. PMID:24486388

  2. Nucleic Acid Backbone Structure Variations: Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic analogues and mimics of the natural genetic material deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are potential gene therapeutic (antisense or antigene) drugs. One of these mimics, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), are chemically closer to peptides and proteins than to DNA, but nonetheless have retained many...... of the structural properties of DNA. These molecules have found applications as probes in genetic diagnostics and are also being developed into antisense (RNA (ribonucleic acid) interference) gene therapeutic drugs, targeting selected genes through sequence-specific recognition of (messenger or micro......)RNA and in the future also antigene applications targeting the double-stranded DNA of the genes themselves leading to gene silencing or guiding specific gene repair. Finally, the special chemical and structural properties of PNA suggest that these or similar molecules might have played a role in the prebiotic origin...

  3. Amyloid-associated nucleic acid hybridisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Braun

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids promote amyloid formation in diseases including Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, it remains unclear whether the close interactions between amyloid and nucleic acid allow nucleic acid secondary structure to play a role in modulating amyloid structure and function. Here we have used a simplified system of short basic peptides with alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues to study nucleic acid - amyloid interactions. Employing biophysical techniques including X-ray fibre diffraction, circular dichroism spectroscopy and electron microscopy we show that the polymerized charges of nucleic acids concentrate and enhance the formation of amyloid from short basic peptides, many of which would not otherwise form fibres. In turn, the amyloid component binds nucleic acids and promotes their hybridisation at concentrations below their solution K(d, as shown by time-resolved FRET studies. The self-reinforcing interactions between peptides and nucleic acids lead to the formation of amyloid nucleic acid (ANA fibres whose properties are distinct from their component polymers. In addition to their importance in disease and potential in engineering, ANA fibres formed from prebiotically-produced peptides and nucleic acids may have played a role in early evolution, constituting the first entities subject to Darwinian evolution.

  4. Multiplexed microfluidic approach for nucleic acid enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Langevin, Stanley Alan; Bent, Zachary; Renzi, Ronald F.; Ferko, Scott M.; Van De Vreugde, James L.; Lane, Todd; Patel, Kamlesh; Branda, Steven

    2016-04-26

    A system for enhancing a nucleic acid sample may include a one pump, a denaturing chamber; a microfluidic hydroxyapatite chromatography device configured for performing hydroxyapatite chromatography on the nucleic acid sample, a sample collector, and tubing connecting the pump with the denaturing chamber, the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and the sample collector such that the pump may be used to move the nucleic acid sample from the denaturing chamber to the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and then to the sample collector.

  5. Pulmonary delivery of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, James

    2007-11-01

    The lung is an appropriate present and future target for gene therapy approaches designed to treat inherited monogenic diseases, eradicate bronchial tumours, transfer pharmacologically active products to the general circulation, express enzymes to catabolise toxins, manage pulmonary hypertension and lung injury and vaccinate against infection. Despite 35 years of gene therapy research and some significant milestones in molecular biology, the clinical potential of gene therapy has yet to be realised. In pulmonary gene therapy the nucleic acid cargo needs to be delivered to cells in the target region of the lung, and even in cases when these targets are well defined this is severely limited by the pulmonary architecture, clearance mechanisms, immune activation, the presence of respiratory mucus and the availability of a truly representative biological model. The challenge from a drug delivery perspective is to consider the suitability of conventional nebulisers and inhalers for delivering DNA to the lung and design and apply integrated formulation and device solutions specific to nucleic acid delivery. PMID:17970661

  6. Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  7. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  9. An introduction to peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Egholm, M

    1999-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) is a powerful new biomolecular tool with a wide range of important applications. PNA mimics the behaviour of DNA and binds complementary nucleic acid strands. The unique chemical, physical and biological properties of PNA have been exploited to produce powerful...

  10. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, Brianne E.; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro. Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  11. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  12. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  13. Scaffolding along Nucleic Acid Duplexes Using 2'-Amino-Locked Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus Incorporation of chemically modified nucleotide scaffolds into nucleic acids to form assemblies rich in function is an innovative area with great promise for nanotechnology and biomedical and material science applications. The intrinsic biorecognition potential of nucleic acids combined...... of the biopolymers of Nature may solve the major challenges of the future material science and biomedicine. However, this requires strong scientific progress and efficient interdisciplinary research. Examples of this Account demonstrate that among other synthetic biopolymers, synthetic nucleic acids containing...

  14. Two perspectives to consider Nucleic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Sosic, A

    2013-01-01

    Since their discovery, nucleic acids have been the object of intense and thorough explorations, leading to the understanding of their structure and functions. Their role as genetic information carriers is well known but there are evidences that they are also involved in a series of other less known processes. No longer have nucleic acids to be considered passive structures, but they are dynamic and active macromolecules, able to assume a number of three-dimensional conformations. Precisely, t...

  15. Rapid nuclear import of short nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Mai; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2016-10-01

    Exogenous short-chain nucleic acids undergo rapid import into the nucleus. Fluorescence-labeled dT1-13 DNA microinjected into the cytoplasm domain of a HeLa cell was rapidly imported into the nucleus domain within 1min. This is much more rapid than what has been observed for intracellular diffusion of small molecules. In contrast, import of longer nucleic acids with a length of over 30nt into the nucleus was suppressed. PMID:27597250

  16. Novel Biochip Platform for Nucleic Acid Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Diaz-Mochon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the use of a novel biochip platform for the rapid analysis/identification of nucleic acids, including DNA and microRNAs, with very high specificity. This approach combines a unique dynamic chemistry approach for nucleic acid testing and analysis developed by DestiNA Genomics with the STMicroelectronics In-Check platform, which comprises two microfluidic optimized and independent PCR reaction chambers, and a sequential microarray area for nucleic acid capture and identification by fluorescence. With its compact bench-top “footprint” requiring only a single technician to operate, the biochip system promises to transform and expand routine clinical diagnostic testing and screening for genetic diseases, cancers, drug toxicology and heart disease, as well as employment in the emerging companion diagnostics market.

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of nat...

  18. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti......-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting...

  19. Imaging Functional Nucleic Acid Delivery to Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Roger L; Hickerson, Robyn P; González-González, Emilio; Flores, Manuel A; Speaker, Tycho P; Rogers, Faye A; Milstone, Leonard M; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic skin diseases arise from well-defined single gene mutations, and in some cases a single point mutation. As the target cells are superficial, these diseases are ideally suited for treatment by nucleic acid-based therapies as well as monitoring through a variety of noninvasive imaging technologies. Despite the accessibility of the skin, there remain formidable barriers for functional delivery of nucleic acids to the target cells within the dermis and epidermis. These barriers include the stratum corneum and the layered structure of the skin, as well as more locally, the cellular, endosomal and nuclear membranes. A wide range of technologies for traversing these barriers has been described and moderate success has been reported for several approaches. The lessons learned from these studies include the need for combinations of approaches to facilitate nucleic acid delivery across these skin barriers and then functional delivery across the cellular and nuclear membranes for expression (e.g., reporter genes, DNA oligonucleotides or shRNA) or into the cytoplasm for regulation (e.g., siRNA, miRNA, antisense oligos). The tools for topical delivery that have been evaluated include chemical, physical and electrical methods, and the development and testing of each of these approaches has been greatly enabled by imaging tools. These techniques allow delivery and real time monitoring of reporter genes, therapeutic nucleic acids and also triplex nucleic acids for gene editing. Optical imaging is comprised of a number of modalities based on properties of light-tissue interaction (e.g., scattering, autofluorescence, and reflectance), the interaction of light with specific molecules (e.g., absorbtion, fluorescence), or enzymatic reactions that produce light (bioluminescence). Optical imaging technologies operate over a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic and if necessary, nanoscopic, and thus can be used to assess nucleic acid delivery to organs, regions, cells

  20. Macromolecular mimicry of nucleic acid and protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Nyborg, Jens; Clark, Brian F

    1999-01-01

    of the concept of macromolecular mimicry. Macromolecular mimicry has further been proposed among initiation and release factors, thereby adding a new element to the description of protein synthesis in bacteria. Such mimicry has also been observed in other biological processes such as autoimmunity, DNA repair......Although proteins and nucleic acids consist of different chemical components, proteins can mimic structures and possibly also functions of nucleic acids. Recently, structural mimicry was observed between two elongation factors in bacterial protein biosynthesis leading to the introduction...

  1. Imaging Functional Nucleic Acid Delivery to Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Roger L; Hickerson, Robyn P; González-González, Emilio; Flores, Manuel A; Speaker, Tycho P; Rogers, Faye A; Milstone, Leonard M; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic skin diseases arise from well-defined single gene mutations, and in some cases a single point mutation. As the target cells are superficial, these diseases are ideally suited for treatment by nucleic acid-based therapies as well as monitoring through a variety of noninvasive imaging technologies. Despite the accessibility of the skin, there remain formidable barriers for functional delivery of nucleic acids to the target cells within the dermis and epidermis. These barriers include the stratum corneum and the layered structure of the skin, as well as more locally, the cellular, endosomal and nuclear membranes. A wide range of technologies for traversing these barriers has been described and moderate success has been reported for several approaches. The lessons learned from these studies include the need for combinations of approaches to facilitate nucleic acid delivery across these skin barriers and then functional delivery across the cellular and nuclear membranes for expression (e.g., reporter genes, DNA oligonucleotides or shRNA) or into the cytoplasm for regulation (e.g., siRNA, miRNA, antisense oligos). The tools for topical delivery that have been evaluated include chemical, physical and electrical methods, and the development and testing of each of these approaches has been greatly enabled by imaging tools. These techniques allow delivery and real time monitoring of reporter genes, therapeutic nucleic acids and also triplex nucleic acids for gene editing. Optical imaging is comprised of a number of modalities based on properties of light-tissue interaction (e.g., scattering, autofluorescence, and reflectance), the interaction of light with specific molecules (e.g., absorbtion, fluorescence), or enzymatic reactions that produce light (bioluminescence). Optical imaging technologies operate over a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic and if necessary, nanoscopic, and thus can be used to assess nucleic acid delivery to organs, regions, cells

  2. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  3. Chemical consequences of irradiating nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of literature data, a discussion is presented of the DNA damage which would be produced in a cellular environment and an attempt is made to place this damage in perspective as a potential hazard in food irradiation. The topics discussed are radiation damage mechanisms, OH reactions with DNA, base products, sugar products, and evaluation of damage from irradiated nucleic acids

  4. Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Domingo, Gonzalo; Gerlach, Jay; Tang, Dennis; Harvey, Darrel; Talwar, Nick; Fichtenholz, Alex; van Lew, Bill; LaBarre, Paul

    2008-02-01

    We have developed components of a diagnostic disposable platform that has the dual purpose of providing molecular diagnostics at the point of care (POC) as well as stabilizing specimens for further analysis via a centralized surveillance system. This diagnostic is targeted for use in low-resource settings by minimally trained health workers. The disposable device does not require any additional instrumentation and will be almost as rapid and simple to use as a lateral flow strip test - yet will offer the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The low-cost integrated device is composed of three functional components: (1) a sample-processing subunit that generates clean and stabilized DNA from raw samples containing nucleic acids, (2) a NA amplification subunit, and (3) visual amplicon detection sub-unit. The device integrates chemical exothermic heating, temperature stabilization using phase-change materials, and isothermal nucleic acid amplification. The aim of developing this system is to provide pathogen detection with NAAT-level sensitivity in low-resource settings where there is no access to instrumentation. If a disease occurs, patients would be tested with the disposable in the field. A nucleic acid sample would be preserved within the spent disposable which could be sent to a central laboratory facility for further analysis if needed.

  5. Locked and unlocked nucleosides in functional nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Holger; Vester, Birte

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acids are able to adopt a plethora of structures, many of which are of interest in therapeutics, bio- or nanotechnology. However, structural and biochemical stability is a major concern which has been addressed by incorporating a range of modifications and nucleoside derivatives. This rev...... review summarizes the use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) and un-locked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers in functional nucleic acids such as aptamers, ribozymes, and DNAzymes....

  6. Advances in magnetofection-magnetically guided nucleic acid delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetofection is nucleic acid delivery to cells supported and site-specifically guided by the attractive forces of magnetic fields acting on nucleic acid shuttles (vectors) which are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. Recent progress with the method confirms its general applicability with small and large nucleic acids and viruses. The method's therapeutic application as well as mechanistic studies will be discussed

  7. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Total Nucleic Acid Extraction from Soil

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Roey Angel ### Abstract The following protocol is intended for the simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from various soil samples along with suggestions on how to tweak the protocol for soil with higher humic content. The protocol has been used by many and results in very high yields of nucleic acids, typically much more than commercial kits. For buffers and solutions used in this protocol, please see accompanying document Buffers and Solutions for TNA Extractions.pdf. ...

  9. Novel applications of locked nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) nucleoside triphosphates were prepared and their substrate properties for different polymerases during primer extension and PCR experiments investigated. Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase and 9( degrees )Nm(TM) DNA polymerase readily accept LNA nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates in primer extension assays. However, in PCR assays, However, in PCR assays, DNA 9oN(m) polymerase proved to be the best for amplification employing the LNA-A nucleotide. PMID:18029570

  10. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  11. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  12. Therapeutic nucleic acids: current clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gogtay, Nithya Jaideep

    2016-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are simple linear polymers that have been the subject of considerable research in the last two decades and have now moved into the realm of being stand-alone therapeutic agents. Much of this has stemmed from the appreciation that they carry out myriad functions that go beyond mere storage of genetic information and protein synthesis. Therapy with nucleic acids either uses unmodified DNA or RNA or closely related compounds. From both a development and regulatory perspective, they fall somewhere between small molecules and biologics. Several of these compounds are in clinical development and many have received regulatory approval for human use. This review addresses therapeutic uses of DNA based on antisense oligonucleotides, DNA aptamers and gene therapy; and therapeutic uses of RNA including micro RNAs, short interfering RNAs, ribozymes, RNA decoys and circular RNAs. With their specificity, functional diversity and limited toxicity, therapeutic nucleic acids hold enormous promise. However, challenges that need to be addressed include targeted delivery, mass production at low cost, sustaining efficacy and minimizing off-target toxicity. Technological developments will hold the key to this and help accelerate drug approvals in the years to come. PMID:27111518

  13. A locked nucleic Acid-based nanocrawler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Pasternak, Karol; Campbell, Meghan A;

    2013-01-01

    excimer formation and pyrene-perylene interstrand Förster resonance energy transfer. We furthermore demonstrate that the nanocrawler selectively and reversibly moves along the road, followed by a bright and consistent fluorescence response for up to 10 cycles without any loss of signal.......Herein we introduce a novel fluorescent LNA/DNA machine, a nanocrawler, which reversibly moves along a directionally polar complementary road controlled by affinity-enhancing locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomers and additional regulatory strands. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dyes attached to 2...

  14. A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay based on strand displacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Vary, C P

    1987-01-01

    A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay which is conducted in solution and requires no separation steps is described. The assay is based on the concept of strand displacement. In the strand displacement assay, an RNA "signal strand" is hybridized within a larger DNA strand termed the "probe strand", which is, in turn, complementary to the target nucleic acid of interest. Hybridization of the target nucleic acid with the probe strand ultimately results in displacement of the RNA signal ...

  15. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C J; Giménez, I B; Cabrini, R L

    1976-03-01

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. PMID:1258094

  16. Flexibility of nucleic acids: from DNA to RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Lei; Jin, Lei; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids.

  17. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail epidermis subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. (orig.)

  18. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. PMID:26896846

  19. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-11-11

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Martí, E.; Briones, C.; Rogero, C.; Gomez-Navarro, C.; Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C. M.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces.

  5. Nucleic acid-binding glycoproteins which solubilize nucleic acids in dilute acid: re-examination of the Ustilago maydis glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.; Champ, D.R.; Young, J.L.; Grant, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Holloman reported the isolation from Ustilago maydis of a glycoprotein which prevented the precipitation of nucleic acids in cold 5% trichloroacetic acid. Two glycoprotein fractions from U. maydis with this nucleic acid-solubilizing activity were isolated in our laboratory using improved purification procedures. The activity was not due to nuclease contamination. The glycoproteins are distinguished by: their ability to bind to concanavalin A-Sepharose; their differential binding to double- and single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, and to ribonucleic acid; their molecular weights (46,000 and 69,000); and the relative amounts present in growing versus nongrowing cells. Both fractions required sulfhydryl-reducing conditions for optimal yields, specific activity, and stability. Nucleic acid binding was cooperative, the minimum number of glycoproteins required to make a native T7 DNA molecule soluble in dilute acid being estimated at 2 and 15, respectively.

  6. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of locked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Karin E; Højland, Torben; Hansen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most promising new nucleic acid analogues that has been produced under the past two decades. In this chapter, we have tried to cover many of the different areas, where this molecule has been used to improve the function of synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs). ...

  7. Gene Targeting and Expression Modulation by Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids capable of sequence specific hybridization to both RNA and DNA. Thus they have obvious potential as gene targeting agents for drug discovery approaches. An overview with emphasis on recent progress on RNA "interference"...

  8. MEANS AND METHODS FOR CLONING NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma, Eric Robin; Poolman, Berend

    2008-01-01

    The invention provides means and methods for efficiently cloning nucleic acid sequences of interest in micro-organisms that are less amenable to conventional nucleic acid manipulations, as compared to, for instance, E.coli. The present invention enables high-throughput cloning (and, preferably, expr

  9. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having 2,6-Diaminopurine Nucleobases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. The peptide nucleic acids of the invention comprise ligands selected from a group cons...

  11. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  12. Intumescent features of nucleic acids and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.alongi@polito.it; Cuttica, Fabio; Blasio, Alessandro Di; Carosio, Federico; Malucelli, Giulio

    2014-09-10

    Highlights: • The combustion resistance of DNA and caseins to different heat fluxes was studied. • Upon heating, DNA and caseins exhibited an intumescent behaviour. • The char derived from DNA was more stable and coherent than that from caseins. - Abstract: Are nucleic acids and proteins intumescent molecules? In order to get an answer, in the present manuscript, powders of deoxyribose nucleic acids (DNA) and caseins have been exposed to different heat fluxes under a cone calorimeter source and to the direct application of a propane flame. Under these conditions, DNA and caseins exhibited a typical intumescent behaviour, generating a coherent expanded cellular carbonaceous residue (char), extremely resistant to heat exposure. The resulting volumetric expansion as well as the resistance of the formed char turned out to be dependent on (i) the chemical structure of the chosen biomacromolecule, (ii) the evolution of ammonia and (iii) the adopted heat flux in cone calorimetry tests (namely, 25, 35, 50 and 75 kW/m{sup 2}). The presence of ribose units within the DNA backbone determined the formation of highly expanded and coherent residues as compared to those obtained from caseins. Indeed, under a heat flux of 35 kW/m{sup 2}, when a carbon source (i.e. common cane sugar) was added to caseins, the resulting char was similar to that formed by DNA. Furthermore, the char expansion was ascribed to the evolution of ammonia released by these biomacromolecules upon heating, as detected by thermogravimetry coupled to infrared spectroscopy, and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy experiments performed on the bubbles present in the residues of flammability tests.

  13. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-01

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand. PMID:27294440

  14. Structural studies of nucleic acids and proteins involved in nucleic acid recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Russo Krauss, Irene

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the structural analysis of the protein-nucleic acid recognition. In particular the research work has been focalized on two different kinds of proteins and their nucleotide ligands. The first part concerns the structural characterization of complexes between human α-thrombin, a protein of physiological and pathological relevance, and two oligonucleotide aptamers (the so called thrombin binding aptamer and a modified version of it), which adopt a G-quadruplex fold. Th...

  15. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills. PMID:23849929

  16. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills.

  17. Recognition of pathogen-associated nucleic acids by endosomal nucleic acid-sensing toll-like receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing He; Huaijie Jia; Zhizhong Jing; Dingxiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Foreign nucleic acids,the essential signature molecules of invading pathogens that act as danger signals for host cells,are detected by endosomal nucleic acid-sensing tolllike receptors (TLRs) 3,7,8,9,and 13.These TLRs have evolved to recognize ‘non-self' nucleic acids within endosomal compartments and rapidly initiate innate immune responses to ensure host protection through induction of type Ⅰ interferons,inflammatory cytokines,chemokines,and co-stimulatory molecules and maturation of immune cells.In this review,we highlight our understanding of the recognition of pathogen-associated nucleic acids and activation of corresponding signaling pathways through endosomal nucleic acid-sensing TLRs 3,7,8,9,and 13 for an enormous diversity of pathogens,with particular emphasis on their compartmentalization,intracellular trafficking,proteolytic cleavage,autophagy,and regulatory programs.

  18. Computational Approaches to Nucleic Acid Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Hosna; Aminpour, Maral; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-10-12

    Recent advances in experimental DNA origami have dramatically expanded the horizon of DNA nanotechnology. Complex 3D suprastructures have been designed and developed using DNA origami with applications in biomaterial science, nanomedicine, nanorobotics, and molecular computation. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) origami has recently been realized as a new approach. Similar to DNA, RNA molecules can be designed to form complex 3D structures through complementary base pairings. RNA origami structures are, however, more compact and more thermodynamically stable due to RNA's non-canonical base pairing and tertiary interactions. With all these advantages, the development of RNA origami lags behind DNA origami by a large gap. Furthermore, although computational methods have proven to be effective in designing DNA and RNA origami structures and in their evaluation, advances in computational nucleic acid origami is even more limited. In this paper, we review major milestones in experimental and computational DNA and RNA origami and present current challenges in these fields. We believe collaboration between experimental nanotechnologists and computer scientists are critical for advancing these new research paradigms. PMID:26348196

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic aci...

  20. Nucleic acid X-ray crystallography via direct selenium derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lina; Sheng, Jia; Huang, Zhen

    2011-09-01

    X-ray crystallography has proven to be an essential tool for structural studies of bio-macromolecules at the atomic level. There are two major bottle-neck problems in the macromolecular crystal structure determination: phasing and crystallization. Although the selenium derivatization is routinely used for solving novel protein structures through the MAD phasing technique, the phase problem is still a critical issue in nucleic acid crystallography. The background and current progress of using direct selenium-derivatization of nucleic acids (SeNA) to solve the phase problem and to facilitate nucleic acid crystallization for X-ray crystallography are summarized in this tutorial review. PMID:21666919

  1. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  2. Assays for urinary biomarkers of oxidatively damaged nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weimann, Allan; Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The analysis of oxidized nucleic acid metabolites can be performed by a variety of methodologies: liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical or mass-spectrometry detection, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis and ELISA (Enzyme...... and skills requirement. The available ELISA methods present considerable specificity problems and cannot be recommended at present. The oxidized nucleic acid metabolites in urine are assumed to originate from the DNA and RNA. However, direct evidence is not available. A possible contribution from...... can easily be expanded to analyze the oxidized ribonucleosides. The urinary measurement of oxidized nucleic acid metabolites provides a non-invasive measurement of oxidative stress to DNA and RNA....

  3. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  4. Boronic acid-based autoligation of nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbeyron, R.; Vasseur, J.-J.; Smietana, M.;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The development of synthetic systems displaying dynamic and adaptive characteristics is a formidable challenge with wide applications from biotechnology to therapeutics. Recently, we described a dynamic and programmable nucleic acid-based system relying on the formation of reversible...... boronate internucleosidic linkages. The DNA- or RNA-templated system comprises a 5′-ended boronic acid probe connecting a 3′-ended ribonucleosidic oligonucleotide partner. To explore the dominant factors that control the reversible linkage, we synthesized a series of 3′-end modified ribonucleotidic strands...

  5. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  6. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  7. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Energy and Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems is presented. This unit discusses methods used to treat the energy and to sample representative configurations. Emphasis is placed on molecular mechanics and empirical force fields.

  8. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Baby Santosh; Pramod K. Yadava

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Ma...

  9. Hydrophilic magnetic latex for nucleic acid extraction, purification and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core-shell magnetic latex particles bearing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) in the shell were prepared by encapsulation of magnetic core using a precipitation polymerization process. The cationic character of the particles' surface is favorable for nucleic acid adsorption-desorption by controlling the pH and salinity of the medium. The concentration process of nucleic acids was presented and proven using DNA as a model

  10. Thermodynamics of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides insights into the influence of modified nucleotide residues on stability of nucleic acids and is crucial for designing duplexes with given properties. In this article, we introduce detailed thermodynamic analysis of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotide residues. We investigate UNA single substitutions as well as model mismatch and dangling end effects. UNA residues placed in a central position makes RNA duplex structure less favourable by 4...

  11. Sensors of Infection: Viral Nucleic Acid PRRs in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Poynter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses produce nucleic acids during their replication, either during genomic replication or transcription. These nucleic acids are present in the cytoplasm or endosome of an infected cell, or in the extracellular space to be sensed by neighboring cells during lytic infections. Cells have mechanisms of sensing virus-generated nucleic acids; these nucleic acids act as flags to the cell, indicating an infection requiring defense mechanisms. The viral nucleic acids are called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and the sensors that bind them are called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. This review article focuses on the most recent findings regarding nucleic acids PRRs in fish, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs, RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, cytoplasmic DNA sensors (CDSs and class A scavenger receptors (SR-As. It also discusses what is currently known of the downstream signaling molecules for each PRR family and the resulting antiviral response, either type I interferons (IFNs or pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The review highlights what is known but also defines what still requires elucidation in this economically important animal. Understanding innate immune systems to virus infections will aid in the development of better antiviral therapies and vaccines for the future.

  12. Interactions of Night Blue with Nucleic Acids and Determination of Nucleic Acids Using Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴会灵; 梁宏; 等

    2003-01-01

    The noncovalent interactions of night blue (NB) with several nucleic acids in buffer medium of Britton-Robinson at pH 4.1 have been studied by spectroscopic methods.It is shown that the binding of NB with nucleic acids involves the J-aggregation of NB molecules on the surface of nucleic acids.The aggregation was encouraged by polyanions nucleic acids,in which nucleic acids served for acting templates,In this connection,a new method of nucleic acids with sensitivity at nanogram level is proposed based on the measurement of enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS).The linear range of ctDNA,fsDNA and yRNA is 0.01-2.5,0.03-2.5 and 0.04-1.0 μg/mL,respectively,and the corresponding detection limits(3σ)are 9.4,7.3 and 5.7ng/mL at 2.5×1005mol/L of NB.Synthetic and real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results.

  13. Microbial Nucleic Acid Sensing in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, K E; Sahingur, S E

    2016-01-01

    One challenge in studying chronic infectious and inflammatory disorders is understanding how host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), specifically toll-like receptors (TLRs), sense and respond to pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, their communication with each other and different components of the immune system, and their role in propagating inflammatory stages of disease. The discovery of innate immune activation through nucleic acid recognition by intracellular PRRs such as endosomal TLRs (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) and cytoplasmic proteins (absent in melanoma 2 and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor) opened a new paradigm: Nucleic acid sensing is now implicated in multiple immune and inflammatory conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, cancer), viral (e.g., human papillomavirus, herpes virus) and bacterial (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, pneumonia) diseases, and autoimmune disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis). Clinical investigations reveal the overexpression of specific nucleic acid sensors in diseased tissues. In vivo animal models show enhanced disease progression associated with receptor activation. The involvement of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic conditions is further supported by studies reporting receptor knockout mice being either protected from or prone to disease. TLR9-mediated inflammation is also implicated in periodontal diseases. Considering that persistent inflammation in the oral cavity is associated with systemic diseases and that oral microbial DNA is isolated at distal sites, nucleic acid sensing may potentially be a link between oral and systemic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent advances in how intracellular PRRs respond to microbial nucleic acids and emerging views on the role of nucleic acid sensors in various systemic diseases. We also highlight new information on the role of intracellular PRRs in the pathogenesis of oral diseases including periodontitis

  14. Structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gansler

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects.

  15. Nucleic acids in circulation: Are they harmful to the host?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indraneel Mittra; Naveen Kumar Nair; Pradyumna Kumar Mishra

    2012-06-01

    It has been estimated that 1011–1012 cells, primarily of haematogenous origin, die in the adult human body daily, and a similar number is regenerated to maintain homeostasis. Despite the presence of an efficient scavenging system for dead cells, considerable amounts of fragmented genetic material enter the circulation in healthy individuals. Elevated blood levels of extracellular nucleic acids have been reported in various disease conditions; such as ageing and age-related degenerative disorders, cancer; acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, severe trauma and autoimmune disorders. In addition to genomic DNA and nucleosomes, mitochondrial DNA is also found in circulation, as are RNA and microRNA. There is extensive literature that suggests that extraneously added nucleic acids have biological actions. They can enter into cells in vitro and in vivo and induce genetic transformation and cellular and chromosomal damage; and experimentally added nucleic acids are capable of activating both innate and adaptive immune systems and inducing a sterile inflammatory response. The possibility as to whether circulating nucleic acids may, likewise, have biological activities has not been explored. In this review we raise the question as to whether circulating nucleic acids may have damaging effects on the host and be implicated in ageing and diverse acute and chronic human pathologies.

  16. Peptide nucleic acids and their potential applications in biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, O.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.;

    1993-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are novel DNA mimics in which the sugar-phosphate backbone has been replaced with a backbone based on amino acids1-3. PNAs exhibit sequence-specific binding to DNA and RNA with higher affinities and specificities than unmodified DNA. They,are resistant to nuclease...

  17. Nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wing-Fu Lai

    2011-09-01

    Lifespan prolongation is a common desire of the human race. With advances in biotechnology, the mechanism of aging has been gradually unraveled, laying the theoretical basis of nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation. Regretfully, clinically applicable interventions do not exist without the efforts of converting theory into action, and it is the latter that has been far from adequately addressed at the moment. This was demonstrated by a database search on PubMed and Web of Science, from which only seven studies published between 2000 and 2010 were found to directly touch on the development of nucleic acid therapy for anti-aging and/or longevity enhancing purposes. In light of this, the objective of this article is to overview the current understanding of the intimate association between genes and longevity, and to bring the prospect of nucleic acid therapy for lifespan prolongation to light.

  18. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  19. Soni-removal of nucleic acids from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Mysore, Sumukh; Gandham, Sai Hari A

    2014-05-23

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) are commonly formed in Escherichia coli due to over expression of recombinant proteins in non-native state. Isolation, denaturation and refolding of these IBs is generally performed to obtain functional protein. However, during this process IBs tend to form non-specific interactions with sheared nucleic acids from the genome, thus getting carried over into downstream processes. This may hinder the refolding of IBs into their native state. To circumvent this, we demonstrate a methodology termed soni-removal which involves disruption of nucleic acid-inclusion body interaction using sonication; followed by solvent based separation. As opposed to conventional techniques that use enzymes and column-based separations, soni-removal is a cost effective alternative for complete elimination of buried and/or strongly bound short nucleic acid contaminants from IBs.

  20. Recent Advances in Chemical Modification of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriks Rozners

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has become an extremely powerful tool in chemistry and biology. Although PNA recognizes single-stranded nucleic acids with exceptionally high affinity and sequence selectivity, there is considerable ongoing effort to further improve properties of PNA for both fundamental science and practical applications. The present paper discusses selected recent studies that improve on cellular uptake and binding of PNA to double-stranded DNA and RNA. The focus is on chemical modifications of PNA's backbone and heterocyclic nucleobases. The paper selects representative recent studies and does not attempt to provide comprehensive coverage of the broad and vibrant field of PNA modification.

  1. Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical sciences, especially in the field of human genetics, is increasingly considered to facilitate a new frontier in development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics. One of major challenges in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient and specific delivery of the molecules to the target tissue and cell upon systemic administration. In this report, I discuss our strategy to develop combinatorial-designed multifunctional nanoparticle assemblies based on natural biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for nucleic acid delivery in: (1) overcoming tumor drug resistance and (2) genetic modulation of macrophage functional phenotype from M1 to M2 in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Unlocked nucleic acid - an RNA modification with broad potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The first unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomer was described more than a decade ago, but only recent reports have revealed the true potential applications of this acyclic RNA mimic. UNA monomers enable the modulation of the thermodynamic stability of various nucleic acid structures such as RNA...... and DNA duplexes, quadruplexes or i-motifs. Moreover, UNA monomers were found to be compatible with RNase H activity, a property which is important for single stranded antisense constructs. Notably, UNA monomers can be applied in the design of superior siRNAs, combining potent gene silencing...

  3. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  4. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  5. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of peptide nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Karin E; Good, Liam; Strömberg, Roger; Gräslund, Astrid; Smith, C I Edvard

    2006-01-01

    During the latest decades a number of different nucleic acid analogs containing natural nucleobases on a modified backbone have been synthesized. An example of this is peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a DNA mimic with a noncyclic peptide-like backbone, which was first synthesized in 1991. Owing to its flexible and neutral backbone PNA displays very good hybridization properties also at low-ion concentrations and has subsequently attracted large interest both in biotechnology and biomedicine. Numerous modifications have been made, which could be of value for particular settings. However, the original PNA does so far perform well in many diverse applications. The high biostability makes it interesting for in vivo use, although the very limited diffusion over lipid membranes requires further modifications in order to make it suitable for treatment in eukaryotic cells. The possibility to use this nucleic acid analog for gene regulation and gene editing is discussed. Peptide nucleic acid is now also used for specific genetic detection in a number of diagnostic techniques, as well as for site-specific labeling and hybridization of functional molecules to both DNA and RNA, areas that are also discussed in this chapter.

  6. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of unlocked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper; Pasternak, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the synthesis of two new unlocked nucleic acid building blocks containing hypoxanthine and 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase moieties and their incorporation into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides were used to examine the thermodynamic properties of UNA against unmo...... unmodified oligonucleotides and the resulting thermodynamic data support that the hydrogen bonding face of UNA is Watson-Crick like....

  7. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Torelli, Emanuela

    2014-03-20

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  9. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V;

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...

  10. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  11. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection and... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases.... PubmedID 18641647 Title Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in v

  14. A real-time assay for monitoring nucleic acid cleavage by quadruplex formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kankia, Besik I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct and straightforward methods to follow nucleic acid cleavage are needed. A spectrophotometric quadruplex formation assay (QFA) was developed, which allows real-time monitoring of site-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. QFA was applied to study both protein and nucleic acid restriction enzymes, and was demonstrated to accurately determine Michaelis–Menten parameters for the cleavage reaction catalyzed by EcoRI. QFA can be used to study the mechanisms of protein–nucleic acid recognition....

  15. Nucleic Acid Charge Transfer: Black, White and Gray

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Keinan, Shahar; Balaeff, Alexander; Beratan, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) indicate that structure and dynamics modulate the charge transfer rates, and that different members of a structural ensemble support different charge transport mechanisms. Here, we review the influences of nucleobase geometry, electronic structure, solvent environment, and thermal conformational fluctuations on the charge transfer mechanism. We describe an emerging framework for understanding...

  16. DMPD: Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17082566 Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Deane JA, Bolland ...S. J Immunol. 2006 Nov 15;177(10):6573-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as mo...difiers of autoimmunity. PubmedID 17082566 Title Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs as modifiers of autoimmunity. Aut

  17. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, I. A.; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-11-02

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  18. Detection of target DNA using fluorescent cationic polymer and peptide nucleic acid probes on solid support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Mario

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids detection using microarrays requires labelling of target nucleic acids with fluorophores or other reporter molecules prior to hybridization. Results Using surface-bound peptide nucleic acids (PNA probes and soluble fluorescent cationic polythiophenes, we show a simple and sensitive electrostatic approach to detect and identify unlabelled target nucleic acid on microarray. Conclusion This simple methodology opens exciting possibilities for applied genetic analysis for the diagnosis of infections, identification of genetic mutations, and forensic inquiries. This electrostatic strategy could also be used with other nucleic acid detection methods such as electrochemistry, silver staining, metallization, quantum dots, or electrochemical dyes.

  19. Electroporation-enhanced delivery of nucleic acid vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Kate E; Humeau, Laurent M

    2015-02-01

    The naked delivery of nucleic acid vaccines is notoriously inefficient, and an enabling delivery technology is required to direct efficiently these constructs intracellularly. A delivery technology capable of enhancing nucleic acid uptake in both cells in tissues and in culture is electroporation (EP). EP is a physical delivery mechanism that increases the permeability of mammalian cell membranes and allows the trafficking of large macromolecules into the cell. EP has now been used extensively in the clinic and been shown to be an effective method to increase both the uptake of the construct and the breadth and magnitude of the resulting immune responses. Excitingly, 2014 saw the announcement of the first EP-enhanced DNA vaccine Phase II trial demonstrating clinical efficacy. This review seeks to introduce the reader to EP as a technology to enhance the delivery of DNA and RNA vaccines and highlight several published clinical trials using this delivery modality.

  20. Nucleic acid-based approaches to STAT inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2012-10-01

    Silencing of abnormally activated genes can be accomplished in a highly specific manner using nucleic acid based approaches. The focus of this review includes the different nucleic acid based inhibition strategies such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), dominant-negative constructs, G-quartet oligonucleotides and decoy oligonucleotides, their mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these approaches to targeting the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins in cancer. Among the STAT proteins, especially STAT3, followed by STAT5, are the most frequently activated oncogenic STATs, which have emerged as plausible therapeutic cancer targets. Both STAT3 and STAT5 have been shown to regulate numerous oncogenic signaling pathways including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and migration/invasion. PMID:24058785

  1. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-01

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  2. Clinical applications of nucleic acid aptamers in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    PEI, XIAOYU; Jun ZHANG; Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are small single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotide segments, which bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity via unique three-dimensional structures. Aptamers are generated by an iterative in vitro selection process, termed as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Owing to their specificity, non-immunogenicity, non-toxicity, easily modified chemical structure and wide range of targets, aptamers appear to be ideal candidates for vario...

  3. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Target Validation and Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pendergrast, P. Shannon; Marsh, H Nicholas; Grate, Dilara; Healy, Judith M.; Stanton, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In the simplest view, aptamers can be thought of as nucleic acid analogs to antibodies. They are able to bind specifically to proteins, and, in many cases, that binding leads to a modulation of protein activity. New aptamers are rapidly generated through the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment) process and have a very high target affinity and specificity (picomoles to nanomoles). Furthermore, aptamers composed of modified nucleotides have a long in vivo half-life ...

  4. Nucleic acid aptamers: clinical applications and promising new horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Xiaohua; Castanares, Mark; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Shawn E Lupold

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are a special class of nucleic acid molecules that are beginning to be investigated for clinical use. These small RNA/DNA molecules can form secondary and tertiary structures capable of specifically binding proteins or other cellular targets; they are essentially a chemical equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small in size, and non-immunogenic. Since the discovery of aptamers in the early 1990s, great efforts have been made to ma...

  5. Non-natural Nucleic Acids for Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Appella, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is an important facet of synthetic biology but can be complicated by undesired nuclease degradation. Incorporating non-natural nucleic acids into a gene could convey resistance to nucleases and promote expression. The compatibility of non-natural nucleosides with polymerases is reviewed with a focus on results from the past two years. Details are provided about how the different systems could be useful in synthetic biology.

  6. Synthesis and photoactivity of phenylazonaphthalene peptide nucleic acid monomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Du Li; Miao Chen; Sheng Liu; Hao Bo Zhang; Zhi Lu Liu

    2008-01-01

    Phenylazonaphthalene peptide nucleic acid (PNA) monomers were successfully synthesized,and their photoisomerization was examined.The new PNA monomers showed reversible trans-cis isomerization with UV and visible light irradiation,which might be the foundation of photo-regulating the hybridization between PNA containing phenylazonaphthalene unit and DNA.Simultaneously,the fluorescence of the new PNA monomers might make them especially useful as structural probes.

  7. New Approaches Towards Recognition of Nucleic Acid Triple Helices

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, Dev P.

    2010-01-01

    We show that groove recognition of nucleic acid triple helices can be achieved with aminosugars. Among these aminosugars, neomycin is the most effective aminoglycoside (groove binder) for stabilizing a DNA triple helix. It stabilizes both the T·A·T triplex and mixed-base DNA triplexes better than known DNA minor groove binders (which usually destabilize the triplex) and polyamines. Neomycin selectively stabilizes the triplex (T·A·T and mixed base) without any effect on the DNA duplex. The sel...

  8. Intracellular Fate of Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Conjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaochen A.; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates are a class of bionanomaterials that are extremely potent in many biomedical applications. Their unique ability to enter multiple mammalian cell types as single-entity agents arises from their novel three-dimensional architecture, which consists of a dense shell of highly oriented oligonucleotides chemically attached typically to a gold nanoparticle core. This architecture allows SNAs to engage certain cell surface receptors to facilitate e...

  9. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  10. Mass spectral characterization of a protein-nucleic acid photocrosslink.

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, M. C.; Resing, K. A.; Collins, B. D.; Willis, M. C.; Koch, T H

    1999-01-01

    A photocrosslink between basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF155) and a high affinity ssDNA oligonucleotide was characterized by positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). The DNA was a 61-mer oligonucleotide photoaptamer bearing seven bromodeoxyuridines, identified by in vitro selection. Specific photocrosslinking of the protein to the oligonucleotide was achieved by 308 nm XeCl excimer laser excitation. The cross-linked protein nucleic acid complex was proteolyzed with ...

  11. Multicentre validation study of nucleic acids extraction from FFPE tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Serena; Hlubek, Falk; Benhattar, Jean; Denkert, Carsten; Dietel, Manfred; Fernandez, Pedro L; Höfler, Gerald; Kothmaier, Hannelore; Kruslin, Bozo; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Perren, Aurel; Popper, Helmuth; Scarpa, Aldo; Soares, Paula; Stanta, Giorgio; Groenen, Patricia J T A

    2010-09-01

    In most pathology laboratories worldwide, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples are the only tissue specimens available for routine diagnostics. Although commercial kits for diagnostic molecular pathology testing are becoming available, most of the current diagnostic tests are laboratory-based assays. Thus, there is a need for standardized procedures in molecular pathology, starting from the extraction of nucleic acids. To evaluate the current methods for extracting nucleic acids from FFPE tissues, 13 European laboratories, participating to the European FP6 program IMPACTS (www.impactsnetwork.eu), isolated nucleic acids from four diagnostic FFPE tissues using their routine methods, followed by quality assessment. The DNA-extraction protocols ranged from homemade protocols to commercial kits. Except for one homemade protocol, the majority gave comparable results in terms of the quality of the extracted DNA measured by the ability to amplify differently sized control gene fragments by PCR. For array-applications or tests that require an accurately determined DNA-input, we recommend using silica based adsorption columns for DNA recovery. For RNA extractions, the best results were obtained using chromatography column based commercial kits, which resulted in the highest quantity and best assayable RNA. Quality testing using RT-PCR gave successful amplification of 200 bp-250 bp PCR products from most tested tissues. Modifications of the proteinase-K digestion time led to better results, even when commercial kits were applied. The results of the study emphasize the need for quality control of the nucleic acid extracts with standardised methods to prevent false negative results and to allow data comparison among different diagnostic laboratories.

  12. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  13. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    OpenAIRE

    Topham, Christopher M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the bindin...

  14. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  15. Non-enzymatic depurination of nucleic acids: factors and mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran An

    Full Text Available Depurination has attracted considerable attention since a long time for it is closely related to the damage and repair of nucleic acids. In the present study, depurination using a pool of 30-nt short DNA pieces with various sequences at diverse pH values was analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Kinetic analysis results showed that non-enzymatic depurination of oligodeoxynucleotides exhibited typical first-order kinetics, and its temperature dependence obeyed Arrhenius' law very well. Our results also clearly showed that the linear relationship between the logarithms of rate constants and pH values had a salient point around pH 2.5. Interestingly and unexpectedly, depurination depended greatly on the DNA sequences. The depurination of poly (dA was found to be extremely slow, and thymine rich sequences depurinated faster than other sequences. These results could be explained to some extent by the protonation of nucleotide bases. Moreover, two equations were obtained based on our data for predicting the rate of depurination under various conditions. These results provide basic data for gene mutagenesis and nucleic acids metabolism in acidic gastric juice and some acidic organelles, and may also help to rectify some misconceptions about depurination.

  16. Non-enzymatic depurination of nucleic acids: factors and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Jia, Yu; Wan, Baihui; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; Li, Jing; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Depurination has attracted considerable attention since a long time for it is closely related to the damage and repair of nucleic acids. In the present study, depurination using a pool of 30-nt short DNA pieces with various sequences at diverse pH values was analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Kinetic analysis results showed that non-enzymatic depurination of oligodeoxynucleotides exhibited typical first-order kinetics, and its temperature dependence obeyed Arrhenius' law very well. Our results also clearly showed that the linear relationship between the logarithms of rate constants and pH values had a salient point around pH 2.5. Interestingly and unexpectedly, depurination depended greatly on the DNA sequences. The depurination of poly (dA) was found to be extremely slow, and thymine rich sequences depurinated faster than other sequences. These results could be explained to some extent by the protonation of nucleotide bases. Moreover, two equations were obtained based on our data for predicting the rate of depurination under various conditions. These results provide basic data for gene mutagenesis and nucleic acids metabolism in acidic gastric juice and some acidic organelles, and may also help to rectify some misconceptions about depurination. PMID:25546310

  17. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  18. Nucleic acid programmed polymeric nanomaterials for biological communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Anthony Michael

    A number of nucleic acid-polymer conjugates were synthesized, resulting in amphiphilic polymer-nucleic acid conjugates with the capability to self-assemble into a range of discrete nanoscale architectures. These nanomaterials, termed DNA-polymer amphiphile nanoparticles (DPA NPs), were studied with respect to their enzymatic processing by both endo- and exonucleases and further deployed as antisense genetic regulatory elements in live cultured human cells. DPA NPs were designed to act as substrates for both non sequence-specific exonucleases and a sequence-specific endonuclease. In all cases, nucleic acids arranged in the corona of spherical nanoparticles exhibited increased resistance to nucleolytic cleavage as compared to native single- or double-stranded analogues. For the exonucleases studied (Exonuclease III from E. Coli and phosphodiesterase I from Crotalus adamanteus), nanoparticle display retarded enzymatic processing by roughly a factor of five. For the endonuclease studied (Nt.CviPII), nanoparticle display prohibited virtually all enzyme activity on oligonucleotides within the nanoparticle shell. To test the ability of these materials to regulate mRNA levels in live cultured human cells, LPA (LNA-polymer amphiphile) NPs were designed to be perfectly complementary to a 20-base region of mRNA encoding the anti-apoptosis protein survivin. In this study two key observations were made. The first observation is that packaging LNA into spherical micellar nanoparticles serves to dramatically enhance cellular uptake of LNA based on flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy data. The second observation is that LPA NPs are capable of regulating mRNA levels by what is hypothesized to be activation of target mRNA for catalytic RNase H-mediated degradation. These materials represent a unique class of DNA delivery system capable of rendering nucleic acids with natural backbone chemistry resistant to nuclease degradation and further serving to deliver DNA into cells to

  19. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O;

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...... acid (PNA) is a DNA analogue with a backbone consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units (Fig. 1) which has been shown to mimic DNA in forming Watson-Crick complementary duplexes with normal DNA. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy we show here that two complementary PNA strands can hybridize to one...

  20. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Perelman, Grant A; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chinen, Alyssa B; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-21

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure-function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability.

  1. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure–function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability. PMID:27523252

  2. Interaction of nucleic acids with carbon nanotubes and dendrimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bidisha Nandy; Mogurampelly Santosh; Prabal K Maiti

    2012-07-01

    Nucleic acid interaction with nanoscale objects like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and dendrimers is of fundamental interest because of their potential application in CNT separation, gene therapy and antisense therapy. Combining nucleic acids with CNTs and dendrimers also opens the door towards controllable self-assembly to generate various supra-molecular and nano-structures with desired morphologies. The interaction between these nanoscale objects also serve as a model system for studying DNA compaction, which is a fundamental process in chromatin organization. By using fully atomistic simulations, here we report various aspects of the interactions and binding modes of DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with CNTs, graphene and dendrimers. Our results give a microscopic picture and mechanism of the adsorption of single- and double-strand DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) on CNT and graphene. The nucleic acid–CNT interaction is dominated by the dispersive van der Waals (vdW) interaction. In contrast, the complexation of DNA (both ssDNA and dsDNA) and siRNA with various generations of poly-amido-amine (PAMAM) dendrimers is governed by electrostatic interactions. Our results reveal that both the DNA and siRNA form stable complex with the PAMAM dendrimer at a physiological pH when the dendrimer is positively charged due to the protonation of the primary amines. The size and binding energy of the complex increase with increase in dendrimer generation. We also give a summary of the current status in these fields and discuss future prospects.

  3. Ionizing radiation induced attachment reactions of nucleic acids and their components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive bibliographic review is given of experimental and theoretical data on radiation-induced attachment reactions of nucleic acids and their components. Mechanisms of these reactions are reviewed. The reactions with water, formate, and alcohols, with amines and other small molecules, and with radiation sensitizers and nucleic acid-nucleic acid reactions are discussed. Studies of the reaction mechanisms show that many of the reactions occur by radical-molecule reactions, but radical-radical reactions also occur. Radiation modifiers become attached to nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo and there are indications that attachment may be necessary for the action of some sensitizers. (U.S.)

  4. Synthesis of New Chrial Building Blocks for Novel Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU,Jie; XU,Xiao-Yu; LIU,Ke-Liang

    2003-01-01

    N-Boc protected amino acids of analogues of peptide nucleic acid (PNA),which are a class of conformationally constrained building blocks based on 4-aminoproline backbone with chirality at 2-c and 4-c,have been synthesized.Those monomers can be used for the construction of novel peptide nucleic acid analogues.

  5. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2011-12-06

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2011-06-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2009-09-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. Analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions by photochemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Hanno; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical cross-linking is a commonly used method for studying the molecular details of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Photochemical cross-linking aids in defining nucleic acid binding sites of proteins via subsequent identification of cross-linked protein domains and amino acid residues....

  12. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  13. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A; Chen, Irene A

    2012-05-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life.

  14. Nucleic Acid Drugs for Prevention of Cardiac Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Suzuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation has been broadly performed in humans. However, occurrence of acute and chronic rejection has not yet been resolved. Several inflammatory factors, such as cytokines and adhesion molecules, enhance the rejection. The graft arterial disease (GAD, which is a type of chronic rejection, is characterized by intimal thickening comprised of proliferative smooth muscle cells. Specific treatments that target the attenuation of acute rejection and GAD formation have not been well studied in cardiac transplantation. Recent progress in the nucleic acid drugs, such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs to regulate the transcription of disease-related genes, has important roles in therapeutic applications. Transfection of cis-element double-stranded DNA, named as “decoy,” has been also reported to be a useful nucleic acid drug. This decoy strategy has been not only a useful method for the experimental studies of gene regulation but also a novel clinical strategy. In this paper, we reviewed the experimental results of NF-κB, E2F, AP-1, and STAT-1 decoy and other ODNs using the experimental heart transplant models.

  15. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  16. Radiation-induced electron migration in nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to non-random types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Radiation-induced electron migration in nucleic acids has been examined using oligonucleotides containing 5-bromouracil (5-BrU). Interaction of 5-BrU with solvated electrons results in release of bromide ions and formation of uracil-5-yl radicals. Monitoring either bromide ion release or uracil formation provides an opportunity to study electron migration processes in model nucleic acid systems. Using this approach we have discovered that electron migration along oligonucleotides is significantly influenced by the base sequence and strandedness. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution, which compares with mean migration distances of 6-10 bp for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 bp for E. coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5' to 3' direction along a double-stranded oligonucleotide containing a region of purine bases adjacent to the 5-BrU moiety. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation. (Author)

  17. Digestion of Nucleic Acids Starts in the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; An, Ran; Xue, Changhu; Ge, Yinlin; Wei, Liangzhou; Liang, Xingguo

    2015-07-14

    The ingestion of nucleic acids (NAs) as a nutritional supplement or in genetically modified food has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years. Discussions over the fate of NAs led us to study their digestion in the stomach. Interestingly, we found that NAs are digested efficiently by human gastric juice. By performing digests with commercial, recombinant and mutant pepsin, a protein-specific enzyme, we learned that the digestion of NAs could be attributed to pepsin rather than to the acidity of the stomach. Further study showed that pepsin cleaved NAs in a moderately site-specific manner to yield 3'-phosphorylated fragments and the active site to digest NAs is probably the same as that used to digest protein. Our results rectify the misunderstandings that the digestion of NAs in the gastric tract begins in the intestine and that pepsin can only digest protein, shedding new light on NA metabolism and pepsin enzymology.

  18. Structural transformation induced by locked nucleic acid or 2′–O-methyl nucleic acid site-specific modifications on thrombin binding aptamer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Li, Da

    2014-01-01

    Background Locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'–O-methyl nucleic acid (OMeNA) are two of the most extensively studied nucleotide derivatives in the last decades. However, how they affect DNA quadruplex structures remains largely unknown. To explore their possible biological affinities for quadruplexes, we investigated how LNA- or OMeNA-substitutions affect G-quadruplex structure formation using a thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), the most studied extracorporal G-quadruplex-forming DNA sequence, whi...

  19. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum: applications in diagnostic techniques for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahan PB

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peter B Gahan Anatomy and Human Sciences Department, King's College London, London Bridge, London, UK Abstract: The analysis of fetal nucleic acids in maternal blood 13 years ago has led to the initiation of noninvasive methods for the early determination of fetal gender, rhesus D status, and a number of aneuploid disorders and hemoglobinopathies. Subsequently, a comparatively large quantity of fetal DNA and RNA has been demonstrated in amniotic fluid as well as small amounts in premature infant saliva. The DNA and RNA in amniotic fluid has permitted an analysis of core transcriptomes, whilst the DNA and RNA in saliva allows the early detection and treatment monitoring of fetal developmental problems. These aspects are discussed together with the methodology and limits of analysis for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis in predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. Keywords: fetal circulating DNA/RNA, amniotic fluid, saliva, aneuploidy, thalassemias

  20. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  1. 78 FR 16513 - Application of Advances in Nucleic Acid and Protein Based Detection Methods to Multiplex...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... Advances in Nucleic Acid and Protein Based Detection Methods to Multiplex Detection of Transfusion... protein based pathogen and blood cell antigen detection methods and to discuss the scientific pathways to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Application of Advances in Nucleic Acid and Protein...

  2. [Determination of the nucleic acids in pig embryonic kidney cells by magnetic cytaphoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikov, V M; Maksimova, E V

    1989-01-01

    Gallocyanine-chrome alum-stained pig embryonic kidney cells have paramagnetic properties. They move under the influence of gradient magnetic field (magnetophoresis). The velocity of magnetophoresis is proportional to the content of nucleic acids in cells. This allows to estimate the content of nucleic acids per cell dry weight by magnetophoresis and analytical centrifugation. PMID:2473104

  3. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... assay. 866.3980 Section 866.3980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended...

  4. Methods for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2015-12-29

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  5. Apparatus for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2016-04-19

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  6. Novel (Phenylethynyl)pyrene-LNA Constructs for Fluorescence SNP Sensing in Polymorphic Nucleic Acid Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira; Samokhina, Evgeniya; Babu, B Ravindra;

    2012-01-01

    We describe fluorescent oligonucleotide probes labeled with novel (phenylethynyl)pyrene dyes attached to locked nucleic acids. Furthermore, we prove the utility of these probes for the effective detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in natural nucleic acids. High-affinity hybridization...

  7. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...... and sequence specificity. In an E. coli cell extract, efficient inhibition is observed when using PNA concentrations in the nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations are required for inhibition in growing cells. A mutant strain of E. coli that is more permeable to antibiotics also is more susceptible...... to antisense PNAs than the wild type. This chapter details methods for testing the antisense activities of PNA in E. coli. As an example of the specific antisense inhibition possible, we show the effects of an anti-beta-galactosidase PNA in comparison to control PNAs. With improvements in cell uptake...

  8. Optimization and comparative evaluation of nucleic acids extraction protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Negura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern molecular applications have grown the need of biobanks, which contain DNA and RNA of high purety, quality, and quantity. Nucleic acid extraction methods have widely variate and evolve in time, from methods using toxic reagents to enzymatic protocols, and furthermore to DNA or RNA-binding polymers, separating membranes or highly eulogized commercially kits. In order to establish a constant, reproducible and ergonomic system in generating biobanks, we compared different available methods for the extraction of genomic DNA and total RNA, from peripheram blood or solid tumoral tissues. We evaluated the cost/effectiveness and time consumption of each method, tracking RNA/DNA quantity, quality and integrity. We imagined a “E-ratio” value to define these parameters, and a “NA- estimation” to integrate “E-ratio” with quality and integrity data.

  9. Quantifying 32P-labeled and unlabeled nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant DNA technology depends on detection methods for nucleic acids compatible with amounts ranging from picograms to grams and from tenths of a microliter to liters. In practical terms there are three basic techniques: (1) absorbance methods suitable for a minimum concentration of micrograms per milliliter, (2) fluorescence methods capable of detecting nanograms of DNA and micrograms of RNA, and (3) methods based on the detection of 32P. Because of the overwhelming importance in molecular biology of the third group, this chapter will stress exquisitely sensitive methods for measuring radioactivity in very small volumes. An illustration in which an enzyme-catalyzed reaction performed in 20 μl is monitored by consuming less than 2% of the total volume will be presented

  10. Spherical Nucleic Acids: A New Form of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Joshua Isaac

    Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) are a new class of nucleic acid-based nanomaterials that exhibit unique properties currently being explored in the contexts of gene-based cancer therapies and in the design of programmable nanoparticle-based materials. The properties of SNAs differ from canonical, linear nucleic acids by virtue of their dense packing into an oriented 3-dimensional array. SNAs can be synthesized from a number of useful nanoparticle templates, such as plasmonic gold and silver, magnetic oxides, luminescent semi-conductor quantum dots, and silica. In addition, by crosslinking the oligonucleotides and dissolving the core, they can be made in a hollow form as well. This dissertation describes the evolution of SNAs from initial studies of inorganic nanoparticle-based materials densely functionalized with oligonucleotides to the proving of a hypothesis that their unique properties can be observed in a core-less structure if the nucleic acids are densely packed and highly oriented. Chapter two describes the synthesis of densely functionalized polyvalent oligonucleotide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. These particles are shown to exhibit cooperative binding in a density- and salt concentration-dependent fashion, with nearly identical behaviors to those of SNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Importantly, these particles are the first non-gold particles shown to be capable of entering cells in high numbers via the SNA-mediated cellular uptake pathway, and provided the first evidence that SNA-mediated cellular uptake is core-independent. In the third chapter, a gold nanoparticle catalyzed alkyne cross-linking reaction is described that is capable of forming hollow organic nanoparticles using polymers with alkyne-functionalized backbones. With this method, the alkyne-modified polymers adsorb to the particle surfaces, cross-link on the surface, allowing the gold nanoparticle to be

  11. Development of PNA-Surfactant Systems for Nucleic Acid Separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernille, James; Armitage, Bruce; Schneider, James

    2002-03-01

    We have been exploring the use of novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) surfactants for use in sequence specific, scalable DNA separations. While the synthetic and physical characteristics of PNA make it a useful molecule for bioseparations, PNA shows limited water solubility. Here we describe a molecular design strategy to improve water solubility while maintaining sequence specificity. A candidate molecule has been identified which contains lysine residues and a short alkane tail. Melting temperature data show that lipid tail interactions with the DNA nucleobases have a small but significant effect on stability while the added lysines stabilize the complex in an ionic strength dependent way. We also discuss the incorporation of these surfactants into micellar systems for novel separations.

  12. Advances in nucleic acid-based diagnostics of bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Kim Bundvig; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2007-01-01

    of these pathogens is important to isolate patients and prevent further spreading of the diseases. Newly developed diagnostic procedures are superior with respect to turnaround time, sensitivity and specificity. Methods like multiplex real time PCR and different array-based technologies offer the possibility...... and slow growing microorgansims. The widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in an increased number of cases with resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin resistant enterococci, and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rapid detection......Methods for rapid detection of infectious bacteria and antimicrobial-resistant pathogens have evolved significantly over the last decade. Many of the new procedures are nucleic acid-based and replace conventional diagnostic methods like culturing which is time consuming especially with fastidious...

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Mauk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min, low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1 nucleic acids (NAs are extracted from relatively large (~mL volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane” to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2 NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C amplified; (3 amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4 paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  14. Lipophilic nucleic acids--a flexible construction kit for organization and functionalization of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Matthias; Berti, Debora; Huster, Daniel; Herrmann, Andreas; Arbuzova, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Lipophilic nucleic acids have become a versatile tool for structuring and functionalization of lipid bilayers and biological membranes as well as cargo vehicles to transport and deliver bioactive compounds, like interference RNA, into cells by taking advantage of reversible hybridization with complementary strands. This contribution reviews the different types of conjugates of lipophilic nucleic acids, and their physicochemical and self-assembly properties. Strategies for choosing a nucleic acid, lipophilic modification, and linker are discussed. Interaction with lipid membranes and its stability, dynamic structure and assembly of lipophilic nucleic acids upon embedding into biological membranes are specific points of the review. A large diversity of conjugates including lipophilic peptide nucleic acid and siRNA provides tailored solutions for specific applications in bio- and nanotechnology as well as in cell biology and medicine, as illustrated through some selected examples. PMID:24650567

  15. The association between low-grade inflammation, iron status and nucleic acid oxidation in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Andersen, Jon T;

    2011-01-01

    nucleic acid oxidation and various iron status markers and especially a close relationship between nucleic acid oxidation and ferritin. This study shows no association between low-grade inflammation and urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in a population of elderly Italian people. The results...... suggest that low-grade inflammation only has a negligible impact on whole body nucleic acid oxidation, whereas iron status seems to be of great importance.......This study applied a case-control approach to investigate the association between low-grade inflammation, defined by high values within the normal range of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation. No differences in excretion of urinary...

  16. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  17. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  18. Formulation of nucleic acid with pH-responsive amphipathic peptides for pulmonary delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Wanling; 梁婉玲

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of many different diseases, but poor delivery limits their clinical application. A series of pH-responsive amphipathic peptides containing histidine or 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) derivatives, LAH and LADap peptides, were investigated in this study as nucleic acid carriers for the treatment of respiratory infectious disease. LAH and LADap peptides are cationic, amphipathic pH-responsive peptides. The major attractive ...

  19. Polymerase-directed synthesis of C5-ethynyl locked nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Burri, Harsha V; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-11-15

    Modified nucleic acids have considerable potential in nanobiotechnology for the development of nanomedicines and new materials. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far and we herein for the first time report the enzymatic incorporation of LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into oligonucleotides. Phusion High Fidelity and KOD DNA polymerases efficiently incorporated LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into a DNA strand and T7 RNA polymerase successfully accepted the LNA-U nucleoside 5'-triphosphate as substrate for RNA transcripts. PMID:20932755

  20. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  1. Proposed Ancestors of Phage Nucleic Acid Packaging Motors (and Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available I present a hypothesis that begins with the proposal that abiotic ancestors of phage RNA and DNA packaging systems (and cells include mobile shells with an internal, molecule-transporting cavity. The foundations of this hypothesis include the conjecture that current nucleic acid packaging systems have imprints from abiotic ancestors. The abiotic shells (1 initially imbibe and later also bind and transport organic molecules, thereby providing a means for producing molecular interactions that are links in the chain of events that produces ancestors to the first molecules that are both information carrying and enzymatically active, and (2 are subsequently scaffolds on which proteins assemble to form ancestors common to both shells of viral capsids and cell membranes. Emergence of cells occurs via aggregation and merger of shells and internal contents. The hypothesis continues by using proposed imprints of abiotic and biotic ancestors to deduce an ancestral thermal ratchet-based DNA packaging motor that subsequently evolves to integrate a DNA packaging ATPase that provides a power stroke.

  2. CNAPS VII - CIRCULATING NUCLEIC ACIDS IN PLASMA AND SERUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest Editor: Damián García-Olmo, Spain

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available On behalf of The 7th International Conference on Circulating Nucleic Acids in Plasma and Serum (CNAPS VII Organizing Committee, it is my great pleasure to extend a warm invitation to you to participate in the CNAPS VII, scheduled to be held the first time in Madrid, Spain, 24th and 25th October 2011, at the La Paz University Hospital. After the great success of the CNAPS VI at Hong Kong, we are honored with the opportunity to host the CNAPS VII in our city of  Madrid. To keep up with our bourgeoning field of science, an outstanding array of international experts on this field have agreed to share their latest results and experiences with us during this meeting, with elating debates, lectures and networking sessions. As in previous conferences, poster and oral presentation sessions will provide all participants with the opportunity to discuss their results with other experts in the field. Aside from the opportunities afforded by the conference´s working sessions, you will also have the chance to experience a myriad of Spanish tourist and cultural attractions. From classic visits to our famous museums, historical buildings and monuments, to a great variety of cultural activities and tours; from our delicious gastronomy to fabulous shopping bargains, there is plenty that will leave you with fond memories of Madrid and its warm and welcoming people.

  3. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed. PMID:27040036

  4. Variability of DNA structure and protein-nucleic acid reconginition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestopalova A. V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Revealing molecular mechanisms of sequence-specific recognition of DNA by proteins is one of the key tasks of biology. The current review presents the results of statistical analysis of the structural databases obtained by different scientific groups studying the conformational features of free and protein-bound DNA fragments that could be used for clarifying the mechanisms of protein-nucleic acid recognition. The analysis of the published data allowed us to make the following generalizations. The ability of DNA double helix to adopt alternative conformations, including the ones of sugarphosphate backbone, is an intrinsic characteristic of certain DNA sequences. Such conformational transitions are the potential sources of formation of unique geometry of the dinucleotide steps and/or individual nucleotides and lead to alteration of base stacking and/or changes of the assessable surface area of atoms, and can be the criteria of recognition of DNA by protein as well. Changes in the physical properties that depend on the DNA structure, i. e. the polar/unpolar profile and electrostatic potential of the grooves, can also be used by protein for DNA readout.

  5. Monitoring Gene Expression In Vivo with Nucleic Acid Molecular Switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Ward; Patricia Bray-Ward

    2005-01-26

    The overall objectives of this project were (1) to develop allosteric ribozymes capable of acting as molecular switches for monitoring the levels of both wild-type and mutant mRNA species in living cells and whole animals and (2) to develop highly efficient reagents to deliver nucleic acid molecular switches into living cells, tissues and animals with the ultimate goal of expression profiling specific mRNAs of diagnostic or prognostic value within tumors in animals. During the past year, we have moved our laboratory to Nevada and in the moving process we have lost electronic and paper copies of prior progress reports concerning the construction and biological properties of the molecular switches. Since there was minimal progress during the last year on molecular switches, we are relying on past project reports to provide a summary of our data on this facet of the grant. Here we are summarizing the work done on the delivery reagents and their application to inducing mutations in living cells, which will include work done during the no cost extension.

  6. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of nucleic acid bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alparone, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities of neutral nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, adenine, hypoxanthine and guanine) were determined using Hartree-Fock, correlated MPn (n = 2, 4), CCSD and DFT (B3LYP, B97-1, CAM-B3LYP) methods. The computations were performed in gaseous and aqueous phases for the most stable tautomeric forms. Frequency-dependent second-order hyperpolarizabilities were calculated for the OKE, IDRI, EFISHG and THG nonlinear optical processes at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The results show that the average electronic polarizabilities increase in the order uracil guanine. This order is also maintained for the electronic hyperpolarizabilities, with the inversion between cytosine and thymine. The response electric properties for the tautomers are almost similar to each other, whereas group substitution and solvation effects are much more significant. Among the DFT methods, the long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functional gives the better performances, reproducing satisfactorily the correlated ab initio (hyper)polarizability data.

  7. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  9. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  10. DMPD: Nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors: beyond ligand search. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18321608 Nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors: beyond ligand search. Miyake K. ...Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2008 Apr 29;60(7):782-5. Epub 2008 Feb 15. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nucleic ac...id-sensing Toll-like receptors: beyond ligand search. PubmedID 18321608 Title Nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like

  11. A conversational system for the computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Sege, R; Söll, D.; Ruddle, F H; Queen, C

    1981-01-01

    We present a conversational system for the computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences based on the well-known Queen and Korn program (1). The system can be used by persons with only minimal knowledge of computers.

  12. Novel redox-sensing modules : Accessory protein- and nucleic acid-mediated signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Groves, Matthew R; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2012-01-01

    SIGNIFICANCE: Organisms have evolved both enzymatic and nonenzymatic pathways to prevent oxidative damage to essential macromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. Pathways modulated by different protein-based sensory and regulatory modules ensure a rapid and appropriate response. RECENT AD

  13. Nucleic acid polymeric properties and electrostatics: Directly comparing theory and simulation with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Adelene Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acids are biopolymers that carry genetic information and are also involved in various gene regulation functions such as gene silencing and protein translation. Because of their negatively charged backbones, nucleic acids are polyelectrolytes. To adequately understand nucleic acid folding and function, we need to properly describe its i) polymer/polyelectrolyte properties and ii) associating ion atmosphere. While various theories and simulation models have been developed to describe nucleic acids and the ions around them, many of these theories/simulations have not been well evaluated due to complexities in comparison with experiment. In this review, I discuss some recent experiments that have been strategically designed for straightforward comparison with theories and simulation models. Such data serve as excellent benchmarks to identify limitations in prevailing theories and simulation parameters. PMID:26482088

  14. Zinc complexes as fluorescent chemosensors for nucleic acids: new perspectives for a "boring" element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenzi, Alessio; Lauria, Antonino; Almerico, Anna Maria; Barone, Giampaolo

    2015-02-28

    Zinc(II) complexes are effective and selective nucleic acid-binders and strongly fluorescent molecules in the low energy range, from the visible to the near infrared. These two properties have often been exploited to quantitatively detect nucleic acids in biological samples, in both in vitro and in vivo models. In particular, the fluorescent emission of several zinc(II) complexes is drastically enhanced or quenched by the binding to nucleic acids and/or upon visible light exposure, in a different fashion in bulk solution and when bound to DNA. The twofold objective of this perspective is (1) to review recent utilisations of zinc(II) complexes as selective fluorescent probes for nucleic acids and (2) to highlight their novel potential applications as diagnostic tools based on their photophysical properties.

  15. Locked vs. unlocked nucleic acids (LNA vs. UNA): contrasting structures work towards common therapeutic goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Meghan A; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotide chemistry has been developed greatly over the past three decades, with many advances in increasing nuclease resistance, enhancing duplex stability and assisting with cellular uptake. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a structurally rigid modification that increases the binding affinity...

  16. A novel procedure for total nucleic acid extraction from small numbers of Eimeria species oocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Galip; Dale, Colin; Maudlin, Ian; Morgan, Kenton

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed in an attempt to extract genomic DNA from a small number of Eimerian oocysts. Sonication, ammonia, ethanol and lysozyme were all found to be unsuitable for the digestion of Eimeria oocysts. The chemicals and enzyme given were not capable of either disruption or digestion of oocysts for nucleic acid extraction. They had the capability of penetrating the oocyst wall but could not break-up the oocyst wall. It is impossible to obtain nucleic acid from Eimeria oocysts if the wall is not broken-up. In this study oocyst disruption was achieved using a simple but highly effective treatment regime involving sodium hypochlorite treatment, osmotic shock and proteinase K digestion. Following the disruption of the oocyst walls, a commercially available nucleic acid purification kit (Wizard DNA Purification Kit, Promega) can be used to prepare high quality nucleic acid.

  17. Peptide nucleic acid: a new artificial biomacromolecular with great potential applications in molecular biology and biomedicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-ke; LU Zu-hong; HE Nong-yue

    2001-01-01

    @@ Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic that was originally developed by Peter E Nielsen in 1991 as a reagent for sequence-specific recognition of double stranded (ds) DNA by a conventional triple helix type principle.

  18. Gene Therapy for Advanced Melanoma: Selective Targeting and Therapeutic Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Viola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, the treatment of malignant melanoma still results in the relapse of the disease, and second line treatment mostly fails due to the occurrence of resistance. A wide range of mutations are known to prevent effective treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Hence, approaches with biopharmaceuticals including proteins, like antibodies or cytokines, are applied. As an alternative, regimens with therapeutically active nucleic acids offer the possibility for highly selective cancer treatment whilst avoiding unwanted and toxic side effects. This paper gives a brief introduction into the mechanism of this devastating disease, discusses the shortcoming of current therapy approaches, and pinpoints anchor points which could be harnessed for therapeutic intervention with nucleic acids. We bring the delivery of nucleic acid nanopharmaceutics into perspective as a novel antimelanoma therapeutic approach and discuss the possibilities for melanoma specific targeting. The latest reports on preclinical and already clinical application of nucleic acids in melanoma are discussed.

  19. THE VARIATION OF NUCLEIC ACIDS CONTENT AFTER SIMAZIN TREATMENT ON VICIA SATIVA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odeta Grama-Tiganasu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Simazin has in certain conditions stimulatory effects on nucleic acids biosynthese. The biosyntese and mitotic division stimulation sugest the possibility to use simazin like growing and germination stimulator.

  20. In-silico design of computational nucleic acids for molecular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2013-05-07

    Within recent years nucleic acids have become a focus of interest for prototype implementations of molecular computing concepts. During the same period the importance of ribonucleic acids as components of the regulatory networks within living cells has increasingly been revealed. Molecular computers are attractive due to their ability to function within a biological system; an application area extraneous to the present information technology paradigm. The existence of natural information processing architectures (predominately exemplified by protein) demonstrates that computing based on physical substrates that are radically different from silicon is feasible. Two key principles underlie molecular level information processing in organisms: conformational dynamics of macromolecules and self-assembly of macromolecules. Nucleic acids support both principles, and moreover computational design of these molecules is practicable. This study demonstrates the simplicity with which one can construct a set of nucleic acid computing units using a new computational protocol. With the new protocol, diverse classes of nucleic acids imitating the complete set of boolean logical operators were constructed. These nucleic acid classes display favourable thermodynamic properties and are significantly similar to the approximation of successful candidates implemented in the laboratory. This new protocol would enable the construction of a network of interconnecting nucleic acids (as a circuit) for molecular information processing.

  1. In-silico design of computational nucleic acids for molecular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years nucleic acids have become a focus of interest for prototype implementations of molecular computing concepts. During the same period the importance of ribonucleic acids as components of the regulatory networks within living cells has increasingly been revealed. Molecular computers are attractive due to their ability to function within a biological system; an application area extraneous to the present information technology paradigm. The existence of natural information processing architectures (predominately exemplified by protein) demonstrates that computing based on physical substrates that are radically different from silicon is feasible. Two key principles underlie molecular level information processing in organisms: conformational dynamics of macromolecules and self-assembly of macromolecules. Nucleic acids support both principles, and moreover computational design of these molecules is practicable. This study demonstrates the simplicity with which one can construct a set of nucleic acid computing units using a new computational protocol. With the new protocol, diverse classes of nucleic acids imitating the complete set of boolean logical operators were constructed. These nucleic acid classes display favourable thermodynamic properties and are significantly similar to the approximation of successful candidates implemented in the laboratory. This new protocol would enable the construction of a network of interconnecting nucleic acids (as a circuit) for molecular information processing. PMID:23647621

  2. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products...

  3. An instrument for automated purification of nucleic acids from contaminated forensic samples

    OpenAIRE

    Broemeling, David J; Pel, Joel; Gunn, Dylan C; Mai, Laura; Thompson, Jason D.; Poon, Hiron; Marziali, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Forensic crime scene sample analysis, by its nature, often deals with samples in which there are low amounts of nucleic acids, on substrates that often lead to inhibition of subsequent enzymatic reactions such as PCR amplification for STR profiling. Common substrates include denim from blue jeans, which yields indigo dye as a PCR inhibitor, and soil, which yields humic substances as inhibitors. These inhibitors frequently co-extract with nucleic acids in standard column or bead-based preps, l...

  4. Development of Chemiluminescent Lateral Flow Assay for the Detection of Nucleic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Nugen, Sam R.; Catherine Fill; Yuhong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive detection methods are of utmost importance for the identification of pathogens related to health and safety. Herein we report the development of a nucleic acid sequence-based lateral flow assay which achieves a low limit of detection using chemiluminescence. On-membrane enzymatic signal amplification is used to reduce the limit of detection to the sub-femtomol level. To demonstrate this assay, we detected synthetic nucleic acid sequences representative of Trypanosoma mRNA, th...

  5. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving...... LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI....

  6. Logic gates and antisense DNA devices operating on a translator nucleic Acid scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyahovsky, Bella; Li, Yang; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2009-07-28

    A series of logic gates, "AND", "OR", and "XOR", are designed using a DNA scaffold that includes four "footholds" on which the logic operations are activated. Two of the footholds represent input-recognition strands, and these are blocked by complementary nucleic acids, whereas the other two footholds are blocked by nucleic acids that include the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme sequence. The logic gates are activated by either nucleic acid inputs that hybridize to the respective "footholds", or by low-molecular-weight inputs (adenosine monophosphate or cocaine) that yield the respective aptamer-substrate complexes. This results in the respective translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the footholds carrying the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme sequence, and the concomitant release of the respective DNAzyme. The released product-strands then self-assemble into the hemin/G-quadruplex-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme that biocatalyzes the formation of a colored product and provides an output signal for the different logic gates. The principle of the logic operation is, then, implemented as a possible paradigm for future nanomedicine. The nucleic acid inputs that bind to the blocked footholds result in the translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the respective footholds carrying the antithrombin aptamer. The released aptamer inhibits, then, the hydrolytic activity of thrombin. The system demonstrates the regulation of a biocatalytic reaction by a translator system activated on a DNA scaffold. PMID:19507821

  7. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  8. A modern mode of activation for nucleic acid enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lévesque

    Full Text Available Through evolution, enzymes have developed subtle modes of activation in order to ensure the sufficiently high substrate specificity required by modern cellular metabolism. One of these modes is the use of a target-dependent module (i.e. a docking domain such as those found in signalling kinases. Upon the binding of the target to a docking domain, the substrate is positioned within the catalytic site. The prodomain acts as a target-dependent module switching the kinase from an off state to an on state. As compared to the allosteric mode of activation, there is no need for the presence of a third partner. None of the ribozymes discovered to date have such a mode of activation, nor does any other known RNA. Starting from a specific on/off adaptor for the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, that differs but has a mechanism reminiscent of this signalling kinase, we have adapted this mode of activation, using the techniques of molecular engineering, to both catalytic RNAs and DNAs exhibiting various activities. Specifically, we adapted three cleaving ribozymes (hepatitis delta virus, hammerhead and hairpin ribozymes, a cleaving 10-23 deoxyribozyme, a ligating hairpin ribozyme and an artificially selected capping ribozyme. In each case, there was a significant gain in terms of substrate specificity. Even if this mode of control is unreported for natural catalytic nucleic acids, its use needs not be limited to proteinous enzymes. We suggest that the complexity of the modern cellular metabolism might have been an important selective pressure in this evolutionary process.

  9. Intracellular fate of spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaochen A; Choi, Chung Hang J; Zhang, Chuan; Hao, Liangliang; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-05-28

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates are a class of bionanomaterials that are extremely potent in many biomedical applications. Their unique ability to enter multiple mammalian cell types as single-entity agents arises from their novel three-dimensional architecture, which consists of a dense shell of highly oriented oligonucleotides chemically attached typically to a gold nanoparticle core. This architecture allows SNAs to engage certain cell surface receptors to facilitate entry. Here, we report studies aimed at determining the intracellular fate of SNAs and the trafficking events that occur inside C166 mouse endothelial cells after cellular entry. We show that SNAs traffic through the endocytic pathway into late endosomes and reside there for up to 24 h after incubation. Disassembly of oligonucleotides from the nanoparticle core is observed 16 h after cellular entry, most likely due to degradation by enzymes such as DNase II localized in late endosomes. Our observations point to these events being likely independent of core composition and treatment conditions, and they do not seem to be particularly dependent upon oligonucleotide sequence. Significantly and surprisingly, the SNAs do not enter the lysosomes under the conditions studied. To independently track the fate of the particle core and the fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides that comprise its shell, we synthesized a novel class of quantum dot SNAs to determine that as the SNA structures are broken down over the 24 h time course of the experiment, the oligonucleotide fragments are recycled out of the cell while the nanoparticle core is not. This mechanistic insight points to the importance of designing and synthesizing next-generation SNAs that can bypass the degradation bottleneck imposed by their residency in late endosomes, and it also suggests that such structures might be extremely useful for endosomal signaling pathways by engaging receptors that are localized within the endosome

  10. Oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Chi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Chia-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate), deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chien Sung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate, deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies.

  12. Detection of methylglyoxal as a degradation product of DNA and nucleic acid components treated with strong acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplen, F W; Fahl, W E; Cameron, D C

    1996-05-01

    The 1,2-diaminobenzene derivation assay for methylglyoxal in biological systems involves the use of perchloric acid, both as a deproteinizing agent and to prevent the spontaneous formation of methylglyoxal from glycolytic pathway intermediates. However, while using a modification of the standard literature assay to measure methylglyoxal in Chinese hamster ovary cells, we found that oxidation of nucleic acids and related compounds by perchloric or trichloroacetic acid results in the formation of methylglyoxal. Compounds containing 2-deoxyribose gave higher levels of methylglyoxal than those containing ribose; purine nucleotides and deoxynucleotides gave more methylglyoxal than did the pyrimidines. Nucleic acids were the most susceptible to degradation, with 12-fold more methylglyoxal being formed from DNA than RNA. Oxidation of nucleic acids increased with higher temperatures and with decreasing nucleic acid fragment size. Another product of nucleic acid oxidation was 2,3-butanedione, the 1,2-diaminobenzene derivative of which is sometimes used as an internal standard during methylglyoxal measurement. Unless accounted for during the assay procedure, the generation of methylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione due to the oxidation of nucleic acids may lead to substantial errors in the determination of methylglyoxal concentrations in biological systems.

  13. Integrated sample-to-detection chip for nucleic acid test assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, R; Pabbaraju, K; Wong, S; Tellier, R; Kaler, K V I S

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid based diagnostic techniques are routinely used for the detection of infectious agents. Most of these assays rely on nucleic acid extraction platforms for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids and a separate real-time PCR platform for quantitative nucleic acid amplification tests (NATs). Several microfluidic lab on chip (LOC) technologies have been developed, where mechanical and chemical methods are used for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids. Microfluidic technologies have also been effectively utilized for chip based real-time PCR assays. However, there are few examples of microfluidic systems which have successfully integrated these two key processes. In this study, we have implemented an electro-actuation based LOC micro-device that leverages multi-frequency actuation of samples and reagents droplets for chip based nucleic acid extraction and real-time, reverse transcription (RT) PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification from clinical samples. Our prototype micro-device combines chemical lysis with electric field assisted isolation of nucleic acid in a four channel parallel processing scheme. Furthermore, a four channel parallel qRT-PCR amplification and detection assay is integrated to deliver the sample-to-detection NAT chip. The NAT chip combines dielectrophoresis and electrostatic/electrowetting actuation methods with resistive micro-heaters and temperature sensors to perform chip based integrated NATs. The two chip modules have been validated using different panels of clinical samples and their performance compared with standard platforms. This study has established that our integrated NAT chip system has a sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the standard platforms while providing up to 10 fold reduction in sample/reagent volumes.

  14. Screen printing of nucleic acid detecting carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequaire, Murielle; Heller, Adam

    2002-09-01

    A large fraction of the presently mass-manufactured (> 10(8) units/year) electrochemical biosensors, used mostly by diabetic people to monitor their blood glucose levels, have screen-printed carbon working electrodes. An earlier study (Campbell, C. N., et al. Anal. Chem. 2002, 74, 158-162) showed that nucleic acids can be assayed at 1 nM concentrations by a sandwich-type amperometric method. The assay was performed with vitreous carbon working electrodes on which an electron-conducting polycationic redox polymer and avidin were coelectrodeposited. Because the rate of the electrodeposition increases with the surface density of the polycationic redox polymer, its practicality depends on pretreatment of the surface, which adds anionic functions. (Gao, Z., et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2002, 41, 810-813). Here it is shown that the required conducting redox polymer films can be electrodeposited on potentially mass manufacturable electrodes made by screen-printing hydrophilic carbon inks on polyester sheets. The modified electrodes are made in two steps. First a polycationic electron-conducting redox polymer is cross-linked and electrodeposited by applying a negative potential. Next, an amine-terminated 20-base single-stranded oligonucleotide is electrodeposited by ligand-exchange. Both steps involve exchange of a labile inner sphere chloride ligand of the polymer-bound osmium-complex: Cross-linking and electrodeposition of the redox polymer result when inner-sphere chloride anions of the osmium complexes are exchanged by imidazole functions of neighboring chains. Incorporation of the oligonucleotide in the redox polymer results in the formation of a coordinative bond between the terminal amine (attached through a spacer to the oligonucleotide) and the osmium complex. In testing for the presence of a 38-base oligonucleotide, the analyte, in a 15- or 25-microL droplet of hybridization solution, is hybridized with and captured by the 20-base electrode-bound sequence; then

  15. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Cobalt Hexammine ion (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive.However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become internal binding into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjac...

  16. Biopolymers: protein and nucleic acids. Annual report, 15 September 1987-14 September 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, J.H.; Abelson, J.N.; Dervan, P.B.; Hood, L.H.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-09-15

    The work focuses on learning the principles that govern interactions between proteins and nucleic acids, both DNA and RNA (specifically tRNA). With these principles as guides peptides (of about 50 amino acids) that bind to specific regions of DNA are being synthesized. Various reactive functionalities are being attached to the synthetic peptides to generate reagents that cleave DNA specifically at the site to which the peptide binds. The work also involves biophysical studies of the protein/nucleic acid complexes in order to expand our understanding of the principles of protein binding to nucleic acids. Development of improved procedures for the chemical synthesis of peptides forms another important aspect of the program.

  17. Lipid-Nucleic Acid Supramolecular Complexes: Lipoplex Structure and the Kinetics of Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nily Dan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for synthetic gene therapy or gene silencing vehicles that can insert therapeutic nucleic acids (DNA or siRNA into cells (so-called transfection has focused interest on lipid-nucleic acid assemblies (lipoplexes. This paper reviews the kinetics pathways leading to lipoplex formation and structure. The process is qualitatively comparable to those of cluster nucleation and growth and to the adsorption of polyelectrolytes on colloidal particles: Initially is a rapid stage where the nucleic acid binds onto the surface of the cationic lipid aggregate (adsorption, or nucleation. This is followed by an intermediate step where the lipid/nucleic acid complexes flocculate to form larger structures (growth. The last and final step involves internal rearrangement, where the overall global structure remains constant while local adjustment of the nucleic acid/lipid organization takes place until the equilibrium lipoplex characteristics are obtained. This step can require unusually long time scales of order hours or longer. Understanding the kinetics of lipoplex formation is not only of fundamental interest as a multi-component, multi-length scale and multi-time scale process, but also has significant implications for the utilization of lipoplexes as carriers for gene delivery and gene silencing agents.

  18. Presence of viral nucleic acids in the middle ear: acute otitis media pathogen or bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ruohola, Aino; Hendley, J Owen

    2012-04-01

    Viruses play an important role in acute otitis media (AOM) pathogenesis, and live viruses may cause AOM in the absence of pathogenic bacteria. Detection of AOM pathogens generally relies on bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. When viral culture is used and live viruses are detected in the middle ear fluid of children with AOM, the viruses are generally accepted as AOM pathogens. Because viral culture is not sensitive and does not detect the comprehensive spectrum of respiratory viruses, polymerase chain reaction assays are commonly used to detect viral nucleic acids in the middle ear fluid. Although polymerase chain reaction assays have greatly increased the viral detection rate, new questions arise on the significance of viral nucleic acids detected in the middle ear because nucleic acids of multiple viruses are detected simultaneously, and nucleic acids of specific viruses are detected repeatedly and in a high proportion of asymptomatic children. This article first reviews the role of live viruses in AOM and presents the point-counterpoint arguments on whether viral nucleic acids in the middle ear represent an AOM pathogen or a bystander status. Although there is evidence to support both directions, helpful information for interpretation of the data and future research direction is outlined.

  19. Future microfluidic and nanofluidic modular platforms for nucleic acid liquid biopsy in precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egatz-Gomez, Ana; Wang, Ceming; Klacsmann, Flora; Pan, Zehao; Marczak, Steve; Wang, Yunshan; Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-05-01

    Nucleic acid biomarkers have enormous potential in non-invasive diagnostics and disease management. In medical research and in the near future in the clinics, there is a great demand for accurate miRNA, mRNA, and ctDNA identification and profiling. They may lead to screening of early stage cancer that is not detectable by tissue biopsy or imaging. Moreover, because their cost is low and they are non-invasive, they can become a regular screening test during annual checkups or allow a dynamic treatment program that adjusts its drug and dosage frequently. We briefly review a few existing viral and endogenous RNA assays that have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. These tests are based on the main nucleic acid detection technologies, namely, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. Several of the challenges that these three technologies still face regarding the quantitative measurement of a panel of nucleic acids are outlined. Finally, we review a cluster of microfluidic technologies from our group with potential for point-of-care nucleic acid quantification without nucleic acid amplification, designed to overcome specific limitations of current technologies. We suggest that integration of these technologies in a modular design can offer a low-cost, robust, and yet sensitive/selective platform for a variety of precision medicine applications. PMID:27190565

  20. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Nucleic Acids Using Anisotropic Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Shen, Hujun; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Yan; Wang, Honglei

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we attempt to apply a coarse-grained (CG) model, which is based on anisotropic Gay-Berne and electric multipole (EMP) potentials, to the modeling of nucleic acids. First, a comparison has been made between the CG and atomistic models (AMBER point-charge model) in the modeling of DNA and RNA hairpin structures. The CG results have demonstrated a good quality in maintaining the nucleic acid hairpin structures, in reproducing the dynamics of backbone atoms of nucleic acids, and in describing the hydrogen-bonding interactions between nucleic acid base pairs. Second, the CG and atomistic AMBER models yield comparable results in modeling double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules. It is encouraging that our CG model is capable of reproducing many elastic features of nucleic acid base pairs in terms of the distributions of the interbase pair step parameters (such as shift, slide, tilt, and twist) and the intrabase pair parameters (such as buckle, propeller, shear, and stretch). Finally, The GBEMP model has shown a promising ability to predict the melting temperatures of DNA duplexes with different lengths. PMID:26717419

  1. Detection of North American eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Amy J; Martin, Denise A; Lanciotti, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and TaqMan nucleic acid amplification assays for the rapid detection of North American eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viral RNAs from samples collected in the field and clinical samples. The sensitivities of these assays have been compared to that of virus isolation. While all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays provide rapid detection of viral RNAs comparable to the isolation of viruses in Vero cells, the TaqMan assays for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs are the most sensitive. We have shown these assays to be specific for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs by testing geographically and temporally distinct strains of EEE and WEE viruses along with a battery of related and unrelated arthropodborne viruses. In addition, all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays have been used to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs from mosquito and vertebrate tissue samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity of nucleic acid amplification demonstrate the usefulness of NASBA, standard RT-PCR, and TaqMan assays, in both research and diagnostic settings, to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs. PMID:12517876

  2. ABIOGENIC INFORMATION COUPLING BETWEEN NUCLEIC ACID AND PROTEIN,OR, HOW PROTEIN AND DNA WERE MARRIED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1968-12-01

    There is now experimental evidence for selectivity between the amino acid and the nucleic acid base which is the beginning of the chemical translation process from one linear system to the other. The linear system of the nucleic acid is, of course, an excellent place to store the information, whereas the linear system of the polypeptide, on the other hand, is the versatile system which can perform many different types of reactions but is unable to store information reliably. The experiments the author has described here may represent the beginning of the method of coupling of those two essential qualities which are required for the generation and evolution of a living organism.

  3. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption of nucleic acids on gold substrate in FTIR reflectance mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovbeshko, G. I.; Chegel, Vladimir I.; Gridina, Nina Y.; Repnytska, O. P.; Sekirin, I. V.; Shirshov, Yuri M.

    2001-06-01

    Data on surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of nucleic acids deposited on the metal surface have been obtained in the experiment in FTIR reflectance mode. As metal surface, we used Au of 200 - 500 Angstrom thickness on quartz substrate. Roughness of Au was not greater than 50 Angstrom. In our experimental conditions, the enhancement factor of SEIRA was about 3 - 7. We obtained different enhancement factors for different vibrations of nuclei acids. Application of this method to the tumour brain nucleic acid gave a possibility to reveal some structural peculiarities of their sugar-phosphate backbone.

  4. Synthesis of reactive nucleic acid analogues and their application for the study of structure and functions of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanevskii, Igor' E; Kuznetsova, Svetlana A [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-31

    Data on the synthesis of reactive derivatives of nucleic acid analogues and their application for the study of structure and functions of biopolymers are generalised. The main types of such analogues including photoactivated reagents containing azidoaryl, halogeno, and thiol groups, psoralen and its derivatives, platinum-based reagents, and nucleic acid analogues containing substituted pyrophosphate or acyl phosphate internucleotide groups are presented. The mechanisms of interaction of these compounds with proteins and nucleic acids are considered. The prospects for the in vivo application of reactive nucleic acids in various systems are discussed. The bibliography includes 76 references.

  5. High-resolution, hybrid optical trapping methods, and their application to nucleic acid processing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemla, Yann R

    2016-10-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool to investigate nucleic-acid processing proteins at the single-molecule level. Recent advances in this technique have now enabled measurements resolving the smallest units of molecular motion, on the scale of a single base pair of DNA. In parallel, new instrumentation combining optical traps with other functionalities have been developed, incorporating mechanical manipulation along orthogonal directions or fluorescence imaging capabilities. Here, we review these technical advances, their capabilities, and limitations, focusing on benchmark studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions they have enabled. We highlight recent work that combines several of these advances together and its application to nucleic-acid processing enzymes. Finally, we discuss future prospects for these exciting developments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 704-714, 2016. PMID:27225537

  6. Enhancing aptamer function and stability via in vitro selection using modified nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Kirsten N; Rangel, Alexandra E; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Nucleic acid aptamers have emerged as a promising alternative to antibodies for use as recognition elements in therapeutics, bioimaging, and analytical applications. A key benefit that aptamers possess relative to antibodies is their ability to be chemically synthesized. This advantage, coupled with the broad range of modified nucleotide building blocks that can be constructed using chemical synthesis, has enabled the discovery and development of modified aptamers having extraordinary affinity, specificity, and biostability. Early efforts to generate modified aptamers focused on selection of a native DNA or RNA aptamer, followed by post-selection trial-and-error testing of modifications. However, recent advances in polymerase engineering and templated nucleic acid synthesis have enabled the direct selection of aptamers having modified backbones and nucleobases. This review will discuss these technological advances and highlight the improvements in aptamer function that have been realized through in vitro selection of non-natural nucleic acids. PMID:27012179

  7. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Craw

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings.

  8. Salt Contribution to the Flexibility of Single-stranded Nucleic Acid of Finite Length

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Feng-Hua; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids are negatively charged macromolecules and their structure properties are strongly coupled to metal ions in solutions. In this paper, the salt effects on the flexibility of single stranded (ss) nucleic acid chain ranging from 12 to 120 nucleotides are investigated systematically by the coarse grained Monte Carlo simulations where the salt ions are considered explicitly and the ss chain is modeled with the virtual bond structural model. Our calculations show that, the increase of ion concentration causes the structural collapse of ss chain and multivalent ions are much more efficient in causing such collapse, and trivalent and small divalent ions can both induce more compact state than a random relaxation state. We found that monovalent, divalent and trivalent ions can all overcharge ss chain, and the dominating source for such overcharging changes from ion exclusion volume effect to ion Coulomb correlations. In addition, the predicted Na and Mg dependent persistence length lp of ss nucleic acid a...

  9. An instrument for automated purification of nucleic acids from contaminated forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broemeling, David J; Pel, Joel; Gunn, Dylan C; Mai, Laura; Thompson, Jason D; Poon, Hiron; Marziali, Andre

    2008-02-01

    Forensic crime scene sample analysis, by its nature, often deals with samples in which there are low amounts of nucleic acids, on substrates that often lead to inhibition of subsequent enzymatic reactions such as PCR amplification for STR profiling. Common substrates include denim from blue jeans, which yields indigo dye as a PCR inhibitor, and soil, which yields humic substances as inhibitors. These inhibitors frequently co-extract with nucleic acids in standard column or bead-based preps, leading to frequent failure of STR profiling. We present a novel instrument for DNA purification of forensic samples that is capable of highly effective concentration of nucleic acids from soil particulates, fabric, and other complex samples including solid components. The novel concentration process, known as SCODA, is inherently selective for long charged polymers such as DNA, and therefore is able to effectively reject known contaminants. We present an automated sample preparation instrument based on this process, and preliminary results based on mock forensic samples.

  10. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Development of Chemiluminescent Lateral Flow Assay for the Detection of Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam R. Nugen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, sensitive detection methods are of utmost importance for the identification of pathogens related to health and safety. Herein we report the development of a nucleic acid sequence-based lateral flow assay which achieves a low limit of detection using chemiluminescence. On-membrane enzymatic signal amplification is used to reduce the limit of detection to the sub-femtomol level. To demonstrate this assay, we detected synthetic nucleic acid sequences representative of Trypanosoma mRNA, the causative agent for African sleeping sickness, with relevance in human and animal health in sub-Saharan Africa. The intensity of the chemiluminescent signal was evaluated by using a charge-coupled device as well as a microtiter plate reader. We demonstrated that our lateral flow chemiluminescent assay has a very low limit of detection and is easy to use. The limit of detection was determined to be 0.5 fmols of nucleic acid target.

  12. Theoretical study of the influence of ribose on the proton transfer phenomenon of nucleic acid bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first comprehensive theoretical study of ribose's effects on the behavior of proton transfer of nucleic acid base is presented. The specific hydrogen bonding of the ribose hydroxyls plays a very important role in the stabilization of the structure of ribonucleoside. Nine stable uridine conformations have been reported. The intermolecular proton transfer of the isolated, monohydrated uridine complexes in three different regions were extensively explored on the basis of density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level. With the introduction of the ribose, not only the structural parameters of the nucleic acid bases changed, but also the energy barriers of the proton transfer process changed. Furthermore, changes of the electron distributions of the molecular orbital of the nucleic acid bases were also analyzed by NBO analysis. Consideration of the ribose's influence represents a much more real situation in the RNA

  13. Towards the routine application of nucleic acid technology for avian disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, D; Mawditt, K; Shaw, K; Britton, P; Naylor, C

    1997-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid technology (polymerase chain reaction, probing, restriction fragment analysis and nucleotide sequencing) in the study of avian diseases has largely been confined to fundamental analysis and retrospective studies. More recently these approaches have been applied to diagnosis and what one might call real-time epidemiological studies on chickens and turkeys. At the heart of these approaches is the identification and characterisation of pathogens based on their genetic material, RNA or DNA. Among the objectives has been the detection of pathogens quickly combined with the simultaneous identification of serotype, subtype or genotype. Nucleic acid sequencing also gives a degree of characterisation unmatched by other approaches. In this paper we describe the use of nucleic acid technology for the diagnosis and epidemiology of infectious bronchitis virus, turkey rhinotracheitis virus (avian pneumovirus) and Newcastle disease virus.

  14. Assessment of Damage to Nucleic Acids and Repair Machinery in Salmonella typhimurium Exposed to Chlorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Phe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Water disinfection is usually evaluated using mandatory methods based on cell culturability. However, such methods do not consider the potential of cells to recover, which should also be kept as low as possible. In this paper, we hypothesized that a successful disinfection is achieved only when the applied chlorine leads to both intracellular nucleic acid damage and strong alterations of the DNA repair machinery. Monitoring the SOS system responsiveness with a umuC'-‘lacZ reporter fusion, we found that the expression of this important cellular machinery was altered after the beginning of membrane permeabilization but prior to the total decline of both the cell culturability and the nucleic acid integrity as revealed by Sybr-II staining. Rapid measurement of such nucleic acid alterations by fluorochrome-based staining could be used as an alternative method for assessing the effectiveness of disinfection with chlorine.

  15. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  16. Nucleic acids for recognition and catalysis: landmarks, limitations, and looking to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, D M

    2000-06-01

    Combinatorial selection of nucleic acids has led to the discovery of novel ligands and catalysts that have implications for both chemistry and medicine. In the context of combinatorial chemistry, degenerate syntheses of nucleic acid libraries readily generate as many as 10(15) different molecules in which a small percentage exhibit interesting binding and/or catalytic properties. The primary advantage of nucleic acids is that library coding is an intrinsic property; sequential composition directly determines the activity. At low temperatures, the sequential composition of single stranded nucleic acids governs folding into irregular tertiary structures resulting in interesting activities. At higher temperatures, the same structures are unfolded and decoded by polymerases to reveal sequential information. The use of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) permits amplification and thus enrichment of the selected activity which is then regenerated chemi-enzymatically. Iterative selection and amplification result in one of the highest throughput screens conceivable whereby each molecule encodes its own activity permitting the ultimate in parallel sampling. Finally, sequence information, and by extension the chemical composition, is obtained by simple sequencing techniques obviating the need for mass spectrometric deconvolution, parallel tagging, and/or large volumes needed for viral and cell culture. This review begins with an introduction of general concepts and considerations. The potential for nucleic acids to generate tight-binding ligands is of interest to structural biologists and medicinal chemists. The therapeutic implications to medicine are also touched upon. Since combinatorially selected nucleic acids and antibodies share many conceptual similarities, their respective advantages and limitations are compared. Theoretical and practical limitations for catalyst discovery are discussed along with the use of other chemical and physical approaches to address some current

  17. Effect of storage of rice seeds on solute leaching and nucleic acid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice (Oryza sativa Linn.) seeds of early varieties 'Ratna' and 'Jaya' and late varieties 'Suakalma' and 'Pankaj' remained viable for 12 to 16 months in normal storage. Conductivity of pooled leachates, leaching of soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen increased with duration of storage. While 32P uptake in isolated embryos and endosperms of fresh, 1-year and 2-year-old seeds showed a declining trend, its incorporation in nucleic acids did not vary significantly. The content of nucleic acid of seeds, however, decreased with an increase in the storage period. (auth.)

  18. Sequence-specific nucleic acid detection from binary pore conductance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Esfandiari, Leyla; Monbouquette, Harold G.; Jacob J. Schmidt

    2012-01-01

    We describe a platform for sequence-specific nucleic acid (NA) detection utilizing a micropipette tapered to a 2 μm diameter pore and 3 μm diameter polystyrene beads to which uncharged peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe molecules have been conjugated. As the target NAs hybridize to the complementary PNA-beads, the beads acquire negative charge and become electrophoretically mobile. An applied electric field guides these NA-PNA-beads toward the pipette tip, which they obstruct, leading to an ind...

  19. The evolution of bat nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Zepeda-Mendoza, M Lisandra; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid-sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is overall congruent with the species tree, consistent with the evolution of many other mammalian nuclear genes. However, the chiropteran TLRs exhibited unique mutations fixed in ligand-binding sites, some of which involved nonconservative amino acid changes and/or targets of positive selection. Such changes could potentially modify protein function and ligand-binding properties, as some changes were predicted to alter nucleic acid binding motifs in TLR 9. Moreover, evidence for episodic diversifying selection acting specifically upon the bat lineage and sublineages was detected. Thus, the long-term adaptation of chiropterans to a wide variety of environments and ecological niches with different pathogen profiles is likely to have shaped the evolution of the bat TLRs in an order-specific manner. The observed evolutionary patterns provide evidence for potential functional differences between bat and other mammalian TLRs in terms of resistance to specific pathogens or recognition of nucleic acids in general. PMID:26503258

  20. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (formerly Docket No. FDA-2005D-0261) Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... availability of a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for...

  1. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline;

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance...

  2. Sequence-specific inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robaczewska, Magdalena; Narayan, Ramamurthy; Seigneres, Beatrice;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) appear as promising new antisense agents, that have not yet been examined as hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors. Our aim was to study the ability of PNAs targeting the duck HBV (DHBV) encapsidation signal epsilon to inhibit reverse transcription (RT...

  3. A rational approach in probe design for nucleic acid-based biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermini, M L; Scarano, S; Bini, R; Banchelli, M; Berti, D; Mascini, M; Minunni, M

    2011-08-15

    Development of nucleic acid-based sensing attracts the interest of many researchers in the field of both basic and applied research in chemistry. Major factors for the fabrication of a successful nucleic acid sensor include the design of probes for target sequence hybridization and their immobilization on the chip surface. Here we demonstrate that a rational choice of bioprobes has important impact on the sensor's analytical performances. Computational evaluations, by a simple and freely available program, successfully led to the design of the best probes for a given target, with direct application to nucleic acid-based sensing. We developed here an optimized and reproducible strategy for in silico probe design supported by optical transduction experiments. In particular Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi), at the forefront of optical sensing, was used here as proof of principle. Five probes were selected, immobilized on gold chip surfaces by widely consolidated thiol chemistry and tested to validate the computational model. Using SPRi as the transducting component, real-time and label free analysis was performed, taking the Homo sapiens actin beta (ACTB) gene fragment as model system in nucleic acid detection. The experimental sensor behavior was further studied by evaluating the strength of the secondary structure of probes using melting experiments. Dedicated software was also used to evaluate probes' folding, to support our criteria. The SPRi experimental results fully validate the computational evaluations, revealing this approach highly promising as a useful tool to design biosensor probes with optimized performances. PMID:21719269

  4. Comparison of three methods for isolation of nucleic acids from membranate inner ear tissue of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Wei-jia; WANG Ying; WANG Qiong; HAN Yue-chen; HU Yu-juan

    2006-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in sensorineural deafness. The aim of this study was to compare three methods for extraction of nucleic acid from membranate inner ear tissue of rats.Methods Alkaline denaturation, a conventional phenol-chloroform method and Trizol reagent were respectively used to extract the slight nucleic acid from membranate inner ear tissue of rats. We assessed the amount and quality of nucleic acid using a UV-spectrometer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results The yield and purity (OD260/OD280) of DNA from inner ear tissue using the phenol-chloroform method was the highest of the three methods. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragment can be amplified by PCR from nucleic acid prepared by all methods, while no nuclear DNA (nDNA) fragment can be amplified by method of alkaline denaturation. Both nuclear and mitochondrial genescould be amplified by reverse transcriptional PCR from the RNA prepared by Trizol reagent.Conclusion Adequate amount and high-quality of mtDNA, nDNA and RNA were obtained from unilateral membranate inner ear tissue of rats. Method of alkaline denaturation could be chosen when mtDNA without nDNA was needed, while phenol-chloroform method was suitable for extracting total DNA (including nDNA and mtDNA); method with Trizol reagent was suitable for extracting total RNA and total DNA.

  5. Stepping towards highly flexible aptamers: enzymatic recognition studies of unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubois, Camille; Campbell, Meghan A; Edwards, Stacey L;

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic recognition of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotides was successfully accomplished. Therminator DNA polymerase was found to be an efficient enzyme in primer extension reactions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 81 mer UNA-modified DNA library was efficiently achieved...

  6. Response of sedimentary nucleic acids to benthic disturbance in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, C.E.G.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Information on the response of nucleic acids (i.e., DNA and RNA) to simulated benthic disturbance was obtained from samples collected from eight sediment cores (0-10 cm) located in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). In general the total sedimentary DNA...

  7. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture 1995. New approaches to in situ detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, M

    1995-08-01

    The present paper reviews recent results obtained by different molecular biology-based, immunocytological approaches to the localization and identification of nucleic acids in sections of biological material. Examples of sensitive, high-resolution detection methods for RNA, DNA or specialized DNA regions are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the potential values and limitations of these new methods. PMID:8536076

  8. Fluorescence Quenching Investigation for Janus Green B and used as Probe in Determination of Nucleic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莉华; 刘六战; 沈含熙

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching of janus green B (JGB) in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle by nucleic acids (DNA) was studied using UV-vis absorption, steady state fluorescence emission methods and lifetime measurements. In the SDS micelle, weak fluorescence of JGB was enhanced, and the maximum emission shifted from 425 to 410 nm. In the presence of DNA, the fluorescence of JGB was quenched. Linear relationships between the fluorescence quenching (F0/F) and concentrations of DNA were observed in the range of 2.4×10-8 to 1.08×10-7mol·L-1 for calf thymus nucleic acids (ct DNA) and 1.9×10-8 to 3.8×10-8 mol·L-1 for fish sperm nucleic acids (fs DNA) when 2.5×10-5 mol·L-1 JGB was employed. The limit detection were 1.3×10-8 mol·L-1 for ct DNA and 6.4×10-9 mol·L-1 for fs DNA. At high DNA concentration, there was a systematic deviation from the Stem-Volmer equation due to the static and dynamic quenching occurring simultaneously. The proposed method was applied to the determination of the nucleic acids in chicken blood extraction and the analytical results were in good agreement with the UV-method.

  9. Survivin mRNA antagonists using locked nucleic acid, potential for molecular cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Niels; Westergaard, Majken; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund;

    2007-01-01

    synergistic effect when combining the mRNA antagonists against Survivin with the chemotherapeutic Taxol. This effect was demonstrated at concentrations of antagonists far lower than any previously demonstrated, indicating the high potential of locked nucleic acid for therapeutic use. Further characterisations...

  10. 78 FR 36698 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Respiratory Specimens AGENCY: Food... Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens from class III (premarket approval) into class II... Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Respiratory Specimens'' are necessary, in addition to general controls,...

  11. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture 1995. New approaches to in situ detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, M

    1995-08-01

    The present paper reviews recent results obtained by different molecular biology-based, immunocytological approaches to the localization and identification of nucleic acids in sections of biological material. Examples of sensitive, high-resolution detection methods for RNA, DNA or specialized DNA regions are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the potential values and limitations of these new methods.

  12. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  13. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Broedbaek

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Urinary excretion of the nucleic acid oxidation markers 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo at the time of diagnosis was not associated with cancer overall in type 2 diabetes patients. For site-specific cancers, risk elevations were seen for breast cancer (8-oxodG. These findings should be examined in future and larger studies.

  14. Nucleic acid probes as a diagnostic method for tick-borne hemoparasites of veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, J V; Buening, G M

    1995-03-01

    An increased number of articles on the use of nucleic acid-based hybridization techniques for diagnostic purposes have been recently published. This article reviews nucleic acid-based hybridization as an assay to detect hemoparasite infections of economic relevance in veterinary medicine. By using recombinant DNA techniques, selected clones containing inserts of Anaplasma, Babesia, Cowdria or Theileria genomic DNA sequences have been obtained, and they are now available to be utilized as specific, highly sensitive DNA or RNA probes to detect the presence of the hemoparasite DNA in an infected animal. Either in an isotopic or non-isotopic detection system, probes have allowed scientists to test for--originally in samples collected from experimentally infected animals and later in samples collected in the field--the presence of hemoparasites during the prepatent, patent, convalescent, and chronic periods of the infection in the host. Nucleic acid probes have given researchers the opportunity to carry out genomic analysis of parasite DNA to differentiate hemoparasite species and to identify genetically distinct populations among and within isolates, strains and clonal populations. Prevalence of parasite infection in the tick vector can now be accomplished more specifically with the nucleic acid probes. Lately, with the advent of the polymerase chain reaction technique, small numbers of hemoparasites can be positively identified in the vertebrate host and tick vector. These techniques can be used to assess the veterinary epidemiological situation in a particular geographical region for the planning of control measures. PMID:7597795

  15. Modulation of i-motif thermodynamic stability by the introduction of UNA (unlocked nucleic acid) monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The influence of acyclic RNA derivatives, UNA (unlocked nucleic acid) monomers, on i-DNA thermodynamic stability has been investigated. The 22 nt human telomeric fragment was chosen as the model sequence for stability studies. UNA monomers modulate i-motif stability in a position-depending manner...

  16. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  17. Determination of viral nucleic acids by electrochemical detection array using paramagnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Huska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple and express determination of dangerous viruses is one of the most important precautions of their pandemic spreading.Paramegnetic nanoparticles in combination with electrochemicaldetection methods belong to the group of techniques fulfilling these requirements. We were able to isolate and subsequently detect 100 pg/μl of viral nucleic acid by using 1 μl of paramagneticnanoparticles.

  18. Polyethersulfone improves isothermal nucleic acid amplification compared to current paper-based diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnes, J C; Rodriguez, N M; Liu, L; Klapperich, C M

    2016-04-01

    Devices based on rapid, paper-based, isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques have recently emerged with the potential to fill a growing need for highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics throughout the world. As this field develops, such devices will require optimized materials that promote amplification and sample preparation. Herein, we systematically investigated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in materials currently used in rapid diagnostics (cellulose paper, glass fiber, and nitrocellulose) and two additional porous membranes with upstream sample preparation capabilities (polyethersulfone and polycarbonate). We compared amplification efficiency from four separate DNA and RNA targets (Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Influenza A H1N1) within these materials using two different isothermal amplification schemes, helicase dependent amplification (tHDA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and traditional PCR. We found that the current paper-based diagnostic membranes inhibited nucleic acid amplification when compared to membrane-free controls; however, polyethersulfone allowed for efficient amplification in both LAMP and tHDA reactions. Further, observing the performance of traditional PCR amplification within these membranes was not predicative of their effects on in situ LAMP and tHDA. Polyethersulfone is a new material for paper-based nucleic acid amplification, yet provides an optimal support for rapid molecular diagnostics for point-of-care applications. PMID:26906904

  19. Thermal Stability of Modified i-Motif Oligonucleotides with Naphthalimide Intercalating Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Ali; Pedersen, Erik B.; Khaireldin, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    naphthalimide (1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione) as the intercalating nucleic acid. The stabilities of i-motif structures with inserted naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides were studied using UV melting temperatures (Tm) and circular dichroism spectra at different pH values and conditions (crowding and...

  20. Free radical damage of nucleic acids and their components. I. Direct absorption of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to summarize our present understanding of free radical formation and reactions when energy from ionizing radiations is deposited directly in nucleic acids. The scope of the discussion is limited to recent progress, with reference to older work only when needed for coherence

  1. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  2. Amplified electrochemical detection of nucleic acid hybridization via selective preconcentration of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Tian, Rui; Zheng, Xingwang; Huang, Rongfu

    2016-08-31

    The common drawback of optical methods for rapid detection of nucleic acid by exploiting the differential affinity of single-/double-stranded nucleic acids for unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is its relatively low sensitivity. In this article, on the basis of selective preconcentration of AuNPs unprotected by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding, a novel electrochemical strategy for nucleic acid sequence identification assay has been developed. Through detecting the redox signal mediated by AuNPs on 1, 6-hexanedithiol blocked gold electrode, the proposed method is able to ensure substantial signal amplification and a low background current. This strategy is demonstrated for quantitative analysis of the target microRNA (let-7a) in human breast adenocarcinoma cells, and a detection limit of 16 fM is readily achieved with desirable specificity and sensitivity. These results indicate that the selective preconcentration of AuNPs for electrochemical signal readout can offer a promising platform for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequence. PMID:27506344

  3. Integrated printed circuit board device for cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lewis A; Wu, Liang Li; Babikian, Sarkis; Bachman, Mark; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-11-01

    Preparation of raw, untreated biological samples remains a major challenge in microfluidics. We present a novel microfluidic device based on the integration of printed circuit boards and an isotachophoresis assay for sample preparation of nucleic acids from biological samples. The device has integrated resistive heaters and temperature sensors as well as a 70 μm × 300 μm × 3.7 cm microfluidic channel connecting two 15 μL reservoirs. We demonstrated this device by extracting pathogenic nucleic acids from 1 μL dispensed volume of whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum. We dispensed whole blood directly onto an on-chip reservoir, and the system's integrated heaters simultaneously lysed and mixed the sample. We used isotachophoresis to extract the nucleic acids into a secondary buffer via isotachophoresis. We analyzed the convective mixing action with micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) and verified the purity and amount of extracted nucleic acids using off-chip quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We achieved a clinically relevant limit of detection of 500 parasites per microliter. The system has no moving parts, and the process is potentially compatible with a wide range of on-chip hybridization or amplification assays.

  4. Nucleic Acids and Enzymes at Electrodes: Electrochemical Nanomedical Biosensors and Biofuel Cell Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferapontova, Elena

    for nanomedicine, based on DNA and RNA architectures (1, 4, 5), in which binding of the analyte results in the electrochemically translatable conformational nanoswitching of nucleic acids, with a special emphasis on electronic molecular beacon systems for genetic and small-molecule electroanalysis. Future...

  5. Efficient Reverse Transcription Using Locked Nucleic Acid Nucleotides towards the Evolution of Nuclease Resistant RNA Aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Edwards, Stacey L;

    2012-01-01

    Modified nucleotides are increasingly being utilized in the de novo selection of aptamers for enhancing their drug-like character and abolishing the need for time consuming trial-and-error based post-selection modifications. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent and successful...... step is a pre-requisite for performing LNA-modified RNA aptamer selection....

  6. One New Method of Nucleic Acid Amplification-Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-en FANG; Jian LI; Qin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification method, which amplifies DNA with high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and efficiency under isothermal conditions using a set of four specially designed primers and a Bst DNA polymerase with strand displacement activity. The basic principle, characteristics, development of LAMP and its applications are summarized in this article.

  7. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mugasa; T. Laurent; G.J. Schoone; P.A. Kager; G.W. Lubega; H.D.F.H. Schallig

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control pr

  8. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  9. Lateral flow devices for nucleic acid analysis exploiting quantum dots as reporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapountzi, Eleni A.; Tragoulias, Sotirios S.; Kalogianni, Despina P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Ioannou, Penelope C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, GR-15771 Athens (Greece); Christopoulos, Theodore K., E-mail: tchrist@upatras.gr [Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Processes, Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Dipstick tests for DNA hybridization assays and genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. • Use of quantum dots as reporters. • Visual detection without the need for expensive instrumentation. • Simplicity and low-cost of the assays. - Abstract: There is a growing interest in the development of biosensors in the form of simple lateral flow devices that enable visual detection of nucleic acid sequences while eliminating several steps required for pipetting, incubation and washing out the excess of reactants. In this work, we present the first dipstick-type nucleic acid biosensors based on quantum dots (QDs) as reporters. The biosensors enable sequence confirmation of the target DNA by hybridization and simple visual detection of the emitted fluorescence under a UV lamp. The ‘diagnostic’ membrane of the biosensor contains a test zone (TZ) and a control zone (CZ). The CZ always fluoresces in order to confirm the proper function of the biosensor. Fluorescence is emitted from the TZ, only when the specific nucleic acid sequence is present. We have developed two general types of QD-based nucleic acid biosensors, namely, Type I and Type II, in which the TZ consists of either immobilized streptavidin (Type I) or immobilized oligodeoxynucleotides (Type II). The control zone consists of immobilized biotinylated albumin. No purification steps are required prior to the application of the DNA sample on the strip. The QD-based nucleic acid biosensors performed accurately and reproducibly when applied to (a) the visual detection of PCR amplification products and (b) visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human genomic DNA from clinical samples. As low as 1.5 fmol of double-stranded DNA were clearly detected by naked eye and the dynamic range extended to 200 fmol. The %CV were estimated to be 4.3–8.2.

  10. RNA:DNA Ratio and Other Nucleic Acid Derived Indices in Marine Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Chícharo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of most used indicators in marine ecology are nucleic acid-derived indices. They can be divided by target levels in three groups: 1 at the organism level as ecophysiologic indicators, indicators such as RNA:DNA ratios, DNA:dry weight and RNA:protein, 2 at the population level, indicators such as growth rate, starvation incidence or fisheries impact indicators, and 3 at the community level, indicators such as trophic interactions, exergy indices and prey identification. The nucleic acids derived indices, especially RNA:DNA ratio, have been applied with success as indicators of nutritional condition, well been and growth in marine organisms. They are also useful as indicators of natural or anthropogenic impacts in marine population and communities, such as upwelling or dredge fisheries, respectively. They can help in understanding important issues of marine ecology such as trophic interactions in marine environment, fish and invertebrate recruitment failure and biodiversity changes, without laborious work of counting, measuring and identification of small marine organisms. Besides the objective of integrate nucleic acid derived indices across levels of organization, the paper will also include a general characterization of most used nucleic acid derived indices in marine ecology and also advantages and limitations of them. We can conclude that using indicators, such RNA:DNA ratios and other nucleic acids derived indices concomitantly with organism and ecosystems measures of responses to climate change (distribution, abundance, activity, metabolic rate, survival will allow for the development of more rigorous and realistic predictions of the effects of anthropogenic climate change on marine systems.

  11. Label-free direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of nucleic acids (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Luca; Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Xie, Hainan; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic-based biosensing has experienced an unprecedented level of attention, with a particular focus on the nucleic acid detection, offering efficient solutions to engineer simple, fast, highly sensitive sensing platforms while overcoming important limitations of PCR and microarray techniques. In the broad field of plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has arisen as a powerful analytical tool for detection and structural characterization of biomolecules. Today applications of SERS to nucleic acid analysis largely rely on indirect strategies, which have been demonstrated very effective for pure sensing purposes but completely dismiss the exquisite structural information provided by the direct acquisition of the biomolecular vibrational fingerprint. Contrarily, direct label-free SERS of nucleic acid shows an outstanding potential in terms of chemical-specific information which, however, remained largely unexpressed mainly because of the inherent poor spectral reproducibility and/or limited sensitivity. To address these limitations, we developed a fast and affordable high-throughput screening direct SERS method for gaining detailed genomic information on nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and for the characterization and quantitative recognition of DNA interactions with exogenous agents. The simple strategy relies on the electrostatic adhesion of DNA/RNA onto positively-charged silver colloids that promotes the nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at picogram level (i.e. the analysis can be performed without the necessity of amplification steps thus providing realistic direct information of the nucleic acid in its native state). We anticipate this method to gain a vast impact and set of applications in different fields, including medical diagnostics, genomic screening, drug discovery, forensic science and even molecular electronics.

  12. Highly Efficient Synthesis of Allopurinol Locked Nucleic Acid Monomer by C6 Deamination of 8-Aza-7-bromo-7-deazaadenine Locked Nucleic Acid Monomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosbar, Tamer Reda El-Saeed; Sofan, M.; Abou-Zeid, L.;

    2013-01-01

    pathway. N-Glycosylation at the 8-position was prevented by steric hindrance from the 7-bromo atom in the starting material 8-aza-7-bromo-7-deazaadenine. In the final step of the synthesis, the bromine was removed together with a benzyl protecting group by catalytic reduction with ammonium formate to give......An allopurinol locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomer was prepared by a novel strategy through C6 deamination of the corresponding 8-aza-7-bromo-7-deazaadenine LNA monomer with aqueous sodium hydroxide. An 8-aza-7-deazaadenine LNA monomer was also synthesized by a modification of the new synthetic...

  13. A model for protocellular coordination of nucleic acid and protein syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The proteinoid model for the coordination of protein synthesis with nucleic acid coding within the evolving protocell is discussed. Evidence for the self-ordering of amino acid chains, which would enhance the catalytic activity of a lysine-rich proteinoid, is presented, along with that for the preferential formation of microparticles, particularly proteinoid microparticles, in various solutions. Demonstrations of the catalytic activity of lysine-rich proteinoids in the synthesis of peptide and internucleotide bonds are pointed out. The view of evolution as a two stage sequence in which the geological synthesis of peptides evolved to the protocellular synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides is discussed, and contrasted with the alternative view, in accord with the central dogma, that nucleic acids arose first then governed the production of proteins and protocells.

  14. Design and Synthesis of Novel Peptide Nucleic Acid Monomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白金泉; 李英; 刘克良

    2001-01-01

    All of the four nucleobases in DNA have replaced the 4-hydroxy group of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trams-4-hydroxy]tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester with cis-stereochemistry. An efficient route for the synthesis of N-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylaminomethyl)-trans-4-hydroxy]-tetrahydropyrrole acetic acid methyl ester has been developed.Starting with this intermediate, the protected monmers were synthesized by the Mitsunobu reaction or via its tosylate.

  15. Nucleic acid fragmentation on the millisecond timescale using a conventional X-ray rotating anode source: application to protein–DNA footprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Henn, Arnon; Halfon, Jacob; Kela, Itai; Orion, Itzhak; Sagi, Irit

    2001-01-01

    Nucleic acid fragmentation (footprinting) by ·OH radicals is used often as a tool to probe nucleic acid structure and nucleic acid–protein interactions. This method has proven valuable because it provides structural information with single base pair resolution. Recent developments in the field introduced the ‘synchrotron X-ray footprinting’ method, which uses a high-flux X-ray source to produce single base pair fragmentation of nucleic acid in tens of milliseconds. We developed a complementar...

  16. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    OpenAIRE

    Fördös Gergely; Biro Jan C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB) contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid...

  17. Synthetic LNA/DNA nano-scaffolds for highly efficient diagnostics of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein novel fluorescent oligonucleotides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies (autoantibodies) are described. The probes are prepared by highly efficient copper-catalyzed click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA...... of the monoclonal human autoantibody is achieved. It makes the novel "clickable" LNA/DNA complexes a very promising tool in molecular diagnostics of both nucleic acids and autoantibodies against DNA. The latter are produced under several autoimmune conditions including antiphospholipide syndrome and systemic lupus...

  18. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    This work examines smart material properties of rational self-assembly and molecular recognition found in nano-biosystems. Exploiting the sequence and structural information encoded within nucleic acids and proteins will permit programmed synthesis of nanomaterials and help create molecular machines that may carry out new roles involving chemical catalysis and bioenergy. Responsive to different ionic environments thru self-reorgnization, nucleic acids (NA) are nature's signature smart material; organisms such as viruses and bacteria use features of NAs to react to their environment and orchestrate their lifecycle. Furthermore, nucleic acid systems (both RNA and DNA) are currently exploited as scaffolds; recent applications have been showcased to build bioelectronics and biotemplated nanostructures via directed assembly of multidimensional nanoelectronic devices 1. Since the most stable and rudimentary structure of nucleic acids is the helical duplex, these were modeled in order to examine the influence of the microenvironment, sequence, and cation-dependent perturbations of their canonical forms. Due to their negatively charged phosphate backbone, NA's rely on counterions to overcome the inherent repulsive forces that arise from the assembly of two complementary strands. As a realistic model system, we chose the HIV-TAR helix (PDB ID: 397D) to study specific sequence motifs on cation sequestration. At physiologically relevant concentrations of sodium and potassium ions, we observed sequence based effects where purine stretches were adept in retaining high residency cations. The transitional space between adenine and guanosine nucleotides (ApG step) in a sequence proved the most favorable. This work was the first to directly show these subtle interactions of sequence based cationic sequestration and may be useful for controlling metallization of nucleic acids in conductive nanowires. Extending the study further, we explored the degree to which the structure of NA

  19. Nucleic Acid Analogue Induced Transcription of Double Stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from a double stranded DNA template by forming a complex by hybridizing to the template at a desired transcription initiation site one or more oligonucleic acid analogues of the PNA type capable of forming a transcription initiation site with the DNA and exposing the complex to...... displacement of one strand of the DNA locally by the PNA hybridization....

  20. Non-Enzymatic Copying of Nucleic Acid Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Jonathan Craig

    2013-01-01

    All known living cells contain a complex set of molecular machinery to support their growth and replication. However, the earliest cells must have been much simpler, consisting of a compartment and a genetic material to allow for Darwinian evolution. To study these intermediates, plausible model `protocells' must be synthesized in the laboratory since no fossils remain. Recent work has shown that fatty acids can self-assemble into vesicles that are able to grow and divide through simple mecha...

  1. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use. PMID:26706801

  2. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Biotoxins: A New Paradigm Toward the Treatment and Diagnostic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Veedu, Rakesh N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can bind to their targets with very high affinity and specificity, and are generally selected by a process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Conventional antibody-based therape...... nucleic acid aptamers developed against various biotoxins of plant, microorganism, or animal origin and show how these can be used in diagnostics (e.g., biosensors) and therapy.......-based therapeutic and diagnostic approach currently employed against biotoxins pose major limitations such as the requirement of a live animal for the in vivo enrichment of the antibody species, decreased stability, high production cost, and side effects. Aptamer technology is a viable alternative that can be used...

  3. Comparison of Three Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Arabella; Pierotti, Chiara; Terreni, Mariarosa; Zappa, Alessandra; Vago, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic reliabilities of three cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid amplification assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compared by using CSF samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a postmortem histopathological diagnosis of CMV encephalitis (n = 15) or other central nervous system conditions (n = 16). By using a nested PCR assay, the quantitative COBAS AMPLICOR CMV MONITOR PCR, and the NucliSens CMV pp67 nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay, sensitivities were 93.3, 86.6, and 93.3%, respectively, and specificities were 93.7, 93.7, and 87.5%, respectively. The COBAS AMPLICOR assay revealed significantly higher CMV DNA levels in patients with diffuse ventriculoencephalitis than in patients with focal periventricular lesions. PMID:11230445

  4. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Lewis, Karen A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization.

  5. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Altschuler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization.

  6. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E;

    2012-01-01

    Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...... have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA...

  7. Nucleic acid and protein extraction from electropermeabilized E. coli cells on a microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matos, T.; Senkbeil, Silja; Mendonça, A.;

    2013-01-01

    technique has been developed which is based on exposing E. coli cells to low voltages to allow extraction of nucleic acids and proteins. The flow-through electropermeability chip used consists of a microfluidic channel with integrated gold electrodes that promote cell envelope channel formation at low......Due to the extensive use of nucleic acid and protein analysis of bacterial samples, there is a need for simple and rapid extraction protocols for both plasmid DNA and RNA molecules as well as reporter proteins like the green fluorescent protein (GFP). In this report, an electropermeability...... can be avoided and the transiently formed pores can be closed again and the cells survive. This method has been used to extract RNA and GFP molecules under conditions of electropermeability. Plasmid DNA could be recovered when the applied voltage was increased to 2 V, thus causing complete cell lysis....

  8. Preparation of surfactant-stabilized gold nanoparticle-peptide nucleic acid conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duy, Janice, E-mail: janice.duy@umit.maine.ed [University of Maine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (United States); Connell, Laurie B. [University of Maine, School of Marine Sciences (United States); Eck, Wolfgang [University of Heidelberg, Applied Physical Chemistry (Germany); Collins, Scott D. [University of Maine, Department of Chemistry (United States); Smith, Rosemary L. [University of Maine, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A simple, two-step method of producing stable and functional peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-conjugated gold nanoparticles using a surfactant stabilization step is presented. PNA are DNA analogs with superior chemical stability and target discrimination, but their use in metallic nanoparticle systems has been limited by the difficulty of producing stable colloids of nanoparticle-PNA conjugates. In this work, the nonionic surfactant Tween 20 (polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate) was used to sterically shield gold surfaces prior to the addition of thiolated PNA, producing conjugates which remain dispersed in solution and retain the ability to hybridize to complementary nucleic acid sequences. The conjugates were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy. PNA attachment to gold nanoparticles was confirmed with an enzyme-linked immunoassay, while the ability of nanoparticle-bound PNA to hybridize to its complement was demonstrated using labeled DNA.

  9. JAWS: Just Add Water System - A device for detection of nucleic acids in Martian ice caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, Eske; Mørk, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    with a regulation of pH and salt concentrations e.g. the MOD systems and could be installed on a planetary probe melting its way down the Martian ice caps e.g. the NASA Cryobot. JAWS can be used for detection of remains of ancient life preserved in the Martian ice as well as for detection of contamination brought......The design of a device for nucleic acid detection in the Martian ice caps is presented; the Just Add Water System (JAWS). It is based on fiber-optic PNA (peptide nucleic acid) light up probe random microsphere universal array technology. JAWS is designed to be part of a larger system...

  10. An algorithm for computing nucleic acid base-pairing probabilities including pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Robert M; Pierce, Niles A

    2004-07-30

    Given a nucleic acid sequence, a recent algorithm allows the calculation of the partition function over secondary structure space including a class of physically relevant pseudoknots. Here, we present a method for computing base-pairing probabilities starting from the output of this partition function algorithm. The approach relies on the calculation of recursion probabilities that are computed by backtracking through the partition function algorithm, applying a particular transformation at each step. This transformation is applicable to any partition function algorithm that follows the same basic dynamic programming paradigm. Base-pairing probabilities are useful for analyzing the equilibrium ensemble properties of natural and engineered nucleic acids, as demonstrated for a human telomerase RNA and a synthetic DNA nanostructure. PMID:15139042

  11. Saccharides as Prospective Immobilizers of Nucleic Acids for Room-Temperature Structural EPR Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Tormyshev, Victor M; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedin, Matvey V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for structural studies of biomolecules and their complexes. This method, whose applicability has been recently extended to room temperatures, requires immobilization of the studied biosystem to prevent averaging of dipolar couplings; at the same time, the modification of native conformations by immobilization must be avoided. In this work, we provide first demonstration of room-temperature EPR distance measurements in nucleic acids using saccharides trehalose, sucrose, and glucose as immobilizing media. We propose an approach that keeps structural conformation and unity of immobilized double-stranded DNA. Remarkably, room-temperature electron spin dephasing time of triarylmethyl-labeled DNA in trehalose is noticeably longer compared to previously used immobilizers, thus providing a broader range of available distances. Therefore, saccharides, and especially trehalose, can be efficiently used as immobilizers of nucleic acids, mimicking native conditions and allowing wide range of structural EPR studies at room temperatures. PMID:27320083

  12. Summarization on the synthesis and radionuclide-labeling of peptide nucleic acid for an oligonucleotide analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is one kind of antisense nucleic acid compounds and an oligonucleotide analogue that binds strongly to DNA and RNA in a sequence specific manner, has its unique advantages in the field of molecular diagnostics and treatment of diseases. Now, people gradually attach more importance to PNA. To optimize the application of PNA in genetic re- search and therapy, a great number of backbone modifications on the newly- type structures of PNA were synthesized to improve its physicochemical proper- ties, such as hybridization speciality, solubility in biofluid, or cell permeability. The modified PNA labeled with radionuclides, which can obtain the aim at specific target and minimal non-target trauma, has important role in research and application of tumorous genitherapy. Here a review on the basic synthesis idea and several primary synthetic methods of PNA analogs was given, and also correlative studies and expectation on the compounds belonging to PNA series labeled with radionuclides were included. (authors)

  13. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use.

  14. Switchable mechanical DNA ``arms'' operating on nucleic acid scaffolds associated with electrodes or semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Liu, Xiaoqing; Willner, Itamar

    2013-09-01

    Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals.Functional footholds linked to DNA scaffolds associated with surfaces provide nano-engineered assemblies acting as switching devices. By the assembly of a β-cyclodextrin receptor on one foothold, and a ferrocene-modified nucleic acid on a second foothold, the switchable and reversible, fuel-driven activation of ``molecular arms'' proceeds, transduced by electrochemical or optical signals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, time-dependent deactivation of a DNA ``arm'' using a DNA anti-fuel, and control experiments, excluding β-cyclodextrin from the systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02653a

  15. Layer-by-layer assembled gold nanoparticles for the delivery of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Eva-Christina; Elbakry, Asmaa; Göpferich, Achim; Breunig, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids to mammalian cells requires a potent particulate carrier system. The physicochemical properties of the used particles, such as size and surface charge, strongly influence the cellular uptake and thereby the extent of the subsequent biological effect. However the knowledge of this process is still fragmentary because heterogeneous particle collectives are applied. Therefore we present a strategy to synthesize carriers with a highly specific appearance on the basis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique. The LbL method is based on the alternate deposition of oppositely charged (bio-)polymers, in our case poly(ethylenimine) and nucleic acids. The size and surface charge of those particles can be easily modified and accordingly systematic studies on cellular uptake are accessible.

  16. Amino-modified tetraphenylethene derivatives as nucleic acid stain: relationship between the structure and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Zhu, Zece; Wei, Danqing; Zhou, Xiang; Qin, Jingui; Yang, Chuluo

    2014-10-22

    A series of new amino-functionalized tetraphenylethene (TPE) derivatives were designed and synthesized to study the effect of molecular structures on the detection of nucleic acid. Contrastive studies revealed that the number of binding groups, the length of hydrophobic linking arm and the configuration of TPE molecule all play important roles on the sensitivity of the probes in nucleic acid detection. Z-TPE3 with two binding amino groups, long linking arms, and cis configuration was found to be the most sensitive dye in both solution and gel matrix. Z-TPE3 is able to stain dsDNA with the lowest amount of 1 ng and exclusively stain 40 ng of short oligonucleotide with only 10 nt. This work is of important significance for the further design of TPE probes as biosensors with higher sensitivity. PMID:25279446

  17. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  18. Macromolecules Mimicking Backbones of Nucleic and Teichoic Acids.Synthesis,Some Properties and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw; Penczek; Julia; B.Pretula; Krzysztof; Kaluzynski

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Several methods have been elaborated in this laboratory allowing preparation of macromolecules with phosphodiester bonds,and having sequence of atoms similar as in the chains of biomacromolecules - nucleic or teichoic acids (TA),namely:-(C)n-O-PO-,where n=2 (for teichoic acids) or 3.These methods,to be discussed in the lecture,are based on the ring-opening polymerization,transesterification,and recently elaborated direct addition of phosphoric acid to diepoxides.For the first time an attempt h...

  19. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT SDS ON DETERMINATION OF NUCLEIC ACID WITH TERBIUM (III)FLUO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuHui; WanYu

    2002-01-01

    The effect of an anionic surfactant(sodium dodecylsulfate.SDS)on the fluorescence properties of nucleic acid with terbium(III)is studied.Results show that ri-bonucleir acid (RNA)presents fluorescence reaction with Tb(III)directly.but deoxyribonucleic acid(DNA)pre-sents similar fluorescence reaction only after its denatura-tion.In the presence of SDS ,the fluorescence intensity is 4.0 times and 3.5 times greater than that of DNA and RNA without SDS.

  20. Mild Detritylation of Nucleic Acid Hydroxyl Groups by Warming-up

    OpenAIRE

    Salon, Jozef; Zhang, Bo; Huang, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to effectively deprotect hydroxyl groups of acid-or-base sensitive bio-macromolecules without causing even minor defects and compromising high quality of final products. We report here a mild detritylation strategy in mildly acidic buffers to remove the DMTr protection from the 5’-hydroxyl groups of synthetic nucleic acids. The DMTr-groups can be easily and effectively removed at pH 4.5 or 5.0 with slight warming-up (40 °C), offering virtually quantitative deprotection. This...

  1. Isolation of nucleic acids and cultures from fossil ice and permafrost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, E.; Hansen, Anders J.; Poinar, H. N.

    2004-01-01

    Owing to their constant low temperatures, glacial ice and permafrost might contain the oldest nucleic acids and microbial cells on Earth, which could prove key to reconstructing past ecosystems and for the planning of missions to other planets. However, recent claims concerning viable cells...... and permafrost, and highlight sources of contamination that could result in false claims. Additionally, we present a set of precautions, controls and criteria to help ensure that future cultures and sequences are authentic. Udgivelsesdato: 2004 Mar...

  2. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: An Emerging Tool for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti-Hsuan Ku

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of small molecules or proteins of living cells provides an exceptional opportunity to study genetic variations and functions, cellular behaviors, and various diseases including cancer and microbial infections. Our aim in this review is to give an overview of selected research activities related to nucleic acid-based aptamer techniques that have been reported in the past two decades. Limitations of aptamers and possible approaches to overcome these limitations are also discussed.

  3. Nucleic Acid Aptamers as Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; John J. Rossi

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are cancers that arise from white blood cells and usually present as solid tumors. Treatment of lymphoma often involves chemotherapy, and can also include radiotherapy and/or bone marrow transplantation. There is an un-questioned need for more effective therapies and diagnostic tool for lymphoma. Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides whose three-dimensional structures are dictated by their sequences. The immense diversity in function and structure of nucleic acids...

  4. High affinity nucleic acid aptamers for streptavidin incorporated into bi-specific capture ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri-Alaoui, Abdessamad; Frigotto, Laura; Manville, Nick; Ibrahim, Jamal; Romby, Pascale; James, William

    2002-01-01

    We have isolated 2′-Fluoro-substituted RNA aptamers that bind to streptavidin (SA) with an affinity around 7 ± 1.8 nM, comparable with that of recently described peptide aptamers. Binding to SA was not prevented by prior saturation with biotin, enabling nucleic acid aptamers to form useful ternary complexes. Mutagenesis, secondary structure analysis, ribonuclease footprinting and deletion analysis provided evidence for the essential structural features of SA-binding aptamers. In order to prov...

  5. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies targeted to alpha-oligonucleotides. Characterisation and application in nucleic acid detection.

    OpenAIRE

    Cros, P.; Kurfürst, R; Allibert, P; Battail, N; Piga, N; Roig, V; Thuong, N T; Mandrand, B; Hélène, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the antigenicity of alpha-deoxyribonucleotides in order to develop a new tool for the detection of nucleic acid sequences for use in diagnostic applications. We describe four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) which recognize alpha-deoxyribonucleotides. Two were raised against a poly(alpha-dT) sequence and specifically recognized the alpha-dT nucleotide. Two were raised against a sequence containing all four common nucleotides as alpha-nucleotides and, surpr...

  7. Plant responses against invasive nucleic acids: RNA silencing and its suppression by plant viral pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Veria; Herman B Scholthof

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is a common strategy shared by eukaryotic organisms to regulate gene expression, and also operates as a defense mechanism against invasive nucleic acids such as viral transcripts. The silencing pathway is quite sophisticated in higher eukaryotes but the distinct steps and nature of effector complexes vary between and even within species. To counteract this defense mechanism viruses have evolved the ability to encode proteins that suppress silencing to protect their genomes from ...

  8. Experimental Warming Decreases the Average Size and Nucleic Acid Content of Marine Bacterial Communities

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara M.

    2016-05-23

    Organism size reduction with increasing temperature has been suggested as a universal response to global warming. Since genome size is usually correlated to cell size, reduction of genome size in unicells could be a parallel outcome of warming at ecological and evolutionary time scales. In this study, the short-term response of cell size and nucleic acid content of coastal marine prokaryotic communities to temperature was studied over a full annual cycle at a NE Atlantic temperate site. We used flow cytometry and experimental warming incubations, spanning a 6°C range, to analyze the hypothesized reduction with temperature in the size of the widespread flow cytometric bacterial groups of high and low nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA bacteria, respectively). Our results showed decreases in size in response to experimental warming, which were more marked in 0.8 μm pre-filtered treatment rather than in the whole community treatment, thus excluding the role of protistan grazers in our findings. Interestingly, a significant effect of temperature on reducing the average nucleic acid content (NAC) of prokaryotic cells in the communities was also observed. Cell size and nucleic acid decrease with temperature were correlated, showing a common mean decrease of 0.4% per °C. The usually larger HNA bacteria consistently showed a greater reduction in cell and NAC compared with their LNA counterparts, especially during the spring phytoplankton bloom period associated to maximum bacterial growth rates in response to nutrient availability. Our results show that the already smallest planktonic microbes, yet with key roles in global biogeochemical cycling, are likely undergoing important structural shrinkage in response to rising temperatures.

  9. Polycation cytotoxicity: a delicate matter for nucleic acid therapy-focus on polyethylenimine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Larsen, Anna K.; Hunter, A. Christy;

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a critical assessment of the major challenges facing nucleic acid therapeutics, focusing on the safety and efficacy of delivery strategies using synthetic polycations and particularly polyethylenimines. Deficiencies in the field and avenues for further research are identified...... that could help with design and selection of an expanded and improved library of safer polycationic vectors for clinical gene therapy and RNA interference delivery....

  10. Miniaturized PCR chips for nucleic acid amplification and analysis: latest advances and future trends

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of performing fast and small-volume nucleic acid amplification and analysis on a single chip has attracted great interest. Devices based on this idea, referred to as micro total analysis, microfluidic analysis, or simply ‘Lab on a chip’ systems, have witnessed steady advances over the last several years. Here, we summarize recent research on chip substrates, surface treatments, PCR reaction volume and speed, architecture, approaches to eliminating cross-contamination and contr...

  11. RNA:DNA Ratio and Other Nucleic Acid Derived Indices in Marine Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Chícharo; Maria Alexandra Chícharo

    2008-01-01

    Some of most used indicators in marine ecology are nucleic acid-derived indices. They can be divided by target levels in three groups: 1) at the organism level as ecophysiologic indicators, indicators such as RNA:DNA ratios, DNA:dry weight and RNA:protein, 2) at the population level, indicators such as growth rate, starvation incidence or fisheries impact indicators, and 3) at the community level, indicators such as trophic interactions, exergy indices and prey identification. The nu...

  12. Devices and approaches for generating specific high-affinity nucleic acid aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kylan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-09-01

    High-affinity and highly specific antibody proteins have played a critical role in biological imaging, medical diagnostics, and therapeutics. Recently, a new class of molecules called aptamers has emerged as an alternative to antibodies. Aptamers are short nucleic acid molecules that can be generated and synthesized in vitro to bind to virtually any target in a wide range of environments. They are, in principal, less expensive and more reproducible than antibodies, and their versatility creates possibilities for new technologies. Aptamers are generated using libraries of nucleic acid molecules with random sequences that are subjected to affinity selections for binding to specific target molecules. This is commonly done through a process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, in which target-bound nucleic acids are isolated from the pool, amplified to high copy numbers, and then reselected against the desired target. This iterative process is continued until the highest affinity nucleic acid sequences dominate the enriched pool. Traditional selections require a dozen or more laborious cycles to isolate strongly binding aptamers, which can take months to complete and consume large quantities of reagents. However, new devices and insights from engineering and the physical sciences have contributed to a reduction in the time and effort needed to generate aptamers. As the demand for these new molecules increases, more efficient and sensitive selection technologies will be needed. These new technologies will need to use smaller samples, exploit a wider range of chemistries and techniques for manipulating binding, and integrate and automate the selection steps. Here, we review new methods and technologies that are being developed towards this goal, and we discuss their roles in accelerating the availability of novel aptamers.

  13. Effects of Salinity: Calcium Interaction on Growth and Nucleic Acid Metabolism in Five Species of Chenopodiaceae

    OpenAIRE

    ABO-KASSEM, Essam El-Deen Mohaned

    2007-01-01

    Seed germination, seedling growth, and some enzyme activity of nucleic acid metabolism were studied in 5 members of Chenopodiaceae [Beta vulgaris L., Chenopodium quinoa Willd., Spinacea oleracea L., Allenrolfia occidentalis (S.Watson) Kuntze, Atriplex hortensis L.] under NaCl salinity alone or combined with 0.5 mM CaSO4. High salinity delayed radical emergence and decreased germination percentage in all plants. Combined CaSO4 reduced inhibition of seed germination in B. vulgaris, S. oleracea,...

  14. Polyanionic Carboxyethyl Peptide Nucleic Acids (ce-PNAs: Synthesis and DNA Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Kirillova

    Full Text Available New polyanionic modifications of polyamide nucleic acid mimics were obtained. Thymine decamers were synthesized from respective chiral α- and γ-monomers, and their enantiomeric purity was assessed. Here, we present the decamer synthesis, purification and characterization by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and an investigation of the hybridization properties of the decamers. We show that the modified γ-S-carboxyethyl-T10 PNA forms a stable triplex with polyadenine DNA.

  15. Evaluation of an Automated Nucleic Acid Extractor for Hepatitis C Virus Load Quantification▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martró, Elisa; García-Sierra, Nerea; González, Victoria; Saludes, Verónica; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicenç

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of molecular methods strongly motivates clinical laboratories to introduce automated nucleic acid extractors. We compared the easyMAG (bioMérieux) with a manual extraction method for hepatitis C virus (HCV) load quantification (RealTime HCV; Abbott). Both methods were comparable, and, therefore, the easyMAG is suitable to be implemented in our laboratory for the management of HCV-infected patients.

  16. Differential adsorption of nucleic acid bases: Relevance to the origin of life

    OpenAIRE

    Sowerby, Stephen J.; Cohn, Corey A; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Holm, Nils G

    2001-01-01

    The adsorption of organic molecules onto the surfaces of inorganic solids has long been considered a process relevant to the origin of life. We have determined the equilibrium adsorption isotherms for the nucleic acid purine and pyrimidine bases dissolved in water on the surface of crystalline graphite. The markedly different adsorption behavior of the bases describes an elutropic series: guanine > adenine > hypoxanthine > thymine > cytosine > uracil. We propose th...

  17. A possible mode of the specifi-crecognition of nucleic acids by proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Seven sets of protein target sites, which occur in several gene promoters, have been analyzed. The results suggest that there is a possible mode of specific recognition of double-helical nucleic acids by proteins. This recognition mode is related to a special topological property of double-helical DNA, which is termed base spatial pattern (BSP) of DNA segment. BSP is the spatial topological property determined only by the spatial arrangement of the bases on double-helical DNA segment.

  18. Recognition of Double Stranded RNA by Guanidine-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids (GPNA)

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Pankaj; Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Rozners, Eriks

    2011-01-01

    Double helical RNA has become an attractive target for molecular recognition because many non-coding RNAs play important roles in control of gene expression. Recently, we discovered that short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) bind strongly and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA via triple helix formation. Herein we tested if the molecular recognition of RNA can be enhanced by α-guanidine modification of PNA. Our study was motivated by the discovery of Ly and co-worker...

  19. Effects of Fixation and Storage of Human Tissue Samples on Nucleic Acid Preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Soo Kyung; Im, Joon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Han, Nayoung; Nam, Kyung Han; Seo, An Na; Lee, Hye Seung

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of recent advances in the molecular diagnosis of cancer patients, tissue quality has become more important in daily practice. Methods To evaluate the effects of fixative, duration of fixation, decalcification, and storage periods on nucleic acid integrity, DNA and RNA were extracted from gastrointestinal cancer tissue. The yield and purity were analyzed, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; 60 bp), β-actin (148 bp), and hu...

  20. Nucleic Acid Purification from FFPE on the Maxwell® 16 Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, K; English, J; Rekke, A.; Owles, C.; Mandrekar, M.; Mandrekar, P.; Hite, D.; Bellevue, S.; Horejsh, D; Urh, M.; Brazas, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples are commonly used for archiving pathological samples for molecular oncology labs and researchers. Traditional methods for the purification of nucleic acids from FFPE tissue samples are often labor intensive, include the use of hazardous organic reagents, and involve difficult pre-processing steps. Here, we describe an automated method for the purification of DNA and RNA from FFPE tissue sections using the Maxwell® 16 instrument that simplifies p...

  1. Nucleic-Acid-Binding Chromophores as Efficient Indicators of Aptamer-Target Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena Sarpong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding affinity and specificity of nucleic acid aptamers have made them valuable candidates for use as sensors in diagnostic applications. In particular, chromophore-functionalized aptamers offer a relatively simple format for detection and quantification of target molecules. We describe the use of nucleic-acid-staining reagents as an effective tool for detecting and signaling aptamer-target interactions. Aptamers varying in size and structure and targeting a range of molecules have been used in conjunction with commercially available chromophores to indicate and quantify the presence of cognate targets with high sensitivity and selectivity. Our assay precludes the covalent modification of nucleic acids and relies on the differential fluorescence signal of chromophores when complexed with aptamers with or without their cognate target. We also evaluate factors that are critical for the stability of the complex between the aptamer and chromophore in presence or absence of target molecules. Our results indicate the possibility of controlling those factors to enhance the sensitivity of target detection by the aptamers used in such assays.

  2. The lactococcal abortive infection protein AbiP is membrane-anchored and binds nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Susana; McGovern, Stephen; Plochocka, Danuta; Santos, Mário A; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Polard, Patrice; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2008-03-30

    AbiP, a lactococcal abortive phage infection system, has previously been shown to arrest phage bIL66M1 DNA replication around 10 min after infection and to inhibit the switch off of phage early transcripts. We report here the functional characterization and implication in the abortive infection phenotype of two domains identified in the AbiP sequence. We show that AbiP is a protein anchored to the membrane by an N-terminal membrane-spanning domain. Our results further suggest that membrane localization may be required for the anti-phage activity of AbiP. The remainder of the protein, which contains a putative nucleic acid binding domain, is shown to be located on the cytosolic side. Purified AbiP is shown to bind nucleic acids with an approximately 10-fold preference for RNA relative to ssDNA. AbiP interaction with both ssDNA and RNA molecules occurs in a sequence-independent manner. We have analyzed the effect of substitutions of aromatic and basic residues on the surface of the putative binding fold. In vitro and in vivo studies of these AbiP derivatives indicate that the previously reported effects on phage development might be dependent on the nucleic acid binding activity displayed by the membrane-bound protein.

  3. Fluorescence Quenching and Binding Interaction of l0-Methylacridinium Iodide to Nucleic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙险峰; 江致勤; 丁兵林

    2003-01-01

    Interaction of 10-methylacridinium iodide (MAI) as fluorescence probe with nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleic acids has been studied by UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that fluorescence of MAI is strongly quenched by the nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleic acids, respectively. The quenching follows the Stern-Volmer linear equation. The fluorescence quenching rate constant (kq) was measured to be 109-1010 (L/mol)/s within the range of diffusion-controlled rate limit, indicating that the interaction between MAI and nucleic acid and their precursors is characteristic of electron transfer mechanism. In addition, the binding interaction model of MAI to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was further investigated. Apparent hypochromism in the absorption spectra of MAI was observed when MAI binds to ct-DNA.Three spectroscopic methods, which include (1) UV spectroscopy, (2) fluorescence quenching of MAI, (3) competitive dual-probe method of MAI and ethidium bromide (EB), were utilized to determine the affinity binding constants (K)of MAI and ct-DNA. The binding constants K obtained from the above methods gave consistent data in the same range (1.0-5.5) ×104 L/mol, which lend credibility to these measurements. The binding site number was determined to be 1.9. The influence of thermal denaturation and phosphate concentration on the binding was examined. The binding model of MAI to ct-DNA including intercalation and outside binding was investigated.

  4. Microfluidic Preparation of Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes Improves Nonviral Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, Christopher L.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chao; Engbersen, Johan F. J.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-11-01

    As the designs of polymer systems used to deliver nucleic acids continue to evolve, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the basic bulk manufacturing techniques of the past will be insufficient to produce polymer-nucleic acid nanocomplexes that possess the uniformity, stability, and potency required for their successful clinical translation and widespread commercialization. Traditional bulk-prepared products are often physicochemically heterogeneous and may vary significantly from one batch to the next. Here we show that preparation of bioreducible nanocomplexes with an emulsion-based droplet microfluidic system produces significantly improved nanoparticles that are up to fifty percent smaller, more uniform, and are less prone to aggregation. The intracellular integrity of nanocomplexes prepared with this microfluidic method is significantly prolonged, as detected using a high-throughput flow cytometric quantum dot Förster resonance energy transfer nanosensor system. These physical attributes conspire to consistently enhance the delivery of both plasmid DNA and messenger RNA payloads in stem cells, primary cells, and human cell lines. Innovation in processing is necessary to move the field toward the broader clinical implementation of safe and effective nonviral nucleic acid therapeutics, and preparation with droplet microfluidics represents a step forward in addressing the critical barrier of robust and reproducible nanocomplex production.

  5. Study of nucleic acid-ligand interactions by capillary electrophoretic techniques: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaga, I O; Bodoki, E; Hambye, S; Blankert, B; Oprean, R

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of nucleic acids-ligand (proteins, nucleic acids or various xenobiotics) interactions is of fundamental value, representing the basis of complex mechanisms that govern life. The development of improved therapeutic strategies, as well as the much expected breakthroughs in case of currently untreatable diseases often relies on the elucidation of such biomolecular interactions. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is becoming an indispensable analytical tool in this field of study due to its high versatility, ease of method development, high separation efficiency, but most importantly due to its low sample and buffer volume requirements. Most often the availability of the compounds of interest is severely limited either by the complexity of the purification procedures or by the cost of their synthesis. Several reviews covering the investigation of protein-protein and protein-xenobiotics interactions by CE have been published in the recent literature; however none of them promotes the use of these techniques in the study of nucleic acid interactions. Therefore, various CE techniques applicable for such interaction studies are discussed in detail in the present review. The paper points out the particular features of these techniques with respect the estimation of the binding parameters, in analytical signal acquisition and data processing, as well as their current shortcomings and limitations.

  6. Operating Cooperatively (OC sensor for highly specific recognition of nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan M Cornett

    Full Text Available Molecular Beacon (MB probes have been extensively used for nucleic acid analysis because of their ability to produce fluorescent signal in solution instantly after hybridization. The indirect binding of MB probe to a target analyte offers several advantages, including: improved genotyping accuracy and the possibility to analyse folded nucleic acids. Here we report on a new design for MB-based sensor, called 'Operating Cooperatively' (OC, which takes advantage of indirect binding of MB probe to a target analyte. The sensor consists of two unmodified DNA strands, which hybridize to a universal MB probe and a nucleic acid analyte to form a fluorescent complex. OC sensors were designed to analyze two human SNPs and E. coli 16S rRNA. High specificity of the approach was demonstrated by the detection of true analyte in over 100 times excess amount of single base substituted analytes. Taking into account the flexibility in the design and the simplicity in optimization, we conclude that OC sensors may become versatile and efficient tools for instant DNA and RNA analysis in homogeneous solution.

  7. NaVirCept - Nucleic Acid-Based Anti-Viral Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccines are generally considered to be the most effective countermeasures to bacterial and viral diseases, however, licensed vaccines against many disease agents are either not available or their efficacies have not been demonstrated. Vaccines are generally agent specific in terms of treatment spectrum and are subject to defeat through natural mutation or through directed efforts. With respect to viral therapeutics, one of the major limitations associated with antiviral drugs is acquired drug resistance caused by antigenic shift or drift. A number of next-generation prophylactic and/or therapeutic measures are on the horizon. Of these, nucleic acid-based drugs are showing great antiviral potential. These drugs elicit long-lasting, broad spectrum protective immune responses, especially to respiratory viral pathogens. The Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral (NaVirCept) project provides the opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of novel medical countermeasures against military-significant endemic and other viral threat agents. This project expands existing DRDC drug delivery capability development, in the form of proprietary liposome intellectual property, by coupling it with leading-edge nucleic acid-based technology to deliver effective medical countermeasures that will protect deployed personnel and the warfighter against a spectrum of viral disease agents. The technology pathway will offer a means to combat emerging viral diseases or modified threat agents such as the bird flu or reconstructed Spanish flu without going down the laborious, time-consuming and expensive paths to develop countermeasures for each new and/or emerging viral disease organism.(author)

  8. Self-assembling micelle-like nanoparticles with detachable envelopes for enhanced delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battogtokh, Gantumur; Ko, Young Tag

    2014-03-01

    In spite of the great potential of nucleic acids as therapeutic agents, the clinical application of nucleic acid therapeutics requires the development of effective systemic delivery strategies. In an effort to develop effective nucleic acid delivery systems suitable for clinical application, we previously reported a self-assembling micelle-like nanoparticle that was based on phospholipid-polyethylenimine conjugates, i.e., "micelle-like nanoparticles" (MNPs). In this study, we aimed to improve the system by enhancing the efficiency of intracellular delivery of the payload via pH-responsive detachment of the monolayer envelope and release of the nucleic acid therapeutics upon reaching the target tissues with an acidic pH, e.g., tumors. The acid-cleavable phospholipid-polyethylenimine conjugate was synthesized via hydrazone bond, and acid-cleavable MNPs were then prepared and characterized as before. We evaluated the acid-cleavable MNP construct for in vitro and in vivo nucleic acid delivery efficiency using cultured tumor cells and tumor-bearing mice. The acid-cleavable nanocarrier showed an enhanced cellular delivery at pH 6.5 as compared to pH 7.4, whereas the noncleavable nanocarrier did not show any differences. Tail vein injections also led to enhanced intracellular uptake of the acid-cleavable nanocarrier compared to the noncleavable nanocarrier into tumor cells of tumor-bearing mice although no significant difference was observed in total tumor accumulation.

  9. Polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulphonate film based disposable nucleic acid biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Nirmal [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Arora, Kavita [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, Surinder P. [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Pandey, Manoj K. [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, Harpal [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Malhotra, Bansi D. [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)]. E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com

    2007-04-18

    Double stranded calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid entrapped polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulphonate (dsCT-DNA-PPy-PVS) films fabricated onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass plates have been used to detect organophosphates such as chlorpyrifos and malathion. These disposable dsCT-DNA-PPy-PVS/ITO bioelectrodes have been characterized using cyclic voltammetry, Fourier-transform-infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. These biosensing electrodes have a response time of 30 s, are stable for about 5 months when stored in desiccated conditions at 25 deg. C and can be used to amperometrically detect chlorpyrifos (0.0016-0.025 ppm) and malathion (0.17-5.0), respectively. The additive effect of these pesticides on the amperometric response of the disposable dsCT-DNA-PPy-PVS/ITO bioelectrodes has also been investigated.

  10. A review of room temperature storage of biospecimen tissue and nucleic acids for anatomic pathology laboratories and biorepositories

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Jerry J.; Mirsadraei, Leili; Sanchez, Desiree E.; Wilson, Ryan W.; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Gregory M Lucey; Wei, Bowen; Singer, Elyse J.; Mareninov, Sergey; Yong, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen biospecimens are crucial for translational research and contain well preserved nucleic acids and protein. However, the risk for catastrophic freezer failure as well as space, cost, and environmental concerns argue for evaluating long-term room temperature storage alternatives. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues have great value but their use is limited by cross-linking and fragmentation of nucleic acids, as well as loss of enzymatic activity. Stabilization solutions can no...

  11. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters.

  12. 核酸疫苗研究进展%Research progress in nucleic acid vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵杰; 梁争论

    2014-01-01

    核酸疫苗是将编码某种抗原的外源基因(DNA或RNA)直接导入动物体细胞内,通过宿主细胞表达系统合成抗原,诱导宿主产生对该抗原的免疫应答,以达到防治疾病目的的一类新型疫苗.研究表明,核酸疫苗不仅具有良好的免疫原性和安全性,而且由于核酸更易于修饰和改造,使核酸疫苗较以往蛋白疫苗具有更大的灵活性.在实际生产中,核酸疫苗的制备和纯化工艺较为简单,生产周期短,生产成本低,且易于制成多价疫苗,因此极有可能成为下一个成功应用于人类的新型疫苗.此文对核酸疫苗的研究进展做一综述.%Nucleic acid vaccine is a new type of vaccine,which can deliver foreign genes (DNA or RNA) encoding antigens of interest directly into animal cells,produce antigens through host cell expression system,and further induce immune response in the host.It is reported that nucleic acid vaccine is better than protein vaccine because it is immunogenic and safe,and easy to be modified and manufactured.In practical production,nucleic acid vaccine has many advantages,such as easy preparation and purification,short production cycle,low production cost,and easy to form multivalent vaccines.Therefore,it is hopeful that nucleic acid vaccine will become a successful vaccine for human use.This review summarizes research progress of nucleic acid vaccine.

  13. MAZ-binding G4-decoy with locked nucleic acid and twisted intercalating nucleic acid modifications suppresses KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells and delays tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, Susanna; Zorzet, Sonia; Rapozzi, Valentina;

    2013-01-01

    KRAS mutations are primary genetic lesions leading to pancreatic cancer. The promoter of human KRAS contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) that can fold in G4-DNA structures binding to nuclear proteins, including MAZ (myc-associated zinc-finger). Here, we report that MAZ activates KRAS...... transcription. To knockdown oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells, we designed oligonucleotides that mimic one of the G-quadruplexes formed by NHE (G4-decoys). To increase their nuclease resistance, two locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications were introduced at the 3'-end, whereas to enhance the folding...... the Kaplan-Meier median survival time by 70%. Together, our data show that MAZ-specific G4-decoys mimicking a KRAS quadruplex are promising for pancreatic cancer therapy....

  14. Nucleic Acid Encoding A Lectin-Derived Progenitor Cell Preservation Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, M. Gabriella; Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Moore, Jeffrey G.

    2001-10-30

    The invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a protein that is effective to preserve progenitor cells, such as hematopoietic progenitor cells. The nucleic acid comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:1, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof. The encoded protein has an amino acid sequence that comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:2, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof that contains an amino acid sequence TNNVLQVT. Methods of using the encoded protein for preserving progenitor cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo are also described. The invention, therefore, include methods such as myeloablation therapies for cancer treatment wherein myeloid reconstitution is facilitated by means of the specified protein. Other therapeutic utilities are also enabled through the invention, for example, expanding progenitor cell populations ex vivo to increase chances of engraftation, improving conditions for transporting and storing progenitor cells, and facilitating gene therapy to treat and cure a broad range of life-threatening hematologic diseases.

  15. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  16. CJD and Scrapie Require Agent-Associated Nucleic Acids for Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsios, Sotirios; Manuelidis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Unlike Alzheimer's and most other neurodegenerative diseases, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) are all caused by actively replicating infectious particles of viral size and density. Different strain-specific TSE agents cause CJD, kuru, scrapie and BSE, and all behave as latent viruses that evade adaptive immune responses and can persist for years in lymphoreticular tissues. A foreign viral structure with a nucleic acid genome best explains these TSE strains and their endemic and epidemic spread in susceptible species. Nevertheless, it is widely believed that host prion protein (PrP), without any genetic material, encodes all these strains. We developed rapid infectivity assays that allowed us to reproducibly isolate infectious particles where >85% of the starting titer separated from the majority of host components, including PrP. Remarkably, digestion of all forms of PrP did not reduce brain particle titers. To ask if TSE agents, as other viruses, require nucleic acids, we exposed high titer FU-CJD and 22L scrapie particles to potent nucleases. Both agent-strains were propagated in GT1 neuronal cells to avoid interference by complex degenerative brain changes that can impede nuclease digestions. After exposure to nucleases that are active in sarkosyl, infectivity of both agents was reproducibly reduced by ≥99%. No gold-stained host proteins or any form of PrP were visibly altered by these nucleases. In contrast, co-purifying protected mitochondrial DNA and circular SPHINX DNAs were destroyed. These findings demonstrate that TSE agents require protected genetic material to infect their hosts, and should reopen investigation of essential agent nucleic acids. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1947-1958, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773845

  17. Weigners fixative-an alternative to formalin fixation for histology with improved preservation of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R; von Deetzen, M; Weiss, A Th; Weigner, J; Weigner, F; Plendl, J; Gruber, A D

    2013-01-01

    Formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue storage in histopathology. However, FFPE has disadvantages in terms of user health, environment, and nucleic acid integrity. Weigners fixative has been suggested as an alternative for embalming cadavers in human and veterinary anatomy. The present study tested the applicability of Weigners for histology and immunohistochemistry and the preservation of nucleic acids. To this end, a set of organs was fixed for 2 days and up to 6 months in Weigners (WFPE) or formalin. WFPE tissues from the skin, brain, lymphatic tissues, liver, and muscle had good morphologic preservation, comparable to formalin fixation. The quality of kidney and lung samples was inferior to FFPE material due to less accentuated nuclear staining and retention of proteinaceous interstitial fluids. Azan, Turnbull blue, toluidin, and immunohistochemical stainings for CD79a, cytokeratin, vimentin, and von Willebrand factor led to comparable results with both fixates. Of note, immunohistochemical detection of CD3 was possible after 6 months in WFPE but not in FFPE tissues. mRNA, miRNA, and DNA from WFPE tissues had superior quality and allowed for amplification of miRNA, 400-bp-long mRNA, and 1000-bp-long DNA fragments after 6 months of fixation in WFPE. In summary, Weigners fixative is a nonhazardous alternative to formalin, which provides a good morphologic preservation of most organs, a similar sensitivity for protein detection, and a superior preservation of nucleic acids. Weigners may therefore be a promising alternative to cryopreservation and may be embraced by people affected by formalin allergies.

  18. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  19. Cell-free nucleic acids as a non-invasive route for investigating atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerne, Darko; Bajalo, Jana Lukac

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is directly linked with atherosclerotic burden and cell-free nucleic acids (cf-NA) analysis has recently emerged as a novel research tool in atherosclerosis practice and research. cf-NA are nucleic acids (DNA, mRNA, miRNA, mitochondrial DNA) found in plasma and cell-free fractions of various other biological fluids. They have all the characteristics of the nucleic acids in the cells of their origin, thus constituting an emerging field for non-invasive assessment. Initially, quantitative and qualitative analysis of cf-NA has been accepted as clinically useful in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis, and in the diagnosis and monitoring of numerous cancers. As to atherosclerosis, cf-NA analysis poses an important challenge in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of acute coronary syndrome, in prediction of cardiovascular disease, in non-invasive early detection of atherosclerosis and understanding its pathological mechanism in vivo, in assessing various issues of treatment for atherosclerosis in vivo, and in the unique simultaneous measurement of mRNA levels and protein concentrations in a single sample of plasma. Examples of its use are presented in this review. Besides the advances in technologies, the precise evaluation and optimization of pre-analytical and analytical aspects of cf-NA analysis have impacted importantly on the reliability of test results. We have, therefore, reviewed the most important analytical considerations. Further clinical studies and analytical improvements will answer the question as to whether cf-NA, as novel biomarkers, can be reliably applied clinically in non-invasive, early diagnosis and monitoring of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of patients who could suffer from acute coronary syndrome. PMID:24320033

  20. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection.

  1. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  2. Improved thrombin binding aptamer by incorporation of a single unlocked nucleic acid monomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Anna; Hernandez, Frank J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt;

    2011-01-01

    A 15-mer DNA aptamer (named TBA) adopts a G-quadruplex structure that strongly inhibits fibrin-clot formation by binding to thrombin. We have performed thermodynamic analysis, binding affinity and biological activity studies of TBA variants modified by unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers. UNA...... that a UNA monomer is allowed in many positions of the aptamer without significantly changing the thrombin-binding properties. The biological effect of a selection of the modified aptamers was tested by a thrombin time assay and showed that most of the UNA-modified TBAs possess anticoagulant properties...

  3. Restoration of nucleic acid biosynthesis after clinical death and factors stimulating the process in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikova, A S; Petukhova, L M; Pogossova, A V; Vinarskaya, A A; Nikulin, V I

    1975-01-01

    The biosynthesis of RNA and DNA falls almost to zero in 60 min after the death of rabbits from anoxia, in all the organs of the body. Rapid artificial cooling of the rabbits to 20 degrees C undertaken within 10 min after death preserved nucleic acid biosynthesis and permitted restoration of life 3-4 h after death, with recovery beginning in 60 min. During the reanimation the addition of ATP to the blood stimulated the restoration of RNA biosynthesis in the spinal cord to a considerable extent; the addition of cocarboxylase to the blood promoted cardiac RNA biosynthesis as well as cardiac and pancreatic DNA biosynthesis during recovery. PMID:1197938

  4. Question 1: Peptide Nucleic Acids and the Origin and Homochirality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  5. Question 1: Peptide nucleic acids and the origin and homochirality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-10-01

    The possibilities of pseudo peptide DNA mimics like PNA (peptide nucleic acid) having a role for the prebiotic origin of life prior to an RNA world is discussed. In particular a scenario is proposed in which protocells with an achiral genetic material through several generations stepwise is converted into a chiral genetic material, e.g., by incorporation of RNA units. Provided that a sufficiently large sequence space is occupied, a selection process based on catalytic function in which a single cell (first common ancestor) has a definite evolutionary advantage, selection of this cell would by contingency also lock it into homochirality.

  6. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids by PNA hybridization directed co-localization of fluorescent beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe;

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a pair of biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting two sequences in 18S rRNA (from the parasite Trypanosoma brucei) at a distance of 191 nt (corresponding to maximum distance of ca. 60 nm) from each other. The PNA probes were individually bound to (strept....... The assay detected the parasite 18S rRNA down to 1.6 fmol while there was no such co-localization visible with human 18S rRNA not containing the PNA targets. Furthermore, the assay showed positive detection with 1.6 ng of total RNA (corresponding to RNA from ca. 300 parasites). Upon further optimization...

  7. Improved Inhibition of Telomerase by Short Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids under Molecular Crowding Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Tani; Pradhan, Devranjan; Géci, Imrich;

    2012-01-01

    crowding conditions mimicking physiological milieu, stabilization of the telomeric G-quadruplex is often lost. We attempted to demonstrate the enhanced G-quadruplex stabilizing ability under molecular conditions by using twisted intercalating nucleic acids (TINA)-modified oligonucleotides. We have shown......-based telomerase repeat amplification assay (TRAP) assay as well as nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based TRAP, we demonstrate remarkable enhancement in their anti-telomerase activity even under molecular crowding conditions. This is the first time in which a G-quadruplex stabilizing agent has...... demonstrated enhanced activity even under molecular crowding conditions....

  8. Action of polyvinylsulphate on metabolism of nucleic acids affected by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyvinyl sulphate (PVS) as a nuclease inhibitor was used to protect endogenic nucleic acids from irradiation-activated nucleases. The survival of 700 rad irradiated rats was 33% and 60% in the control and PVS-treated (25 mg/kg) groups, respectively. PVS intravenously injected to 1000 R irradiated animals at 50 mg/kg inhibited DNase I in the liver and spleen and stimulated DNase 2 in the liver. A partial restoration of DNA level in the liver was observed simultaneously with the inhibitory effect on alkaline nucleases (no restoration effect had been found in the spleen)

  9. Synthesis of Thermostable Azo-type Photoswitches towards Photoreaulatina Nucleic Acid Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; GAO Shuang; ZHOU Kai; CHEN Wenbin; NIU Congwei; XI Zhen

    2009-01-01

    In order to design efficient and thermostable azo-type regulators,a series of azo-type compounds were synthesized and characterized.While introducing an inductive electron-withdrawing group to an azobenzene para or meta-position,the obtained compound can be an excellent photoswitch.3,3'-Azo-di-benzyl alcohol was designed and synthesized as one of therrnostable and efficient photoswitches,which can efficiently reversibly photoregulate the nucleic acid structure with its cis-isomer being sufficiently stable at physiological temperature.

  10. The orientation of binding of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase on nucleic acid hybrids.

    OpenAIRE

    DeStefano, J J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) to heteroduplexes was examined using a substrate consisting of a 42 nt chimeric nucleic acid composed. (5'-->3') of 23 nt of RNA and 19 of DNA. This chimera was hybridized to an internal region of a relatively long complementary DNA or RNA. When the chimera was bound to DNA and conditions limiting cleavage to a single binding event between the enzyme and substrate were employed initial RNase H-directed cleavages occurred 19-21 nt from the chimera ...

  11. Use of molecular nuclear methods in communicable diseases: From nucleic acid hybridization to proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of decades of intensive research on communicable diseases, infection agents still remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. These rates have driven a major resurgence in biological research efforts for the identification of new targets for vaccine development, drugs and diagnostics assays products. Molecular nuclear techniques focused in nucleic acid hybridization and DNA amplification and more recently proteomic approaches are employed to address questions related to communicable diseases. In nucleic acid hybridization, denatured DNA or RNA is immobilized on an inert support, so that bound sequences are available for hybridization with an added nucleic acid radioactive probe to facilitate analysis. After extensive washing, hybrids are detected by autoradiography or phosphoimager analyzer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), is a very sensitive method for nucleic acid amplification used when the targets are scarce in the cells or in clinical material. Differently, the challenge of proteome analysis lies with the task of achieving a combination of high-throughput screening while maintaining high sensitivity for the detection of low copy number proteins. Many different detection technologies have been developed to improve visualization of proteins in protein analysis and radiolabelling is one of the strategies for protein detection. For metabolic experiments, proteins must be labelled with an appropriate radioactive isotope in vivo prior to isolation by electrophoretic analysis. Additionally, protein phosphorylation, an important post-translational modification, is analyzed by using 32P for in vivo labelling of phosphorylated proteins and further identification by mass spectrometry. The major problems which limit proteomic studies deal with the comparative analysis of 2DE gel images. In conventional methodology, the protein samples to be compared are separated independently on different gels. Using a 2DE image analysis software spots are

  12. Single and double stranded DNA detection using locked nucleic acid (LNA) functionalized nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Stokes, Robert; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2008-08-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides can be used for the detection of specific sequences of DNA. We show that gold nanoparticles modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) form stronger duplexes with a single stranded DNA target and offer better discrimination against single base pair mismatches than analogous DNA probes. Our LNA nanoparticle probes have also been used to detect double stranded DNA through triplex formation, whilst still maintaining selectivity for only complementary targets. Nanoparticle conjugates embedded with suitable surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) labels have been synthesized enabling simultaneous detection and identification of multiple DNA targets.

  13. Characterization of the interaction between collectin 11 (CL-11, CL-K1) and nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Brandt, Jette; Iyer, Sinduja S C;

    2013-01-01

    to changes in ionic strength and pH. Competition studies show that CL-11 binds to nucleic acids and carbohydrates via separate binding-sites and oligomericity appears crucial for binding activity. Combined interaction with DNA and mannan strongly increases binding avidity. By surface plasmon resonance we...... estimate the dissociation constant for the binding between CL-11 and double stranded DNA oligonucleotides to KD=9-20nM. In an in vitro assay we find that CL-11 binds to DNA coated surfaces, which leads to C4b deposition via MASP-2. We propose that CL-11, e.g. via complement, may play a role in response...

  14. Hydrogen bond removal of pterin derivative whose structure is similar to nucleic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogawa, Mitsuru; Arai, Toshiyuki; Endo, Nobuyuki; Pack, Seung Pil; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Pterin, an analog of guanine, is an electron transfer compound in biological systems. Among the analogs, 6-formylpterin (6FP) has been demonstrated to have many marked physiological and pharmacological activities and it is, therefore, worthwhile to elucidate whole mechanism of its activities. Unfortunately, however, 6FP is hardly soluble in water and organic solvents. Like nucleic acid bases, 6FP makes intermolecular hydrogen bonds and forms stacking structure causing such drawback nature. This has made mechanistic studies on 6FP activities extremely difficult. In this study, we carried out derivatization for 6FP and succeeded in increasing water solubility with maintaining its physiological activities. PMID:17150758

  15. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  16. Antibacterial Peptide Nucleic Acid-Antimicrobial Peptide (PNA-AMP) Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anna Mette; Bonke, Gitte; Larsen, Camilla Josephine;

    2016-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers constitute a novel class of potential antibiotics that inhibit bacterial growth via specific knockdown of essential gene expression. However, discovery of efficient, nontoxic delivery vehicles for such PNA oligomers has remained a challenge....... In the present study we show that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with an intracellular mode of action can be efficient vehicles for bacterial delivery of an antibacterial PNA targeting the essential acpP gene. The results demonstrate that buforin 2-A (BF2-A), drosocin, oncocin 10, Pep-1-K, KLW-9,13-a, (P59→W59...

  17. Coupling Two Different Nucleic Acid Circuits in an Enzyme-Free Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Ellington

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA circuits have proven to be useful amplifiers for diagnostic applications, in part because of their modularity and programmability. In order to determine whether different circuits could be modularly stacked, we used a catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA circuit to initiate a hybridization chain reaction (HCR circuit. In response to an input nucleic acid sequence, the CHA reaction accumulates immobilized duplexes and HCR elongates these duplexes. With fluorescein as a reporter each of these processes yielded 10-fold signal amplification in a convenient 96-well format. The modular circuit connections also allowed the output reporter to be readily modified to a G-quadruplex-DNAzyme that yielded a fluorescent signal.

  18. Nucleic acids encoding plant glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-03-29

    Glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding GPT proteins, and uses thereof are disclosed. Provided herein are various GPT proteins and GPT gene coding sequences isolated from a number of plant species. As disclosed herein, GPT proteins share remarkable structural similarity within plant species, and are active in catalyzing the synthesis of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (2-oxoglutaramate), a powerful signal metabolite which regulates the function of a large number of genes involved in the photosynthesis apparatus, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism.

  19. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  20. [Rapidly labelled low molecular weight components in nucleic acid preparations from plant cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G; Grotha, R

    1974-09-01

    After pulse-labelling with [(3)H]nucleosides and [(3)H]orotic acid of freely suspended callus cells of Petroselinum sativum and tissue fragments of the liverwort Riella helicophylla, rapidly labelled low molecular weight components were detected among the total nucleic acids when these were extracted in the presence of Mg(2+) and finally precipitated with alcohol. These highly labelled species could clearly be distinguished from the 5 S- and 4 S-RNA on the basis of their migration in agarose-polyacrylamide gels (2.4%) and their elution from Sephadex G-150 columns. No degradation was obtained with DNase and RNase. By using [(14)C]ATP as a marker it was found that the low molecular components consisted mainly of nucleoside triphosphates. Only small amounts of nucleoside diphosphates were detected, which were obviously formed by degradation of the former. Nucleic acid preparations free of nucleoside phosphates were obtained by using Mg-free extraction buffers containing EDTA. PMID:24458196

  1. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L; Mohn, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanogram...

  2. Resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral characteristics of interaction of nucleic acids with some cationic surfactantsand their analytical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘绍璞; 胡小莉; 罗红群; 范莉

    2002-01-01

    In near neutral medium, the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensities of an alone cationic surfactant and nucleic acid are very weak. However, when they combine with each other to form a complex, the RRS intensity of the solution is enhanced greatly. In this paper the reactions of five cationic surfactants with nucleic acids have been studied. The results show that the reaction conditions and RRS spectral characteristics of these reactions are similar, but their sensitivities are obviously different. Among them, the sensitivity of cetyldimethyl benzylammonium chloride (CDBAC) with an aryl and large molecular weight is the highest, while that of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) without aryl and with small molecular weight is the lowest. The detection limits for ctDNA and yRNA of the former are 6.6 and 29.4 ng@mL?1, while that of the latter are 13.3 and 53.6 ng@mL?1. The method has better selectivity and can be applied to the determination of trace amounts of nucleic acids. Furthermore, it is discovered in the investigation that not only the RRS intensity is related to the structure and molecular weight of the cationic surfactants, but also the change of the RRS intensity is closely related to the conformational change of nucleic acid. Therefore, the RRS method can be expanded to become a useful way to study the nucleic acid conformation.

  3. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis. PMID:26807518

  4. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. PMID:26612862

  5. A novel silicon based mags-biosensor for nucleic acid detection by magnetoelectronic transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eloisa Castagna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a novel silicon biosensor based on magnetoelectronic transduction (MAGS for nucleic acid detection. The mags-biosensor is a planar device composed by a primary micro-coil, and two secondary coils which produce a differential voltage due to the induced magnetic field. The presence of magnetic material over one of the secondary coils causes variations of induced magnetic field density that in turn results in a total output voltage different from zero. The voltage variation, therefore, is a measure of the amount of magnetic material present in the active zone. A device sensitivity of 5.1 mV/ng and a resolution of 0.008 ng have been observed. The biosensor also presents a micro-heater and a thermal sensor respectively to set and read-out the chip temperature: this aspect enables the device to be used for several biochemical applications that need temperature control and activation such for example nucleic acid amplification (real-time PCR, antigen- antibody detection (immune-assay and SNP detection.

  6. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  7. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattawut Yotapan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  8. An overlooked riddle of life's origins: energy-dependent nucleic acid unzipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovác, Ladislav; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáska, L'ubomír

    2003-01-01

    The imposing progress in understanding contemporary life forms on Earth and in manipulating them has not been matched by a comparable progress in understanding the origins of life. This paper argues that a crucial problem of unzipping of the double helix molecule of nucleic acid during its replication has been underrated, if not plainly overlooked, in the theories of life's origin and evolution. A model is presented of how evolution may have solved the problem in its early phase. Similar to several previous models, the model envisages the existence of a protocell, in which osmotic disbalance is being created by accumulation of synthetic products resulting in expansion and division of the protocell. Novel in the model is the presence in the protocell of a double-stranded nucleic acid, with each of its two strands being affixed by its 3'-terminus to the opposite sides of the membrane of a protocell. In the course of the protocell expansion, osmotic force is utilized to pull the two strands longitudinally in opposite directions, unzipping the helix and partitioning the strands between the two daughter protocells. The model is also being used as a background for arguments of why life need operate in cycles. Many formal models of life's origin and evolution have not taken into account the fact that logical possibility does not equal thermodynamic feasibility. A system of self-replication has to consist of both replicators and replicants. PMID:15008415

  9. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  10. Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in Danish overweight/obese children and youths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloppenborg, Julie Tonsgaard; Fonvig, Cilius Esman; Johannesen, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    study we investigated the relationships between urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation concentrations and the degree of obesity and glucose metabolism in overweight compared to lean children. 42 (24 girls) and 35 lean (19 girls) children and adolescents were recruited from the Registry of the Danish...... or glucose metabolism in lean and obese children. However, sub-analyses adjusted for age, sex and the degree of obesity showed positive associations between the two hour glucose (2 h glucose) and the urinary markers 8-oxoGuo (p=0.02, r(2)= 0.63) and 8-oxodG (p=0.046, r(2)= 0.48) and between the insulinogenic...... index and 8-oxoGuo (p=0.03, r(2)=0.60) in the 12 obese children exhibiting impaired glucose tolerance. Excretion of the urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and the degree of obesity or the glucose metabolism were not associated in this study. Nevertheless, obese children with impaired glucose...

  11. Circulating nucleic acids: a new class of physiological mobile genetic elements [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraneel Mittra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile genetic elements play a major role in shaping biotic genomes and bringing about evolutionary transformations. Herein, a new class of mobile genetic elements is proposed in the form of circulating nucleic acids (CNAs derived from the billions of cells that die in the body every day due to normal physiology and that act intra-corporeally. A recent study shows that CNAs can freely enter into healthy cells, integrate into their genomes by a unique mechanism and cause damage to their DNA. Being ubiquitous and continuously arising, CNA-induced DNA damage may be the underlying cause of ageing, ageing-related disabilities and the ultimate demise of the organism. Thus, DNA seems to act in the paradoxical roles of both preserver and destroyer of life. This new class of mobile genetic element may be relevant not only to multi-cellular organisms with established circulatory systems, but also to other multi-cellular organisms in which intra-corporeal mobility of nucleic acids may be mediated via the medium of extra-cellular fluid.

  12. Superresolution intrinsic fluorescence imaging of chromatin utilizing native, unmodified nucleic acids for contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay M.; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Urban, Ben E.; Chandler, John E.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing the nanoscale intracellular structures formed by nucleic acids, such as chromatin, in nonperturbed, structurally and dynamically complex cellular systems, will help expand our understanding of biological processes and open the next frontier for biological discovery. Traditional superresolution techniques to visualize subdiffractional macromolecular structures formed by nucleic acids require exogenous labels that may perturb cell function and change the very molecular processes they intend to study, especially at the extremely high label densities required for superresolution. However, despite tremendous interest and demonstrated need, label-free optical superresolution imaging of nucleotide topology under native nonperturbing conditions has never been possible. Here we investigate a photoswitching process of native nucleotides and present the demonstration of subdiffraction-resolution imaging of cellular structures using intrinsic contrast from unmodified DNA based on the principle of single-molecule photon localization microscopy (PLM). Using DNA-PLM, we achieved nanoscopic imaging of interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes, allowing a quantitative analysis of the DNA occupancy level and a subdiffractional analysis of the chromosomal organization. This study may pave a new way for label-free superresolution nanoscopic imaging of macromolecular structures with nucleotide topologies and could contribute to the development of new DNA-based contrast agents for superresolution imaging. PMID:27535934

  13. Superresolution intrinsic fluorescence imaging of chromatin utilizing native, unmodified nucleic acids for contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Almassalha, Luay M; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Urban, Ben E; Chandler, John E; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F; Backman, Vadim

    2016-08-30

    Visualizing the nanoscale intracellular structures formed by nucleic acids, such as chromatin, in nonperturbed, structurally and dynamically complex cellular systems, will help expand our understanding of biological processes and open the next frontier for biological discovery. Traditional superresolution techniques to visualize subdiffractional macromolecular structures formed by nucleic acids require exogenous labels that may perturb cell function and change the very molecular processes they intend to study, especially at the extremely high label densities required for superresolution. However, despite tremendous interest and demonstrated need, label-free optical superresolution imaging of nucleotide topology under native nonperturbing conditions has never been possible. Here we investigate a photoswitching process of native nucleotides and present the demonstration of subdiffraction-resolution imaging of cellular structures using intrinsic contrast from unmodified DNA based on the principle of single-molecule photon localization microscopy (PLM). Using DNA-PLM, we achieved nanoscopic imaging of interphase nuclei and mitotic chromosomes, allowing a quantitative analysis of the DNA occupancy level and a subdiffractional analysis of the chromosomal organization. This study may pave a new way for label-free superresolution nanoscopic imaging of macromolecular structures with nucleotide topologies and could contribute to the development of new DNA-based contrast agents for superresolution imaging. PMID:27535934

  14. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  15. Spatio-Temporal Variations of High and Low Nucleic Acid Content Bacteria in an Exorheic River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Hao, Zhenyu; Ma, Lili; Ji, Yurui; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) content are commonly observed in aquatic environments. To date, limited knowledge is available on their temporal and spatial variations in freshwater environments. Here an investigation of HNA and LNA bacterial abundance and their flow cytometric characteristics was conducted in an exorheic river (Haihe River, Northern China) over a one year period covering September (autumn) 2011, December (winter) 2011, April (spring) 2012, and July (summer) 2012. The results showed that LNA and HNA bacteria contributed similarly to the total bacterial abundance on both the spatial and temporal scale. The variability of HNA on abundance, fluorescence intensity (FL1) and side scatter (SSC) were more sensitive to environmental factors than that of LNA bacteria. Meanwhile, the relative distance of SSC between HNA and LNA was more variable than that of FL1. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that the influence of geographical distance (reflected by the salinity gradient along river to ocean) and temporal changes (as temperature variation due to seasonal succession) on the patterns of LNA and HNA were stronger than the effects of nutrient conditions. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the distribution of LNA and HNA bacteria, including the abundance, FL1 and SSC, was controlled by different variables. The results suggested that LNA and HNA bacteria might play different ecological roles in the exorheic river.

  16. High-throughput optical sensing of nucleic acids in a nanopore array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Castell, Oliver K.; Bayley, Hagan; Wallace, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Protein nanopores such as α-hemolysin and MspA can potentially be used to sequence long strands of DNA quickly and at low cost. In order to provide high-speed sequencing, large arrays of nanopores are required that allow the nanopores to individually addressed, but current nanopore sequencing methods rely on ionic current measurements and such methods are likely to prove difficult to scale up. Here, we show that, by optically encoding the ionic flux through protein nanopores, the discrimination of nucleic acid sequences and the detection of sequence-specific nucleic acid binding events can be parallelized. We make optical recordings at a density of ~104 nanopores per mm2 in a single droplet interface bilayer. Nanopore blockades can discriminate between DNAs with sub-pA equivalent resolution, and specific miRNA sequences can be identified by differences in unzipping kinetics. By creating an array of 2500 bilayers with a micro-patterned hydrogel chip, we are also able to load different samples into specific bilayers, suitable for high-throughput nanopore recording. PMID:26322943

  17. lncRNATargets: A platform for lncRNA target prediction based on nucleic acid thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruifeng; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have supported that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform various functions in various critical biological processes. Advanced experimental and computational technologies allow access to more information on lncRNAs. Determining the functions and action mechanisms of these RNAs on a large scale is urgently needed. We provided lncRNATargets, which is a web-based platform for lncRNA target prediction based on nucleic acid thermodynamics. The nearest-neighbor (NN) model was used to calculate binging-free energy. The main principle of NN model for nucleic acid assumes that identity and orientation of neighbor base pairs determine stability of a given base pair. lncRNATargets features the following options: setting of a specific temperature that allow use not only for human but also for other animals or plants; processing all lncRNAs in high throughput without RNA size limitation that is superior to any other existing tool; and web-based, user-friendly interface, and colored result displays that allow easy access for nonskilled computer operators and provide better understanding of results. This technique could provide accurate calculation on the binding-free energy of lncRNA-target dimers to predict if these structures are well targeted together. lncRNATargets provides high accuracy calculations, and this user-friendly program is available for free at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/lrt/ . PMID:27306075

  18. Tailoring Conformation-Induced Chromism of Polythiophene Copolymers for Nucleic Acid Assay at Resource Limited Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwar, Deepa; Ammanath, Gopal; Cheema, Jamal Ahmed; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Here we report on the design and synthesis of cationic water-soluble thiophene copolymers as reporters for colorimetric detection of microRNA (miRNA) in human plasma. Poly(3-alkoxythiophene) (PT) polyelectrolytes with controlled ratios of pendant groups such as triethylamine/1-methyl imidazole were synthesized for optimizing interaction with target miRNA sequence (Tseq). Incorporation of specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences with the cationic polythiophenes yielded distinguishable responses upon formation of fluorescent PT-PNA-Tseq triplex and weakly fluorescent PT-Tseq duplex, thereby enabling selective detection of target miRNA. Unlike homopolymers of PT (hPT), experimental results indicate the possibility of utilizing copolymers of PT (cPT) with appropriate ratios of pendant groups for miRNA assay in complex matrices such as plasma. As an illustration, colorimetric responses were obtained for lung cancer associated miRNA sequence (mir21) in human plasma, with a detection limit of 10 nM, illustrating the feasibility of proposed methodology for clinical applications without involving sophisticated instrumentation. The described methodology therefore possesses high potential for low-cost nucleic acid assays in resource-limited settings. PMID:26956217

  19. High-throughput optical sensing of nucleic acids in a nanopore array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Castell, Oliver K; Bayley, Hagan; Wallace, Mark I

    2015-11-01

    Protein nanopores such as α-haemolysin and Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) can be used to sequence long strands of DNA at low cost. To provide high-speed sequencing, large arrays of nanopores are required, but current nanopore sequencing methods rely on ionic current measurements from individually addressed pores and such methods are likely to prove difficult to scale up. Here we show that, by optically encoding the ionic flux through protein nanopores, the discrimination of nucleic acid sequences and the detection of sequence-specific nucleic acid hybridization events can be parallelized. We make optical recordings at a density of ∼10(4) nanopores per mm(2) in a single droplet interface bilayer. Nanopore blockades can discriminate between DNAs with sub-picoampere equivalent resolution, and specific miRNA sequences can be identified by differences in unzipping kinetics. By creating an array of 2,500 bilayers with a micropatterned hydrogel chip, we are also able to load different samples into specific bilayers suitable for high-throughput nanopore recording. PMID:26322943

  20. Effects on cell growth processes (mitosis, synthesis of nucleic acids and of proteins). Chapter 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of reports of the interference of -SH radioprotective agents with cell division and with the processes of nucleic acid and protein synthesis which are a prerequisite for mitosis. Mitotic activity is inhibited to the same extent in mammalian tissues as in cultures of animal and plant cells and bacteria. With cultured cells, the toxicity and the antimitotic activity have been found to be at their highest level for intermediate concentrations of the compound and to decrease for higher and lower concentrations. Inhibition of the synthesis of nucleic acids by -SH radioprotective substances has been observed with cultures of cells and bacteria and in mammalian tissues. In vitro interactions with the structures of free DNA and nucleoprotein have also been studied. The extent to which such complexes between the protective agent and DNA or nucleoprotein occur in vivo is not known. A depression of protein synthesis has been observed, and participates in the more general inhibition of growth processes. Possible mechanisms of these effects are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  2. Disrupting protein expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids reduces infection by obligate intracellular Rickettsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Rebecca S; McClure, Jennifer C; Kaur, Simran J; Sears, Khandra T; Rahman, M Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria's ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria.

  3. Construction of HA-1-DC Nucleic-acid Vaccine and Induction of Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yaya; ZHANG Donghua; HU Jinmei; LIU Wenli; ZHOU hongsheng; ZHANG Lu; LIU Dan; HUANG Zhenqian; TAN Huo

    2007-01-01

    An HA-1-DC nucleic-acid vaccine was constructed to induce anti-leukemia effect after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). DCs were generated from HSCT donors in vitro, and its immunologic activity was assayed by using flow cytometry and mixed lymphocytes reaction.HA-1 gene was electroporated into the cultured DCs to construct a DC nucleic-acid vaccine. After transfection for 48 h, the expression of HA-1 protein could be detected by using Western blot. The DCs were cultured with syngenic lymphocytes to induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs).The cytoxicity of the CTLs was detected by LDH assay. The results showed that The DCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) expressed the phenotype of DCs, and were effective in stimulating proliferation of the allogenic lymphocytes. After electroporating for 48-h, HA-1 protein was detected by using Western blot. The cytotoxity of inducing CTLs was higher than the control group. It was suggested that minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 could be considered as a target of immunotherapy against leukemia after HSCT.

  4. Entropy Beacon: A Hairpin-Free DNA Amplification Strategy for Efficient Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yifan; Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Zhao, Zilong; Qiu, Liping; Chen, Huapei; Jin, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Here, we propose an efficient strategy for enzyme- and hairpin-free nucleic acid detection called an entropy beacon (abbreviated as Ebeacon). Different from previously reported DNA hybridization/displacement-based strategies, Ebeacon is driven forward by increases in the entropy of the system, instead of free energy released from new base-pair formation. Ebeacon shows high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 5 pM target DNA in buffer and 50 pM in cellular homogenate. Ebeacon also benefits from the hairpin-free amplification strategy and zero-background, excellent thermostability from 20 °C to 50 °C, as well as good resistance to complex environments. In particular, based on the huge difference between the breathing rate of a single base pair and two adjacent base pairs, Ebeacon also shows high selectivity toward base mutations, such as substitution, insertion, and deletion and, therefore, is an efficient nucleic acid detection method, comparable to most reported enzyme-free strategies.

  5. Circulating nucleic acids and hemostasis: biological basis behind their relationship and technical issues in assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Elisa; Montagnana, Martina; Fava, Cristiano; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2014-10-01

    Nucleic acids (NAs) constitute the backbone of cellular life permitting conservation, transmission, and execution of genetic information. In the past few years, new unexpected functions for NAs, projecting them also beyond nuclear and cellular boundaries have been recognized: circulating cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs), histones, DNA-histone complexes, microRNAs (miRs) may have a regulatory role in physiological and pathological processes. In particular, several lines of evidence suggest that they can constitute unconventional mediators of thrombus formation, intervening both in hemostasis and thrombosis. Furthermore, in the past decade, the possibility to detect and quantify these in plasma and/or in serum has led to their ancillary use as potential markers in various medical conditions. The use of these as markers within the fields of thrombosis and hemostasis looks promising: the potential implications include the possibility to assess patients' risk profiles for thrombotic events and the identification of more directed targets for pharmacologic intervention. The major impediment is that, to date, the methods by which NAs are explored, still largely differ between published studies and standardized procedures are still lacking. Future research should focus on the physiological mechanisms underlying the activities of such mediators in specific thrombotic conditions and on the definition of reliable methods for their quantification in biological fluids.

  6. Membraneless organelles can melt nucleic acid duplexes and act as biomolecular filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Timothy J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Baldwin, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Membraneless organelles are cellular compartments made from drops of liquid protein inside a cell. These compartments assemble via the phase separation of disordered regions of proteins in response to changes in the cellular environment and the cell cycle. Here we demonstrate that the solvent environment within the interior of these cellular bodies behaves more like an organic solvent than like water. One of the most-stable biological structures known, the DNA double helix, can be melted once inside the liquid droplet, and simultaneously structures formed from regulatory single-stranded nucleic acids are stabilized. Moreover, proteins are shown to have a wide range of absorption or exclusion from these bodies, and can act as importers for otherwise-excluded nucleic acids, which suggests the existence of a protein-mediated trafficking system. A common strategy in organic chemistry is to utilize different solvents to influence the behaviour of molecules and reactions. These results reveal that cells have also evolved this capability by exploiting the interiors of membraneless organelles.

  7. Functional nucleic acid-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Mo, Liuting; Lu, Chun-Hua; Fu, Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb a large amount of water. By their hydrophilic, biocompatible and highly tunable nature, hydrogels can be tailored for applications in bioanalysis and biomedicine. Of particular interest are DNA-based hydrogels owing to the unique features of nucleic acids. Since the discovery of the DNA double helical structure, interest in DNA has expanded beyond its genetic role to applications in nanotechnology and materials science. In particular, DNA-based hydrogels present such remarkable features as stability, flexibility, precise programmability, stimuli-responsive DNA conformations, facile synthesis and modification. Moreover, functional nucleic acids (FNAs) have allowed the construction of hydrogels based on aptamers, DNAzymes, i-motif nanostructures, siRNAs and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to provide additional molecular recognition, catalytic activities and therapeutic potential, making them key players in biological analysis and biomedical applications. To date, a variety of applications have been demonstrated with FNA-based hydrogels, including biosensing, environmental analysis, controlled drug release, cell adhesion and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on advances in the development of FNA-based hydrogels, which have fully incorporated both the unique features of FNAs and DNA-based hydrogels. We first introduce different strategies for constructing DNA-based hydrogels. Subsequently, various types of FNAs and the most recent developments of FNA-based hydrogels for bioanalytical and biomedical applications are described with some selected examples. Finally, the review provides an insight into the remaining challenges and future perspectives of FNA-based hydrogels.

  8. A Study on HSV—1Corneal Potential Infection by in Situ Nucleic Acid hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoweiLi; LixinXie

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:To evaluate the possibility of HSV-1 corneal latency by in situ nucleic acid hybridization in animal models.Methods:20 normal New Zealand White(NEW)rabbits were used,14of them were inoculated bilaterally with 3×10PFU/ml of McKrae strain HSV-1by in-trastromal injection,22/28eyes developed typical herpes simplex keratitis(HSK) diseases.At 60day postoperation(PI),4latent corneas were transplanted to one eye of 4noninfected NZW rabbits and removed2weeks PI,Corneas at all time intervals of infection and two weeks after PKPwere detected for presence of HSV-1antigen and nucleic acid sequences by using clonal IgGHSV-1antibody and biotinylated HSV-1DNAprobe individually.Results:The results showed that the HSV-1DNA sequences were retained with-in the corneal epithelium and anterior stromal keratocytes during acute diseases,while the corneas during latent infection and postoperation,the HSV-1DNAse-quences were retained only within the stromal layer with negative HSV-1antigne staining.Conclusions:These results strongly suggest that the cornea may be capable of harburing latent HSV-1.Eye Science 1995;11:117-119.

  9. Structural basis of nucleic acid recognition by FK506-binding protein 25 (FKBP25), a nuclear immunophilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajit; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear immunophilin FKBP25 interacts with chromatin-related proteins and transcription factors and is suggested to interact with nucleic acids. Currently the structural basis of nucleic acid binding by FKBP25 is unknown. Here we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of full-length human FKBP25 and studied its interaction with DNA. The FKBP25 structure revealed that the N-terminal helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain and C-terminal FK506-binding domain (FKBD) interact with each other and that both of the domains are involved in DNA binding. The HLH domain forms major-groove interactions and the basic FKBD loop cooperates to form interactions with an adjacent minor-groove of DNA. The FKBP25-DNA complex model, supported by NMR and mutational studies, provides structural and mechanistic insights into the nuclear immunophilin-mediated nucleic acid recognition.

  10. Nucleic Acid and protein changes in relation to cold acclimation and freezing injury of korean boxwood leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusta, L V; Weiser, C J

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative differences in nucleic acids of Korean boxwood (Buxus microphylla var. Koreana) leaves were determined by methylated albumin kieselguhr chromatography at different levels of cold hardiness. During cold acclimation there was an increase in RNA, mainly ribosomal RNA, with little or no change in DNA. The increase in ribosomal RNA was closely paralleled by an increase in water soluble and membrane bound proteins. As cold hardiness increased, ribonuclease activity declined.Exposure of hardy boxwood plants to warm temperatures resulted in a rapid loss in cold resistance and a rapid synthesis of nucleic acids as judged by (32)P incorporation.Following a killing frost to Korean boxwood leaves, there was a rapid decrease in all nucleic acid fractions which was attributed to nuclease activity. Within 5 hours there was no measurable soluble RNA and ribosomal RNA. Tenaciously bound RNA was somewhat more persistent. PMID:16657903

  11. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures for target recycling detection of nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueran; Chen, Xifeng; Wang, Bidou; Liu, Guangxing; Tang, Yuguo; Miao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which attacks the human body's immune system and further leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nucleic acid detection is of great importance in the medical diagnosis of such diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and enzyme-free electrochemical method for the target recycling detection of nuclei acid. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures are designed and constructed on the electrode interface for target capture and signal enrichment. This strategy is convenient and sensitive, with a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, and can also successfully distinguish single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, the proposed method has a promising potential application for HIV DNA detection. PMID:27170090

  12. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures for target recycling detection of nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueran; Chen, Xifeng; Wang, Bidou; Liu, Guangxing; Tang, Yuguo; Miao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus which attacks the human body's immune system and further leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nucleic acid detection is of great importance in the medical diagnosis of such diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and enzyme-free electrochemical method for the target recycling detection of nuclei acid. DNA tetrahedron and star trigon nanostructures are designed and constructed on the electrode interface for target capture and signal enrichment. This strategy is convenient and sensitive, with a limit of detection as low as 1 fM, and can also successfully distinguish single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, the proposed method has a promising potential application for HIV DNA detection.

  13. Self-assembled monolayer based electrochemical nucleic acid sensor for Vibrio cholerae detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleic acid sensor has been fabricated by immobilization of thiolated (5' end) single stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNA-SH) onto gold (Au) coated glass electrode for Vibriocholerae detection. This ssDNA-SH/Au bioelectrode characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM),Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electrochemical technique, has been used for hybridization detection of genomic DNA (dsDNA/Au). This ssDNA-SH/Au bioelectrode can specifically detect up to 100- 500 ng/μL genomic DNA of Vibriocholeare within 60 s of hybridization time at 25°C by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using methylene blue (MB) as electro-active DNA hybridization indicator. The value of sensitivity of the dsDNA/Au electrode has been determined as 0.027μA/ng cm−2 with regression coefficient as 0.978. This DNA bioelectrode is stable for about 4 months when stored at 4°C.

  14. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvia, Fontenete; Joana, Barros; Pedro, Madureira;

    2015-01-01

    in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears...... acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect...... of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly...

  15. TD-DFT Investigation of the Magnetic Circular Dichroism Spectra of Some Purine and Pyrimidine Bases of Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahleson, Tobias; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick;

    2015-01-01

    We present a computational study of the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra in the 200–300 nm wavelength region of purine and its derivative hypoxanthine, as well as of the pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids uracil, thymine, and cytosine, using the B3LYP and CAM–B3LYP functionals. Solvent...... and the B term shape of the spectra of pyrimidine bases are reproduced. Our calculations also correctly reproduce the reversed phase of the MCD bands in purine compared to that of its derivatives present in nucleic acids. Solvent effects are sizable and system specific, but they do not in general alter...

  16. Liquid biopsies for liquid tumors:emerging potential of circulating free nucleic acid evaluation for the management of hematologic malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jay Hocking; Sridurga Mithraprabhu; Anna Kalff; Andrew Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Circulating free nucleic acids; cell free DNA and circulating micro-RNA, are found in the plasma of patients with hematologic and solid malignancies at levels higher than that of healthy individuals. In patients with hematologic malignancy cell free DNA reflects the underlying tumor mutational profile, whilst micro-RNAs reflect genetic interference mechanisms within a tumor and potentially the surrounding microenvironment and immune effector cells. These circulating nucleic acids offer a potentially simple, non-invasive, repeatable analysis that can aid in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions in cancer treatment.

  17. Comparative nucleic acid transfection efficacy in primary hepatocytes for gene silencing and functional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morral Núria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary hepatocytes are the best resource for in vitro studies directed at understanding hepatic processes at the cellular and molecular levels, necessary for novel drug development to treat highly prevalent diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There is a need to identify simple methods to genetically manipulate primary hepatocytes and conduct functional studies with plasmids, small interfering RNA (siRNA or microRNA (miRNA. New lipofection reagents are available that have the potential to yield higher levels of transfection with reduced toxicity. Findings We have tested several liposome-based transfection reagents used in molecular biology research. We show that transfection efficiency with one of the most recently developed formulations, Metafectene Pro, is high with plasmid DNA (>45% cells as well as double stranded RNA (>90% with siRNA or microRNA. In addition, negligible cytotoxicity was present with all of these nucleic acids, even if cells were incubated with the DNA:lipid complex for 16 hours. To provide the proof of concept that these conditions can be used not only for overexpression of a gene of interest, but also in RNA interference applications, we targeted two liver expressed genes, Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein-1 and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 using plasmid-mediated short hairpin RNA expression. In addition, similar transfection conditions were used to optimally deliver siRNA and microRNA. Conclusions We have identified a lipid-based reagent for primary hepatocyte transfection of nucleic acids currently used in molecular biology laboratories. The conditions described here can be used to expedite a large variety of research applications, from gene function studies to microRNA target identification.

  18. Culture confirmation of gonococcal infection by recall of subjects found to be positive by nucleic acid amplification tests in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community.......To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community....

  19. DMPD: The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086372 The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive...ritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. PubmedID 18086372 Title Th...e role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. Autho

  20. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample.

  1. Nucleic Acids in Human Glioma Treatment: Innovative Approaches and Recent Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Catuogno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors with a dismal prognosis. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have a modest survival benefit. A crucial challenge is to deliver drugs effectively to invasive glioma cells residing in a sanctuary within the central nervous system. New therapies are essential, and oligonucleotide-based approaches, including antisense, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, and nucleic acid aptamers, may provide a viable strategy. Thanks to their unique characteristics (low size, good affinity for the target, no immunogenicity, chemical structures that can be easily modified to improve their in vivo applications, these molecules may represent a valid alternative to antibodies particularly to overcome challenges presented by the blood-brain barrier. Here we will discuss recent results on the use of oligonucleotides that will hopefully provide new effective treatment for gliomas.

  2. Interactions of Nucleic Acid Bases with Temozolomide. Stacked, Perpendicular, and Coplanar Heterodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasende, Okuma Emile; Nziko, Vincent de Paul N; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) was paired with each of the five nucleic acid bases, and the potential energy surface searched for all minima, in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory and MP2 methods. Three types of arrangements were observed, with competitive stabilities. Coplanar H-bonding structures, reminiscent of Watson-Crick base pairs were typically the lowest in energy, albeit by a small amount. Also very stable were perpendicular arrangements that included one or more H-bonds. The two monomers were stacked approximately parallel to one another in the third category, some of which contained weak and distorted H-bonds. Dispersion was found to be a dominating attractive force, largest for the stacked structures, and smallest for the coplanar dimers.

  3. Evidence for extensive non-endocytotic translocation of peptide nucleic acids across mammalian plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, Johannes; Turner, Yvonne; Pritz, Stephan; Bienert, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The ability of peptide nucleic acids (PNA) to enter and to cross filter-grown MDCK, HEK and CHO cells was studied by means of a protocol based on capillary electrophoresis combined with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The used approach avoided possible errors encountered in protocols based on confocal laserscanning microscopy and FACS analysis. In contradiction to the commonly anticipated unability of PNA to cross biomembranes, extensive translocation of unmodified PNA into and across the investigated cell types was found. The transport mode comprised a variety of energy dependent and -independent as well as temperature sensitive mechanisms being probably destined to natural substrates and hijacked by PNA. The presented results suggest active as well as passive export mechanisms rather than poor penetration into cells to be responsible for the only weak biological activity of unmodified PNA.

  4. Isothermal cycling and cascade signal amplification strategy for ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed a novel isothermal cascade signal-amplification strategy for ultrasensitive colorimetric determination of nucleic acids. It is based on double-cycling amplification with formation of DNAzyme via a polymerase-induced strand-displacement reaction and nicking endonuclease-assisted recycling. The assay makes use of a hairpin DNA, a short primer, KF-polymerase, and nicking endonuclease. The presence of a target DNA triggers the strand-displacement and polymerization reaction with the formation of numerous DNAzyme molecules. Upon addition of H2O2 to the resulting mixture, the H2O2 reacts with 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiozoline)-6-sulfonate to form a colored product in the aid of DNAzyme, which is quantified by photometry at 415 nm. Under optimal conditions, the assay allows target DNA to be determined at concentration as low as 0.6 aM. (author)

  5. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  6. Computer-aided nucleic acid secondary structure modeling incorporating enzymatic digestion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, G J; Gehrke, L; Roth, D A; Auron, P E

    1984-01-01

    We present a computer-aided method for determining nucleic acid secondary structure. The method utilizes a program which has the capability to filter matrix diagonal data on the basis of diagonal length, stabilization energy, and chemical and enzymatic data. The program also allows the user to assign selected regions of the structure as uniquely single-stranded or paired, and to filter out "trade-off" structures on the basis of such pairing. In order to demonstrate the utility of the program we present a preliminary secondary structure for the 3' end of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 (AMV-4 RNA). This structure is based on an analysis which includes the use of in vitro partial enzymatic digestion of the RNA. Images PMID:6320093

  7. Importance of databases of nucleic acids for bioinformatic analysis focused to genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Gutierrez, L. R.; Barrios-Hernández, C. J.; Pedraza-Ferreira, G. R.; Vera-Cala, L.; Martinez-Perez, F.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, bioinformatics has become a new field of science, indispensable in the analysis of millions of nucleic acids sequences, which are currently deposited in international databases (public or private); these databases contain information of genes, RNA, ORF, proteins, intergenic regions, including entire genomes from some species. The analysis of this information requires computer programs; which were renewed in the use of new mathematical methods, and the introduction of the use of artificial intelligence. In addition to the constant creation of supercomputing units trained to withstand the heavy workload of sequence analysis. However, it is still necessary the innovation on platforms that allow genomic analyses, faster and more effectively, with a technological understanding of all biological processes.

  8. Comparative Molecular Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics Study of Microhydration of Nucleic Acid Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Velasco, M; Poltev, V

    2013-01-01

    DNA is the most important biological molecule, and its hydration contributes essentially to the structure and functions of the double helix. We analyze the microhydration of the individual bases of nucleic acids and their methyl derivatives using methods of molecular mechanics (MM) with the Poltev-Malenkov (PM), AMBER and OPLS force fields, as well as ab initio Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations at MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. A comparison is made between the calculated interaction energies and the experimental enthalpies of microhydration of bases, obtained from mass spectrometry at low temperatures. Each local water-base interaction energy minimum obtained with MM corresponds to the minimum obtained with QM. General qualitative agreement was observed in the geometrical characteristics of the local minima obtained via the two groups of methods. MM minima correspond to slightly more coplanar structures than those obtained via QM methods, and the absolute MM energy values overestimate corresponding values ...

  9. Biomedical Applications of Quantum Dots, Nucleic Acid-Based Aptamers, and Nanostructures in Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Xenia; Farid, Sidra; Choi, Min; Lan, Yi; Mukherjee, Souvik; Datta, Debopam; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    This review is a survey of the biomedical applications of semiconductor quantum dots, nucleic acid-based aptamers, and nanosensors as molecular biosensors. It focuses on the detection of analytes in biomedical applications using (1) advances in molecular beacons incorporating semiconductor quantum dots and nanoscale quenching elements; (2) aptamer-based nanosensors on a variety of platforms, including graphene; (3) Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using nanostructures for enhanced SERS spectra of biomolecules, including aptamers; and (4) the electrical and optical properties of nanostructures incorporated into molecular beacons and aptamer-based nanosensors. Research done at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) is highlighted throughout since it emphasizes the specific approaches taken by the bioengineering department at UIC.

  10. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  11. Cellular delivery and antisense effects of peptide nucleic acid conjugated to polyethyleneimine via disulfide linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Peter R; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is potentially an attractive antisense and antigene agent for which more efficient cellular delivery systems are still warranted. The cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) is commonly used for cellular transfection of DNA and RNA complexes, but is not readily applicable...... for PNA due to the (inherent) charge neutrality of PNA. However, PEI could function as an efficient scaffold for PNA via chemical conjugation. Accordingly, we modified PEI with the amine-reactive heterobifunctional linker agent N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) (with and without a PEG...... moiety) and further reacted this with a cysteine PNA. The level of modification was determined spectrophotometrically with high accuracy, and the PNA transfection efficiency of the conjugates was evaluated in an antisense luciferase splice-correction assay using HeLa pLuc705 cells. We find that PEI...

  12. DNA detection using water-soluble conjugated polymers and peptide nucleic acid probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, Brent S.; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2002-08-01

    The light-harvesting properties of cationic conjugated polymers are used to sensitize the emission of a dye on a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence for the purpose of homogeneous, "real-time" DNA detection. Signal transduction is controlled by hybridization of the neutral PNA probe and the negative DNA target. Electrostatic interactions bring the hybrid complex and cationic polymer within distances required for Förster energy transfer. Conjugated polymer excitation provides fluorescein emission >25 times higher than that obtained by exciting the dye, allowing detection of target DNA at concentrations of 10 pM with a standard fluorometer. A simple and highly sensitive assay with optical amplification that uses the improved hybridization behavior of PNA/DNA complexes is thus demonstrated.

  13. Targeted gene correction using psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin conjugates of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Gene correction activation effects of a small series of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA) covalently conjugated to the DNA interacting ligands psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin targeted proximal to a stop codon mutation in an EGFP reporter gene were studied. A 15-mer homopyrimidine...... interstrand crosslinked adducts with dsDNA dramatically decreased the frequency of targeted repair/correction. The PNA conjugates were also studied in mammalian cell lines upon transfection of PNA bound EGFP reporter vector and scoring repair of the EGFP gene by FACS analysis of functional EGFP expression...... suggest that simple triplex forming PNAs have little effect on proximal gene correctional events whereas PNA conjugates capable of forming DNA adducts and interstrand crosslinks are strong inhibitors. Most interestingly the PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin enhanced repair...

  14. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  15. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  16. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  17. Direct observation of transition paths during the folding of proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Krishna; Foster, Daniel A N; Dee, Derek R; Yu, Hao; Wang, Feng; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Transition paths, the fleeting trajectories through the transition states that dominate the dynamics of biomolecular folding reactions, encapsulate the critical information about how structure forms. Owing to their brief duration, however, they have not previously been observed directly. We measured transition paths for both nucleic acid and protein folding, using optical tweezers to observe the microscopic diffusive motion of single molecules traversing energy barriers. The average transit times and the shapes of the transit-time distributions agreed well with theoretical expectations for motion over the one-dimensional energy landscapes reconstructed for the same molecules, validating the physical theory of folding reactions. These measurements provide a first look at the critical microscopic events that occur during folding, opening exciting new avenues for investigating folding phenomena. PMID:27124461

  18. Simulated Raman correlation spectroscopy for quantifying nucleic acid-silver composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lindsay M.; Smolyaninov, Alexei; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic devices are of great interest due to their ability to confine light to the nanoscale level and dramatically increase the intensity of the electromagnetic field, functioning as high performance platforms for Raman signal enhancement. While Raman spectroscopy has been proposed as a tool to identify the preferential binding sites and adsorption configurations of molecules to nanoparticles, the results have been limited by the assumption that a single binding site is responsible for molecular adsorption. Here, we develop the simulated Raman correlation spectroscopy (SRCS) process to determine which binding sites of a molecule preferentially bind to a plasmonic material and in what capacity. We apply the method to the case of nucleic acids binding to silver, discovering that multiple atoms are responsible for adsorption kinetics. This method can be applied to future systems, such as to study the molecular orientation of adsorbates to films or protein conformation upon adsorption. PMID:27010074

  19. Aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2011-11-15

    The present invention provides aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneously determining the presence and optionally the concentration of multiple analytes in a sample. Methods of utilizing the system and kits that include the sensor components are also provided. The system includes a first reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a first analyte; a second reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a second analyte; a third polynucleotide; a fourth polynucleotide; a first particle, coupled to the third polynucleotide; a second particle, coupled to the fourth polynucleotide; and at least one quencher, for quenching emissions of the first and second quantum dots, coupled to the first and second reactive polynucleotides. The first particle includes a quantum dot having a first emission wavelength. The second particle includes a second quantum dot having a second emission wavelength different from the first emission wavelength. The third polynucleotide and the fourth polynucleotide are different.

  20. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  1. Software scripts for quality checking of high-throughput nucleic acid sequencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, G R; Tong, J; Miller, R; Hsia, C; Rausch, C; Kang, Y; Anderson, O D

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a graphical interface to allow the researcher to view and assess the quality of sequencing results using a series of program scripts developed to process data generated by automated sequencers. The scripts are written in Perl programming language and are executable under the cgibin directory of a Web server environment. The scripts direct nucleic acid sequencing trace file data output from automated sequencers to be analyzed by the phred molecular biology program and are displayed as graphical hypertext mark-up language (HTML) pages. The scripts are mainly designed to handle 96-well microtiter dish samples, but the scripts are also able to read data from 384-well microtiter dishes 96 samples at a time. The scripts may be customized for different laboratory environments and computer configurations. Web links to the sources and discussion page are provided. PMID:11414222

  2. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  3. Structure of the fully modified left-handed cyclohexene nucleic acid sequence GTGTACAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeyns, Koen; Herdewijn, Piet; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-02-13

    CeNA oligonucleotides consist of a phosphorylated backbone where the deoxyribose sugars are replaced by cyclohexene moieties. The X-ray structure determination and analysis of a fully modified octamer sequence GTGTACAC, which is the first crystal structure of a carbocyclic-based nucleic acid, is presented. This particular sequence was built with left-handed building blocks and crystallizes as a left-handed double helix. The helix can be characterized as belonging to the (mirrored) A-type family. Crystallographic data were processed up to 1.53 A, and the octamer sequence crystallizes in the space group R32. The sugar puckering is found to adopt the 3H2 half-chair conformation which mimics the C3'-endo conformation of the ribose sugar. The double helices stack on top of each other to form continuous helices, and static disorder is observed due to this end-to-end stacking.

  4. Nucleic-acid characterization of the identity and activity of subsurface microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, E. L.

    Nucleic-acid approaches to characterizing naturally occurring microorganisms in their habitats have risen to prominence during the last decade. Extraction of deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) and ribonucleic-acid (RNA) biomarkers directly from environmental samples provides a new means of gathering information in microbial ecology. This review article defines: (1) the subsurface habitat; (2) what nucleic-acid procedures are; and (3) the types of information nucleic-acid procedures can and cannot reveal. Recent literature examining microbial nucleic acids in the terrestrial subsurface is tabulated and reviewed. The majority of effort to date has focused upon insights into the identity and phylogeny of subsurface microorganisms afforded by analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. Given the power of nucleic-acid-based procedures and their limited application to subsurface habitats to date, many future opportunities await exploration. Au cours des derniers dix ans, les approches basées sur les acides nucléiques sont apparues et devenues essentielles pour caractériser dans leurs habitats les microorganismes existant à l'état naturel. L'extraction directe de l'ADN et de l'ARN, qui sont des biomarqueurs, d'échantillons environnementaux a fourni un nouveau moyen d'obtenir des informations sur l'écologie microbienne. Cet article synthétique définit 1) l'habitat souterrain, 2) ce que sont les procédures basées sur les acides nucléiques, 3) quel type d'informations ces procéedures peuvent et ne peuvent pas révéler. Les travaux récemment publiés concernatn les acides nucléiques microbiens dans le milieu souterrain terrestre sont catalogués et passés en revue. La majorité des efforts pour obtenir es données s'est concentrée sur l'identité et la phylogénie des microorganismes souterrains fournies par l'analyse de leurs gènes 16S rRNA. Étant donné la puissance des procédures basées sur les acides nucléiques et leur application limitée aux habitats souterrains

  5. Sensitive electrochemical monitoring of nucleic acids coupling DNA nanostructures with hybridization chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Xu, Mingdi; Yang, Huanghao; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping, E-mail: dianping.tang@fzu.edu.cn

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new signal-on metallobioassay was developed for detection of nucleic acids. •Target-triggered long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures are used for amplification of electronic signal. •Hybridization chain reaction is utilized for construction of long-range DNA nanostructures. -- Abstract: Methods based on metal nanotags have been developed for metallobioassay of nucleic acids, but most involve complicated labeling or stripping procedures and are unsuitable for routine use. Herein, we report the proof-of-concept of a novel and label-free metallobioassay for ultrasensitive electronic determination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related gene fragments at an ultralow concentration based on target-triggered long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures and DNA-based hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The signal is amplified by silver nanotags on the DNA duplex. The assay mainly consists of capture probe, detection probe, and two different DNA hairpins. In the presence of target DNA, the capture probe immobilized on the sensor sandwiches target DNA with the 3′ end of detection probe. Another exposed part of detection probe at the 5′ end opens two alternating DNA hairpins in turn, and propagates a chain reaction of hybridization events to form a nicked double-helix. Finally, numerous silver nanotags are immobilized onto the long-range DNA nanostructures, each of which produces a strong electronic signal within the applied potentials. Under optimal conditions, the target-triggered long-range DNA nanostructures present good electrochemical behaviors for the detection of HIV DNA at a concentration as low as 0.5 fM. Importantly, the outstanding sensitivity can make this approach a promising scheme for development of next-generation DNA sensors without the need of enzyme labeling or fluorophore labeling.

  6. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30–100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. (paper)

  7. Influence of plasma processing on recovery and analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Page

    Full Text Available Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs are under investigation as a liquid biopsy in cancer. However there is wide variation in blood processing and methods for isolation of circulating free DNA (cfDNA and microRNAs (miRNAs. Here we compare the extraction efficiency and reproducibility of 4 commercially available kits for cfDNA and 3 for miRNA using spike-in of reference templates. We also compare the effects of increasing time between venepuncture and centrifugation and differential centrifugation force on recovery of CNAs. cfDNA was quantified by TaqMan qPCR and targeted deep sequencing. miRNA profiles were assessed with TaqMan low-density arrays and assays. The QIAamp(® DNA Blood Mini and Circulating nucleic acid kits gave the highest recovery of cfDNA and efficient recovery (>90% of a 564bp spike-in. Moreover, targeted sequencing revealed overlapping cfDNA profiles and variant depth, including detection of HER2 gene amplification, using the Ion AmpliSeq™Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. Highest yields of miRNA and the synthetic Arabidopsis thaliana miR-159a spike-in were obtained using the miRNeasy Serum/Plasma kit, with saturation above 200 µl of plasma. miRNA profiles showed significant variation with increasing time before centrifugation (p 12 years, highlighting the potential for analysis of stored sample biobanks. In the era of the liquid biopsy, standardisation of methods is required to minimise variation, particularly for miRNA.

  8. Converting Mosquito Surveillance to Arbovirus Surveillance with Honey-Baited Nucleic Acid Preservation Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flies, Emily J; Toi, Cheryl; Weinstein, Philip; Doggett, Stephen L; Williams, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Spatially and temporally accurate information about infectious mosquito distribution allows for pre-emptive public health interventions that can reduce the burden of mosquito-borne infections on human populations. However, the labile nature of arboviruses, the low prevalence of infection in mosquitoes, the expensive labor costs for mosquito identification and sorting, and the specialized equipment required for arbovirus testing can obstruct arbovirus surveillance efforts. The recently developed techniques of testing mosquito expectorate using honey-baited nucleic acid preservation cards or sugar bait stations allows a sensitive method of testing for infectious, rather than infected, mosquito vectors. Here we report the results from the first large-scale incorporation of honey-baited cards into an existing mosquito surveillance program. During 4 months of the peak virus season (January-April, 2014) for a total of 577 trap nights, we set CO2-baited encephalitis vector survey (EVS) light traps at 88 locations in South Australia. The collection container for the EVS trap was modified to allow for the placement of a honey-baited nucleic acid preservation card (FTA™ card) inside. After collection, mosquitoes were maintained in a humid environment and allowed access to the cards for 1 week. Cards were then analyzed for common endemic Australian arboviruses using a nested RT-PCR. Eighteen virus detections, including 11 Ross River virus, four Barmah Forest virus, and three Stratford virus (not previously reported from South Australia) were obtained. Our findings suggest that adding FTA cards to an existing mosquito surveillance program is a rapid and efficient way of detecting infectious mosquitoes with high spatial resolution.

  9. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  10. RNA preservation agents and nucleic acid extraction method bias perceived bacterial community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann McCarthy

    Full Text Available Bias is a pervasive problem when characterizing microbial communities. An important source is the difference in lysis efficiencies of different populations, which vary depending on the extraction protocol used. To avoid such biases impacting comparisons between gene and transcript abundances in the environment, the use of one protocol that simultaneously extracts both types of nucleic acids from microbial community samples has gained popularity. However, knowledge regarding tradeoffs to combined nucleic acid extraction protocols is limited, particularly regarding yield and biases in the observed community composition. Here, we evaluated a commercially available protocol for simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA, which we adapted for freshwater microbial community samples that were collected on filters. DNA and RNA yields were comparable to other commonly used, but independent DNA and RNA extraction protocols. RNA protection agents benefited RNA quality, but decreased DNA yields significantly. Choice of extraction protocol influenced the perceived bacterial community composition, with strong method-dependent biases observed for specific phyla such as the Verrucomicrobia. The combined DNA/RNA extraction protocol detected significantly higher levels of Verrucomicrobia than the other protocols, and those higher numbers were confirmed by microscopic analysis. Use of RNA protection agents as well as independent sequencing runs caused a significant shift in community composition as well, albeit smaller than the shift caused by using different extraction protocols. Despite methodological biases, sample origin was the strongest determinant of community composition. However, when the abundance of specific phylogenetic groups is of interest, researchers need to be aware of the biases their methods introduce. This is particularly relevant if different methods are used for DNA and RNA extraction, in addition to using RNA protection agents only for RNA

  11. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  12. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC

  13. Development of nucleic acid vaccines: use of self-amplifying RNA in lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Gascón A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Rodríguez-Gascón, Ana del Pozo-Rodríguez, María Ángeles SolinísPharmacokinetic, Nanotechnology and Gene Therapy Group (PharmaNanoGene, Faculty of Pharmacy, Centro de Investigación Lascaray Ikergunea, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, SpainAbstract: Self-amplifying RNA or RNA replicon is a form of nucleic acid-based vaccine derived from either positive-strand or negative-strand RNA viruses. The gene sequences encoding structural proteins in these RNA viruses are replaced by mRNA encoding antigens of interest as well as by RNA polymerase for replication and transcription. This kind of vaccine has been successfully assayed with many different antigens as vaccines candidates, and has been shown to be potent in several animal species, including mice, nonhuman primates, and humans. A key challenge to realizing the broad potential of self-amplifying vaccines is the need for safe and effective delivery methods. Ideally, an RNA nanocarrier should provide protection from blood nucleases and extended blood circulation, which ultimately would increase the possibility of reaching the target tissue. The delivery system must then be internalized by the target cell and, upon receptor-mediated endocytosis, must be able to escape from the endosomal compartment into the cell cytoplasm, where the RNA machinery is located, while avoiding degradation by lysosomal enzymes. Further, delivery systems for systemic administration ought to be well tolerated upon administration. They should be safe, enabling the multiadministration treatment modalities required for improved clinical outcomes and, from a developmental point of view, production of large batches with reproducible specifications is also desirable. In this review, the concept of self-amplifying RNA vaccines and the most promising lipid-based delivery systems are discussed.Keywords: self-amplifying RNA vaccine, RNA replicon, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nucleic acid

  14. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS: applications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Masiá JA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available José A González-Masiá,1 Damián García-Olmo,2 Dolores C García-Olmo31General Surgery Service, General University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, 2Department of Surgery, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and La Paz University Hospital, IdiPaz, Madrid, 3Experimental Research Unit, General University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, SpainAbstract: The presence of small amounts of circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS is not a new finding. The verification that such amounts are significantly increased in cancer patients, and that CNAPS might carry a variety of genetic and epigenetic alterations related to cancer development and progression, has aroused great interest in the scientific community in the last decades. Such alterations potentially reflect changes that occur during carcinogenesis, and include DNA mutations, loss of heterozygosity, viral genomic integration, disruption of microRNA, hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes, and changes in the mitochondrial DNA. These findings have led to many efforts toward the implementation of new clinical biomarkers based on CNAPS analysis. In the present article, we review the main findings related to the utility of CNAPS analysis for early diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of cancer, most of which appear promising. However, due to the lack of harmonization of laboratory techniques, the heterogeneity of disease progression, and the small number of recruited patients in most of those studies, there has been a poor translation of basic research into clinical practice. In addition, many aspects remain unknown, such as the release mechanisms of cell-free nucleic acids, their biological function, and the way by which they circulate in the bloodstream. It is therefore expected that in the coming years, an improved understanding of the relationship between CNAPS and the molecular biology of cancer will lead to better diagnosis, management, and treatment.Keywords: plasma, cancer, clinical

  15. Circulating nucleic acids damage DNA of healthy cells by integrating into their genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indraneel Mittra; Naveen Kumar Khare; Gorantla Venkata Raghuram; Rohan Chaubal; Fatema Khambatti; Deepika Gupta; Ashwini Gaikwad; Preeti Prasannan; Akshita Singh; Aishwarya Iyer; Ankita Singh; Pawan Upadhyay; Naveen Kumar Nair; Pradyumna Kumar Mishra; Amit Dutt

    2015-03-01

    Whether nucleic acids that circulate in blood have any patho-physiological functions in the host have not been explored. We report here that far from being inert molecules, circulating nucleic acids have significant biological activities of their own that are deleterious to healthy cells of the body. Fragmented DNA and chromatin (DNAfs and Cfs) isolated from blood of cancer patients and healthy volunteers are readily taken up by a variety of cells in culture to be localized in their nuclei within a few minutes. The intra-nuclear DNAfs and Cfs associate themselves with host cell chromosomes to evoke a cellular DNA-damage-repair-response (DDR) followed by their incorporation into the host cell genomes. Whole genome sequencing detected the presence of tens of thousands of human sequence reads in the recipient mouse cells. Genomic incorporation of DNAfs and Cfs leads to dsDNA breaks and activation of apoptotic pathways in the treated cells. When injected intravenously into Balb/C mice, DNAfs and Cfs undergo genomic integration into cells of their vital organs resulting in activation of DDR and apoptotic proteins in the recipient cells. Cfs have significantly greater activity than DNAfs with respect to all parameters examined, while both DNAfs and Cfs isolated from cancer patients are more active than those from normal volunteers. All the above pathological actions of DNAfs and Cfs described above can be abrogated by concurrent treatment with DNase I and/or anti-histone antibody complexed nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results that circulating DNAfs and Cfs are physiological, continuously arising, endogenous DNA damaging agents with implications to ageing and a multitude of human pathologies including initiation of cancer.

  16. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  17. Rapid Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by PCR-Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatairat Kamphee

    Full Text Available Several existing molecular tests for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB are limited by complexity and cost, hindering their widespread application. The objective of this proof of concept study was to develop a simple Nucleic Acid Lateral Flow (NALF immunoassay as a potential diagnostic alternative, to complement conventional PCR, for the rapid molecular detection of MDR-TB. The NALF device was designed using antibodies for the indirect detection of labeled PCR amplification products. Multiplex PCR was optimized to permit the simultaneous detection of the drug resistant determining mutations in the 81-bp hot spot region of the rpoB gene (rifampicin resistance, while semi-nested PCR was optimized for the S315T mutation detection in the katG gene (isoniazid resistance. The amplification process additionally targeted a conserved region of the genes as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DNA control. The optimized conditions were validated with the H37Rv wild-type (WT Mtb isolate and Mtb isolates with known mutations (MT within the rpoB and katG genes. Results indicate the correct identification of WT (drug susceptible and MT (drug resistant Mtb isolates, with the least limit of detection (LOD being 104 genomic copies per PCR reaction. NALF is a simple, rapid and low-cost device suitable for low resource settings where conventional PCR is already employed on a regular basis. Moreover, the use of antibody-based NALF to target primer-labels, without the requirement for DNA hybridization, renders the device generic, which could easily be adapted for the molecular diagnosis of other infectious and non-infectious diseases requiring nucleic acid detection.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  19. Utility of lab-on-a-chip technology for high-throughput nucleic acid and protein analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawtin, Paul; Hardern, Ian; Wittig, Rainer;

    2005-01-01

    On-chip electrophoresis can provide size separations of nucleic acids and proteins similar to more traditional slab gel electrophoresis. Lab-on-a-chip (LoaC) systems utilize on-chip electrophoresis in conjunction with sizing calibration, sensitive detection schemes, and sophisticated data analysi...

  20. Reduced PCR sensitivity due to impaired DNA recovery with the MagNA pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, T; van Breda, A; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam; Beld, M; Savelkoul, P; Boom, R; de Boer, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing demand for molecular diagnostics in clinical microbiology laboratories necessitates automated sample processing. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the MagNA Pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit (M extraction) in comparison with the manual method (Si extraction)

  1. Evaluation and optimization of nucleic acid extraction methods for the molecular analysis of bacterial communities associated with corrored steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Marty; J.-F. Ghiglione; S. Païsse; H. Gueuné; L. Quillet; M.C.M. van Loosdrecht; G. Muyzer

    2012-01-01

    Different DNA and RNA extraction approaches were evaluated and protocols optimized on in situ corrosion products from carbon steel in marine environments. Protocols adapted from the PowerSoil DNA/RNA Isolation methods resulted in the best nucleic acid (NA) extraction performances (ie combining high

  2. An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Shah, Sunny S; Behura, Susanta K; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Severson, David W; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-10-15

    We present a novel low-cost biosensor for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids based on an ionic diode feature of an anion exchange nanoporous membrane under DC bias. The ionic diode feature is associated with external surface charge inversion on the positively charged anion exchange nanomembrane upon hybridization of negatively charged nucleic acid molecules to single-stranded oligoprobes functionalized on the membrane surface resulting in the formation of a cation selective monolayer. The resulting bipolar membrane causes a transition from electroconvection-controlled to water-splitting controlled ion conductance, with a large ion current signature that can be used to accurately quantify the hybridized nucleic acids. The platform is capable of distinguishing two base-pair mismatches in a 22-base pairing segment of microRNAs associated with oral cancer, as well as serotype-specific detection of dengue virus. We also show the sensor' capability to selectively capture target nucleic acids from a heterogeneous mixture. The limit of detection is 1 pM for short 27 base target molecules in a 15-min assay. Similar hybridization results are shown for short DNA molecules as well as RNAs from Brucella and Escherichia coli. The versatility and simplicity of this low-cost biosensor should enable point-of-care diagnostics in food, medical and environmental safety markets.

  3. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  4. The isolation of nucleic acids from fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues-which methods are useful when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Thomas P Gilbert

    Full Text Available Museums and pathology collections around the world represent an archive of genetic material to study populations and diseases. For preservation purposes, a large portion of these collections has been fixed in formalin-containing solutions, a treatment that results in cross-linking of biomolecules. Cross-linking not only complicates isolation of nucleic acid but also introduces polymerase "blocks" during PCR. A wide variety of methods exists for the recovery of DNA and RNA from archival tissues, and although a number of previous studies have qualitatively compared the relative merits of the different techniques, very few have undertaken wide scale quantitative comparisons. To help address this issue, we have undertaken a study that investigates the quality of nucleic acids recovered from a test panel of fixed specimens that have been manipulated following a number of the published protocols. These include methods of pre-treating the samples prior to extraction, extraction and nucleic acid purification methods themselves, and a post-extraction enzymatic repair technique. We find that although many of the published methods have distinct positive effects on some characteristics of the nucleic acids, the benefits often come at a cost. In addition, a number of the previously published techniques appear to have no effect at all. Our findings recommend that the extraction methodology adopted should be chosen carefully. Here we provide a quick reference table that can be used to determine appropriate protocols for particular aims.

  5. Development of a nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay for simultaneous detection of Listeria spp. and Listeriamonocytogenes in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazkova, M.; Koets, M.; Rauch, P.; Amerongen, van A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA) for the assessment of listeria contamination. The detection procedure starts with enrichment of sample in Half Fraser broth (24 h). Following isolation of DNA, a duplex PCR is performed with two labelled primer sets, one generic and dir

  6. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  7. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G; Baylis, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  8. A universal molecular translator for non-nucleic acid targets that enables dynamic DNA assemblies and logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Hu, Shichao; Wang, Huaming; Zhao, Yan; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    A universal molecular translator based on the target-triggered DNA strand displacement was developed, which was able to convert various kinds of non-nucleic acid targets into a unique output DNA. This translation strategy was successfully applied in directing dynamic DNA assemblies and in realizing three-input logic gate operations. PMID:25295484

  9. Unlocked nucleic acids with a pyrene-modified uracil: Synthesis, hybridization studies, fluorescent properties and i-motif stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perlíková, P.; Karlsen, K.K.; Pedersen, E.B.;

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of two new phosphoramidite building blocks for the incorporation of 5-(pyren-1-yl)uracilyl unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers into oligonucleotides has been developed. Monomers containing a pyrene-modified nucleobase component were found to destabilize an i-motif structure at pH 5...

  10. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2016-03-22

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  11. Biology Teacher and Expert Opinions about Computer Assisted Biology Instruction Materials: A Software Entitled Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Timucin, Melih

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to collect and evaluate opinions of CAI experts and biology teachers about a high school level Computer Assisted Biology Instruction Material presenting computer-made modelling and simulations. It is a case study. A material covering "Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis" topic was developed as the "case". The goal of the…

  12. SeqX: a tool to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fördös Gergely

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interacting residues of protein and nucleic acid sequences are close to each other – they are co-located. Structure databases (like Protein Data Bank, PDB and Nucleic Acid Data Bank, NDB contain all information about these co-locations; however it is not an easy task to penetrate this complex information. We developed a JAVA tool, called SeqX for this purpose. Results SeqX tool is useful to detect, analyze and visualize residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. The user a. selects a structure from PDB; b. chooses an atom that is commonly present in every residues of the nucleic acid and/or protein structure(s c. defines a distance from these atoms (3–15 Å. The SeqX tool detects every residue that is located within the defined distances from the defined "backbone" atom(s; provides a DotPlot-like visualization (Residues Contact Map, and calculates the frequency of every possible residue pairs (Residue Contact Table in the observed structure. It is possible to exclude +/- 1 to 10 neighbor residues in the same polymeric chain from detection, which greatly improves the specificity of detections (up to 60% when tested on dsDNA. Results obtained on protein structures showed highly significant correlations with results obtained from literature (p Conclusion The tool is simple and easy to use and provides a quick and reliable visualization and analyses of residue co-locations in protein and nucleic acid structures. Availability and requirements http://janbiro.com/Downloads.html SeqX, Java J2SE Runtime Environment 5.0 (available from [see Additional file 1] http://www.sun.com and at least a 1 GHz processor and with a minimum 256 Mb RAM. Source codes are available from the authors. Additional File 1 SeqX_1.041_05601.jar. see this article Click here for file

  13. Nanoparticle strategies for cancer therapeutics: Nucleic acids, polyamines, bovine serum amine oxidase and iron oxide nanoparticles (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Enzo; Vianello, Fabio; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Thomas, Thresia; Thomas, T J

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology for cancer gene therapy is an emerging field. Nucleic acids, polyamine analogues and cytotoxic products of polyamine oxidation, generated in situ by an enzyme-catalyzed reaction, can be developed for nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics with reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic efficacy. Nucleic acid-based gene therapy approaches depend on the compaction of DNA/RNA to nanoparticles and polyamine analogues are excellent agents for the condensation of nucleic acids to nanoparticles. Polyamines and amine oxidases are found in higher levels in tumours compared to that of normal tissues. Therefore, the metabolism of polyamines spermidine and spermine, and their diamine precursor, putrescine, can be targets for antineoplastic therapy since these naturally occurring alkylamines are essential for normal mammalian cell growth. Intracellular polyamine concentrations are maintained at a cell type-specific set point through the coordinated and highly regulated interplay between biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism. In particular, polyamine catabolism involves copper-containing amine oxidases. Several studies showed an important role of these enzymes in developmental and disease-related processes in animals through the control of polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment, and environmental and/or cellular stress. The production of toxic aldehydes and reactive oxygen species (ROS), H2O2 in particular, by these oxidases suggests a mechanism by which amine oxidases can be exploited as antineoplastic drug targets. The combination of bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) and polyamines prevents tumour growth, particularly well if the enzyme has been conjugated with a biocompatible hydrogel polymer. The findings described herein suggest that enzymatically formed cytotoxic agents activate stress signal transduction pathways, leading to apoptotic cell death. Consequently, superparamagnetic nanoparticles or other

  14. First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of our first-principles study based on density functional theory on the interaction of the nucleic acid base molecules adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), and uracil (U), with a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). Specifically, the focus is on the physisorption of base molecules on the outer wall of a (5, 0) metallic CNT possessing one of the smallest diameters possible. Compared to the case for CNTs with large diameters, the physisorption energy is found to be reduced in the high-curvature case. The base molecules exhibit significantly different interaction strengths and the calculated binding energies follow the hierarchy G>A>T>C>U, which appears to be independent of the tube curvature. The stabilizing factor in the interaction between the base molecule and CNT is dominated by the molecular polarizability that allows a weakly attractive dispersion force to be induced between them. The present study provides an improved understanding of the role of the base sequence in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) in their interactions with carbon nanotubes of varying diameters

  15. Specificity of protein — Nucleic acid interaction and the biochemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, S. K.; Basu, H. S.

    1984-12-01

    The water soluble carbodiimide mediated condensation of dipeptides of the general form Gly-X was carried out in the presence of mono- and poly-nucleotides. The observed yield of the tetrapeptide was found to be higher for peptide-nucleotide system of higher interaction specificity following mainly the anticodon-amino acid relationship (Basu, H.S. & Podder, S.K., 1981, Ind. J. Biochem. Biophys., 19, 251 253). The yield of the condensation product of L-peptide was more because of its higher interaction specificity. The extent of the racemization during the condensation of Gly-L-Phe, Gly-L-Tyr and Gly-D-Phe was found to be dependent on the specificity of the interaction —the higher the specificity, the lesser the racemization. The product formed was shown to have a catalytic effect on the condensation reaction. These data thus provide a mechanism showing how the specific interaction between amino acids/dipeptides and nucleic acids could lead to the formation of the ‘primitive’ translation machinery.

  16. Immunocytochemistry versus nucleic acid amplification in fine needle aspirates and tissues of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Mati Goel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunocytochemistry (ICC is an established routine diagnostic adjunct to cytology and histology for tumor diagnosis but has received little attention for diagnosis of tuberculosis. Aims: To have an objective method of direct visualization of mycobacteria or their products in clinical extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB specimens, immunocytochemical localization of M. tuberculosis antigen by staining with species specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was done in fresh and archival fine needle aspirates and tissue granulomata of 302 cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and was compared with the molecular diagnostic i.e., nucleic amplification and conventional [Cytomorphology, Ziehl Neelsen (ZN staining and culture] tests and 386 controls. Results: Diagnostic indices by Bayesian analysis for all types of archival and fresh material varied from 64 to 76% in nucleic acid amplification (NAA and 96 to 98% in ICC. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic indices of ZN staining and/ or ICC in fresh or archival material whereas the sensitivity of NAA differed significantly in fresh versus archival material both in cytology (71.4% vs 52.1% and histology (51.1% vs 38.8%. ICC can be easily used on archival smears and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections with almost equal sensitivity and specificity as with fresh material, in contrast to NAA which showed significant difference in test results on archival and fresh material. Conclusions: Low detection sensitivity of MTB DNA in archival material from known tuberculous cases showed the limitation of in-house NAA-based molecular diagnosis. ICC was found to be sensitive, specific and a better technique than NAA and can be used as an adjunct to conventional morphology and ZN staining for the diagnosis of

  17. Effect of gamma-irradiation on nucleic acids, proteins, respiration and phosphatase activity of carrot callus cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callus tissue cultures were subjected to 60Co qamma irradiation at 0.5 Krad and analysed for nucleic acids, proteins, respiration rate and phosphatase activity on 0, 10, 20 and 30 days. The RNA contents and respiratory rates were enhanced as a result of irradiation. The RNA contents were reduced than their non-irradiated counterparts. The acid phosphatase activity was enhanced immediately after irradiation, declined on 10th and 20th day and more thereafter. (author)

  18. Recent developments in nucleic acid based techniques for use in rumen manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher McSweeney

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based techniques which can be used to characterise complex microbial communities without incubation are now being employed regularly in ruminant nutrition studies. Conventional culture-based methods for enumerating rumen microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, protozoa, and fungi have been superseded and are now used mainly to obtain pure isolates of novel organisms and reference strains that are required for the development and validation of the nucleic acid approaches. These reference strains are also essential for physiological studies of the lifestyle of the organisms as well as sources of genomic DNA and RNA that can be analysed for functional gene activity. The foundation of the molecular ecology techniques is 16S/18S rDNA sequence analysis which has provided a phylogenetically based classification scheme for enumeration and identification of microbial community members. The use of this marker gene in assays involving the use of single nucleic acid probes or primer sets is rapidly evolving to high throughput approaches such as microarray analysis and new generation sequencing technologies. While these analyses are very informative for determining the composition of the microbial community and monitoring changes in population size, they can only infer function based on these observations. The focus of nucleic acid research is now shifting to the functional analysis of the ecosystem which involves the measurement of functional genes and their expression in the predominant or specific members of the rumen microbial community. Functional gene studies are less developed than 16S rDNA-based analysis of community structure. Also for gene expression studies there are inherent problems involved in extracting high quality RNA from digesta, and priming cDNA synthesis from bacterial mRNA. This paper reviews nucleic acid based molecular methods which have recently been developed for studying the structure and function of rumen microbial

  19. X-ray crystal structure of N-6 adenine deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phidung Hong

    X-ray diffraction by using resonant anomalous scattering has become a popular tool for solving crystal structures in the last ten years with the expanded availability of tunable synchrotron radiation for protein crystallography. Mercury atoms were used for phasing. The crystal structure of N-6 deoxyribose nucleic acid methyltransferase from Streptoccocus pneumoniae (DpnM) was solved by using the Multiple Anomalous Diffraction technique. The crystal structure reveals the formation of mercaptide between the mercury ion and the thiol group on the cysteine amino acid in a hydrophobic environment. The crystal structure contains the bound ligand, S- adenosyl-l-methionine on the surface of the concave opening. The direction of the β-strands on the beta sheets are identical to other solved methyltransferases. The highly conserved motifs, DPPY and the FxGxG, are found to be important in ligand binding and possibly in methyl group transfer. The structure has a concave cleft with an opening on the order of 30 Å that can accommodate a DNA duplex. By molecular modelling coupled to sequence alignment, two other highly conserved residues Arg21 and Gly19 are found to be important in catalysis.

  20. Carrier-free Gene Silencing by Amphiphilic Nucleic Acid Conjugates in Differentiated Intestinal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Elena; Lee, Soo Hyeon; Yamada, Ken; Halloy, François; Martínez-Montero, Saúl; Jahns, Hartmut; Hall, Jonathan; Damha, Masad J; Castagner, Bastien; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapy can be beneficial for the local treatment of gastrointestinal diseases that currently lack appropriate treatments. Indeed, several oligonucleotides (ONs) are currently progressing through clinical trials as potential treatments for inflammatory bowel diseases. However, due to low uptake of carrier-free ONs by mucosal cells, strategies aimed at increasing the potency of orally administered ONs would be highly desirable. In this work, we explored the silencing properties of chemically modified and highly resistant ONs derivatized with hydrophobic alkyl chain on intestinal epithelial cells. We screened a set of lipid-ON conjugates for the silencing of model Bcl-2 mRNA and selected 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-arabinonucleic acid modified ON bearing docosanoyl moiety (L-FANA) as the most potent candidate with lowest toxicity. The efficacy of L-FANA conjugate was preserved in simulated intestinal fluids and in the inverted transfection setup. Importantly, L-FANA conjugate was able to downregulate target gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels in a difficult-to-transfect polarized epithelial cell monolayer in the absence of delivery devices and membrane disturbing agents. These findings indicate that lipid-ON conjugates could be promising therapeutics for the treatment of intestinal diseases as well as a valuable tool for the discovery of new therapeutic targets.

  1. Complete nucleic acid sequence of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV) from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Praveen; Safeena, Muhammed P; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-06-01

    Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) of shrimp, recently been classified as Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV). The complete nucleic acid sequence of PstDNV from India was obtained by cloning and sequencing of different DNA fragment of the virus. The genome organisation of PstDNV revealed that there were three major coding domains: a left ORF (NS1) of 2001 bp, a mid ORF (NS2) of 1092 bp and a right ORF (VP) of 990 bp. The complete genome and amino acid sequences of three proteins viz., NS1, NS2 and VP were compared with the genomes of the virus reported from Hawaii, China and Mexico and with partial sequence available from isolates from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis of shrimp, insect and vertebrate parvovirus sequences showed that the Indian PstDNV isolate is phylogenetically more closely related to one of the three isolates from Taiwan (AY355307), and two isolates (AY362547 and AY102034) from Thailand. PMID:21402111

  2. Application of peptide nucleic acids containing azobenzene self-assembled electrochemical biosensors in detecting DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hybridization of peptide nucleic acids probe containing azobenzene (NH2-TNT4, N-PNAs) with DNA was performed by covalently immobilizing of NH2-TNT4 in sequence on the 3-mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer modified gold electrode with the helps of N-(3-dimethylaminopropy1)-N’-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), and the hybrid was coded as N-PNAs/DNA. Using [Fe(CN)6]4-/3- (1:1) as the electrochemical indicator, the electrochemical properties of the N-PNAs self-assembled monolayer (N-PNAs-SAMs) and N-PNAs/DNA hybridization system under the conditions of before and after UV light irradiation were characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Results showed that the redox currents decreased with the increase of irradiation time, suggesting that the ability of the charge transfer on the electrode surface was weakened and the conformation of hybrid system had been changed, and the control of PNAs/DNA hybridization could be realized by UV light irradiation.

  3. Carrier-free Gene Silencing by Amphiphilic Nucleic Acid Conjugates in Differentiated Intestinal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Elena; Lee, Soo Hyeon; Yamada, Ken; Halloy, François; Martínez-Montero, Saúl; Jahns, Hartmut; Hall, Jonathan; Damha, Masad J; Castagner, Bastien; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapy can be beneficial for the local treatment of gastrointestinal diseases that currently lack appropriate treatments. Indeed, several oligonucleotides (ONs) are currently progressing through clinical trials as potential treatments for inflammatory bowel diseases. However, due to low uptake of carrier-free ONs by mucosal cells, strategies aimed at increasing the potency of orally administered ONs would be highly desirable. In this work, we explored the silencing properties of chemically modified and highly resistant ONs derivatized with hydrophobic alkyl chain on intestinal epithelial cells. We screened a set of lipid-ON conjugates for the silencing of model Bcl-2 mRNA and selected 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-arabinonucleic acid modified ON bearing docosanoyl moiety (L-FANA) as the most potent candidate with lowest toxicity. The efficacy of L-FANA conjugate was preserved in simulated intestinal fluids and in the inverted transfection setup. Importantly, L-FANA conjugate was able to downregulate target gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels in a difficult-to-transfect polarized epithelial cell monolayer in the absence of delivery devices and membrane disturbing agents. These findings indicate that lipid-ON conjugates could be promising therapeutics for the treatment of intestinal diseases as well as a valuable tool for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27648924

  4. Investigation and Manipulation of the Local Microenvironment of Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, William Edward

    For the past several decades, tremendous efforts have been made by many to battle cancer,one of the leading causes of death in the United States and around the world. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and treatment of many genetically-based disorders such as cancer remains very difficult to this day. This is due to the fact that current technologies are unable to adequately differentiate between healthy and diseased cells. In many cases, state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutics for genetic disorders rely on targeting downstream effects that may be related to, or influenced by aberrations in gene expression, rather than targeting the up- or down-regulated transcripts themselves. This type of targeting can lead to significant off-target effects, which can translate to false positives for diagnostics, and systemic toxicity for therapeutics. This thesis discusses a nanoparticle-based conjugate which aims to increase the specificity of diagnostics, therapeutics, and biological research platforms by targeting RNA transcripts directly. This nanoconjugate, known as the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) is capable of entering live cells with negligible cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, and binding onto targeted RNA transcripts. Chapter one details the properties and synthesis of the SNA, and discusses how the cell entry/transcript binding capabilities of the SNA can be translated into therapeutic and diagnostic platforms. Chapter two then moves into the therapeutic applications of the SNA, discussing a novel platform known as the Sticky-flare, which is capable of detecting and fluorescently labeling target transcripts for real time analysis. Chapter three then investigates the function of the SNA in a therapeutic application. Specifically, the route that topically applied SNAs take to penetrate through skin is elucidated, and is contextualized by comparing the penetration of SNAs with equivalent linear DNA sequences. Linear nucleic acids are typically not capable of effecting gene

  5. Circular RNA oligonucleotides. Synthesis, nucleic acid binding properties, and a comparison with circular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Kool, E T

    1994-06-25

    We report the synthesis and nucleic acid binding properties of two cyclic RNA oligonucleotides designed to bind single-stranded nucleic acids by pyr.pur.pyr-type triple helix formation. The circular RNAs are 34 nucleotides in size and were cyclized using a template-directed nonenzymatic ligation. To ensure isomeric 3'-5' purity in the ligation reaction, one nucleotide at the ligation site is a 2'-deoxyribose. One circle (1) is complementary to the sequence 5'-A12, and the second (2) is complementary to 5'-AAGAAAGAAAAG. Results of thermal denaturation experiments and mixing studies show that both circles bind complementary single-stranded DNA or RNA substrates by triple helix formation, in which two domains in a pyrimidine-rich circle sandwich a central purine-rich substrate. The affinities of these circles with their purine complements are much higher than the affinities of either the linear precursors or simple Watson-Crick DNA complements. For example, circle 1 binds rA12 (pH 7.0, 10 mM MgCl2, 100 mM NaCl) with a Tm of 48 degrees C and a Kd (37 degrees C) of 4.1 x 10(-9) M, while the linear precursor of the circle binds with a Tm of 34 degrees C and a Kd of 1.2 x 10(-6) M. The complexes of circle 2 are pH-dependent, as expected for triple helical complexes involving C(+)G.C triads, and mixing plots for both circles reveal one-to-one stoichiometry of binding either to RNA or DNA substrates. Comparison of circular RNAs with previously synthesized circular DNA oligonucleotides of the same sequence reveals similar behavior in the binding of DNA, but strikingly different behavior in the binding of RNA. The cyclic DNAs show high DNA-binding selectivity, giving relatively weaker duplex-type binding with complementary RNAs. The relative order of thermodynamic stability for the four types of triplex studied here is found to be DDD > RRR > RDR > DRD. The results are discussed in the context of recent reports of strong triplex dependence on RNA versus DNA backbones. Triplex

  6. CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC POLYMERS ⅩⅩⅢ SYNTHESIS AND ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF POLYPHOSPHATES CONTAINING BOTH NUCLEIC ACID BASE AND PHOSPHONOACETIC ACID ETHYL ESTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Renxi; LIU Zhenghua; LI Li

    1989-01-01

    Eight new polyphosphates containing both nucleic acid base and phosphonoacetic acid ethyl ester were synthesized by the polycondensation of P, P- dichloride of phosphonoacetic acid ethyl ester with 1, 3-dihydroxyalkyl - 5 - fluorouracil, 1,3 - dihydroxyalkyl - uracil and 1, 3 - dihydroxyalkylthymine. These polyphosphates were tested against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma in mice. Polymer Ⅱa and Ⅱc exhibited excellent antitumor activity. Ⅱc also showed lower toxicity.

  7. Nucleic Acids and Protein Metabolism of Bone Marrow Cells Studied by Means of Tritiumlabelled Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the use of tritium-labelled compounds in radioautographic technique are discussed. Tritium electrons have a maximal energy of 0.018 MeV, corresponding to about 1μm range in a photographic emulsion, and consequently they allow the highest possible resolution at a cellular and subcellular level. This is particularly useful for studying metabolic phenomena of tissues which are composed, as in the case of bone marrow, of different cellular types at various stages of differentiation. This technique has been used for investigating nucleic acids and protein metabolism of normal and leukaemic bone marrow cells. DNA metabolism has been studied utilizing a specific precursor, H3-thymidine. Some significant differences of the percentages of labelled cells have been detected by comparing the normal and leukaemic elements belonging to the same stage of maturation. In acute leukaemia cells, particularly, a strikingly lower incorporation of thymidine was found and these results have been taken as evidence of a decreased proliferative capacity of these cells, as compared to normal myeloblasts. With the same technique, RNA and protein metabolism have been investigated utilizing H3- uridine, H3-leucine and H3-phenylalanine as precursors. The existence of a strict interrelationship between RNA and protein metabolism is now fully accepted in cellular biology. The existence of a constant ratio between uridine and amino acids incorporation has also been demonstrated in normal bone marrow cells. In acute leukaemia cells the incorporation of RNA and protein precursors, although different from case to case, is constantly and significantly lower. Furthermore, the ratio between uridine and amino acids incorporation is constantly altered in these cells. The lower RNA and protein metabolism and its dissociation in acute leukaemia cells is discussed in relation to the well-known maturation defect of these cells. (author)

  8. Comparative distribution study of C labelled amino acids, glucose-analogue and precursor of nucleic acid, as tumor seeking agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi; Hisada, Kinichi

    1984-08-01

    As tumor-seeking agents, glucose analogues, natural amino acids, synthetic nonmetabolized amino acids, and precursor of nucleic acids, etc., labeled with positron emitter, such as C and YF have been recently investigated. However, there are very few reports concerning comparative study of tumor uptake and tissue distribution of these agents. This preliminary paper describes comparative distribution and whole-body autoradiography of these agents. UC labeled deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), L-, DL-leucine, 1-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid (ACPC), -amino isobutyric acid ( -AIB), and thymidine were intravenously injected through tail vein into separate groups of the experimental animals. As the experimental animals, the mice with Ehrlich tumor and the rats with Hepatoma AH109A were used. Within 30 min after injection, FDG had the highest tumor uptake and tumor to tissue ratios, although FDG was inferior to ACPC and thymidine in related to tumor to heart, lung and brain ratios. However, the time course study indicated that tumor uptake of ACPC, -AIB and D-leucine increased with time, whereas those of other agents decreased with time or reached a plateau. Thus, at 120 min after injection, ACPC had the highest tumor uptake and tumor to tissue ratios, although ACPC was inferior to FDG in related to tumor to blood, liver and pancreas ratios. Autoradiogram of ACPC showed very clear tumor image as well as that of FDG. The above data suggest that synthetic nonmetabolized amino acids, such as ACPC may be promising as tumor-seeking agents, when used with a single photon emission computed tomography, while glucose analogue such as FDG, are the best tumor-seeking agent, when used with a positron emission computed tomography. (author).

  9. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Topham, Christopher [University of Heidelberg

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  10. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  11. Modular calibrant sets for the structural analysis of nucleic acids by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippens, Jennifer L; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; D'Esposito, Rebecca J; Fabris, Daniele

    2016-06-20

    This study explored the use of modular nucleic acid (NA) standards to generate calibration curves capable of translating primary ion mobility readouts into corresponding collision cross section (CCS) data. Putative calibrants consisted of single- (ss) and double-stranded (ds) oligo-deoxynucleotides reaching up to ∼40 kDa in size (i.e., 64 bp) and ∼5700 Å(2) in CCS. To ensure self-consistency among reference CCS values, computational data obtained in house were preferred to any experimental or computational data from disparate sources. Such values were obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and either the exact hard sphere scattering (EHSS) or the projection superposition approximation (PSA) methods, and then plotted against the corresponding experimental values to generate separate calibration curves. Their performance was evaluated on the basis of their correlation coefficients and ability to provide values that matched the CCS of selected test samples mimicking typical unknowns. The results indicated that the predictive power benefited from the exclusion of higher charged species that were more susceptible to the destabilizing effects of Coulombic repulsion. The results revealed discrepancies between EHSS and PSA data that were ascribable to the different approximations used to describe the ion mobility process. Within the boundaries defined by these approximations and the challenges of modeling NA structure in a solvent-free environment, the calibrant sets enabled the experimental determination of CCS with excellent reproducibility (precision) and error (accuracy), which will support the analysis of progressively larger NA samples of biological significance. PMID:27152369

  12. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  13. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between Temozolamide and nucleic acids by using disposable pencil graphite electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Cansu; Eksin, Ece; Congur, Gulsah; Erdem, Arzum

    2015-11-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of adult brain tumour and skin cancer. The biomolecular interaction between TMZ and DNA was investigated for the first time in this study using disposable pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) in combination with electrochemical techniques. The surface confined interactions between TMZ and different type of nucleic acids were performed. Before/after surface confined interaction process, the oxidation signals of TMZ, guanine and adenine were measured using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and PGE and accordingly, the changes at the oxidation signals were evaluated. The detection limit (DL) was also estimated based on the oxidation signal of TMZ. The interaction of TMZ with single stranded poly [A], poly [G], or double stranded poly [A]-poly[T] and poly [G]-poly[C] was also explored. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were utilized for detection the interaction between TMZ and DNA. The features of this single-use electrochemical sensor was discussed in comparison to other reports that were developed for TMZ detection.

  14. Enzyme-free detection and quantification of double-stranded nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuillie, Cécile; Merheb, Maxime Mohamad; Gillet, Benjamin; Montagnac, Gilles; Hänni, Catherine; Daniel, Isabelle

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a fully enzyme-free SERRS hybridization assay for specific detection of double-stranded DNA sequences. Although all DNA detection methods ranging from PCR to high-throughput sequencing rely on enzymes, this method is unique for being totally non-enzymatic. The efficiency of enzymatic processes is affected by alterations, modifications, and/or quality of DNA. For instance, a limitation of most DNA polymerases is their inability to process DNA damaged by blocking lesions. As a result, enzymatic amplification and sequencing of degraded DNA often fail. In this study we succeeded in detecting and quantifying, within a mixture, relative amounts of closely related double-stranded DNA sequences from Rupicapra rupicapra (chamois) and Capra hircus (goat). The non-enzymatic SERRS assay presented here is the corner stone of a promising approach to overcome the failure of DNA polymerase when DNA is too degraded or when the concentration of polymerase inhibitors is too high. It is the first time double-stranded DNA has been detected with a truly non-enzymatic SERRS-based method. This non-enzymatic, inexpensive, rapid assay is therefore a breakthrough in nucleic acid detection. PMID:22695500

  15. Nucleic acid based quantitative microbial community analysis in different marine and terrestrial sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, A.; Blazejak, A.; Köweker, G.

    2009-12-01

    Sub-seafloor sediments harbour over half of all prokaryotic cells on Earth. This immense cell number is calculated from numerous microscopic cell counts (AODC) in ODP sediment cores. Since AODC can not differentiate between living or dead cells, the population size of living microorganisms and the abundance of different prokaryotic groups are unknown. Recent molecular nucleic acid and biomarker analyses showed that a high proportion of the cells are alive and that the microbial communities of deep marine sediments harbour members of distinct, uncultured bacterial and archaeal lineages. The main objective of our project is the quantification of living prokaryotes in various sediments. Deep sediment samples from the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans (ODP Legs 201 and 207, IODP Exp. 307 and 308), sediments from the Indian Ocean (RV Sonne 189-2) and the Black Sea (RV Meteor 51/4) as well as terrestrial Chesapeake Bay Sediments (ICDP) were analyzed using Catalyzed Reporter Deposition - Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (CARD - FISH) and quantitative, real-time PCR (Q-PCR), targeting either the 16S rRNA gene or the functional genes dsrA, mcrA and aprA to quantify microorganisms of various phylogenetic or physiological groups (e.g. JS1 cluster and Chloroflexi). At all sediment sites, cell numbers decreased with depth, however, the abundance of particular microbial groups varied at different sites and depths. The results indicate that global estimates of the deep biosphere should be reconsidered.

  16. In vivo encapsulation of nucleic acids using an engineered nonviral protein capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilavivat, Seth; Sardar, Debosmita; Jana, Subrata; Thomas, Geoffrey C; Woycechowsky, Kenneth J

    2012-08-15

    In Nature, protein capsids function as molecular containers for a wide variety of molecular cargoes. Such containers have great potential for applications in nanotechnology, which often require encapsulation of non-native guest molecules. Charge complementarity represents a potentially powerful strategy for engineering novel encapsulation systems. In an effort to explore the generality of this approach, we engineered a nonviral, 60-subunit capsid, lumazine synthase from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS), to act as a container for nucleic acid. Four mutations were introduced per subunit to increase the positive charge at the inner surface of the capsid. Characterization of the mutant (AaLS-pos) revealed that the positive charges lead to the uptake of cellular RNA during production and assembly of the capsid in vivo. Surprisingly, AaLS-pos capsids were found to be enriched with RNA molecules approximately 200-350 bases in length, suggesting that this simple charge complementarity approach to RNA encapsulation leads to both high affinity and a degree of selectivity. The ability to control loading of RNA by tuning the charge at the inner surface of a protein capsid could illuminate aspects of genome recognition by viruses and pave the way for the development of improved RNA delivery systems. PMID:22827162

  17. Fluorescent Probes for Nucleic Acid Visualization in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre S. Boutorine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review analyses the literature concerning non-fluorescent and fluorescent probes for nucleic acid imaging in fixed and living cells from the point of view of their suitability for imaging intracellular native RNA and DNA. Attention is mainly paid to fluorescent probes for fluorescence microscopy imaging. Requirements for the target-binding part and the fluorophore making up the probe are formulated. In the case of native double-stranded DNA, structure-specific and sequence-specific probes are discussed. Among the latest, three classes of dsDNA-targeting molecules are described: (i sequence-specific peptides and proteins; (ii triplex-forming oligonucleotides and (iii polyamide oligo(N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole minor groove binders. Polyamides seem to be the most promising targeting agents for fluorescent probe design, however, some technical problems remain to be solved, such as the relatively low sequence specificity and the high background fluorescence inside the cells. Several examples of fluorescent probe applications for DNA imaging in fixed and living cells are cited. In the case of intracellular RNA, only modified oligonucleotides can provide such sequence-specific imaging. Several approaches for designing fluorescent probes are considered: linear fluorescent probes based on modified oligonucleotide analogs, molecular beacons, binary fluorescent probes and template-directed reactions with fluorescence probe formation, FRET donor-acceptor pairs, pyrene excimers, aptamers and others. The suitability of all these methods for living cell applications is discussed.

  18. Discrimination of bacteriophage infected cells using locked nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (LNA-FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Boas, Diana; Almeida, Carina; Sillankorva, Sanna; Nicolau, Ana; Azeredo, Joana; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage-host interaction studies in biofilm structures are still challenging due to the technical limitations of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to provide a direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method based on locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes, which targets the phage replication phase, allowing the study of population dynamics during infection. Bacteriophages specific for two biofilm-forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter, were selected. Four LNA probes were designed and optimized for phage-specific detection and for bacterial counterstaining. To validate the method, LNA-FISH counts were compared with the traditional plaque forming unit (PFU) technique. To visualize the progression of phage infection within a biofilm, colony-biofilms were formed and infected with bacteriophages. A good correlation (r = 0.707) was observed between LNA-FISH and PFU techniques. In biofilm structures, LNA-FISH provided a good discrimination of the infected cells and also allowed the assessment of the spatial distribution of infected and non-infected populations.

  19. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer's gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  20. Efficient gene silencing by delivery of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides, unassisted by transfection reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C A; Hansen, J Bo; Lai, Johnathan; Wu, SiJian; Voskresenskiy, Anatoliy; Høg, Anja; Worm, Jesper; Hedtjärn, Maj; Souleimanian, Naira; Miller, Paul; Soifer, Harris S; Castanotto, Daniella; Benimetskaya, Luba; Ørum, Henrik; Koch, Troels

    2010-01-01

    For the past 15-20 years, the intracellular delivery and silencing activity of oligodeoxynucleotides have been essentially completely dependent on the use of a delivery technology (e.g. lipofection). We have developed a method (called 'gymnosis') that does not require the use of any transfection reagent or any additives to serum whatsoever, but rather takes advantage of the normal growth properties of cells in tissue culture in order to promote productive oligonucleotide uptake. This robust method permits the sequence-specific silencing of multiple targets in a large number of cell types in tissue culture, both at the protein and mRNA level, at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Optimum results were obtained with locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate gap-mers. By appropriate manipulation of oligonucleotide dosing, this silencing can be continuously maintained with little or no toxicity for >240 days. High levels of oligonucleotide in the cell nucleus are not a requirement for gene silencing, contrary to long accepted dogma. In addition, gymnotic delivery can efficiently deliver oligonucleotides to suspension cells that are known to be very difficult to transfect. Finally, the pattern of gene silencing of in vitro gymnotically delivered oligonucleotides correlates particularly well with in vivo silencing. The establishment of this link is of particular significance to those in the academic research and drug discovery and development communities.

  1. Peptide nucleic acids arrest the growth of gastric cancer cells SGC7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宽; 张岂凡; 王锡山; 薛英威; 庞达; 傅松滨

    2004-01-01

    Background Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has many characteristics useful in molecular biology. This paper described an effective way to raise the cell ingestion rate of PNA so as to kill gastric cancer cells.Methods Heteroduplexes of PNAs and oligonucleotides, wrapped by Lipofectamine 2000, were used to infect SGC7901 cells. The inhibitive effect of heteroduplexes was evaluated by analyzing cell clone forming and cell growth rate. Telomerase activity of SGC7901 cells was detected by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) and silver staining assay.Results PNAs showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The percentage of proliferation inhibition was 99.4% after 7 days; the rate of cloning inhibition was 98.2% after 8 days;whereas for oligonucleotide groups, at the same concentration, the percentages were 50. 1% and 67. 5% respectively. Antisense PNA-DNA-Lipofectamine 2000 group (AP-D-L group) exhibited significantly different percentages from the control groups (P<0.05). The test result indicated that telomerase activity of the AP-D-L group was inhibited (P<0.05). At the same time, the impact on cell morphology was observed.Conclusions The results showed that PNAs are potent antisense reagents. The telomeraseassociated therapies are very promising for the treatment of malignant tumours.

  2. Nucleic acids from long-term preserved FFPE tissues are suitable for downstream analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludyga, Natalie; Grünwald, Barbara; Azimzadeh, Omid; Englert, Sonja; Höfler, Heinz; Tapio, Soile; Aubele, Michaela

    2012-02-01

    Tissues used for clinical diagnostics are mostly formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) which provides many advantages. However, the quality of the obtained nucleic acids (NA) is reduced and this turns out to be a challenge for further molecular analyses. Although the spectrum of analyses of NA extracted from FFPE tissue has increased, the standard operating procedures for NA isolation from old tissue blocks still need to be improved. Here, we compared the efficiency of different NA extraction methods, using FFPE tissues of variable age and origin, with respect to downstream analyses. Our study showed that the phenol-chloroform isoamyl alcohol (PCI) and the commercial Qiagen protocol yielded samples with highest purity. The PCI protocol delivered the longest amplicons even from samples from the 1970s. We developed a short (1 h) tissue lysis procedure that turned out to be highly time- and cost-effective when DNA quality was tested using single and multiplex PCR. Compared to a 1-day lysis-protocol, the amplicons were only 100 bp shorter. In addition, single-copy genes used in daily routine were successfully amplified from long-term stored FFPE samples following 1-h tissue-lysis. The RNA integrity numbers (RIN) determined on RNA isolated from FFPE tissues indicated degraded RNA; however, all RINs were above the generally agreed threshold of 1.4. We showed that, depending on the purpose of the analysis, NA retrieved from FFPE tissues older than 40 years may be successfully used for molecular analysis.

  3. Field Effect Sensors for Nucleic Acid Detection: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Veigas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the use of field-effect-based devices has become a basic structural element in a new generation of biosensors that allow label-free DNA analysis. In particular, ion sensitive field effect transistors (FET are the basis for the development of radical new approaches for the specific detection and characterization of DNA due to FETs’ greater signal-to-noise ratio, fast measurement capabilities, and possibility to be included in portable instrumentation. Reliable molecular characterization of DNA and/or RNA is vital for disease diagnostics and to follow up alterations in gene expression profiles. FET biosensors may become a relevant tool for molecular diagnostics and at point-of-care. The development of these devices and strategies should be carefully designed, as biomolecular recognition and detection events must occur within the Debye length. This limitation is sometimes considered to be fundamental for FET devices and considerable efforts have been made to develop better architectures. Herein we review the use of field effect sensors for nucleic acid detection strategies—from production and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics lab.

  4. Automated nucleic acid amplification testing in blood banks: An additional layer of blood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Chigurupati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A total of 30 million blood components are transfused each year in India. Blood safety thus becomes a top priority, especially with a population of around 1.23 billion and a high prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in general population. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT in blood donor screening has been implemented in many developed countries to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections (TTIs. NAT takes care of the dynamics of window period of viruses and offers the safest blood pack for donation. Aims: The aim of this study is to show the value of NAT in blood screening. Settings and Design: Dhanavantari Blood Bank, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subjects and Methods: Over a period of 1 year from January 2012 to December 2012, a total number of 15,000 blood donor samples were subjected to tests for HIV, HBV, and HCV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method and 8000 ELISA nonreactive samples were subjected for NAT using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technology. Results: Of the 15,000 donors tested, 525 were seroreactive. In 8000 ELISA negative blood samples subjected to NAT, 4 donor samples were reactive for HBV. The NAT yield was 1 in 2000. Conclusions: NAT could detect HIV, HBV, and HCV cases in blood donor samples those were undetected by serological tests. NAT could interdict 2500 infectious donations among our approximate 5 million annual blood donations.

  5. Life in the light: nucleic acid photoproperties as a legacy of chemical evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Ashley A; Zhang, Yuyuan; de Vries, Mattanjah S; Kohler, Bern

    2016-09-21

    Photophysical investigations of the canonical nucleobases that make up DNA and RNA during the past 15 years have revealed that excited states formed by the absorption of UV radiation decay with subpicosecond lifetimes (i.e., blocks is an elegant solution to the threat of photochemical damage. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation strongly supports the hypothesis that UV radiation played a major role in shaping molecular inventories on the early Earth before the emergence of life and the subsequent development of a protective ozone shield. Here, we review the general physical and chemical principles that underlie the photostability, or "UV hardiness", of modern nucleic acids and discuss the possible implications of these findings for prebiotic chemical evolution. In RNA and DNA strands, much longer-lived excited states are observed, which at first glance appear to increase the risk of photochemistry. It is proposed that the dramatically different photoproperties that emerge from assemblies of photostable building blocks may explain the transition from a world of molecular survival to a world in which energy-rich excited electronic states were eventually tamed for biological purposes such as energy transduction, signaling, and repair of the genetic machinery. PMID:27539809

  6. Optimal design of parallel triplex forming oligonucleotides containing Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids--TINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uffe V; Mikkelsen, Nikolaj D; Jøhnk, Nina; Okkels, Limei M; Westh, Henrik; Lisby, Gorm

    2010-07-01

    Twisted intercalating nucleic acid (TINA) is a novel intercalator and stabilizer of Hoogsteen type parallel triplex formations (PT). Specific design rules for position of TINA in triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have not previously been presented. We describe a complete collection of easy and robust design rules based upon more than 2500 melting points (T(m)) determined by FRET. To increase the sensitivity of PT, multiple TINAs should be placed with at least 3 nt in-between or preferable one TINA for each half helixturn and/or whole helixturn. We find that Delta T(m) of base mismatches on PT is remarkably high (between 7.4 and 15.2 degrees C) compared to antiparallel duplexes (between 3.8 and 9.4 degrees C). The specificity of PT by Delta T(m) increases when shorter TFOs and higher pH are chosen. To increase Delta Tms, base mismatches should be placed in the center of the TFO and when feasible, A, C or T to G base mismatches should be avoided. Base mismatches can be neutralized by intercalation of a TINA on each side of the base mismatch and masked by a TINA intercalating direct 3' (preferable) or 5' of it. We predict that TINA stabilized PT will improve the sensitivity and specificity of DNA based clinical diagnostic assays. PMID:20338879

  7. Hybrid polymeric hydrogels via peptide nucleic acid (PNA)/DNA complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Te-Wei; Feng, Jiayue; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-12-28

    This work presents a new concept in hybrid hydrogel design. Synthetic water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) polymers grafted with multiple peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are crosslinked upon addition of the linker DNA. The self-assembly is mediated by the PNA-DNA complexation, which results in the formation of hydrophilic polymer networks. We show that the hydrogels can be produced through two different types of complexations. Type I hydrogel is formed via the PNA/DNA double-helix hybridization. Type II hydrogel utilizes a unique "P-form" oligonucleotide triple-helix that comprises two PNA sequences and one DNA. Microrheology studies confirm the respective gelation processes and disclose a higher critical gelation concentration for the type I gel when compared to the type II design. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the interconnected microporous structure of both types of hydrogels. Type I double-helix hydrogel exhibits larger pore sizes than type II triple-helix gel. The latter apparently contains denser structure and displays greater elasticity as well. The designed hybrid hydrogels have potential as novel biomaterials for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:26394062

  8. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-08-27

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  9. A Sensitive Peptide Nucleic Acid Probe Assay for Detection of BRAF V600 Mutations in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Long; Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hsieh, Jia-Juan; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    Mutated v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) is an important biomarker for the prediction of therapeutic efficacy of several anticancer drugs. The detection of BRAF mutation faces two challenges: Firstly, there are multiple types of mutations, and secondly, tumor samples usually contain various amounts of wild-type, normal tissues. Here, we describe a newly established method for sensitive detection of multiple types of BRAF V600 mutations in excess wild-type background. The method introduced a fluorophore-tagged peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to serve as both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamp and sensor probe, which inhibited the amplification of wild-type templates during PCR and revealed multiple types of mutant signals during melting analysis. We demonstrated the design and optimization process of the method, and applied it in the detection of BRAF mutations in 49 melanoma samples. This PNA probe assay method detected three types of mutations in 17 samples, and was much more sensitive than conventional PCR plus Sanger sequencing. PMID:27566656

  10. Fluorometric quantification of polyphosphate in environmental plankton samples: extraction protocols, matrix effects, and nucleic acid interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference.

  11. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  12. Excretion and detection of SARS coronavirus and its nucleic acid from digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Wei Wang; Xiao-Ming Wu; Wen-Jun Xiao; Xiu-Mei Zhu; Chang-Qing Gu; Jing Yin; Wei Wei; Wei Yao; Chao Liu; Jian-Feng Li; Guo-Rong Ou; Jin-Song Li; Min-Nian Wang; Tong-Yu Fang; Gui-Jie Wang; Yao-Hui Qiu; Huai-Huan Wu; Fu-Huan Chao; Jun-Wen Li; Ting-Kai Guo; Bei Zhen; Qing-Xin Kong; Bin Yi; Zhong Li; Nong Song; Min Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) could be excreted from digestive system.METHODS: Cell culture and semi-nested RT-PCR were used to detect SARS-CoV and its RNA from 21 stool and urine samples, and a kind of electropositive filter media particles was used to concentrate the virus in 10 sewage samples from two hospitals receiving SAPS patients in Beijing in China.RESULTS: It was demonstrated that there was no live SARS-CoV in all samples collected, but the RNA of SARS-CoV could be detected in seven stool samples from SARS patients with any one of the symptoms of fever, malaise,cough, or dyspnea, in 10 sewage samples before disinfection and 3 samples after disinfection from the two hospitals.The RNA could not be detected in urine and stool samples from patients recovered from SARS.CONCLUSION: Nucleic acid of SARS-CoV can be excreted through the stool of patients into sewage system, and the possibility of SARS-CoV transmitting through digestive system cannot be excluded.

  13. Efficient nucleic acid delivery to murine regulatory T cells by gold nanoparticle conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamrad, Lisa; Rehbock, Christoph; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Buer, Jan; Barcikowski, Stephan; Hansen, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses have to be tightly controlled to guarantee maintenance of immunological tolerance and efficient clearance of pathogens and tumorigenic cells without induction of unspecific side effects. CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in these processes due to their immunosuppressive function. Genetic modification of Tregs would be helpful to understand which molecules and pathways are involved in their function, but currently available methods are limited by time, costs or efficacy. Here, we made use of biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles as non-viral carriers to transport genetic information into murine Tregs. Confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed an efficient uptake of the bioconjugates by Tregs. Most importantly, coupling eGFP-siRNA to those particles resulted in a dose and time dependent reduction of up to 50% of eGFP expression in Tregs isolated from Foxp3eGFP reporter mice. Thus, gold particles represent a suitable carrier for efficient import of nucleic acids into murine CD4+ CD25+ Tregs, superior to electroporation. PMID:27381215

  14. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro eCosta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid testing (NAT designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90´s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnosis for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnosis approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  15. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field

  16. Synthesis and study on biological activity of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds – regulators of enzymes of nucleic acid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexeeva I. V.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations on the development of new regulators of functional activity of nucleic acid biosynthesis enzymes based on polycyclic nitrogen-containing heterosystems are summarized. Computer design and molecular docking in the catalytic site of target enzyme (T7pol allowed to perform the directed optimization of basic structures. Several series of compounds were obtained and efficient inhibitors of herpes family (simple herpes virus type 2, Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A and hepatitis C viruses were identified, as well as compounds with potent antitumor, antibacterial and antifungal activity. It was established that the use of model test systems based on enzymes participating in nucleic acids synthesis is a promising approach to the primary screening of potential inhibitors in vitro.

  17. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Liwo, Adam [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdańsk, Wita Stwosza 63, 80-308 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  18. The isolation of nucleic acids from fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues-which methods are useful when?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Haselkorn, Tamara; Bunce, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    , the benefits often come at a cost. In addition, a number of the previously published techniques appear to have no effect at all. Our findings recommend that the extraction methodology adopted should be chosen carefully. Here we provide a quick reference table that can be used to determine appropriate protocols....... Cross-linking not only complicates isolation of nucleic acid but also introduces polymerase "blocks" during PCR. A wide variety of methods exists for the recovery of DNA and RNA from archival tissues, and although a number of previous studies have qualitatively compared the relative merits...... of the different techniques, very few have undertaken wide scale quantitative comparisons. To help address this issue, we have undertaken a study that investigates the quality of nucleic acids recovered from a test panel of fixed specimens that have been manipulated following a number of the published protocols...

  19. Rapid One-Step Selection Method for Generating Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Development of a DNA Aptamer against alpha-Bungarotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Shamaileh, Hadi A.; Edwards, Stacey L.;

    2012-01-01

    by PCR enrichment of the selected aptamers. One round of selection successfully identified a DNA aptamer sequence with a binding affinity of 7.58 mu M. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a one-step method for rapid production of nucleic acid aptamers. Although the reported binding affinity is in the low...... in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. Principal Findings: Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against alpha-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed...... micromolar range, we believe that this could be further improved by using larger targets, increasing the stringency of selection and also by combining a capillary electrophoresis separation prior to the one-step selection. Furthermore, the method presented here is a user-friendly, cheap and an easy way...

  20. Increasing the Analytical Sensitivity by Oligonucleotides Modified with Para- and Ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids - TINA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe V; Géci, Imrich; Jøhnk, Nina;

    2011-01-01

    . Here, we report the synthesis of a novel ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA) amidite utilizing the phosphoramidite approach, and examine the stabilizing effect of ortho- and para-TINA molecules in antiparallel DNA duplex formation. In a thermal stability assay, ortho- and para......The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic assays using DNA hybridization techniques are limited by the dissociation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antiparallel duplex helices. This situation can be improved by addition of DNA stabilizing molecules such as nucleic acid intercalators......-TINA molecules increased the melting point (Tm) of Watson-Crick based antiparallel DNA duplexes. The increase in Tm was greatest when the intercalators were placed at the 5' and 3' termini (preferable) or, if placed internally, for each half or whole helix turn. Terminally positioned TINA molecules improved...