WorldWideScience

Sample records for bremsstrahlung x-rays produced

  1. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120{degree} to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL.

  2. Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 μm (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

  3. Vircator in regime of x-ray Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power vircator with multi-flight electrons cross optical thin anode foil power pulses generation of X-ray radiation created and operated in first. The vircator realized on the base of direct action electron accelerator with supplies of inductive energy storage with plasma switch of current. In paper results of 2-D self-consistent calculations of electron beam dynamics in vircator camera and determined spectra of arise UHF-radiation. The results of first experiments on vircator X-ray Bremsstrahlung for thin (10 mkm, Ta) and thick (100 mkm, Ta) anode foils are presented. The dose of X-ray radiation for thin foil (Eγ > 30 keV) in 8 greater than dose received for thick anode, middle photon energy reduced from 80 keV to 30 keV

  4. High power bremsstrahlung X-ray source for radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsumoto, K.; Sunaga, H.; Tanaka, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Agematsu, T.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshida, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Sakamoto, I.; Tamura, N.

    The high power X-ray irradiation facility designed for the sterilization of medical appliances is described. The X-ray source consists of the 5 MeV, 300 kW Cockcroft Walton type of electron accelerator and the water cooled tantalum target. Conditions necessary for designing the X-ray target are conversion efficiency from electron beam to X-ray, thermal conductivity, readiness for machining and cost of the material. The conversion efficiency was determined through the Monte Carlo type calculation and obtained as 10.8 % for 3.667 g/cm 2 thickness (1 csda range) of tantalum target. In order to obtain the data on the source design, experiments have been carried out at the JAERI TAKASAKI 2 MeV, 60 kW Cockcroft-Walton type of electron accelerator equipped with a tantalum target. The size of package and the speed of conveyor was determined through the calculation of the absorbed dose distribution in the irradiated medium and the utilization efficiency.

  5. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung are calculated from electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the...

  6. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habsh; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativisitic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and space reuseable launch vehicles (sRLVs). The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremsstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  7. Observation of material, thickness, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity dependent effects in moderate and high Z targets in a gamma and x-ray LIDAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Laubach, Mitchell A.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2015-06-01

    A high energy gamma and x-ray LIDAR system consisting of a fast pulse (~50 ps, FWHM) LINAC and a Cherenkov detection system was used to investigate response differences among materials, their thicknesses, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities. The energies and pulse width of electrons used to produce bremsstrahlung x-rays were set at 20 or 40 MeV and 50 ps FWHM duration, respectively. The Cherenkov detector was built with a fused silica glass optically coupled to a 51 mm fast timing photomultiplier tube, which has an intrinsic energy threshold of 340.7 keV for Compton backscattered gammas. Such a fast detection system yields a coincidence resolving time of 93 ps FWHM, which is equivalent to a depth resolving capability of about 3 cm FWHM. The thicknesses of iron and lead targets were varied from 1 in. to 7 in. with a step of 1 in., and the thicknesses of DU were varied from 1/3 in. to 1 in. with a step of 1/3 in. The experimental results show that iron targets tend to produce a factor of five less observed x-rays and gammas, with less energetic photoelectron frequency distributions, compared with DU and lead targets for the same beam intensity and target thicknesses. Additionally, the self-shielding effect causes the lead to yield more gammas than the DU considering the experimental observation point. For the setup used in this study, a charge per pulse in the range of 1-2.5 nC yields the best resolving capability between the DU and lead targets.

  8. Bremsstrahlung x ray spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: Predictions for future planetary spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of X ray spectra due to bremsstrahlung from precipitating auroral electrons at Jupiter and Saturn are presented. The model assumes that a field-aligned potential drop accelerates a primary beam of electrons into the atmosphere where a population of secondary electrons having a power law energy dependence is generated. The spectrum at Jupiter is normalized to the soft X ray observations of Metzger et al (1983) at the low-energy end and constrained at the high-energy end by UV auroral energy requirements. The spectrum at Saturn is constructed by analogy to the Jovian case allowing for variation of the beam energy, energy flux, and scale size of the Saturnian aurora. The resulting indicate that a significant flux of X rays is emanating from both planets which may serve as a basis for conducting planetary X ray astronomy as part of future spacecraft missions to the planets

  9. High-power vircator in the regime of warm bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents the results of 2D self-consistent calculations of electron beam dynamics in vircator cell alongside with the resulting spectra of the accompanying microwave radiation. Also presented are the results of 1D calculations of electron beam dynamics with consideration for dissipation at the anode foil alongside with the resulting spectra of X-ray radiation. Being presented are the results of the first experiments aimed at investigation of bremsstrahlung X-ray radiation of the vircator for thin (10 μm, Ta) and thick (100 μm, Ta) anode foil

  10. Thermalisation and hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency of self-interacting solar flare fast electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, R K; MacKinnon, A L; Brown, J C

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical descriptions of the production of solar flare bremsstrahlung radiation assume the collision of dilute accelerated particles with a cold, dense target plasma, neglecting interactions of the fast particles with each other. This is inadequate for situations where collisions with this background plasma are not completely dominant, as may be the case in, for example, low-density coronal sources. We aim to formulate a model of a self-interacting, entirely fast electron population in the absence of a dense background plasma, to investigate its implications for observed bremsstrahlung spectra and the flare energy budget. We derive approximate expressions for the time-dependent distribution function of the fast electrons using a Fokker-Planck approach. We use these expressions to generate synthetic bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra as would be seen from a corresponding coronal source. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the observed behaviour of some flares. As the flare progresses, the model's...

  11. A high-power vircator operating as an X-ray bremsstrahlung generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vircator capable of generating high-power X-ray pulses due to the multiple transitions of electrons through a thin anode foil transparent to X radiation has been created and put into operation for the first time. The vircator is created on the basis of a direct-action electron accelerator supplied from an inductive energy storage operating with a plasma opening switch. Self-consistent two-dimensional simulations of the electron beam dynamics in the vircator chamber are performed, and the spectra of the generated microwave radiation are determined. Self-consistent one-dimensional simulations of the beam dynamics with allowance for electron scattering in the foil were also carried out, and the X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra were measured. Results are presented from the first experiments on the generation of X-ray bremsstrahlung in vircators with thin (10 μm) and thick (100 μm) tantalum anode foils. For a thin foil, the X-ray (Eγ > 30 keV) dose is eight times as high as that for a thick foil and the average photon energy is 30 keV (against 80 keV for a thick foil)

  12. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. Methods: HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung emission are calculated from various electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere to study the observed (primary and albedo) sources. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. Results: We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the extent of the HXR source at a given disk location. In the radial direction, the polarization magnitude and direction at specific positions along the HXR source will either increase or decrease with increased photon distribution directivity towards the photosphere. We also show how high electron cutoff energies influence the direction of polarization at above ~100 keV. Conclusions: Spatially resolved HXR polarization measurements can provide important information about the directivity and energetics of the electron distribution. Our results indicate the preferred angular resolution of polarization measurements required to distinguish between the scattered and primary components. We also show how spatially resolved polarization measurements could be used to probe the emission pattern of an HXR source, using both the magnitude and the direction of the polarization.

  13. X-rays from Proton Bremsstrahlung: Evidence from Fusion Reactors and Its Implication in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Nie

    2009-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, a proton and a neutron generated in previous reactions may again fuse with each other. Or they can in turn fuse with or be captured by an un-reacted deuteron. The average center-of-mass (COM) energy for such reaction is around 10 keV in a typical fusion reactor, but could be as low as 1 keV. At this low COM energy, the reacting nucleons are in an s-wave state in terms of their relative angular momentum. The single-gamma radiation process is thus strongly suppressed due to conservation laws. Instead the gamma ray released is likely to be accompanied by x-ray photons from a nuclear bremsstrahlung process. The x-ray thus generated has a continuous spectrum and peaks around a few hundred eV to a few keV. The average photon energy and spectrum properties of such a process are calculated with a semiclassical approach. The results give a peak near 1.1 keV for the proton-deuteron fusion and a power-to-the-minus-second law in the spectrum's high-energy limit. An analysis of some prior tokamak disc...

  14. The development of a high power bremsstrahlung radiator for the production of monochromatic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental setup for the production of monochromatic X-ray beams tunable in the energy region between 75 KeV and 700 KeV was built at our facility. The concept is based on monochromatization of a broad energy bremsstrahlung spectrum by Laue diffraction on a curved single crystal and by selection of the desired energy with an appropriate slit system, 10.45 meters behind the crystal. The bremsstrahlung spectrum is created when accelerated electrons from a high power 20 kW linac lose energy in a radiator. In this study, the radiator has been optimized for the creation of a bremsstrahlung spectrum suitable for monochromatization with a crystal. Monte-Carlo Simulations (using the BEAM-EGS4 code) of electrons incident with different energies on a radiator with varying composition (aluminum, carbon and tantalum) and thickness were carried out. Furthermore a study of the thermal properties of these materials when being exposed to a high power electron beam was done. This lead to the remarkable conclusion that a thin radiator composed of a low Z material should be used. This result is quite surprising as usually a high Z material is used for efficient transformation of charged particle energy to bremsstrahlung photons. A low Z radiator however will create a less divergent photon beam, leading to more photons on the effective surface area of the crystal. A set of radiators was designed to have an optimal configuration for different monochromatic beams needed. Because only a small fraction of the electrons are stopped in these thin radiators, a cleaning magnet and a beamstop need to be inserted in the setup. Due to the high power of the electron beam on the one hand and its divergency after traversing the radiator on the other, a special magnet system had to be designed to remove the electrons from the photon beam. This was done by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and a ray tracing program. Finally it was estimated that, when using this new setup, the intensity of the

  15. A FOURIER-TRANSFORMED BREMSSTRAHLUNG FLASH MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS IN ACCRETING BLACK HOLE SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accreting black hole sources show a wide variety of rapid time variability, including the manifestation of time lags during X-ray transients, in which a delay (phase shift) is observed between the Fourier components of the hard and soft spectra. Despite a large body of observational evidence for time lags, no fundamental physical explanation for the origin of this phenomenon has been presented. We develop a new theoretical model for the production of X-ray time lags based on an exact analytical solution for the Fourier transform describing the diffusion and Comptonization of seed photons propagating through a spherical corona. The resulting Green's function can be convolved with any source distribution to compute the associated Fourier transform and time lags, hence allowing us to explore a wide variety of injection scenarios. We show that thermal Comptonization is able to self-consistently explain both the X-ray time lags and the steady-state (quiescent) X-ray spectrum observed in the low-hard state of Cyg X-1. The reprocessing of bremsstrahlung seed photons produces X-ray time lags that diminish with increasing Fourier frequency, in agreement with the observations for a wide range of sources

  16. A characterization and optimization study of Gamble II as an X-ray bremsstrahlung source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adverse effects of radiation on solid state devices are strongly spectrum dependent. It is thus essential that the radiation spectrum from flash x-ray sources be available when they are used as facilities for testing electronic components. This paper describes a preliminary study in which previously developed computer codes were used to calculate the radiation spectrum produced by NRL's Gamble II pulsed power generator. To determine how well the calculated spectrum matched the experimental one, doses in CaF2-Mn TLD's were computed for the dosimeters placed behind various thicknesses of Cu and Pb filters and compared with the experimentally measured doses. Using a diode model that was consistent with presently understood electron beam behavior, a spectrum was generated which predicted TLD doses to within about 15% of the experimentally measured values

  17. Internal Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 57Co in coincidence with K-X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the IB photons from 57Co are measured in coincidence with 6.4 keV x rays emitted due to the EC process. The IB photons are measured using a (1.75 x 2.0 ) NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and k-x rays are detected using a proportional counter

  18. Multi-keV X-Ray Conversion Efficiency in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Landen, O L; Hammer, J H; Suter, L J; Miller, M C; Davis, J; Grun, J

    2002-10-31

    X-ray sources are created at the Nova and Omega laser by irradiating a confined volume of Ar, Xe, or Kr gas. The gas is heated by forty 0.35 {micro}m wavelength, 1-ns square laser beams to produce He-like ions that radiate K-shell emission over mm-sized dimensions. The targets are designed to be ''underdense'', meaning that the initial gas density is lower than the critical density of the laser, n{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The laser energy is primarily absorbed by inverse bremsstrahlung and a supersonic heat wave efficiently ionizes the gas. Results from time-resolved and time-integrated diagnostics over a range of experimental parameters are compared. This work represents an important, new method for development of efficient, large-area, tailored multi-keV x-ray sources.

  19. X-ray imaging of laser produced plasmas by a compound 3D x-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot scheme for the study of plasma under extreme condition is implemented using a compound 3D X-ray lens. Hard X-ray image of laser plasma produced by irradiating of copper foil by intense laser pulse was recorded using this lens

  20. Bremsstrahlung spectra produced by kilovolt electron impact on thick targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of bremsstrahlung spectra generated by 5-25 keV electron impact on thick targets of aluminium, titanium, zirconium, molybdenum and tungsten are reported. The experimental data are compared with the simulation results of X-ray spectra obtained from the general-purpose Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, which implements accurate cross-sections for ordinary bremsstrahlung emission but disregards polarization bremsstrahlung. The agreement between the experimental and simulation results is satisfactory. This is in contrast with a recent study in which large discrepancies were observed between experimental and Monte Carlo simulation results. Our results provide evidence for the reliability of the combined choices of the interaction cross-sections and of the simulation algorithms implemented in PENELOPE for bremsstrahlung emission.

  1. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. III - Polarization, directivity, and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the spectrum, directivity, and state of polarization of the bremsstrahlung radiation expected from a beam of high-energy electrons spiraling along radial magnetic field lines toward the photosphere. A Monte Carlo method is then described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. The accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. The calculated characteristics of the incident X-rays are used to evaluate the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of the reflected and total X-ray fluxes. The results are compared with observations.

  2. X-ray production ∼130 Angstrom from laser-produced plasmas for projection x-ray lithography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray production in the region around 130 Angstrom from laser-produced plasmas have been investigated as a source for projection x-ray lithography. The dependence of x-ray conversion efficiency on target material, intensity, and pulse length has been studied using a 0.53 μm laser with a maximum of 0.3 J. Conversion efficiency of 1% into a 3 Angstrom bandwidth has been demonstrated for Sn targets at intensities around 1011 W/cm2 using a 7.5 ns pulse. Intensity scaling suggests that laser spot size and two-dimensional expansion are important for optimizing x-ray production at these low irradiation intensities

  3. ASCA View of the Supernova Remnant Gamma Cygni (G78.2+2.1) Bremsstrahlung X-ray Spectrum from Loss-flattened Electron Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Uchiyama, Y; Aharonian, F A; Mattox, J R; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Aharonian, Felix; Mattox, John

    2002-01-01

    We perform X-ray studies of the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) gamma-Cygni associated with the brightest EGRET unidentified source 3EG J2020+4017. In addition to the thermal emissions with characteristic temperature of kT = 0.5-0.9 keV, we found an extremely hard X-ray component from several clumps localized in the northern part of the remnant. This component is described by a power-law with a photon index of 0.8-1.5. Both the absolute flux and the spectral shape of the nonthermal X-rays cannot be explained by the synchrotron or inverse-Compton mechanisms. We argue that the unusually hard X-ray spectrum can be naturally interpreted in terms of nonthermal bremsstrahlung from Coulomb-loss-flattened electron distribution in dense environs with the gas density about 10 to 100 cm^-3 . For given spectrum of the electron population, the ratio of the bremsstrahlung X- and gamma-ray fluxes depends on the position of the ``Coulomb break'' in the electron spectrum. The bulk of gamma-rays detected by EGRET would come...

  4. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  5. X-ray line emission produced in clump bow shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassinelli, Joe P.; Ignace, R.; Waldron, W.; Cho, J.; Murphy, N; Lazarian, A.

    2008-01-01

    We summarize Chandra observations of the emission line profiles from 17 OB stars. The lines tend to be broad and unshifted. The forbidden/intercombination line ratios arising from Helium-like ions provide radial distance information for the X-ray emission sources, while the H-like to He-like line ratios provide X-ray temperatures, and thus also source temperature versus radius distributions. OB stars usually show power law differential emission measure distributions versus temperature. In mod...

  6. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice.

  7. X-ray optical diagnostic of laser produced plasmas for nuclear fusion and X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butzbach, R.

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, the conception, design and appliance of toroidally bent crystals for the X-ray optical diagnostics of laser produced plasmas is discussed. The first part of this work deals with the development, design and characterization of an X-Ray microscope for the observation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, which act against the confinement and ignition of the fuel in the inertial confinement fusion process. The aim of the second part of the present work was the diagnostic of the lasing medium for amplified spontaneous emission close to the water window. For this purpose, an one-dimensionally (1-D) imaging X-ray spectrometer based on toroidally bent quartz crystals was developed for the observation of the Ni-like 4f-3d transition of Yb, Hf, Ta, and W ions, which should be related to the amplified 4d-4p emission, since the 4f niveau is very close to the 4d niveau. Thus, the 4f-3d transition can serve as an indicator for the population of the 4d niveau. (orig.)

  8. The optical/UV excess of X-ray dim isolated neutron star:bremsstrahlung emission from a strange star plasma atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weiyang; Tong, Hao; Ge, Mingyu; Li, Zhaosheng; Men, Yunpeng; Xu, Renxin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) are characterized by Planckian spectra in X-ray bands, but show optical/ultraviolet(UV) excesses which are the measured photometry exceeding that extrapolated from X-ray spectra. To solve this problem, a radiative model of bremsstrahlung emission from a plasma atmosphere is constructed in the regime of strange (quark-cluster) star. The plasma atmosphere is supposed to be of two-temperature, formed and maintained by the ISM-accreted matter which is bound on a star's surface because of the so-called strangeness barrier. All the seven XDINS spectra could be well fitted by the radiative model, from optical/UV to X-ray bands. The fitted radiation radii of XDINSs are from 7 to 13 km, while the modelled electron temperatures are between 50 and 250 eV, except RX J0806.4$-$4123 with a radiation radius $\\sim 3$ km, indicating that this source could be a low-mass strange star candidate.

  9. Temporal and Spectral Resolved Measurement of Soft X-ray From Ultrashort Pulse Laser Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Theobald; L.Veisz; H.Schwoerer; R.Sauerbrey; X.Z.Tang

    2001-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse produced plasmas are powerful sources of incoherent XUV/soft X-ray radiation and have important applications range from microscopy to lithography. Adding a prepulse is one possible way to enhance soft X-ray emission. The experiment is performed on the Jena 10 TW laser system in IOQ, Germany. The main purpose is to measure the time-resolved soft X-ray spectrum, and study how a prepulse play an important role and enhance the X-ray emission as well as and pulse duration. We clarified the temporal behavior of X-ray emission from quartz plasma produced by intensive femtosecond 800 nm laser pulse, and obtained a quantitative pictures of the

  10. Electron-electron bremsstrahlung emission and the inference of electron flux spectra in solar flares

    OpenAIRE

    Kontar, E. P.; Emslie, A. G.; Massone, A. M.; Piana, M.; Brown, J.C.; Prato, M.

    2007-01-01

    Although both electron-ion and electron-electron bremsstrahlung contribute to the hard X-ray emission from solar flares, the latter is normally ignored. Such an omission is not justified at electron (and photon) energies above $\\sim 300$ keV, and inclusion of the additional electron-electron bremsstrahlung in general makes the electron spectrum required to produce a given hard X-ray spectrum steeper at high energies. Unlike electron-ion bremsstrahlung, electron-electron bremsstrahlung cannot ...

  11. Effect of an electron scattering cloud on X-ray oscillations produced by beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, J.; Lamb, F. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a scattering cloud on the amplitude of oscillations produced by a rotating beam of X-rays is investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The scattering cloud was modeled as a uniform density sphere, and the source was represented as an anistropic distribution of radiation emerging from a point at the center of the scattering cloud. The intensity distribution produced by the source beam is examined as a function of optical depth. The relation between electron scattering optical depth and the forward-backward ratio is studied. It is observed that the scattering in a central corona of various optical depths reduces the amplitude of the oscillation. The data suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the X-ray intensities of some luminous low-mass X-ray binaries are caused by oscillations in the luminosity of the X-ray star.

  12. Detection of 1 - 100 keV x-rays from high intensity, 500 fs laser- produced plasmas using charge-coupled devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.; Young, B.K.F.; Conder, A.D.; Stewart, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a compact, vacuum compatible, large format, charge- coupled device (CCD) camera for scientific imaging and detection of 1- 100 keV x rays in experiments at LLNL JANUS-1ps laser. A standard, front-illuminated, multi-pin phase device with 250 k electron full well capacity, low dark current (10 pA/cm{sup 2} at 20 C) and low read noise (5 electron rms) is cooled to -35 C to give the camera excellent 15-bit dynamic range and signal-to-noise response. Intensity and x-ray energy linear response were determined for optical and x-ray (<65 keV) photons and are in excellent agreement. Departure from linearity was less than 0.7%. Inherent linearity and energy dispersive characteristics of CCD cameras are well suited for hard x-ray photon counting. X-rays absorbed within the depletion and field-free regions can be distinguished by studying the pulse height spectrum. Results are presented for the detection of 1-100 keV Bremsstrahlung continuum, K-shell and L-shell fluorescence spectra emitted from high intensity (10{sup 18}W cm{sup -2}), 500 fs laser- produced plasmas.

  13. Background X-ray Radiation Fields Produced by Young Embedded Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred; Holden, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Most star formation in our galaxy occurs within embedded clusters, and these background environments can affect the star and planet formation processes occurring within them. In turn, young stellar members can shape the background environment and thereby provide a feedback mechanism. This work explores one aspect of stellar feedback by quantifying the background X-ray radiation fields produced by young stellar objects. Specifically, the distributions of X-ray luminosities and X-ray fluxes produced by cluster environments are constructed as a function of cluster membership size $N$. Composite flux distributions, for given distributions of cluster sizes $N$, are also constructed. The resulting distributions are wide and the X-ray radiation fields are moderately intense, with the expected flux levels exceeding the cosmic and galactic X-ray backgrounds by factors of $\\sim10-1000$ (for energies 0.2 -- 15 keV). For circumstellar disks that are geometrically thin and optically thick, the X-ray flux from the backgrou...

  14. Electron spectra deduced from solar hard X-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottet, G.; Vilmer, N.

    1984-01-01

    Information regarding the acceleration of electrons in solar flares may be deduced from the hard X-ray emission they produce through bremsstrahlung. From these observations, the electron energy spectra and temporal evolution as well as some characteristics of the ambient medium can be deduced through models. Here, a model of hard X-ray emission is briefly presented and some of the results are discussed in the light of hard X-ray observations and acceleration processes. 18 references.

  15. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  16. Characteristics of ultrafast K line hard x-ray source from femtosecond terawatt laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏; 陈建文; 高鸿奕; 陆培祥; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical studies and analytical scalings were carried out to find the optimized laser parameters and target conditions so that ultrashort hard x-ray pulses and high x-ray power could be achieved. The dependence of laser intensity and wavelength on the yield of K-shell x-ray emission was studied. We propose an optimal design for a foil target for producing high-yield hard x-ray pulses of customizing duration.

  17. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Senecha; Y B S R Prasad; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; G S Solanki; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An investigation of x-ray emission from Cu plasma produced by 1.054 m Nd:glass laser pulses of 5 ns duration, at 2 × 1012-2 × 1013 W cm-2 is reported. The x-ray emission has been studied as a function of target position with respect to the laser beam focus position. It has been observed that x-ray emissions from ns duration plasma show a volume effect similar to subnanosecond plasmas. Due to this effect the x-ray yield increases when target is moved away relative to the best focal plane of the laser beam. This result supports the theoretical model of Tallents and has also been testified independently using suitably modified theoretical model for our experimental conditions. While above result is in good agreement with similar experimental results obtained for sub-nanosecond laser produced plasmas, it differs from result claiming filamentation rather than pure geometrical effect leading to x-ray enhancement for ns plasmas.

  18. X-ray and radio observations of energetic electrons produced in the 3 November 2003 solar flare at ~09:5000 UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Lüthi, T.; Magun, A.; Krucker, S.; Schwartz, R.; Trottet, G.

    Hard X-ray and radio observations provide complementary observations of energetic electrons produced in solar flares. The GOES X4 flare on 03 November 2003 at ˜ 09:50 UT was observed and imaged up to several 100 keV by the RHESSI experiment. It was simultaneously observed at metric/decimetric wavelengths by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) and at centimetric/millimetric wavelengths by radio instruments operated by the Institute of Applied Physics (University of Bern). We present in this contribution an analysis of these radio and X-ray data. The time profiles of the X-ray emission above 50 keV and of the centimetric/millimetric emissions show two main parts (impulsive emission lasting about three minutes) and a long duration emission (partially observed by RHESSI) separated in time by four minutes. At metric/decimetric wavelengths a type II burst with an unusually high frequency is observed between the impulsive emissions and the long duration radio continuum. Combined analysis of RHESSI sources at energies above a few hundred keV and of metric/decimetric sources observed by the NRH shows the extension in space of both X-ray and radio sources traced by energetic electrons between the impulsive part of the event and the late energetic X-ray phase associated with the strong radio continuum. Spectral analysis of the high energy X-ray continuum and of the centimetric/millimetric will be performed to infer the characteristics of energetic electrons in both parts of the events and to further investigate in this event the relationship between centimetric-millimetric emitting electrons and HXR/GR bremsstrahlung emitting ones.

  19. Analysis of X-ray spectra emitted from laser-produced plasmas of uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, J P; Szabo, C I; Parente, F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we used the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method to generate theoretical X-ray spectra for Co-, Ni-, Cu-, Zn-, Ga-, Ge-, As-, Se-, Br-, Kr-, and Rb-like uranium ions. Using the distribution of these ions in a laser-produced plasma, for different plasma temperatures, we generate theoretical spectra, which are compared to experimental data.

  20. Vertical profile of the environmental gamma-ray in Kashiwazaki Kariwa area. Detection of bremsstrahlung X-ray generated by winter thunderstorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumulative dose measurements have been performed at the points from 1 m to 117 m above the ground on the arrester tower located at the site of the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLD) and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). From the measurement results, the mean dose rates both from RPLD and TLD gradually decrease with height in summer season. On the other hand, the vertical profile of upper regions showed in the reverse attenuation in winter season. It was assumed that the increasing trend of dose rates with height is caused by some external radiation source peculiar to winter season. In this winter, many thunderstorms occurred and dose rates from both NaI(Tl) and ionization chamber (IC) detectors increased occasionally at monitoring stations. According to the Monte Carlo calculation of the behaviour of electrons and photons in the model thundercloud, it was suggested that bremsstrahlung X-rays generated at high altitude has been attributed to the radiation source. (author)

  1. Characteristic and non-characteristic X-ray yields produced from thick Ti element by sub-relativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Namita; Kumar, Sunil; Bhatt, Pragya; Singh, Raj; Singh, B.K. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X-ray spectra of a thick Ti element by 10-25 keV electron impact are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measured Ti K{sub {alpha}} yields are found to be in good agreement with PWBA theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields agree reasonably with MC simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Average value of the ratio K{sub {alpha}}/(K{sub {alpha}} + K{sub {beta}}) of Ti is found to be 0.881 {+-} 0.003. -- Abstract: Measurements are performed to study the electron impact energy dependence of doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields (DDBY) and of characteristic Ti K{sub {alpha}} line yields produced from sub-relativistic electrons (10-25 keV) colliding with a thick Ti (Z = 22) target. The emitted radiation is detected by a Si-PIN photo-diode detector with energy resolution (FWHM) of 180 eV at 5.9 keV. The measured data of DDBY are compared with the results predicted by Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations using the general purpose PENELOPE code. A reasonable agreement is found between experimental and simulation results within the experimental uncertainty of measurements of 12%. Characteristic Ti K{sub {alpha}} yields are obtained for the considered impact energy range and they are compared with the existing theoretical results. A good agreement is found between the present measurements and the theoretical calculations. Furthermore, data are presented for impact energy dependence of the ratio K{sub {alpha}}/(K{sub {alpha}}+ K{sub {beta}}) of a thick Ti target under impact of 10-25 keV electrons. The ratio shows a very weak dependence on impact energy in the studied range. The average value of the ratio is found to be 0.881 {+-} 0.003.

  2. Effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on silicon semiconductor plasma X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Numakura, T; Minami, R; Watanabe, H; Sasuga, T; Nishizawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Nagashima, S; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S; Hirano, K; Maezawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on the X-ray energy responses of semiconductor detectors are characterized. The degradation of the response of position-sensitive X-ray tomography detectors in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak is found after neutron exposure produced by deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma fusion experiments. For the purpose of further detailed characterization of the neutron degradation effects, an azimuthally varying-field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator is employed using well-calibrated neutron fluence. These neutron effects on the detector responses are characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory (KEK). The effects of neutrons on X-ray sensitive semiconductor depletion thicknesses are also investigated using an impedance analyser. Novel findings of (i) the dependence of the response degradation on X-ray energies as well as (ii) the recovery of the degraded detector response due to the detector bias applic...

  3. Optimising hard X-ray generation from laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to increase the X-ray yield for a laser produced plasma by optimising the focusing conditions and temporal shape of the laser pulses. The focusing conditions are improved by introducing a control system that secures the laser target surface to exact focus within a range of a few micrometers, allowing continuously high laser intensity for plasma generation. The temporal shape of the laser pulses is changed by introducing a saturable absorber in the laser beam. The laser produces a substantial pre-pulse that heats and expands the target material prior to main pulse arrival. The saturable absorber can increase the main pulse/pre-pulse ratio of the laser pulse up to four orders of magnitude and consequently reduce expansion of the target material before the main pulse. The belief is that an increase in target density at the time of main pulse arrival will change the energy distribution of the X-rays, towards a more efficient X-ray production in the hard X-ray region. This report and the work connected to it, includes the preliminary measurements and results for these improvements. 17 refs

  4. Ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE YuCheng

    2007-01-01

    The ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses are reported. The laser phase relation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) shows two different radiation energy distributions in time (or laser phase) domain. These energy-phase relations are helpful for realizing the dynamic processes of HHG. Two presented parameterized formulas can be used to calculate the durations of the energy distributions with a bandwidth of the pulse. These formulas are useful in calculating and simulating pulses transports and interactions with mediums. The time structures of atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses can be directly measured with photoelectron spectrum transfer equations and the related laser phase determination methods without any previous pulse shape and the instantaneous frequency assumptions. These equations and methods can be used to evaluate and improve the technical parameters of the ultra-short X-ray sources. They have wide measurement ranges and high time resolutions, which may enable ultra-fast measurements to reach metrological precisions, and lead to a new tide of scientific researches in physics, chemistry, biochemistry, etc. The application of attoand femtosecond X-rays as well as the theoretical and technical problems in measurements are briefly discussed.

  5. Bent crystal X-ray optics for the diagnosis and applications of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis discussed several aspects of X-ray optics based on bent crystals and a number of applications of these optics. First, a deeper insight into the reflection properties of elastically bent perfect crystal optics was gained by the consideration of all deformation effects. It was shown that the reflection properties depend on the lateral position on the crystal, an effect that was not addressed before, neither experimentally nor theoretically. To investigate this effect, an apparatus for the measurement of Bragg angles of bent crystals with high angular resolution was built. It was measured that the lattice plane distances of two-dimensionally bent crystals vary laterally by up to 10-4. This effect has to be considered in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy and imaging with these bent crystals. It can explain discrepancies in theoretical and experimental spectrometer resolution with spherically bent crystals. Besides these principal investigations, in this thesis a number of X-ray optics were presented that demonstrate the application potential of bent crystal optics. This includes two optics that are used in the field of applications of laser-produced plasmas as high repeating hard X-ray sources. It was shown that an X-ray spectrometer based on full cylinder rings of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is capable to record the rather weak single shot pulses from a high repeating 1 er-plasma X-ray source. This is possible due to the high collection efficiency of the instrument of up to 5.10-4. Furthermore, X-ray optics based on toroidally bent crystals that make it possible to spectrally select a bandwidth of ∝1 eV and focus the ultrashort X-ray pulses from such a laser-plasma source, were designed, prepared and characterized. It was shown that these bent crystals provide the calculated integrated reflectivity, the predicted bandwidth and focus to spot sizes smaller than 60 μm. A novel application of toroidally bent crystals was pointed out: a method

  6. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. 4: Polarization, directivity and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1976-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. the accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. Using the characteristics of the incident X-rays of the model for solar X-ray flares, the spectrum, directivity and polarization of the reflected and the total X-ray fluxes are evaluated. The results are compared with observations.

  7. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  8. A novel method for producing x-ray test objects and phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakou, C; Horrocks, J A; Marshall, N W; Speller, R D

    2004-04-21

    A novel method for producing customized x-ray test objects and clinically realistic phantoms has been developed. Test objects can be created with a drawing software package and the digital images can be printed on a standard inkjet printer but using potassium iodide solution in place of the cartridge's ink. The reproducibility and the consistency, the limiting spatial resolution, the uniformity as well as the potassium iodide thickness per print have been evaluated. The relationship between the number of prints, grey levels and the radiation contrast was investigated and quantified. A copy of the Leeds TO10 contrast detail test object was printed and the x-ray images of the Leeds TO10 and of the printed Leeds TO10 were compared. In addition, the potential use of this method was demonstrated by reproducing a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty clinical digital image. The reproducibility and consistency of this method was found to be better than 0.1%. The limiting spatial resolution of the printer using ink was found to be 3.55 1p mm(-1) but it deteriorated when the ink was replaced with potassium iodide and as the print density increases. The uniformity across the printed area was found to be satisfactory although an artefact due to the printer was present in the x-ray images. The comparison between the Leeds TO10 and the printed Leeds TO10 gave differences less than 10%. A good agreement between the clinical image and the printed clinical image was found. In conclusion, the method is a reliable, cost-effective, flexible and alternative way for producing x-ray test objects and clinically related phantoms.

  9. Curved crystal spectrometer for the measurement of X-ray lines from laser-produced plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jun; XIAO Sha-li; WANG Hong-jian; TANG Chang-huan; LIU Shen-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to diagnose the laser-produced plasmas, a focusing curved crystal spectrometer has been developed for measuring the X-ray lines radiated from a laser-produced plasmas. The design is based on the fact that the ray emitted from a source located at one focus of an ellipse will converge on the other focus by the reflection of the elliptical surface. The focal length and the eccentricity of the ellipse are 1350 mm and 0.9586, respectively. The spectrometer can be used to measure the X-ray lines in the wavelength range of 0.2-0.37 nm, and a LiF crystal (200) (2d = 0.4027 nm) is used as dispersive element covering Bragg angle from 30° to 67.5°. The spectrometer was tested on Shenguang-Ⅱ which can deliver laser energy of 60-80 J/pulse and the laser wavelength is 0.35 μm. Photographs of spectra including the 1s2p 1p1-1s2 1S0 resonance line(w),the 1s2p 3P2-1s2 1S0 magnetic quadrupole line(x), the 1s2p 3p1 1s2 1S0 intercombination lines(y), the 1s2p 3S1-1s2 1S0 forbidden line(z) in helium-like Ti X XI and the 1s2s2p 2P3/2-1s22s 2S1/2 line(q) in lithium-like Ti X X have been recorded with a X-ray CCD camera. The experimental result shows that the wavelength resolution(λ/△λ) is above 1000 and the elliptical crystal spectrometer is suitable for X-ray spectroscopy.

  10. X-ray studies of nanoporous carbon powders produced from silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the structure of nanoporous carbon powders produced directly by chlorination of polycrystalline α-SiC powders with various degrees of dispersion. Small-angle scattering data were used to derive the distribution function for scattering inhomogeneities with respect to inertia radii m(Rg). It is shown that the mean sizes and the fraction of large inhomogeneities increase with increasing size of grains in the starting powder. As follows from the diffraction patterns, the degree of 'graphitization' of nanocluster structure increases simultaneously, which is attributed to longer times required for carbonization of coarser grains. An analysis of photoelectron spectra for 1s electrons of carbon atoms shows that, for most of the C-C bonds (>65%), the hybridization of valence bonds is intermediate between those for graphite and diamond (spx, where 2 < x < 3), which is indicative of the bending of graphene-like layers in nanoclusters

  11. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  12. Parameterization of x-ray production in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, J.M.

    1980-10-01

    A simple and algebraically tractable model is developed for the efficiency of x-ray production in a certain spectral region by laser driven plasmas. The model is used as a interpolation/extrapolation device for experimental and theoretical results from three different target concepts. These tests indicate that it is of use in its intended capacity. Certain relationships between independent parameters and scaling laws also result from this construction. Most notable among these is the prediction that the efficiency for producing line radiation in a certain narrow energy range scales like the inverse square of this energy.

  13. The application of photoconductive detectors to the measurement of x-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) offer an attractive alternative for the measurement of pulsed x-rays from laser produced plasmas. These devices are fast (FWHM ∼100 ps), sensitive and simple to use. We have used InP, GaAs, and Type IIa diamond as PCDs to measure x-rays emission from 100 eV to 100 keV. Specifically, we have used these detectors to measure total radiation yields, corona temperatures, and hot electron generated x-rays from laser produced plasmas. 5 refs., 4 figs

  14. Development of a X-UV Michelson interferometer for probing laser produced plasmas with a X-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, S. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Zeitoun, Ph.; Vanbostal, L.; Carillon, A.; Fourcade, P.; Idir, M.; Pape, S. le; Ros, D.; Jamelot, G. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; Bechir, E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Delmotte, F.; Ravet, M.F. [IOTA, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2001-07-01

    We have developed and used a soft X-ray Michelson interferometer to probe large laser-produced plasmas. The aim investigated is to obtain electron density profiles and thus important informations on the plasma dynamic. This paper describes our design and presents some preliminary results using a nickel-like X-ray laser operating at 13.9 nm. We present numericals results which show the interest of using X-ray laser to probe laser-produced plasma by interferometry. (orig.)

  15. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  16. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2∼2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30 degree ∼ 67.5 degree, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4 degree ∼134 degree . The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional micro adjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  17. Low-Dose-Rate Computed Tomography System Utilizing 25 mm/s-Scan Silicon X-ray Diode and Its Application to Iodine K-Edge Imaging Using Filtered Bremsstrahlung Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Ryo; Sato, Eiichi; Yanbe, Yutaka; Chiba, Hiraku; Maeda, Tomoko; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A low-dose-rate X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for reducing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system with a tube current of sub-mA was developed using a silicon X-ray diode (Si-XD). The Si-XD is a high-sensitivity Si photodiode (PD) selected for detecting X-ray photons, and the X-ray sensitivity of the Si-XD was twice as high as that of Si-PD cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)]. X-ray photons are directly detected using the Si-XD without a scintillator, and the photocurrent from the diode is amplified using current-voltage and voltage-voltage amplifiers. The output voltage is converted into logical pulses using a voltage-frequency converter with a maximum frequency of 500 kHz, and the frequency is proportional to the voltage. The pulses from the converter are sent to the differentiator with a time constant of 500 ns to generate short positive pulses for counting, and the pulses are counted using a counter card. Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 5 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 3.0°. The tube current and voltage were 0.55 mA and 60 kV, respectively, and iodine K-edge CT was carried out using filtered bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra with a peak energy of 38 keV.

  18. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed

  19. X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  20. Time-resolved x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for studying laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglio, N M; Kauffman, R L; Hawryluk, A M; Medecki, H

    1983-01-15

    The development of a new time-resolved x-ray spectrometer is reported in which a free-standing x-ray transmission grating is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera. The instrument measures continuous x-ray spectra with 20-psec temporal resolution and moderate spectral resolution (deltalambda >/= 1 A) over a broad spectral range (0.1-5 keV) with high sensitivity and large information recording capacity. Its capabilities are well suited to investigation of laser-generated plasmas, and they nicely complement the characteristics of other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques presently in use. The transmission grating spectrometer has been used on a variety of laser-plasma experiments. We report the first measurements of the temporal variation of continuous low-energy x-ray spectra from laser-irradiated disk targets. PMID:18195786

  1. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. 3: Polarization and directivity of bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1976-01-01

    The spectrum, directivity and state of polarization is presented of the bremsstrahlung radiation expected from a beam of high energy electrons spiraling along radial magnetic field lines toward the photosphere. The results are used for calculation of the characteristics of the reflected plus direct flux.

  2. High-resolution X-ray focusing concave (elliptical) curved crystal spectrograph for laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali xiao(肖沙里); Yingjun Pan(潘英俊); Xianxin Zhong(钟先信); Xiancai Xiong(熊先才); Guohong Yang(杨国洪); Zongli Liu(刘宗礼); Yongkun Ding(丁永坤)

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum emitted from laser-produced plasma contains plentiful information.X-ray spectrometer is a powerful tool for plasma diagnosis and studying the information and evolution of the plasma.X-ray concave(elliptical)curved crystals analyzer was designed and manufactured to investigate the properties of laser-produced plasma.The experiment was carried out on Mianyang Xingguang-ⅡFacility and aimed at investigating the characteristics of a high density iron plasma.Experimental results using KAP,LIF,PET,and MICA curved crystal analyzers are described,and the spectra of Au,Ti laser-produced plasma are shown.The focusing crystal analyzer clearly gave an increase in sensitivity over a flat crystal.

  3. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  4. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. PMID:12791989

  5. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers, whose Z's range from 13 to 22, are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasms is changed from SiO2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  6. Modification of gravitational redshift of x-ray burst produced by pulsar surface magnetoplasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jun; Ji Pei-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the propagation of x-ray bursts in the magnetoplasma of pulsar magnetosphere is discussed.The electromagnetic interaction between x-ray bursts and magnetoplasma is described as some geometry.The electromagnetic effects of surface superstrong magnetic field and dynamic effects of outflowing magnetoplasma of pulsars are treated as an optical metric.The Gordon metric is introduced to represent the gravitational metric and optical metric.So the propagation of x-ray bursts in magnetoplasma of pulsars can be described as x-ray bursts transmitting in an effective space characterized by Gordon metric.The modification of gravitational redshift,attributed to the flowing magnetoplasma of pulsars,is obtained and it is shown that the modification is of redshift and can reach the same magnitude as the gravitational redshift for ordinary pulsars.

  7. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; V K Senecha; H C Pant; M P Kamath; G S Solanki; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; A S Joshi; N Sreedhar; Sameer Nigam; C P Navathe

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form where ∼ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  8. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  9. Studies of some isomeric yield ratios produced with bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, D

    1998-01-01

    The experimental isomeric ratios for sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Mn, sup 8 sup 6 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 7 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 9 sup m sup , sup g Zr, sup 1 sup 1 sup 0 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 1 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 1 sup , sup g Pm, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 2 sup , sup m sup 1 Eu, sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Ho, sup 1 sup 6 sup 4 sup m sup , sup g Ho and sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 sup m sup , sup g Lu measured by the activation technique from different targets in (gamma, xnp) reactions (x<=3) at the bremsstrahlung end-point energy of 43 MeV are presented. The predictions of calculations performed by means of compound nucleus particle evaporation and final gamma-deexcitation were critically discussed. The importance of inclusion in the calculations of nonequilibrium particle emission and an adequate gamma-decay mode of isomeric nuclei was considered for some of the reactions investigated.

  10. Laboratory-Produced X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas for Astrophysics Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Clement; Le Pape, Sebastien; Liedahl, Duane; Ma, Tammy; Berzak-Hopkins, Laura; Reverdin, Charles; Rousseaux, Christophe; Renaudin, Patrick; Blancard, Christophe; Nottet, Edouard; Bidault, Niels; Mancini, Roberto; Koenig, Michel

    2015-11-01

    X-ray photoionized plasmas are rare in the laboratory, but of broad importance in astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei, x-ray binaries. Indeed, existing models are not yet able to accurately describe these plasmas where ionization is driven by radiation rather than electron collisions. Here, we describe an experiment on the LULI2000 facility whose versatility allows for measuring the X-ray absorption of the plasma while independently probing its electron density and temperature. The bright X-ray source is created by the two main beams focused inside a gold hohlraum and is used to photoionise a Neon gas jet. Then, a thin gold foil serves as a source of backlit photons for absorption spectroscopy. The transmitted spectrum through the plasma is collected by a crystal spectrometer. We will present the experimental setup used to characterize both plasma conditions and X-ray emission. Then we will show the transmitted spectra through the plasma to observe the transition from collision dominated to radiation dominated ionization and compare it to model predictions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Planetary X-ray studies: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Our solar system is a fascinating physics laboratory and X-ray observations are now firmly established as a powerful diagnostic tool of the multiple processes taking place in it. The science that X-rays reveal encompasses solar, space plasma and planetary physics, and the response of bodies in the solar system to the impact of the Sun's activity. This talk will review what we know from past observations and what we expect to learn in the short, medium and long term. Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated that the origin of Jupiter's bright soft X-ray aurorae lies in the Charge eXchange (CX) process, likely to involve the interaction with atmospheric neutrals of local magnetospheric ions, as well as those carried in the solar wind. At higher energies electron bremsstrahlung is thought to be the X-ray emitting mechanism, while the whole planetary disk acts as a mirror for the solar X-ray flux via Thomson and fluorescent scattering. This 'X-ray mirror' phenomenon is all that is observed from Saturn's disk, which otherwise lacks X-ray auroral features. The Earth's X-ray aurora is bright and variable and mostly due to electron bremsstrahlung and line emission from atmospheric species. Un-magnetised planets, Venus and Mars, do not show X-ray aurorae but display the interesting combination of mirroring the solar X-ray flux and producing X-rays by Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) in their exospheres. These processes respond to different solar stimulation (photons and solar wind plasma respectively) hence their relative contributions are seen to vary according to the Sun's output. Present and future of planetary X-ray studies are very bright. We are preparing for the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter this summer and for coordinated observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton on the approach and later during Juno's orbital phase. These will allow direct correlation of the local plasma conditions with the X-ray emissions and the establishment of the

  12. GLOBAL MODELING OF X-RAY SPECTRA PRODUCED IN O-TYPE STAR WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars revealed less wind absorption than expected from smooth winds with conventional mass-loss rates. Various solutions have been proposed, including porous winds, optically thick clumps, or an overall reduction of the mass-loss rates. The latter has a strong impact on the evolution of the star. Our final goal is to analyze high-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars with a multi-temperature plasma model in order to determine crucial stellar and wind parameters such as the mass-loss rate, the CNO abundances, and the X-ray temperature plasma distribution in the wind. In this context we are developing a modeling tool to calculate synthetic X-ray spectra. We present here the main ingredients and physics necessary for such a work. Our code uses the most recent version of the AtomDB emissivities to compute the intrinsic emissivity of the hot plasma as well as the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to evaluate the opacity of the cool wind. Following the comparison between two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation, we introduce, for the first time in X-rays, the effects of a tenuous inter-clump medium. We then explore the quantitative impact of different model parameters on the X-ray spectra such as the position in the wind of the X-ray emitting plasma. For the first time, we also show that the two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation yield different results, although the differences for individual lines are small and can probably not be tested with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. As an illustration of our method, we compare various synthetic line profiles to the observed O VIII λ18.97 line in the spectrum of ζ Puppis. We illustrate how different combinations of parameters can actually lead to the same morphology of a single line, underlining the need to analyze the whole spectrum in a consistent way when attempting to constrain the parameters of the wind.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from F. nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria is responsible for oral malodour. Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from Fusobacterium nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from the crystals using a synchrotron-radiation source. The Fn1220 crystal belonged to tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.8, c = 99.2 Å) and the Cdl crystal belonged to monoclinic space group P21 (unit-cell parameters a = 84.9, b = 70.9, c = 87.6 Å, β = 90.3°)

  14. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  15. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David

    formation are not fully understood or agreed upon in the literature. In this research, the method of pyrolysis of boron tribromide (hydrogen reduction of boron tribromide) was used to deposit boron on a tantalum filament. The goal was to refine this method, or potentially use it in combination with a second method (amorphous boron crystallization), to the point where it is possible to grow large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals with consistency. A pyrolysis apparatus was designed and built, and a number of trials were run to determine the conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary for alpha-rhombohedral boron production. This work was focused on the x-ray diffraction analysis of the boron deposits; x-ray diffraction was performed on a number of samples to determine the types of boron (and other compounds) formed in each trial and to guide the choices of test conditions for subsequent trials. It was found that at low reaction temperatures (in the range of around 830-950 °C), amorphous boron was the primary form of boron produced. Reaction temperatures in the range of around 950-1000 °C yielded various combinations of crystalline boron and amorphous boron. In the first trial performed at a temperature of 950 °C, a mix of amorphous boron and alpha-rhombohedral boron was formed. Using a scanning electron microscope, it was possible to see small alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals (on the order of ~1 micron in size) embedded in the surface of the deposit. In subsequent trials carried out at reaction temperatures in the range of 950 °C -- 1000 °C, it was found that various combinations of alpha-rhombohedral boron, beta-rhombohedral boron, and amorphous boron were produced; the results tended to be unpredictable (alpha-rhombohedral boron was not produced in every trial), and the factors leading to success/failure were difficult to pinpoint. These results illustrate how sensitive of a process producing alpha-rhombohedral boron can be, and indicate that

  16. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  17. Polycrystalline lead iodide films produced by solution evaporation and tested in the mammography X-ray energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condeles, J. F.; Mulato, M.

    2016-02-01

    Lead iodide polycrystalline films have been deposited on corning glass substrates using solution evaporation in oven. Films 6 μm-thick were obtained with full coverage of the substrates as verified by scanning electron microscopy. Some pin-holes were observable. X-ray diffraction revealed a crystalline structure corresponding to the 4 H-PbI2 polytype formation. Polarized Raman scattering experiments indicated a lamellar structure. Anisotropy was also investigated using depolarization ratio calculations. The optical and electrical properties of the samples were investigated using photoluminescence and dark conductivity as a function of temperature, respectively. Activation energies of 0.10 up to 0.89 eV were related to two main electrical transport mechanisms. Films were also exposed to X-ray irradiation in the mammography X-ray energy range. The detector produced was also exposed to X-ray from 5 mR up to 1450 mR. A linear response was observed as a function of dose with a slope of 0.52 nA/mm2 per mR.

  18. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  19. Observation and modelling of hollow multicharged ion x-ray spectra radiated by laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallah, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faenov, A Ya [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Pikuz, T A [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Akobelev, I Yu [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Fukuda, Y [JAPAN/RUSSIA

    2008-01-01

    The role of the highly charged hollow ions in the X-Ray emission plasma spectTa is investigated for 2 cases: (1) plasma obtained under inadiation of Ar clusters by ultrashort laser pulses and (2) Mg-plasma heated by a short-wavelength long (nanosecond) laser pulse. Experimental measurements are presented. Calculations in support of these measurements have been performed using a detailed atomic kinetics model with the ion distributions found from solution of the time-dependent rate equations.

  20. Pressure dependence of X-rays produced by an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal at low pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanamoto, Katsumi, E-mail: hana@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kawabe, Atsushi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Okada, Mari; Yamaoka, Kiyonori [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-21

    The energy spectra of X-rays produced by an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal have been measured at pressures of 5-50 Pa. The energy spectra showed that the amount of X-rays increased exponentially and the endpoint energy of the spectra increased linearly with the decrease of pressure at pressures of 10-25 Pa. A maximum endpoint energy of about 22 keV was obtained using an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal with 0.5 mm thickness at the pressure of 10 Pa. The maximum energy produced by the present experimental setup was estimated assuming that the LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal forms a parallel-plate capacitor. The estimated energy reasonably agreed with the energy obtained. The pressure dependence of the endpoint energy was discussed in relation to the breakdown potential at low pressures.

  1. The spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha L S

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool for the study of high energy accelerated electrons. Bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by, and directly related to, high energy electrons accelerated during a flare, provide a powerful diagnostic tool for determining both the properties of the accelerated electron distribution, and of the flaring coronal and chromospheric plasmas. This thesis is specifically concerned with the study of spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources via both modelling and X-ray observations using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Firstly, a new model is presented, accounting for finite temperature, pitch angle scattering and initial pitch angle injection. This is developed to accurately infer the properties of the acceleration region from the observations of dense coronal X-ray sources. Moreover, examining how the spatial properties of dense coronal X-ray sources change in time, interesting trends in length, width, position, number density ...

  2. Mechanisms of mercury removal by biochars produced from different feedstocks determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Landis, Richard C

    2016-05-01

    Thirty-six biochars produced from distinct feedstocks at different temperatures were evaluated for their potential to remove mercury (Hg) from aqueous solution at environmentally relevant concentrations. Concentrations of total Hg (THg) decreased by >90% in batch systems containing biochars produced at 600 and 700 °C and by 40-90% for biochars produced at 300 °C. Elevated concentrations of SO4(2-) (up to 1000 mg L(-1)) were observed in solutions mixed with manure-based biochars. Sulfur X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses indicate the presence of both reduced and oxidized S species in both unwashed and washed biochars. Sulfur XANES spectra obtained from biochars with adsorbed Hg were similar to those of washed biochars. Micro-X-ray fluorescence mapping results indicate that Hg was heterogeneously distributed across biochar particles. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure modeling indicates Hg was bound to S in biochars with high S content and to O and Cl in biochars with low S content. The predominant mechanisms of Hg removal are likely the formation of chemical bonds between Hg and various functional groups on the biochar. This investigation provides information on the effectiveness and mechanisms of Hg removal that is critical for evaluating biochar applications for stabilization of Hg in surface water, groundwater, soils, and sediments. PMID:26844404

  3. Soft x-ray generation in gases by means of a pulsed electron beam produced in a high-voltage barier discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarov, A.V.; Peters, P.J.M.; Boller, K.-J.

    2007-01-01

    A large area pulsed electron beam is produced by a high-voltage barrier discharge. We compare the properties of the x-rays generated by stopping this beam of electrons in a thin metal foil with those generated by stopping the electrons directly in various gases. The generation of x-rays was investig

  4. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  5. Operation Aurorozone: An experiment in sun/weather. [effects of aurorall produced X-rays on ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Hilsenrath, E.

    1977-01-01

    Operation Aurorozone was a highly coordinated sequence of 33 rocket flights launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, in September 1976. The effects of aurorally produced X-rays on stratospheric neutral and electrical parameters was studied. The sun/weather coupling between upper and lower regions of the atmosphere is thought to be related to these middle atmospheric parameters. The results show a consistent depletion of ozone above 1 mb during three independent auroral events, with magnitudes in excess of those expected from the measured energy radiation sources. Simultaneously, enhanced conductivity changes were observed to occur in accord with the measured ionizing radiations.

  6. Oxidation of nanostructured Ti films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Monica de, E-mail: desimone@tasc.infm.it [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Snidero, Elena [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, c/o Laboratorio TASC Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Bongiorno, Gero [Fondazione Filarete, v.le Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milano (Italy); Giorgetti, Luca [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Dip. di Oncologia Sperimentale, Via Adamello 16, 20139, Milano (Italy); Amati, Matteo [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    We used in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the oxidation process of a cluster-assembled metallic titanium film exposed to molecular oxygen at room temperature. The nanostructured film has been grown on a Si(111) substrate, in ultra high vacuum conditions, by coupling a supersonic cluster beam deposition system with an XPS experimental chamber. Our results show that upon in-situ oxygen exposure Ti{sup 3+} is the first oxidation state observed, followed by Ti{sup 4+}, whereas Ti{sup 2+} is practically absent during the whole process. Our results compare well with the existing literature on Ti films produced using other techniques.

  7. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  8. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  9. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  10. Characterization of electrons and x-rays produced using chirped laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. Z.; Behm, K.; He, Z.-H.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nees, J. A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-11-01

    The electron injection process into a plasma-based laser wakefield accelerator can be influenced by modifying the parameters of the driver pulse. We present an experimental study on the combined effect of the laser pulse duration, pulse shape, and frequency chirp on the electron injection and acceleration process and the associated radiation emission for two different gas types—a 97.5% He and 2.5% N2 mixture and pure He. In general, the shortest pulse duration with minimal frequency chirp produced the highest energy electrons and the most charge. Pulses on the positive chirp side sustained electron injection and produced higher charge, but lower peak energy electrons, compared with negatively chirped pulses. A similar trend was observed for the radiant energy. The relationship between the radiant energy and the electron charge remained linear over a threefold change in the electron density and was independent of the drive pulse characteristics. X-ray spectra showed that ionization injection of electrons into the wakefield generally produced more photons than self-injection for all pulse durations/frequency chirp and had less of a spread in the number of photons around the peak x-ray energy.

  11. Neutron dosimetry of a medical accelerator which produces X-ray with high energy at Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycarbonate detector and albedo-neuton dosemeters which is innovated at radiiation protection of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran was used to measure neutron doses in and out of radiation field. Dose distribution in radiation field, out of field and around the collimator, at the head of equipment, and dose topology in the field is determined. The response of these dosimeters to neutron contamination dose at the therapy room, the corridor, control room was investigated. Also response to recieved dose of the personnel is determined. According to the results obtained, by increasing photon doses at a constant size of the field 20 mutipliy 20 2 cm, the neutron dose at the center of X radiation field, lineary by 2.8 multiply 10-3 sv/sv X rar coefficient and in a fix field 40 multiply 40 cm2 by 3.1 multiply 10-3 sv/svX ray is increased. Also in constant photon dose, by changing the field size, neutron doses variation at the center of radiation field is investigated. Outside radiation field, neutron leakage percentage at different sectors of the head is obtained. using albedo-neutron dosemeters tracks density register for thermal, albedo and fast neutrons at therapy room for photon doses of 1 sv respectively was 37, 5710, 5364. Also at the same condition, at the extreme end of corridor the particle track density was 11, 885, 800. Track density registered for thermal albedo and fast neutron at the control room for one month respectively was 256, 786, 745. At the back of therapy room the track density for thermal neutrons was 14408 track per square centimeters for one month, but at the same period no particle tracks was observed. Finally, three personnel of accelerator's section was monitored by neutron dosemeters

  12. Soft X-ray Emissions from Planets, Moons, and Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A I

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (10 keV) x-rays result mainly from the electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  13. Meter-scale spark X-ray spectrumstatistics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B E; Kochkin, P; Grondahl, Ø; Nisi, R; Weber, K; Scherrer, Z; LeCaptain, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission by sparks implies bremsstrahlung from a population of energetic electrons, but the details of this process remain a mystery. We present detailed statistical analysis of X-ray spectra detected by multiple detectors during sparks produced by 1 MV negative high-voltage pulses with 1 $\\mu$s risetime. With over 900 shots, we statistically analyze the signals, assuming that the distribution of spark X-ray fluence behaves as a power law and that the energy spectrum of X-rays detectable after traversing $\\sim$2 m of air and a thin aluminum shield is exponential. We then determine the parameters of those distributions by fitting cumulative distribution functions to the observations. The fit results match the observations very well if the mean of the exponential X-ray energy distribution is 86 $\\pm$ 7 keV and the spark X-ray fluence power law distribution has index -1.29 $\\pm$ 0.04 and spans at least 3 orders of magnitude in fluence.

  14. X-ray polarization measurement for fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma under oblique incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Y; Inubushi, Y; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Kai, T; Nakamura, T; Johzaki, T; Nagatomo, H; Mima, K [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D; Morace, A; Redaelli, R [University of Milan - Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C; Santos, J [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Malka, G [CENBG, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS - IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Boscheron, A [CEA/CESTA Le BARP (France); Casner, A [CEA-DAM He de France, Bruyres-le-Chtel (France); Koenig, M [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Cedex (France)], E-mail: okano-yas@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    Study on x-ray polarization spectroscopy was performed for intense-laser-produced plasma under laser-oblique incidence. The laser pulse was focused onto a polyvinylchloride target at angles of 67 degrees and 7 degrees to the target normal at average intensities of 10{sup 17-18} W/cm{sup 2}. There were differences in the spectra for shifted K{alpha} lines of C1 atoms between the oblique and nearly normal incidence, indicating the low laser-energy absorption in the oblique incidence. A difference in polarization degrees of C1 He{alpha} lines was also observed, and this means the polarization of incident laser pulse affect velocity distribution functions of fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma.

  15. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Choi, I.W. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  16. Thermal casting of polymers in centrifuge for producing X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Randy M.; Decker, Todd A.

    2012-03-27

    An optic is produced by the steps of placing a polymer inside a rotateable cylindrical chamber, the rotateable cylindrical chamber having an outside wall, rotating the cylindrical chamber, heating the rotating chamber forcing the polymer to the outside wall of the cylindrical chamber, allowing the rotateable cylindrical chamber to cool while rotating producing an optic substrate with a substrate surface, sizing the optic substrate, and coating the substrate surface of the optic substrate to produce the optic with an optic surface.

  17. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon plasma with laser intensity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; R A Joshi; G P Gupta; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2003-12-01

    Absolute measurement for He- resonance (1s2 10-1s2p 11, at 40.2 Å) line emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been studied as a function of laser intensity. The optimum laser intensity is found to be ≈ 1.3 × 1012 W/cm2 for the maximum emission of 3.2 × 1013 photons sr-1 pulse-1. Since this line lies in the water window spectral region, it has potential application in x-ray microscopic imaging of biological sample in wet condition. Theoretical calculation using corona model for the emission of this line is also carried out with appropriate ionization and radiative recombination rate coefficients.

  18. X-ray spectroscopic characterization of laser produced hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we performed experiments of emission and absorption spectroscopy of laser produced plasmas, to provide well characterized spectral data which permit to benchmark atomic physics codes. More precisely, we produced xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions and studied their emission spectra. In a second experiment, we characterized the absorption spectra of zinc sulfide and aluminium plasmas in LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions.The first two chapters give an outline of the theory involved in the study of the emission and absorption plasma spectroscopy. Chapter 1 describes the different atomic processes occurring in a plasma. The LTE and the NLTE statistics ruling the equilibrium of the atomic processes are presented. Then, we give a brief description of the different codes of plasma atomic physics used in the analysis of our experimental data, namely HULLAC, SCO and TRANSPEC/AVERROES. In Chapter 2 the macroscopic theory of the radiation transport through a plasma is given. We describe also the self-similar model of Basko and the view factor approach, which permits us to calculate the heating conditions of the absorption foils achieved in the interior of the spherical gold cavity. Chapter 3 gives a description of the instruments used for realizing the two experiments, as well as the technical characteristics of the LULI2000 laser facility used to perform the experiments. Chapter 4 presents the experiment realized to characterize the emission spectra of the xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE, as well the analysis of the experimental data with TRANSPEC/AVERROES. Finally, the experiment for measuring the absorption spectrum of the ZnS plasma mixture and the analysis of the experimental data with the code SCO are given in Chapter 5

  19. AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-09-20

    Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

  20. Characteristics of a cylindrical collector mirror for laser-produced xenon plasma soft X-rays and improvement of mirror lifetime by buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoaki; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Miyamoto, Shuji; Masuda, Kazuya; Amano, Sho; Kanda, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-01

    The focusing characteristics of a ruthenium-coated cylindrical mirror were investigated on the basis of its ability to collect and focus broadband 5-17-nm soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma. Based on the plasmas spectral intensity distribution and the reflectivity function of the mirror, we defined the optimum position of the integrated cylindrical mirror at which the X-ray energy flux transported and focused through the mirror was maximum. A minimum spot diameter of 22 mm at a distance of approximately 200 mm from a soft X-ray source was confirmed. The maximum intensity of the collected soft X-rays was 1.3 mJ/cm(2) at the center of the irradiation zone. Thus, the irradiation intensity was improved by approximately 27 times when compared to that of 47 μJ/cm(2) without the mirror. The debris sputtering rate on the reflection surface of the mirror can be reduced to 1/110 by argon gas at 11 Pa, while the attenuation rate of the soft X-rays due to absorption by the buffer gas can be suppressed to less than 10% at the focal point. The focusing property of the mirror is expected to be maintained for 3000 h or longer without significant degradation for a 100 W/320 pps laser shot if the ruthenium layer is thicker than 10 μm. These results suggest that a stand-alone broadband soft X-ray processing system can be realized by using laser-produced plasma soft X-rays.

  1. Simulation and experimental research of x-ray toroidally bent crystal imaging with laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyi, Wang; Shali, Xiao; jian, Lu; Yufen, Wu; Jun, Shi; Jiayu, Qian; Shenye, Liu; Minxi, Wei; Bolun, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Bragg law and imaging principle of bent crystal, the imaging properties of the monochromic backlighting system with a toroidally bent crystal were studied via ray-tracing simulations and experiments. Comparison experiments with both toroidally and spherically bent crystals using a Cr line as the backlighter were performed, showing that using toroidally bent crystal, a 2D image with the same magnifications in meridional and sagittal directions can be obtained with higher spatial resolution. Experiments with laser-produced plasmas using Mica crystal were carried out on the Shenguang II laser facility. Five laser beams were focused onto a Ti planar target producing a line at 4.75 keV as the backlighter and an image of a metal grid with size of 200 μm  ×  200 μm was recorded with an x-ray image plate. A spatial resolution of 40 μm was demonstrated with a magnification of 3 due to the restriction of the target chamber size. 10 μm spatial resolution might be possible if the detector can be located outside the chamber to enlarge the magnification.

  2. Cold highly ionized ions: Comparison of energies of recoil ions produced by heavy ions and by synchrotron radiation x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellin, I.A.; Levin, J.C.; O, C.S.; Cederquist, H.; Elston, S.B.; Short, R.T.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    1987-01-01

    The energies of highly excited, high-charge-state recoil ions produced by fast heavy-ion impact on target atoms (''hammer'' method) have been compared with the energies of similar-charge-state recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades subsequent to inner-shell photoabsorption of tuned synchrotron radiation x rays (''scalpel'' method). These comparisons show that the ''hammer'' method leads to recoil ion temperatures typically 4 orders of magnitude lower than those which occur in plasma sources in which ions of similar ionization and excitation states have comparable abundance, while the ''scalpel'' method leads to temperatures up to 6 orders of magnitude lower. Advantages and drawbacks of each method for potential precision spectroscopy of stored or trapped high charge state ions, and for production of extracted beams of low emittance for use in secondary ion-atom collision studies at eV to keV energies are discussed. 20 refs.

  3. Characterization of a plasma produced using a high power laser with a gas puff target for x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high temperature, high density plasma can be produced by using a nanosecond, high-power laser with a gas puff target. The gas puff target is formed by puffing a small amount of gas from a high-pressure reservoir through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the gas puff target specially designed for x-ray laser experiments. The solenoid valve with the nozzle in the form of a slit 0.3-mm wide and up to 40-mm long, allows to form an elongated gas puff suitable for the creation of an x-ray laser active medium by its perpendicular irradiation with the use of a laser beam focused to a line. Preliminary results of the experiments on the laser irradiation of the gas puff targets, produced by the new valve, show that hot plasma suitable for x-ray lasers is created

  4. Pressure dependence of X-rays produced by an LiTaO3 single crystal at the pressures of 1-20Pa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-10-01

    The energy spectra of X-rays produced by an LiTaO3 single crystal have been measured at pressures of 1-20Pa. The energy spectra showed that the endpoint energy and the amount of X-rays gradually increased with the decrease of pressure at 5-8Pa and abruptly increased around 4Pa and below. A maximum endpoint energy of 70keV was obtained using the LiTaO3 single crystal with 5mm thickness at a pressure of 3Pa. The change of X-rays produced by the LiTaO3single crystal was discussed in relation to the breakdown potential at the pressures.

  5. Gold nanoparticles: BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) coating and X-ray irradiation produce variable-spectrum photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuo-Hao [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Sheng-Feng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ong, Edwin B.L. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tan, Hui-Ru [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Yang, C.S. [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hwu, Y., E-mail: phhwu@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    We show that by using different x-ray irradiation times of BSA-coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) we can change their ultraviolet-stimulated photoluminescence and shift the spectral weight over the visible spectral range. This is due to the interplay of two emission bands, one due to BSA and the other related to gold. The emission properties did not change with time over a period of several months. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coated with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) are synthesized by x-ray irradiation. • BSA coated AuNPs with ∼1 nm size show strong photoluminescence in red by UV excitation. • The blue photoluminescence of BSA increase with x-ray irradiation. • Increase x-ray irradiation time during the synthesis shift the color of the colloid from red to blue.

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  8. Femtosecond electron and X-ray generation by laser and plasma-based sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of ultra-short x-rays by Thomson scattering intense laser pulses from electron beams is discussed, including recent experimental results and methods for enhancing the x-ray flux. A high flux of x-rays in a femtosecond pulse requires the generation of femtosecond electron bunches and a head-on Thomson scattering geometry. The generation of ultrashort electron bunches in a plasma-based accelerator with an injection technique that uses two colliding laser pulses is discussed. Simulations indicate the bunches as short as a few fs can be produced. Conversion of the fs electron pulse to a fs x-ray pulse can be accomplished by Bremsstrahlung or Thomson scattering

  9. X-ray lithography sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron from dipole magnets in electron storage rings has emerged as a useful source of x-rays for lithography. To meet the need for these sources numerous groups around the world have embarked on projects to design and construct storage rings for x-ray lithography. Both conventional electromagnets as well as superconducting (SC) dipoles have been incorporated into the various designs. An overview of the worldwide effort to produce commercial x-ray sources will be presented. To better illustrate the elements involved in these sources a closer examination of the Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source Project (SXLS) at BNL will be presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  10. Single and double core-hole ion emission spectroscopy of transient neon plasmas produced by ultraintense x-ray laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Single core-hole (SCH) and double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon gas in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the laser-produced highly transient plasmas. The plasma density effects on level populations are demonstrated with an x-ray photon energy of 2000 eV. For laser photon energy in the range of 937 - 1360 eV, resonant absorptions (RA) of 1s-np (n> = 2) transitions play important roles in time evolution of the population and DCH emission spectroscopy. For x-ray photon energy larger than 1360 eV, no RA exist and transient plasmas show different features in the DCH spectroscopy.

  11. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, D.; Claps, G.; De Angelis, R.; Murtas, F.

    2016-03-01

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector (`GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude.

  12. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector ('GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude

  13. Origin of Thermal and Non-Thermal Hard X-ray Emission from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Dogiel, Vladimir; Yuasa, Takayuki; Prokhorov, Dmitrii; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Bamba, Aya; Inoue, Hajime; Ko, Chung-Ming; Kokubun, Motohide; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Noriko Y

    2009-01-01

    We analyse new results of Chandra and Suzaku which found a flux of hard X-ray emission from the compact region around Sgr A$^\\ast$ (r ~ 100 pc). We suppose that this emission is generated by accretion processes onto the central supermassive blackhole when an unbounded part of captured stars obtains an additional momentum. As a result a flux of subrelativistic protons is generated near the Galactic center which heats the background plasma up to temperatures about 6-10 keV and produces by inverse bremsstrahlung a flux of non-thermal X-ray emission in the energy range above 10 keV.

  14. Energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced by high energy bremsstrahlung in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron energy spectra in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen were calculated for various bremsstrahlung end-point energies and, from these, tissue spectra were calculated using the tissue equivalent molecular formula C5H40O18N. The method involves folding the known bremsstrahlung spectrum shape with the cross section for each possible decay mode in each element which leads to neutron production. The partial photoneutron cross sections used have been derived from published data

  15. Polychromatic X-ray Beam from the Acceleration of Energetic Electrons in Ultrafast Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Félicie; Taphuoc, Kim; Shah, Rahul; Burgy, Frederic; Rousseau, Jean Philippe; Rousse, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Polychromatic beams of hard X-rays from ultrafast laser plasma interaction are studied. Just as in a conventional synchrotron, electrons are accelerated and wiggled, but on a much shorter scale of a few millimeters. By focusing a 50 TW CPA laser system (30 fs duration) onto a helium gas jet, we obtained a polychromatic collimated beam (50 mrad) of X-ray radiation in the keV range. In addition, its perfect synchronization with the laser system, its ultrafast duration (≃30 fs) and its brightness (up to 108 photons/shot/solid angle at 0.1% BW) will make it applicable to both X-ray science and backlighting to address laboratory astrophysics research issues.

  16. Polarization effects in radiation from compact X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of polarization of X rays emitted by magnetized neutron stars, white dwarfs and black hole accretion disks is presented and predictions are compared with polarimetric data. Polarization occurs in accreting neutron stars and white dwarfs in binary systems as plasma travels along magnetic field lines formed between the companions. Movement parallel to the field produces circular polarization, transverse propagation yields linear polarization and elliptical polarization arises from other angles. The actual mechanism is alterations in the absorption coefficients of magnetized plasma, changes introduced by available bremsstrahlung and electron scattering processes. Thomson scattering is an origin of X ray polarization in black hole and neutron star accretion disks, with the type of polarization being dependent on the radiation density near the boundary, the presence of Faraday rotation and the geometry of the disk magnetic field. Polarimetric data on 10 stellar objects are presented as supportive evidence for the theory. 14 references

  17. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences. Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons. This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning. This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes. During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields. These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air. Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away. As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited.

  18. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  19. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards ...

  1. Analysis of the X-ray and time-resolved XUV emission of laser produced Xe and Kr plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Kontogiannopoulos, N.; Marquès, J.-R.; Tzortzakis, S.; Lecherbourg, L.; Thais, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    2007-05-01

    A frequency-doubled laser beam of the Nd:glass kilojoule nanosecond LULI2000 facility (1.5 ns duration, 200-400 J energy, 0.53 μm wavelength) was focused on a Xe or Kr gas jet. The plasma was simultaneously diagnosed with X-ray (in the wavelength range of 6-8 Å for Kr and of 12-15 Å for Xe) and time-resolved XUV (20-200 Å) emission spectroscopy. Electron density and temperature as well as the ionization charge were measured by time-resolved Thomson scattering of the heating laser pulse. The spectra are compared with the calculations performed with the NLTE collisional-radiative code AVERROES/TRANSPEC. Best fits of the X-ray and XUV spectra obtained are presented. The measured charge distribution and dynamics is analyzed using the simultaneous Thomson scattering diagnostic.

  2. Relative timing of solar prompt. gamma. -ray line and X-ray emission produced by flare accelerated ions and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulot, E.; Vilmer, N.; Trottet, G.

    1988-09-25

    SMM and Hinotori observations show that the peak time of the ..gamma..-ray emission is sometimes delayed with respect to the one of the hard X-ray flux. Such delays may be interpreted either as an evidence of a two step acceleration process of electrons and ions or as the result of the partial trapping and/or propagation of the particles from the acceleration region to the interaction site. Here we focus on the latter hypothesis and present some preliminary calculations of the time dependent transport of energetic ions. Preliminary estimates of the 4.4 MeV line emission are used to discuss the relative timing of Hard X-ray and ..gamma..-ray emissions. One difficulty with the preliminary model discussed here is that the number of ions involved in the ..gamma..-ray line production is very large. Nevertheless, for reasonable parameters, a good agreement is found between observed and expected delays.

  3. Studies for the development of a micro-focus monochromatic x-ray source with making use of a highly charged heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new scheme for a micro-focus monochromatic X-ray source using a focused highly charged ion beam colliding with a solid surface. When highly charged ion approaches a surface, many electrons are captured into the ion and the so-called hollow atom is produced. The hollow atom will decay by emitting X-rays before and after hitting the surface. Such X-rays do not contain any contribution from bremsstrahlung, so that monochromatic X-rays can be obtained by using proper filters. For the first step of realizing the proposed scheme, an ion focusing system with a glass capillary has been developed. In order to study the monochromaticity of the emission, X-ray spectra from hollow atoms produced in the collisions between highly charged heavy ions and several surfaces have been observed. (author)

  4. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra

  5. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  6. Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

  7. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  8. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  9. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews II, Kenneth L.; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated...

  10. Independent determinations of temperature and ionization balance in a laser-produced plasma by use of L-shell x-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We outline a method for determining independently the electron temperature and charge state distribution in plasmas by use of ratios of sodiumlike satellite and neonlike resonance x-ray emission. The technique is applied to a bromine plasma produced by laser irradiation of a microdot. Results are consistent with the formation in the corona of a recombining plasma. The temperature is found to decrease with distance in the corona

  11. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  12. Optimization of X-ray sources from a high-average-power ND:Glass laser-produced plasma for proximity lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The concept of a laser-based proximity lithography system for electronic microcircuit production has advanced to the point where a detailed design of a prototype system capable of exposing wafers at 40 wafer levels per hr is technically feasible with high-average-power laser technology. In proximity x-ray lithography, a photoresist composed of polymethyl- methacrylate (PMMA) or similar material is exposed to x rays transmitted through a mask placed near the photoresist, a procedure which is similar to making a photographic contact print. The mask contains a pattern of opaque metal features, with line widths as small as 0.12 {mu}m, placed on a thin (1-{mu}m thick) Si membrane. During the exposure, the shadow of the mask projected onto the resist produces in the physical and chemical properties of the resist a pattern of variation with the same size and shape as the features contained in the metal mask. This pattern can be further processed to produce microscopic structures in the Si substrate. The main application envisioned for this technology is the production of electronic microcircuits with spatial features significantly smaller than currently achievable with conventional optical lithographic techniques (0.12 {micro}m vs 0.25 {micro}m). This article describes work on optimizing a laser-produced plasma x-ray source intended for microcircuit production by proximity lithography.

  13. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  14. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser wakefield accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Arefiev, Alex; Downer, Mike; InstituteFusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin Team

    2014-10-01

    Compton backscatter (CBS) x-rays have been generated from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) electron beams by retro-reflecting the LWFA drive pulse with a plasma mirror (PM) and by backscattering a secondary pulse split from the driver pulse. However, tunable quasi-monoenergetic CBS x-rays have been produced only by the latter method, which requires challenging alignment. Here we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (~50% FWHM), bright (5 × 106 photon per shot) CBS x-rays with central energy tunability from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by combining a PM with a tunable LWFA. 30 TW, 30-fs (FWHM), laser pulses from the UT3 laser system were focused (f/12) to spot diameter 11 micron, intensity ~6 × 1018 W/cm2 (a = 1.5) at a 1-mm long Helium gas jet, yielding quasi-monoenergetic relativistic electrons. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflected the LWFA driving pulse into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detecting bremsstrahlung background. By changing gas jet backing pressure, electron energy was tuned from 60 to 90 MeV, thereby tuning the CBS x-ray energy, which was determined by measuring transmission through a metal filter pack. The x-ray beam profiles recorded on an image plate had 5-10-mrad divergence.

  15. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions

  16. Influence of multiple scattering of relativistic electrons on the linewidth of Parametric X-ray Radiation produced in the extremely Bragg geometry in the absence of photoabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    The multiple scattering effect on the linewidth of backward Parametric X-ray Radiation (PXR) produced in the extremely Bragg geometry by low energy relativistic electrons traversing a single crystal is discussed. It is shown that there are conditions when the influence of photoabsorption on the linewidth can be neglected, and only the multiple scattering process of relativistic electrons in crystals leads to the PXR lines broadening. Based on obtained theoretical and numerical results for the linewidth broadening caused by multiple scattering of 30 and 50 MeV relativistic electrons in a Si crystal of various thicknesses, an experiment could be performed to help in revealing the scattering effect on the PXR lines in the absence of photoabsorption. This leads to more accurate understanding of the influence of scattering process on the linewidth of backward PXR and helps to better construct a table-top narrow bandwidth X-ray source for both scientific and industrial applications.

  17. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma produced by ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; U Chakravarty; Manoranjan P Singh; J A Chakera; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the synthetic spectra generated using the spectroscopic code Prism-SPECT. It is observed that He-like resonance line emission occurs from the plasma region having sub-critical density, whereas K- emission arises from the bulk solid heated to a temperature of 10 eV by the impact of hot electrons. K- line from Be-like ions was used to estimate the hot electron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature showed a scaling of 0.47 with laser intensity.

  18. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Shao-yong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yuan, Yong-teng; Miao, Wen-yong; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Hu, Guang-yue, E-mail: gyhu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  19. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from plasma produced by the femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; B S Rao; P D Gupta

    2012-02-01

    We report here an experimental study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from magnesium plasma produced by laser pulses of three widely different pulse durations (FWHM) of 45 fs, 25 ps and 3 ns, at a constant laser fluence of ∼ 1.5 × 104 J cm-2. It is observed that the X-ray yield of the resonance lines from the higher ionization states such as H- and He-like ions decreases on decreasing the laser pulse duration, even though the peak laser intensities of 3.5 × 1017 W cm-2 for the 45 fs pulses and 6.2 × 1014 W cm-2 for the 25 ps pulses are much higher than 5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the 3 ns laser pulse. The results were explained in terms of the ionization equilibrium time for different ionization states in the heated plasma. The study can be useful to make optimum choice of the laser pulse duration to produce short pulse intense X-ray line emission from the plasma and to get the knowledge of the degree of ionization in the plasma.

  20. Dosimetry and monitoring of thin X-ray beam produced by linear particle accelerator, for application in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetry and monitoring characteristics of thin X-ray beams, and the application of 4MeV linear particle accelerator to radiosurgery are studied. An addition collimation system, consisted of 3 lead collimators, which allows to obtain thin beams of 6,10 and 15 mm of diameter, was fabricated. The stereo taxic system, together with modifications in dispositives, provide the accuracy required in volum-targed location. The dosimetric informations were determined with silicon detector inserted into water simulator. The isodose curves for each beam, and total isodoses simulating the treatment were established using radiographic emulsions in conditions which reproduce real circunstances of pacient irradiation. (M.C.K.)

  1. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC® EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 × 10 × 10-cm3 polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09–1.07, 1.23–1.17, and 1.27–1.19 for doses 50–200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV–4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  2. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  4. X-Ray Lines from Hot Flows around White Dwarfs. Application to SS Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, K; Raymond, J; Menou, Kristen; Perna, Rosalba; Raymond, John

    2001-01-01

    Instead of possessing a boundary layer at the interface between a disk and their stellar surface, White Dwarfs (WDs) in quiescent Dwarf Novae (DN) could accrete via an Advection-Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF), responsible for the X-ray Bremsstrahlung emission observed. Such a hot accretion flow is also expected to produce characteristic thermal line emission. Using SS Cyg as a specific example, we show that knowing a priori the inclination and the WD mass in quiescent DN makes X-ray line diagnostics powerful probes of the flow structure in these systems. Current X-ray instruments can discriminate, from their width, between lines emitted from a flow with a Keplerian rotation rate and those emitted at a substantially sub-Keplerian rate. This could be used to observationally test the property of energy advection, which is at the origin of the partial radial pressure support by the hot gas and the sub-Keplerian rotation rate in an ADAF.

  5. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver R.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2015-08-01

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2-6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ˜20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ˜190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform's useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry.

  6. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoidn, Oliver R.; Seidler, Gerald T., E-mail: seidler@uw.edu [Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2–6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform’s useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry.

  7. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolutiona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N.; Lu, Jian; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the Lβ1- and Lβ2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

  8. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver R; Seidler, Gerald T

    2015-08-01

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2-6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform's useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry. PMID:26329247

  9. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2–6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform’s useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry

  10. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  11. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S., E-mail: dhaliwalas@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, Longowal(Sangrur) -148106, Punjab (India)

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  12. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter 90Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of FmodBH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the FmodBH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  13. X-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  14. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  15. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  16. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  17. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  18. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard-X-ray producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Emslie, A G; Vilmer, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations from {\\em RHESSI} have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch angle scattering of fast electrons off low frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop and ...

  19. Turbulent Pitch-angle Scattering and Diffusive Transport of Hard X-Ray-producing Electrons in Flaring Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ~ (108-109) cm for ~30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  20. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Vilmer, Nicole, E-mail: eduard@astro.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [LESIA Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ∼ (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ∼30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  1. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  3. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  4. Effect of dielectronic recombination on the charge-state distribution and soft X-ray line intensity of laser-produced carbon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; G P Gupta; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2005-01-01

    The effect of dielectronic recombination in determining charge-state distribution and radiative emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been investigated in the collisional radiative ionization equilibrium. It is observed that the relative abundances of different ions in the plasma, and soft X-ray emission intensity get significantly altered when dielectronic recombination is included. Theoretical estimates of the relative population of CVI to CV ions and ratio of line intensity emitted from them for two representative formulations of dielectronic recombination are presented.

  5. On the inability of Comptonization to produce the broad X-ray iron lines observed in Seyfert nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S

    1999-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that Compton downscattering may give rise to the broad iron lines seen in the X-ray spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies. This challenges the standard model in which these lines originate from the innermost regions of the black hole accretion disk with Doppler shifts and gravitational redshifts giving rise to the broadened line profile. Here, we apply observational constraints to the Compton downscattering model for MCG-6-30-15 and NGC3516, the two best cases to date of Seyfert galaxies with relativistically broad lines. We show that the continuum source in MCG-6-30-15 required by the constrained model violates the black body limit. In the case of NGC3516, only a very small region of parameter space is compatible with the constraints. Hence, we conclude that the Comptonization model is not a viable one for the broad line seen in these two objects. The accretion disk model remains the best interpretation of these data.

  6. Modeling and characterization of X-ray yield in a polychromatic, lab-scale, X-ray computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modular X-ray computed micro-tomography (µXCT) system is characterized in terms of X-ray yield resulting both from the generated X-ray spectrum and from X-ray detection with an energy-sensitive detector. The X-ray computed tomography system is composed of a commercially available cone-beam microfocus X-ray source and a modular optically-coupled-CCD-scintillator X-ray detector. The X-ray yield is measured and reported in units independent from exposure time, X-ray tube beam target current, and cone-beam-to-detector geometry. The polychromatic X-ray source is modeled as a broad Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in order to understand the effect of the controllable parameters, that is, X-ray tube accelerating voltage and X-ray beam filtering. An approach is adopted which expresses the absolute number of emitted X-rays. The response of the energy-sensitive detector to the modeled spectrum is modeled as a function of scintillator composition and thickness. The detection efficiency model for the polychromatic X-ray detector considers the response of the light collection system and the electronic imaging array in order to predict absolute count yield under the studied conditions. The modeling approach is applied to the specific hardware implemented in the current µXCT system. The model's predictions for absolute detection rate are in reasonable agreement with measured values under a range of conditions applied to the system for X-ray microtomography imaging, particularly for the LuAG:Ce scintillator material

  7. Modeling and characterization of X-ray yield in a polychromatic, lab-scale, X-ray computed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, J.C.E.; Chawla, Nikhilesh, E-mail: nchawla@asu.edu

    2015-05-21

    A modular X-ray computed micro-tomography (µXCT) system is characterized in terms of X-ray yield resulting both from the generated X-ray spectrum and from X-ray detection with an energy-sensitive detector. The X-ray computed tomography system is composed of a commercially available cone-beam microfocus X-ray source and a modular optically-coupled-CCD-scintillator X-ray detector. The X-ray yield is measured and reported in units independent from exposure time, X-ray tube beam target current, and cone-beam-to-detector geometry. The polychromatic X-ray source is modeled as a broad Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in order to understand the effect of the controllable parameters, that is, X-ray tube accelerating voltage and X-ray beam filtering. An approach is adopted which expresses the absolute number of emitted X-rays. The response of the energy-sensitive detector to the modeled spectrum is modeled as a function of scintillator composition and thickness. The detection efficiency model for the polychromatic X-ray detector considers the response of the light collection system and the electronic imaging array in order to predict absolute count yield under the studied conditions. The modeling approach is applied to the specific hardware implemented in the current µXCT system. The model's predictions for absolute detection rate are in reasonable agreement with measured values under a range of conditions applied to the system for X-ray microtomography imaging, particularly for the LuAG:Ce scintillator material.

  8. Can field portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) produce high quality data for application in environmental contamination research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Taylor, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    This research evaluates the analytical capabilities of a field portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF) for the measurement of contaminated soil samples using a matrix-matched calibration. The calibrated pXRF generated exceptional data quality from the measurement of ten soil reference materials. Elemental recoveries improved for all 11 elements post-calibration with reduced measurement variation and detection limits in most cases. Measurement repeatability of reference values ranged between 0.2 and 10% relative standard deviation, while the majority (82%) of reference recoveries were between 90 and 110%. Definitive data quality, the highest of the US EPA's three level quality ranking, was achieved for 15 of 19 elemental datasets. Measurement comparability against inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) values was excellent for most elements (e.g, r(2) 0.999 for Mn and Pb, r(2) > 0.995 for Cu, Zn and Cd). Parallel measurement of reference materials revealed ICP-AES and ICP-MS measured Ti and Cr poorly when compared to pXRF. Individual recoveries of soil reference materials by both ICP-AES and pXRF showed that pXRF was equivalent to or better than ICP-AES values for all but two elements (Ni, As). This study demonstrates pXRF as a suitable alternative to ICP-AES analysis in the measurement of Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, and Pb in metal-contaminated soils. Where funds are limited, pXRF provides a low-cost, high quality solution to increasing sample density for a more complete geochemical investigation. PMID:27100216

  9. Can field portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) produce high quality data for application in environmental contamination research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Taylor, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    This research evaluates the analytical capabilities of a field portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF) for the measurement of contaminated soil samples using a matrix-matched calibration. The calibrated pXRF generated exceptional data quality from the measurement of ten soil reference materials. Elemental recoveries improved for all 11 elements post-calibration with reduced measurement variation and detection limits in most cases. Measurement repeatability of reference values ranged between 0.2 and 10% relative standard deviation, while the majority (82%) of reference recoveries were between 90 and 110%. Definitive data quality, the highest of the US EPA's three level quality ranking, was achieved for 15 of 19 elemental datasets. Measurement comparability against inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) values was excellent for most elements (e.g, r(2) 0.999 for Mn and Pb, r(2) > 0.995 for Cu, Zn and Cd). Parallel measurement of reference materials revealed ICP-AES and ICP-MS measured Ti and Cr poorly when compared to pXRF. Individual recoveries of soil reference materials by both ICP-AES and pXRF showed that pXRF was equivalent to or better than ICP-AES values for all but two elements (Ni, As). This study demonstrates pXRF as a suitable alternative to ICP-AES analysis in the measurement of Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, and Pb in metal-contaminated soils. Where funds are limited, pXRF provides a low-cost, high quality solution to increasing sample density for a more complete geochemical investigation.

  10. Strong X-ray emission from electrified insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Nobuya; Maeda, Kuniko; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    Terasawa reported strong X-ray emission from charged-up insulators, and proposed an X-ray production device only using the electrification. We constructed a similar device and studied the conditions of X-ray emission. It was shown that X-rays could be produced without supplying electrons from a filament. PMID:16038514

  11. Solar Hard X-ray Source Sizes in a Beam-Heated and Ionised Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    O'Flannagain, A; Gallagher, P T

    2014-01-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have shown that HXR source sizes are 3-6 times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionisation (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionised plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionised region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to...

  12. Energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced by high-energy bremsstrahlung in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced when bremsstrahlung of end-point energy in the range 10-30 MeV is incident on oxygen, carbon and nitrogen have been calculated. Photonuclear reactions of the type (γ,n) and (γ,pn) have been included. The respective contributions of various nuclear reactions have been adjusted using the published values of experimentally determined cross-sections, or branching ratios, where these are available. Where no such information exists in the literature, the values have been empirically estimated. Agreement has been obtained between the calculated photoneutron spectra from C, N and O at various energies and the available experimentally-measured spectra. The photoneutron spectra from C,N and O have been combined in the right proportion (C5H40O18N) to compute the spectra of secondary neutrons from tissue irradiated with bremsstrahlung of end-point energy from 10-30 MeV. Mean neutron energies and kerma factors for these spectra have been calculated. (author)

  13. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  14. Solar hard X-ray halo from decaying neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    MacKinnon, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To quantify the solar X-ray halo resulting from inner bremsstrahlung in beta decay of neutrons generated by cosmic ray bombardment of the solar surface. Methods: We show analytically how the angular form of this X-ray halo directly reflects the energy distribution of neutrons escaping the Sun. Previous Monte Carlo calculations of solar albedo neutron production are used to normalise an assumed parametric form for the escaping neutron distribution and thus to estimate the halo's inte...

  15. Advances in X-ray spectroscopy contributions in honour of professor Y. Cauchois

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    1982-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Spectroscopy covers topics relevant to the advancement of X-ray spectroscopy technology. The book is a collection of papers written by specialists in X-ray spectroscopy and pays tribute to the scientific work of Prof. Yvette Cauchois. The text is organized into four parts. Part I covers the analysis of X-ray transitions between atomic levels and relativistic theories of X-ray emission satellites and electron BremsStrahlung. Part II reviews the means provided by X-ray spectroscopy for the determination of the electronic structure of solids, while Part III discusses methods of

  16. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  17. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  18. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P; 10.1118/1.4767770

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Cent...

  19. Selective photo-activation analysis with laser-driven x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Golovin, Grigory; Powers, Nathan; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Petersen, Chad; Zhang, Jun; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Zhao, Baozhen; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Umstadter, Donald; Haden, Dan; Silano, Jack; Karwowski, Hugon

    2013-04-01

    We discuss a technique for the identification of nuclear isotopes by selective photo-activation analysis. A narrow divergence beam of high-energy photons is produced when a laser driven electron beam Compton backscatters off a counter-propagating high-intensity laser pulse. The x-rays from this compact laser-driven synchrotron light source are MeV energy, narrow-bandwidth, tunable, polarized, and bright (10^8 photons s-1). Such characteristics make these x-rays well-suited for nuclear interrogation by means of triggering (γ,f) and (γ,xn) reactions. The narrow bandwidth of the x-ray light can be exploited to selectively activate nuclei with isotopic sensitivity, without causing unwanted background from collateral activation. Additionally, the polarized nature of the x-rays can be used to study anisotropy of neutron emission, for precise identification of isotopes. Activation by laser-driven synchrotron x-rays will be compared with activation by bremsstrahlung.

  20. Hard X-ray Detectability of Small Impulsive Heating Events in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, L.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Marsh, A.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.

    2015-12-01

    Impulsive heating events ("nanoflares") are a candidate to supply the solar corona with its ~2 MK temperature. These transient events can be studied using extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray observations, among others. However, the impulsive events may occur in tenuous loops on small enough timescales that the heating is essentially not observed due to ionization timescales, and only the cooling phase is observed. Bremsstrahlung hard X-rays could serve as a more direct and prompt indicator of transient heating events. A hard X-ray spacecraft based on the direct-focusing technology pioneered by the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket could search for these direct signatures. In this work, we use the hydrodynamical EBTEL code to simulate differential emission measures produced by individual heating events and by ensembles of such events. We then directly predict hard X-ray spectra and consider their observability by a future spaceborne FOXSI, and also by the RHESSI and NuSTAR spacecraft.

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miaja-Avila, L.; G. C. O'Neil; Uhlig, J.; C. L. Cromer; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary opti...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  3. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  4. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  5. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  6. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  7. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  8. Digital X-ray detector based on a CCD matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of charge-coupled devices (CCD) as position-sensitive detectors for X-ray radiation is discussed. The experimental scheme contains a videotransmission camera to detect pulsed X-ray radiation and Vektor analog-to-digital converters and computer interface. It is shown that the sensitivity range of a K1200TsM1 matrix to bremsstrahlung with an average energy of 75 keV is 2.7·10-8-0.8·10-6 J/cm2. The spatial resolution of the resultant X-ray image is discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs

  9. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobko, A., E-mail: lobko@inp.bsu.by [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Golubeva, E. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Ryazan State RadioEngineering University, 59/1 Gagarina Street, Ryazan 390005 (Russian Federation); Paddubskaya, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shenderova, O. [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Dr., S. 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States); Uglov, V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Valynets, N. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc.

  10. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Haque; A Moon; T Hirai; H Yamada

    2011-02-01

    The tabletop storage ring, 6 MeV MIRRORCLE, is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. In spite of low electron energy, the 6 MeV MIRRORCLE generates hard X-rays ranging from 10 keV up to its electron energy and milliwatt order submillimetre range FIR rays. Bremsstrahlung is the mechanism for the hard X-ray generation. Images produced with 11 × geometrical magnification display a sharply enhanced edge effect when generated using a 25 mm rod electron target. Bright far-infrared is generated in the same way using a conventional synchrotron light source, but with MIRRORCLE the spectral flux is found to be ∼ 1000 times greater than that of a standard thermal source. Partially coherent enhancement is observed in the case of FIR output.

  11. Experimental and analytical study of the bremsstrahlung radiation production at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bremsstrahlung photon beam from an X-ray tube with chromium anode has been studied, for an electron energy of 60 Kev. In the experimental step, a new measurement method has been developed. This is based on the detection and measurement of the fluorescence produced when the photons from the tube impinge on targets which are used as calibrated flux monitors. The composition and physical characteristics of the targets are well-known. In the steps of experimental data treatment, an analytical study of the theoretical models describing thick target bremsstrahlung yield is performed. A factorization which accounts for the elemental physical processes is obtained, employing simple mathematical functions. The characteristic parameters found in the numerical fit process lead to results in good agreement with the experimental observations from other authors and predict theoretical exposure values in perfect agreement with the exposures measured for X-ray beams generated in several operating conditions. (author)

  12. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  13. X-ray Spectroscopy of Bursts from SGR 1806-20 with RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Ibrahim, Alaa

    1998-01-01

    We report on new RXTE X-ray spectral analysis of bursts from SGR 1806-20, the most prolific SGR source known. Previous studies of bursts from this source revealed a remarkable lack of spectral variability both in single bursts as well as from burst to burst. We present here some of the first evidence for significant spectral evolution within SGR bursts. We find that optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) spectra including photoelectric absorption provide the best fits to most bursts, however, other models (power law, Band GRB) can also produce statistically acceptable fits. We confirm the existence of a rolloff in the photon number spectrum below 5 keV.

  14. A laser-plasma–produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. (author)

  15. A laser-plasma-produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Shimokawa, Takashi; Imai, Takashi; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kando, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. PMID:25862698

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  18. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  2. X-ray back-lighter characterization for iron opacity measurements using laser-produced aluminium K-alpha emission

    OpenAIRE

    Rossall, A K; Gartside, L. M. R.; Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N K; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Gaffney, J; Rose, S. J.; Tallents, G J; , Tel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aluminium K ? emission (1.5 keV) produced by an 8 J, 500 ps, Nd:Glass laser incident at 45? onto a layered target of 0.8 ?m thick aluminium (front side) and 1?m thick iron (back side) has been used to probe the opacity of iron plasma. Source broadened spectroscopy and continuum emission analysis shows that whole beam self focussing within the aluminium plasma results in a two temperature spatial distribution. Thermal conduction from the laser-irradiated aluminium into the iron lay...

  3. Density and x-ray emission profile relationships in highly ionized high-Z laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a benchmark measurement of the electron density profile in the region where the electron density is 1019 cm–3 and where the bulk of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission occurs from isotropically expanding spherical high-Z gadolinium plasmas. It was found that, due to opacity effects, the observed EUV emission is mostly produced from an underdense region. We have analyzed time-resolved emission spectra with the aid of atomic structure calculations and find the multiple ion charge states around 18+ during the laser pulse irradiation

  4. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  5. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Clementson, J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schweikhard, L. [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  6. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  7. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  8. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  9. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) publishes Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation , ... eSubmitter Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff - Assembler's Guide to Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  12. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  14. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-05-21

    A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  15. Study of x-rays produced from debris-free sources with Ar, Kr and Kr/Ar mixture linear gas jets irradiated by UNR Leopard laser beam with fs and ns pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Moschella, J. J.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Weller, M. E.; Cline, W.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.

    2016-06-01

    Experiments of x-ray emission from Ar, Kr, and Ar/Kr gas jet mixture were performed at the UNR Leopard Laser Facility operated with 350 fs pulses at laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2 and 0.8 ns pulses at an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. Debris free x-ray source with supersonic linear nozzle generated clusters/monomer jet with an average density of ≥1019 cm-3 was compared to cylindrical tube subsonic nozzle, which produced only monomer jet with average density 1.5-2 times higher. The linear (elongated) cluster/gas jet provides the capability to study x-ray yield anisotropy and laser beam self-focusing with plasma channel formation that are interconnecting with efficient x-ray generation. Diagnostics include x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras and spectrometers. It was observed that the emission in the 1-9 keV spectral region was strongly anisotropic depending on the directions of laser beam polarization for sub-ps laser pulse and supersonic linear jet. The energy yield in the 1-3 keV region produced by a linear nozzle was an order of magnitude higher than from a tube nozzle. Non-LTE models and 3D molecular dynamic simulations of Ar and Kr clusters irradiated by sub-ps laser pulses have been implemented to analyze obtained data. A potential evidence of electron beam generation in jets' plasma was discussed. Note that the described debris-free gas-puff x-ray source can generate x-ray pulses in a high repetition regime. This is a great advantage compared to solid laser targets.

  16. X-ray Emission and Absorption Studies of Silicides in Relation to their Electronic Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Wiech, G.; Zahorowski, W.; Speier, W.; Goedkoop, J.B.; Czyzyk, Marek; Acker, J.F. van; Leuken, E. van; Groot, R.A. de; Laan, G. van der; Sarma, D.D.; Kumar, L.; Buschow, K.H.J.; Fuggle, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The valence bands and conduction bands of about 30 transition metal silicides (of which we concentrate on 4 here) have been investigated by measurements of Si X-ray emission bandsspectra, X-ray absorption spectra near the Si K (1s) edge, photoemission spectra, and Bremsstrahlung Isochromat spectra.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A tomographic x-ray system is an x-ray device intended to be used to produce radiologic images of a specific cross-sectional plane of the body by blurring or eliminating detail from other...

  18. Cold highly ionized ions: Comparison of energies of recoil ions produced by heavy ions and by synchrotron radiation X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellin, I.A.; Levin, J.C.; O, C.S.; Cederquist, H.; Elston, S.B.; Short, R.T.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    1988-01-01

    The energies of highly excited, high-charge-state recoil ions produced by fast heavy-ion impact on target atoms ('hammer' method) have been compared with the energies of similar-charge-state recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades subsequent to inner-shell photoabsorption of tuned synchrotron radiation X-rays ('scalpel' method). These comparisons show that the 'hammer' method leads to recoil ion temperatures typically 4 orders of magnitude lower than those which occur in plasma sources in which ions of similar ionization and excitation states have comparable abundance, while the 'scalpel' method leads to temperatures up to 6 orders of magnitude lower. Advantages and drawbacks of each method for potential precision spectroscopy of stored or trapped high charge state ions, and for production of extracted beams of low emittance for use in secondary ion-atom collison studies at eV to keV energies are discussed.

  19. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with

  20. Short-time X-ray diffraction with an efficient-optimized, high repetition-rate laser-plasma X-ray-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the production and application of ultrashort X-ray pulses. In the beginning different possibilities for the production of X-ray pulses with pulse durations of below one picosecond are presented, whereby the main topic lies on the so called laser-plasma X-ray sources with high repetition rate. In this case ultrashort laser pulses are focused on a metal, so that in the focus intensities of above 1016 W/cm2 dominate. In the ideal case in such way ultrafast electrons are produced, which are responsible for line radiation. In these experiments titanium Kα radiation is produced, thes photons possess an energy of 4.51 keV. For the efficient production of line radiation here the Ti:Sa laser is optimized in view of the laser energy and the pulse shape and the influence of the different parameters on the Kα production systematically studied. The influences of laser intensity, system-conditioned pre-pulses and of phase modulation are checked. It turns out that beside the increasement of the Kα radiation by a suited laser intensity a reduction of the X-ray background radiation is of deciding importance for the obtaining of clear diffraction images. This background radiation is mainly composed of bremsstrahlung. It can be suppressed by the avoidance of intrinsic pre-pulses and by means of 2nd-order phase modulation. By means of optical excitation and X-ray exploration experiments the production of acoustic waves after ultrashort optical excitation in a 150 nm thick Ge(111) film on Si(111) is studied. These acoustic waves are driven by thermal (in this time scale time-independent) and electronic (time dependent) pressure amounts. As essential results it turns out that the relative amount of the electronic pressure increases with decreasing excitation density

  1. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  2. Inflow Generated X-ray Corona Around Supermassive Black Holes and Unified Model for X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lile

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, covering the spatial domain from hundreds of Schwarzschild radii to $2\\ \\mathrm{pc}$ around the central supermassive black hole of mass $10^8 M_\\odot$, with detailed radiative cooling processes, are performed. Generically found is the existence of a significant amount of shock heated, high temperature ($\\geq 10^8\\ \\mathrm{K}$) coronal gas in the inner ($\\leq 10^4 r_\\mathrm{sch}$) region. It is shown that the composite bremsstrahlung emission spectrum due to coronal gas of various temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the overall ensemble spectrum of AGNs and hard X-ray background. Taking into account inverse Compton processes, in the context of the simulation-produced coronal gas, our model can readily account for the wide variety of AGN spectral shape, which can now be understood physically. The distinguishing feature of our model is that X-ray coronal gas is, for the first time, an integral part of the inflow gas and its observable characteristics are phys...

  3. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  4. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  5. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  6. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  7. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  8. L-shell X-ray emission measurement of Au plasma produced by intense femtosecond laser%超强激光脉冲作用下的Au等离子体L-X射线辐射测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兆锐; 袁萍; 李忠文; 杨治虎

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on interaction between intense femtosecond laser and high-purity gold were performed on the SI-LEX- I laser facility. The single-photon counting X-ray CCD camera was used to measure the L-shell X-ray emission from Au plasma at different laser power densities. The experimental results show that in the process of Au plasma X-ray emission, the high-speed electrons result in the intense bremsstrahlung and thermal radiation, and all the radiation intensity increases with the laser power density.%基于SILEX-Ⅰ激光器,利用单光子计数型电荷耦合器件,在超强超短脉冲激光与高纯度Au靶相互作用中,通过改变入射激光的能量,测量了不同激光功率密度下的Au等离子体L-X射线发射谱.实验结果表明:在超强超短脉冲激光作用下,Au等离子体L-X射线发射过程中由于高速电子存在,会诱发很强的热辐射和轫致辐射,并且Au等离子体特征L-X射线发射强度、热辐射和轫致辐射随激光功率密度增加而增强.

  9. Development of an X-ray microscope using a pulse train laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulse train laser with energy of 1 J was used to produce high intensity X-ray. We developed a soft X-ray microscope using a laser plasma X-ray source and an X-ray zooming tube. An X-ray image of Cu 2000 mesh was observed. (author)

  10. Moessbauer and X-ray Study of Fe{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}, 0.2{<=}x{<=}0.5, Samples Produced by Mechanical Alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyola Lozano, D., E-mail: doyola@ut.edu.co; MartInez, Y. Rojas; Bustos, H.; Perez Alcazar, G. A. [Universidad del Tolima, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia)

    2004-12-15

    In this work we report the magnetic and structural properties obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, of the Fe{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}, 0.2{<=}x{<=}0.5, alloys produced by mechanical alloying. Alloys with x=0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5, were for milled 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours. All the obtained alloys are in the bcc phase. The obtained Moessbauer spectra are characteristic of disordered ferromagnetic system. The lattice parameter remains nearly constant ({approx}2.91 A) for all the milling times and compositions. The mean grain sizes in the (110) and (211) direction are nearly constants with the milling time but vary from 15.5 to 11 nm and from 10.5 to 8.5 nm when Al content grow between x=0.2 to x=0.4, respectively. The difference between the mean grain sizes in these two directions shows that the grains are of prolate spheroid form.

  11. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; 10.1118/1.4761870

    2012-01-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a PMMA phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Differential Compto...

  12. Time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission of femtosecond-laser-produced plasmas in the 1.5-keV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Nagels-Silvert, V.; Geindre, J. P.; Gauthier, J. C.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    Recent experimental results on ion beams produced in high-intensity laser-solid interactions indicate the presence of very intense electric fields in the target. This suggests the possibility of efficiently heating a solid material by means of the fast electrons created during the laser-solid interactions and trapped in the target, rather than by the laser photons themselves. We tested this mechanism by irradiating very small cubic aluminum targets with the LULI 100-TW, 300-fs laser at 1.06-μm wavelength. X-ray spectra were measured with an ultra-fast streak camera, coupled to a conical Bragg crystal, providing spectra in the 1.5-keV range with high temporal and spectral resolution. The results indicate the creation of a hot plasma, but a very low coupling between the rapid electrons and the solid. A tentative explanation, in agreement with other experimental results and with preliminary particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, points out the fatal role of the laser prepulse.

  13. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  14. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  15. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  16. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  17. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron or X-ray beam sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons, based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γn) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γn) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. For electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10 to 11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. (author)

  18. Compact X-ray sources: X-rays from self-reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangles, Stuart P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-based particle acceleration offers a way to reduce the size of hard-X-ray sources. Scientists have now developed a simple scheme that produces a bright flash of hard X-rays by using a single laser pulse both to generate and to scatter an electron beam.

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  20. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  1. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  2. Beam propagation of x rays in a laser-produced plasma and a modified relation of interferometry in measuring the electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, using a quantum mechanical technique and introducing the so-called V representation (where the representation transformation is made by using the potential Hamiltonian V), we studied x-ray propagation in a linear plasma medium both analytically and numerically. A modified relation between the phase of the probe and the reference light and the electron density of the plasma is derived, in which the contribution of the gradient of the electron density has been taken into account. It is shown that this relation has the advantage in measurements of the electron density of a plasma using the x-ray interferometry technique of lessening the errors originating from the electron density gradient. The validity of x-ray interferometry is discussed in both mathematical and physical terms

  3. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Schioppa

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray flu

  4. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses pyroelectric detectors which are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low energy x-rays. The authors report tests of LiTaO3, Sr.5Ba.5Nb2O6 and LiNbO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1 ns low energy x-rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100 ns x-rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  5. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyroelectric detectors are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low-energy x rays. We report our tests of LiTaO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1-ns low-energy x rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100-ns x rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  6. Determination of metals in samples of Cocuy hand craft penca, produced in Lara State, Venezuela, by use of Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cocuy is a hydro alcoholic mixture coming from the distillation of fermented juice of agave cocuy. It is originate from Venezuela and it is produced in arid and semi-arid regions of that Country. In the last years, government has been concerned to obtain the legalization of the cocuy produced by peasants from the Municipality Urdaneta. The characterization of the cocuy produced in this municipality is an important contribution for the community and for the health of the consumers. To study the characteristics of the process of cocuy production in that region, it was carried out a census of producers, and a survey was applied in order to obtain information about raw material, process and storage of the cocuy. Samples were taken from different producers, to which it was determined p H, acidity, alcoholic degree, dry extract, refraction index, and content of Cu, Zn, Fe and Pb. The determination of metal in samples of cocuy was carried out by the method of Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence. This technique is very appropriate for alcoholic matrices, since effects of matrices are not observed, contrary to the technique of Atomic Absorption, which is the suitable one for the quality standards for this kind of drinks. The method TXRF has the additional advantage of the simultaneous determination with sample volumes of microliters order. The in situ internal standardization (in the reflector) was investigated by use of two methodologies, and the traditional procedure of addition of the internal pattern was compared. The analytic quality of the obtained results for each procedure it was object of analysis and it will be discussed. The concentration of metal Zn, Fe and Pb was near to limit of detection of the technique. The accuracy of the obtained results for Cu was determined by comparison with the technique of Atomic Absorption and it will also be object of discussion. They were found differences between the content of metal and the alcoholic degree, among

  7. Efficient soft x-ray emission source at 13.5 nm by use of a femtosecond-laser-produced Li-based microplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated to optimize a Li-based microjet target coupled to dual subpicosecond laser pulses as a 13.5 nm soft x-ray emission source. An optimum pulse duration of 450 fs to achieve a maximum emission at 13.5 nm was well explained by the resonant absorption process. Utilization of dual femtosecond pulses revealed that the optimum pulse separation around 500 ps was necessary to achieve a maximum soft x-ray conversion efficiency of 0.2%, where plasma hydrodynamics could not be neglected. A one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic simulation reproduced this optimum pulse separation behavior

  8. Efficient soft x-ray emission source at 13.5 nm by use of a femtosecond-laser-produced Li-based microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Kubodera, Shoichi; Sasaki, Wataru; Yugami, Noboru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alex

    2005-06-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated to optimize a Li-based microjet target coupled to dual subpicosecond laser pulses as a 13.5 nm soft x-ray emission source. An optimum pulse duration of 450 fs to achieve a maximum emission at 13.5 nm was well explained by the resonant absorption process. Utilization of dual femtosecond pulses revealed that the optimum pulse separation around 500 ps was necessary to achieve a maximum soft x-ray conversion efficiency of 0.2%, where plasma hydrodynamics could not be neglected. A one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic simulation reproduced this optimum pulse separation behavior.

  9. Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted from highly ionized atoms in the vacuum spark and laser-produced high power plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in atomic spectroscopy has greatly been reinforced in the last ten years. This gain of interest is directly related to the developments in different fields of research where hot plasmas are created. These fields include in particular controlled thermonuclear fusion research by means of inertial or magnetic confinement approaches and also the most recent efforts to achieve lasers in the XUV region. The present work is based on the specific contribution of the atomic spectroscopy group at the Hebrew University. The recent development of both theoretical and experimental tools allowed us to progress in the understanding of the highly ionized states of heavy elements. In this work the low-inductance vacuum-spark developed at the Hebrew University was used as the hot plasma source. The spectra were recorded in the 7-300 A range by means of a high-resolution extreme-grazing-incidence spectrometer developed at the Racah Institute by Profs. J.L. Schwob and B.S. Fraenkel. To the extend the spectroscopic studies to higher-Z atoms, the laser-produced plasma facility at Soreq Nuclear Center was used. In this work the spectra of the sixth row elements were recorded in the x-rays by means of a crystal spectrometer. All these experimental systems are briefly described in chapter one. Chapter two deals with the theoretical methods used in the present work for the atomic calculations. Chapter three deals with the spectra of elements of the fifth row emitted from the vacuum-spark in the 30-150 A range. These spectra as experimental data were used in order to test ab-initio computations along the NiI sequence 3d-nl transitions. The results of this work are presented in chapter four. Chapter five is devoted to the measurement and analysis of spectra emitted from the vacuum-spark by rare-earth elements. (author)

  10. Inductive Voltage Adder Driven X-Ray Sources for Hydrodynamic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, V.; Cordova, S.; Droemer, D.; Gustwiller, J.; Hunt, E.; Johnson, D.L.; MacLeod, G.; Maenchen, John; Menge, P.; Molina, I.; Oliver, B; Olson, C.; Rosenthal, S; Rovang, D.; Smith, I.; Welch, D.; Woo, L.

    1999-06-17

    Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerators were developed to provide high-current (100s of kA) power pulses at high voltage (up to 20 MV) using robust modular components. This architecture simultaneously resolves problems found in conventional pulsed and linear induction accelerators. A variety of high-brightness pulsed x-ray radiographic sources are needed from sub-megavolt to 16-MeV endpoints with greater source brightness (dose/spot) than presently available. We are applying IVA systems to produce very intense (up to 75 TW/cm{sup 2}) electron beams for these flash radiographic applications. The accelerator electromagnetic pulse is converted to a directed electron beam at the end of a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line. The cantilevered cathode threading the accelerator cavities terminates in a small (1-mm diameter) needle, producing the electron beam which is transported to a grounded bremsstrahlung converter within a strong ({approximately}50-T) axial magnetic field. These systems produce mm-sized stable electron beams, yielding very intense x-ray sources. Detailed simulations of the electron beam generation, transport, and target interaction are presented along with scaling laws for the radiation production and x-ray spot size. Experimental studies confirm these simulations and show this reliable, compact, and inexpensive technology scales to 1000-R doses a meter from a mm-diameter source in 50 ns.

  11. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D J; Almagri, A F; Burke, D R; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; Kaufman, M C; O'Connell, R

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Z(eff) and the particle diffusion coefficient D(r). A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Z(eff) and D(r). PMID:21034007

  12. Measurements of L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb by low-energy electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. L.; An, Z.; Zhu, J. J.; Tan, W. J.; Liu, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    The total L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb elements were measured by detecting the characteristic X-rays induced by the electron impact in the energy range of 6-28 keV. In this experiment, the thin films with thick aluminum substrates were used as the targets, and the experimental setup was improved. The influence of multiple scattering of electrons penetrating the targets films, electrons reflected from the thick aluminum substrates and bremsstrahlung photons produced when incident electrons impacted the targets were corrected by using the Monte Carlo method. The experimental results determined in this paper were compared with some theoretical models and other available experimental data in the literature. It was shown that the L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb elements measured in this paper were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions within the uncertainties.

  13. X-Ray Emission from M32: X-Ray Binaries or a micro-AGN?

    OpenAIRE

    Eskridge, Paul B.; White III, Raymond E.; Davis, David S.

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed archival {\\it ROSAT} PSPC data for M32 in order to study the x-ray emission from this nearest elliptical galaxy. We fit spectra from three long exposures with Raymond-Smith, thermal bremsstrahlung, and power-law models. All models give excellent fits. The thermal fits have kT$\\approx$4 keV, the Raymond-Smith iron abundance is $0.4^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$ Solar, the power-law fit has $\\alpha$=1.6$\\pm$0.1, and all fits have $N_H$ consistent with the Galactic column. The source is center...

  14. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  15. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  16. Dental x-ray diagnostic installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exemplary embodiment comprises an exposure unit including an X-ray tube and a cassette holder rotatable about vertical axes and between which the head of the patient is disposed. A radiation detector is disposed at the cassette holder for supplying an electrical signal corresponding to the dose rate when it is struck by X-rays and being interconnected with an X-ray tube voltage controller and a dose rate regulator in such manner that the X-ray tube voltage is influenced by the output of the radiation detector to control the dose rate to a value producing an optimum film blackening. A function generator determining the speed of the exposure unit is provided in which a speed curve is stored given which the radiation dose influencing the film is approximately constant

  17. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  18. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  19. Infrared and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy Analyses of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) Aerosols Produced at Low Temperature (200 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2016-10-01

    We present our latest results on the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment developed on the COSmIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames. In Titan's atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry induced by UV radiation and electron bombardment occurs between N2 and CH4 and leads to the production of larger molecules and solid aerosols. In the THS, Titan's chemistry is simulated by pulsed plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion, at Titan-like temperature (200 K). The residence time of the gas in the pulsed plasma discharge is ~3 µs, hence the chemistry is truncated allowing us to probe the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry, by adding heavier precursors into the initial N2-CH4 gas mixture. Experiments have been performed in different gas mixtures from the simpler N2-CH4 (98:2 and 95:5), to more complex mixtures: N2-CH4-C2H2 (91:5:4 and 94.5:5:0.5), N2-CH4-C6H6 (90:5:5) and N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 (86:5:4:5). Both the gas and solid phases have been analyzed using a combination of in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to monitor the different steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry [1]. The results of the solid phase study are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. The solid phase products are in the form of grains produced in volume and not from interaction on the substrate's surface. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates (100-500 nm in N2-CH4, up to 5 µm in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6). Moreover, the morphology of the grains seems to depend on the precursors, a finding that could have an impact on Titan haze microphysical models. We will present the latest results of the infrared and x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopic measurements that have been performed on all four mixtures. These results provide information on the nature of the different functional groups present in our samples as

  20. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 1800 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  1. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ...

  6. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si02. The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much ...

  9. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  12. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovelin, J.; Vainio, R.; Andersson, H.; Valtonen, E.; Alha, L.; Mälkki, A.; Grande, M.; Fraser, G. W.; Kato, M.; Koskinen, H.; Muinonen, K.; Näränen, J.; Schmidt, W.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Anttila, M.; Vihavainen, T.; Kiuru, E.; Roos, M.; Peltonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Talvioja, M.; Portin, P.; Prydderch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS) on the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will investigate the direct solar X-rays, and energetic protons and electrons which pass the Spacecraft on their way to the surface of Mercury. These measurements are vitally important for understanding quantitatively the processes that make Mercury's surface glow in X-rays, since all X-rays from Mercury are due to interactions of the surface with incoming highly energetic photons and space particles. The X-ray emission of Mercury's surface will be analysed to understand its structure and composition. SIXS data will also be utilised for studies of the solar X-ray corona, flares, solar energetic particles, and the magnetosphere of Mercury, and for providing information on solar eruptions to other BepiColombo instruments. SIXS consists of two detector subsystems. The X-ray detector system includes three identical GaAs PIN detectors which measure the solar spectrum at 1-20 keV energy range, and their combined field-of-view covers ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The particle detector system consists of an assembly including a cubic central CsI(Tl) scintillator detector with five of its six surfaces covered by a thin Si detector, which together perform low-resolution particle spectroscopy with a rough angular resolution over a field-of-view covering ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The energy range of detected particle spectra is 0.1-3 MeV for electrons and 1-30 MeV for protons. A major task for the SIXS instrument is the measurement of solar X-rays on the dayside of Mercury's surface to enable modeling of X-ray fluorescence and scattering on the planet's surface. Since highly energetic particles are expected to also induce a significant amount of X-ray emission via particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and bremsstrahlung when they are absorbed by the solid surface of the planet Mercury, SIXS performs measurements of fluxes and spectra of protons and electrons. SIXS performs

  2. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse

  3. K x-ray transitions from highly charged very slow Ne recoil ions produced by 1.4 MeV/amu very heavy ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K x-ray transitions in highly charged neon recoil ions have been observed in collisions of 1.4 MeV/amu Ar12+, Ti14+, Ni16+, Kr18+, Xe24+, Pb36+ and U40+ with a neon gas target. The spectral lines are attributed to excited states of Ne9+, Ne8+ and Ne7+. Experimental evidence is given for a secondary selective electron capture into outer shells of fully stripped slow target ions. (author)

  4. X-ray microscopy of live biological micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Al-Ani, Ma'an Nassar

    Real-time, compact x-ray microscopy has the potential to benefit many scientific fields, including microbiology, pharmacology, organic chemistry, and physics. Single frame x-ray micro-radiography, produced by a compact, solid-state laser plasma source, allows scientists to use x-ray emission for elemental analysis, and to observe biological specimens in their natural state. In this study, x-ray images of mouse kidney tissue, live bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia, and the bacteria's interaction with the antibiotic gentamicin, are examined using x-ray microscopy. For the purposes of comparing between confocal microscopy and x-ray microscopy, we introduced to our work the technique of gold labeling. Indirect immunofluorescence staining and immuno-gold labeling were applied on human lymphocytes and human tumor cells. Differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC) showed the lymphocyte body and nucleus, as did x-ray microscopy. However, the high resolution of x-ray microscopy allows us to differentiate between the gold particles bound to the antibodies and the free gold. A compact, tabletop Nd: glass laser is used in this study to produce x-rays from an Yttrium target. An atomic force microscope is used to scan the x-ray images from the developed photo-resist. The use of compact, tabletop laser plasma sources, in conjunction with x-ray microscopy, is a new technique that has great potential as a flexible, user-friendly scientific research tool.

  5. A million X-ray detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC)

    2016-06-01

    Part of the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre responsibilities include producing an X-ray catalogue of all X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton. The latest version, 3XMM, takes advantage of improvements made to the source characterisation, reducing the number of spurious detections, but providing better astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity, as well as spectra and timeseries for a quarter of all catalogue detections. The data release 5 (3XMM-DR5, April 2015) is derived from the first 13 years of observations with XMM-Newton. 3XMM-DR5 includes 565962 X-ray detections and 396910 unique sources, detected as many as 48 times. 3XMM-DR5 is therefore the largest X-ray source catalogue. 3XMM-DR6 will be made available during 2016 and will augment the catalogue with 70000 X-ray detections. Over the next decade the catalogue will reach 1 million X-ray detections, including galaxy clusters, galaxies, tidal disruption events, gamma-ray bursts, stars, stellar mass compact objects, supernovae, planets, comets and many other systems. Thanks to the wide range of data products for each catalogue detection, the catalogue is an excellent resource for finding populations of sources as well as new and extreme objects. Here we present results achieved from searching the catalogue and discuss improvements that will be provided in future versions.

  6. X-ray variability and period determinations in the eclipsing polar DP Leonis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Craig R.; Cordova, France A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of our ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations on the eclipsing magnetic cataclysmic variable DP Leo. The soft X-ray spectrum is modeled by a blackbody of kT = 24.8(sup +2.6 sub -8.1) eV. Severe limits are placed upon the flux from any hard bremsstrahlung component. A strong soft X-ray excess, with respect to hard X-ray emission, is found. The soft X-ray blackbody luminosity is larger than both the cyclotron and bremsstrahlung luminosities. An upper limit of 500 pc is obtained for the system's distance based upon the X-ray absorption (N(sub H) less than 5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm) and an estimate of 260(sup +150 sub -100) pc is determined from a published measurement of the secondary's flux. For the derived blackbody fit, the bolometric luminosity is found to be L(sub bb, bol) = 1.4(sup +7.1 sub -0.3) x 10(exp 31)(d/260 pc)(exp 2) ergs/s. Absorption by the accretion stream produces an intensity dip prior to each eclipse. Extreme variability in the shape of the light curve from eclipse to eclipse demonstrates that changes in the rate of accretion onto the white dwarf, the sizes of accretion filaments, or variations in the location or amount of absorbing matter in the system occur on timescales shorter than the orbital period (89.8 minutes). No evidence exists for accretion onto the stronger (59 MG) magnetic pole in the ROSAT data. A new ephemeris is presented for the eclipse of the white dwarf emission region by the secondary star and another is produced for the orbital conjunction of the two components. The rotation of the white dwarf is shown to be faster than the orbital period by (5.3 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) s. The origin of the asynchronous rotation may be activity cycle included orbital period variations or oscillations of the white dwarf's main pole about an equilibirium position. The accretion stream is modeled assuming that disruption of the stream along magnetic field lines occurs close to the white dwarf. The ROSAT

  7. X-ray today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, U. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The interest attracted by the new imaging modalities tends to overshadow the continuing importance of projection radiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless, projection techniques still represent by far the greatest proportion of diagnostic imaging examinations, and play an essential role in the growing number of advanced interventional procedures. This article describes some of the latest developments in X-ray imaging technology, using two products from the Philips range as examples: the Integris Allura cardiovascular system with 3D image reconstruction, and the BV Pulsera: a high-end, multi-functional mobile C-arm system with cardiac capabilities. (orig.)

  8. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  9. Characterization of a triboelectric x-ray spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya-Sanchez, E. Ulises; Romo-Espejel, J. A.; Aceves-Aldrete, F. J. [Departamento de Fisica, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Low-energy X-ray imaging system has been useful in medical diagnostic in order to obtain high contrast in soft tissue. Recently, Camara et al. and most recently Hird et al. have produced low-energy X-rays using a triboelectric effect. The main aim of this work is to characterize the penetration (beam quality) of a triboelectric X-ray source in terms of the computed Half Value Layer (HVL). Additionally, the computed HVL of the triboelectric X-ray source has been compared with the HVL of X-ray tube Mo-anode (Apogee 5000). According to our computations the triboelectric X-ray source has a similar penetration such as a X-ray tube source.

  10. Test facility for astronomical x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Lewis, Robert A.; Bordas, J.

    1990-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions; however, the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area while still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes, is described. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  11. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions, however the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area whilst still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes is described below. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  12. Demonstration of x-ray holography with an x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray holography offers the potential for obtaining high resolution three-dimensional images of in vitro biological microstructures. Significant progress toward this goal has been achieved with holography systems using synchrotron x-ray sources and recently spatial resolutions as small as 40 nm have been demonstrated. These experiments required x-ray exposures of an hour or longer, which makes high spatial resolution difficult to achieve in live biological specimens because of blurring of the image. This blurring is caused by specimen motion and prohibits the imaging of dynamical processes within the specimen. A possible solution to this problem is to exploit the extremely high brightness and long coherence lengths produced by x-ray lasers and create the hologram with exposure times of less than 1 nsec. This report presents the results from an experiment in which an x-ray laser was used to produce x-ray holograms. The holography geometry used was a Gabor in-line type modified by the inclusion of a high reflectivity multi-layer x-ray mirror used as a narrow bandpass filter

  13. Polarization Bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Korol, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces and reviews both theory and applications of polarizational bremsstrahlung, i.e. the electromagnetic radiation emitted during collisions of charged particles with structured, thus polarizable targets, such as atoms, molecules and clusters.   The subject, following the first experimental evidence a few decades ago, has gained importance through a number of modern applications.  Thus, the study of several radiative mechanisms is expected to lead to the design of novel light sources, operating in various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conversely, the analysis of the spectral and angular distribution of the photon emission constitutes a new tool for extracting information on the interaction of the colliding particles, and on their internal structure and dynamical properties.   Last but not least, accurate quantitative descriptions of the photon emission processes determine the radiative energy losses of particles in various media, thereby providing essential  information required f...

  14. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  15. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  16. Review of laser produced multi-keV X-ray sources from metallic foils, cylinders with liner, and low density aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Experimental results obtained within the last fifteen years on multi-keV X-ray sources irradiated with nanosecond scale pulse duration 3ω laser light at TW power levels by CEA and collaborators are discussed in this review paper. Experiments were carried out on OMEGA and GEKKO XII laser facilities where emitting materials in the 5-10 keV multi-keV energy range are intermediate Z value metals from titanium to germanium. Results focused on conversion efficiency improvement by a factor of 2 when an underdense plasma is created using a laser pre-pulse on a metallic foil, which is then heated by a second laser pulse delayed in time. Metal coated inner surface walls of plastic cylindrical tube ablated by laser beam impacts showed that plasma confinement doubles X-ray emission duration as it gives adequate plasma conditions (electron temperature and density) over a long period of time. Low-density aerogels (doped with metal atoms uniformly distributed throughout their volume or metal oxides) contained in a plastic cylinder have been developed and their results are comparable to gas targets. A hybrid target concept consisting of a thin metal foil placed at the end of a cylinder filled with low density aerogel has emerged as it could collect benefits from pre-exploded thin foils, efficient laser absorption in aerogel, and confinement by cylinder walls. All target geometry performances are relatively close together at a given photon energy and mainly depend on laser irradiation condition optimizations. Results are compared with gas target performances from recent NIF experiments allowing high electron temperatures over large dimension low density plasmas, which are the principal parameters for efficient multi-keV X-ray production.

  17. Charge exchange produced K-shell x-ray emission from Ar16+ in a tokamak plasma with neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; Marion, M; Olson, R E

    2004-12-27

    High-resolution spectroscopy of hot tokamak plasma seeded with argon ions and interacting with an energetic, short-pulse neutral hydrogen beam was used to obtain the first high-resolution K-shell x-ray spectrum formed solely by charge exchange. The observed K-shell emission of Ar{sup 16+} is dominated by the intercombination and forbidden lines, providing clear signatures of charge exchange. Results from an ab initio atomic cascade model provide excellent agreement, validating a semiclassical approach for calculating charge exchange cross sections.

  18. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  19. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  20. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  1. Comparative experimental study of PIXE and X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIXE and X RF techniques are powerful analysis instruments in the determination of traces of elements. Although the physical processes characteristic X-rays production (ionization-emission) are similar in both methods, the representative background of each technique, responsible of its sensitivity, are different. This is because the interaction between exciter agents and the matter produces different effects. In PIXE, the background is caused by the radiation produced by the braking of the secondary electrons: Bremsstrahlung. In X RF, the background is due to the elastic and inelastic scattering of photons: Rayleigh and Compton effects. In this work, we have compared the results of the analysis of environmental samples using both methods, in order to know the scope of each one and develop them as complementary techniques. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of bremsstrahlung contribution to photon transport in coupled photon-electron problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio; Salvat, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The most accurate description of the radiation field in x-ray spectrometry requires the modeling of coupled photon-electron transport. Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect actually produce electrons as secondary particles which contribute to the photon field through conversion mechanisms like bremsstrahlung (which produces a continuous photon energy spectrum) and inner-shell impact ionization (ISII) (which gives characteristic lines). The solution of the coupled problem is time consuming because the electrons interact continuously and therefore, the number of electron collisions to be considered is always very high. This complex problem is frequently simplified by neglecting the contributions of the secondary electrons. Recent works (Fernández et al., 2013; Fernández et al., 2014) have shown the possibility to include a separately computed coupled photon-electron contribution like ISII in a photon calculation for improving such a crude approximation while preserving the speed of the pure photon transport model. By means of a similar approach and the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE (coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo), the bremsstrahlung contribution is characterized in this work. The angular distribution of the photons due to bremsstrahlung can be safely considered as isotropic, with the point of emission located at the same place of the photon collision. A new photon kernel describing the bremsstrahlung contribution is introduced: it can be included in photon transport codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo) with a minimal effort. A data library to describe the energy dependence of the bremsstrahlung emission has been generated for all elements Z=1-92 in the energy range 1-150 keV. The bremsstrahlung energy distribution for an arbitrary energy is obtained by interpolating in the database. A comparison between a PENELOPE direct simulation and the interpolated distribution using the data base shows an almost perfect agreement. The use of the data base increases

  3. X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 126 X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest (Web, free access)   Tables and graphs of the photon mass attenuation coefficient and the mass energy-absorption coefficient are presented for all of the elements Z = 1 to 92, and for 48 compounds and mixtures of radiological interest. The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray, gamma ray, bremsstrahlung) from 1 keV to 20 MeV.

  4. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  5. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  6. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  7. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  8. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  9. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  10. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron — or X-ray beam sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboutet, H.; Aucouturier, J.

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons ( BX rays), based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γ n) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γ n) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. We conclude that for electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10-11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. There is only a small increase of induced activity as the energy changes from 5 to 10 MeV, for the same total applied dose.

  11. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  12. X-ray spectra for mamography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of Monte Carlo methods the X-ray spectra that produce Mammography equipment have been obtained. The mammographs are widely used with the purpose of diagnosing the cancer of the mammary glands. Different makers and mammographs models are distinguished by the voltage capacity and the current, exist as well as in the target type and filter. The targets that are used are Mo, Rh and W and the filters are Mo, Rh, Al and Be. In this work the results obtained by means of the MCNP code of the X-ray spectra take place when an electron beam of 28 keV is made impact on Mo, Rh and W targets, as well as the spectra that result of filtering these X rays using different types of filters. The resulting spectra contain the continuous spectrum of the stopping radiation, as well as the X rays characteristic of the used target. The utility of estimating the spectra of X rays by means of Monte Carlo is that it can use to estimate the absorbed dose by the gland, as well as the absorbed dose by other organs. It also allows to calculate the detector response. (Author)

  13. GENERATION OF SUBPICOSECOND X-RAY PULSES IN STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supicosecond x-ray pulses are routinely produced at ALS, BESSY and SLS with slicing technique and used in pump-probe experiments with controlled delay between laser pump pulses and x-ray probe pulses. New development aiming for a production of a subpicosecond x-ray pulses using rf orbit deflection technique is under way at APS. Both techniques will be reviewed here

  14. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  15. X-RAY SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS OF SILICON OXIDES ON SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, R; Lucas, C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the X-ray reflectivity and the X-ray scattering in the tails of the Bragg reflections from samples of silicon wafers with oxide layers produced by varying techniques and thicknesses. The measurements were performed by using a triple crystal spectrometer on a rotating anode X-ray source. The advantages of using a triple crystal spectrometer for these measurements are high resolution even when the surfaces are not macroscopically flat and a clear separation of the...

  16. Three dimensional digital X-ray microtomography with a microfocal X-ray generator and an MWPC area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray microscopy offers many potential applications in the life sciences and non-destructive testing for the study of small (micron-sized) structures. Digital capture of the X-ray images offers further possibilities for image processing and for tomography. We have combined a microfocal X-ray generator with a multi-step avalanche/multiwire proportional counter to produce a digital X-ray microscope. Spatial resolution down to around 10 microns has been observed. The digital data sets obtained from the system have been used to develop and explore 3-D tomographic images of an insect are presented, produced by a cone beam algorithm. (author)

  17. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  18. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Burghammer, Manfred [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Martínez-Criado, Gema [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.

  19. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  20. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  1. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g., conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is $\\sim 0.1 \\%$ at energies $\\gtrsim kT$. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scale...

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.P. [Department of Optometry and Radiography, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China). E-mail: benngkp at netvigator.com; Kwok, C.S.; Ng, K.P.; Tang, F.H. [Department of Optometry and Radiography, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2000-05-01

    A model for generating x-ray spectra in mammography is presented. This model used the ITS version 3 Monte Carlo code for simulating the radiation transport. Various target/filter combinations such as tungsten/aluminium, molybdenum/molybdenum, molybdenum/rhodium and rhodium/rhodium were used in the simulation. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were included in the model. The simulated x-ray emission spectra were compared with two sets of spectra, those of Boone et al (1997 Med. Phys. 24 1863-74) and IPEM report 78. The {chi}{sup 2} test was used for the overall goodness of fit of the spectral data. There is good agreement between the simulated x-ray spectra and the comparison spectra as the test yielded a probability value of nearly 1. When the transmitted x-ray spectra for specific target/filter combinations were generated and compared with a measured molybdenum/rhodium spectrum and spectra generated in IPEM report 78, close agreement is also observed. This was demonstrated by the probability value for the {chi}{sup 2} test being almost 1 for all the cases. However, minor differences between the simulated spectra and the 'standard' ones are observed. (author)

  3. X-ray emission from single Wolf-Rayet stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes our knowledge of the X-ray emission from single WN, WC, and WO stars. These stars have relatively modest X-ray luminosities, typically not exceeding L_sun. The analysis of X-ray spectra usually reveals thermal plasma with temperatures reaching a few 10 MK. X-ray variability is detected in some WN stars. At present we don't fully understand how X-ray radiation in produced in WR stars, albeit there are some promising research avenues, such as the presence of CIRs in the winds of some stars. To fully understand WR stars we need to unravel mechanisms of X-ray production in their winds.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  5. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray tube is connected to several different image processing devices in X-ray diagnostic equipment. Only a single organ selector is allocated to it, for which the picture parameters for each image processing device are selected. The choice of the correct combination of picture parameters is made by means of a selector switch. (DG)

  6. X-ray tube arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tube is described incorporating an elongated target/ anode over which the electron beam is deflected and from which x-rays are emitted. Improved methods of monitoring and controlling the amplitude of the beam deflection are presented. (U.K.)

  7. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  8. On the Use of Wide-Angle Energy-Sensitive Detectors in White-Beam X-Ray Single-Crystal Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Staun Olsen, J.; Gerward, Leif

    1980-01-01

    The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation.......The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation....

  9. Comparative X-ray diffraction study of the crystalline microstructure of tetragonal and monoclinic vanadium-zirconium dioxide solid solutions produced from gel precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojdecki, Marek Andrzej [Wojskowa Akademia Techniczna, Warszawa (Poland). Inst. Matematyki i Kryptologii; Ruiz de Sola, Esther; Alarcon, Javier [Valencia Univ., Burjasot (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Serrano, Francisco Javier; Amigo, Jose Maria [Valencia Univ., Burjasot (Spain). Dept. de Geologia

    2009-04-15

    The microstructural characteristics of solid solutions, prepared by heating dried gel precursors with nominal compositions V{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} (0{<=}x{<=}0.1) at 723 and 1573 K, were determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. The crystalline microstructure of the resulting specimens, characterized by a prevalent crystallite shape, a volume-weighted crystallite size distribution and a second-order lattice strain distribution, was found to depend on the vanadium content. A characteristic feature of all size distributions was their bimodality, explained as a result of transformations between tetragonal and monoclinic phases during thermal treatment. A comparative study of the microstructure of both zirconia phases has been carried out, enabling reconstruction of a probable course of crystallization of both pure and vanadium-doped zirconias: on heating a sample, nucleation and the early growth stages involve crystallites of both phases; then on annealing and cooling, the crystallites of one phase transform into the other, depending on the thermal treatment temperature. Each logarithmic normal component of the crystallite size distribution of the resulting phase can be attributed to one of these processes. The limit of solubility of vanadium in tetragonal and monoclinic zirconia is estimated from the microstructural characteristics. (orig.)

  10. An X-ray Temperature Map of Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1997-01-01

    We present an X-ray temperature map of the Coma cluster of galaxies obtained with the ROSAT PSPC. As expected from the X-ray surface brightness distribution the intracluster gas of Coma is not isothermal. The temperature structure resembles a bow shock of hot gas produced by the passage of the subcluster around NGC 4839 through the main cluster, confirming hydrodynamical simulations.

  11. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  12. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division I.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  13. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  14. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  15. L X-ray intensity ratios for high Z elements induced with X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Limin

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intensity ratios I(Lα1,2)/I(Lβ1,2), I(Lα1,2)/I(Lγ) and I(Lβ1,2)/I(Lγ) for elements Ta, W, Au and Pb by 13.1 keV bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, experimental values were compared with the theoretical results and other experimental results. Theoretical results of the intensity ratios were calculated with theoretical subshell photoionization cross sections, fractional X-ray emission rates, fluorescence yields, and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. Good agreement can be observed between experimental values and theoretical results. Comparing with L1 and L2 subshells, the ionization cross section of L3 subshell shows a large increase for Ta and W with the variation of excitation energy from 59.5 keV to 13.1 keV.

  16. Carbon nanotubes and fullerites in high-energy and X-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that the unique structures of carbon nanotubes and single-crystals of C60 fullerenes may have applications to X-ray, neutron and high-energy particle physics, based on channeling, Bragg diffraction and coherent radiation. These are reviewed, pointing out the peculiarities and advantages of nanocrystals compared to ordinary crystals. New applications are explored: X-rays and neutron channeling, undulator radiation in periodically bent nanotubes, 'channeled' transition radiation. Quantum and classical channeling, channeling in bent nanocrystals, Bragg scattering of X-rays and neutrons, channeling radiation, coherent bremsstrahlung, parametric X-ray and nanotube undulator radiation are particularly studied using both analytical and Monte-Carlo methods. Continuous potentials, electron densities, transverse energy levels, and spectra of various types of coherent radiation are calculated. Large dechanneling lengths of positive particles, bending efficiencies, reflecting coefficients of soft X-rays and PXR yields are predicted. Principles of particle detectors using photo- and secondary electron emissions are discussed

  17. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Tenhunen, Mikko (Dept. of Physics, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: jani.keyrilainen@hus.fi; Bravin, Alberto (Bio-medical Beamline ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Fernandez, Manuel (High Brilliance Beamline ID2, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Virkkunen, Pekka (Dept. of Radiology, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Suortti, Pekka (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2010-10-15

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  18. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  19. X-ray diffraction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides an x-ray diffraction apparatus permitting the rotation of the divergence sit in conjunction with the rotation of the x-ray irradiated specimen, whereby the dimensions of the x-ray irradiated portion of the specimen remain substantially constant during the rotation of the specimen. In a preferred embodiment, the divergence slit is connected to a structural element linked with a second structural element connected to the specimen such that the divergence slit rotates at a lower angular speed than the specimen

  20. X-ray shout echoing through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 3991 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in hours. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 2153 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays (Please choose "hi-res" version for animation) XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in seconds. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. This echo forms when the powerful radiation of a gamma-ray burst, coming from far away, crosses a slab of dust in our Galaxy and is scattered by it, like the beam of a lighthouse in clouds. Using the expanding rings to precisely pin-point the location of this dust, astronomers can identify places where new stars and planets are likely to form. On 3 December 2003 ESA's observatory, Integral, detected a burst of gamma rays, lasting about 30 seconds, from the direction of a distant galaxy. Within minutes of the detection, thanks to a sophisticated alert network, many

  1. Angular resolution measurements at SPring-8 of a hard X-ray optic for the New Hard X-ray Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Spiga, D.; Raimondi, L.; Furuzawa, A.; Basso, S; Binda, R.; Borghi, G.; Cotroneo, V.; Grisoni, G.; Kunieda, H.; Marioni, F.; Matsumoto, H; Mori, H.; Miyazawa, T.; B. Negri; Orlandi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with on- ground X-ray facilities...

  2. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source

  3. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  4. X-Ray Morphology,Kinematics and Geometry of the Eridanus Soft X-Ray Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyu; Burrows, David N.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Snowden, Steve L.; Penprase, Bryan E.

    1994-12-01

    We present mosaics of X-ray intensity maps and spectral fit results for selected regions of the Eridanus soft X-ray Enhancement (EXE), as well as kinematics of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region and geometrical properties of this X-ray emitting bubble. The work is based on pointed observations with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, 21 cm observations with the NRAO 140 foot telescope at Green Bank and interstellar Na D line observations with the NOAO Coude Feed telescope at Kitt Peak. The ROSAT pointed observations examine two regions of the EXE. The first is an X-ray absorption lane produced by an IR filament which is located at galactic coordinates of about (199(deg) , -45(deg) ). The second is in the vicinity of the northern (galactic) boundary of the 1/4 keV EXE, at galactic coordinates of about (200(deg) , -25(deg) ). Both our spatial and spectral analysis suggest that variations in emission measure and NH are primarily reponsible for the observed variations of the X-ray intensity. Using 100mu intensities obtained from IRAS maps and NH column densities obtained from our X-ray spectral fits, we find 100 microns/NH ratios across the IR filament that are compatible with typical high latitude values. Maps of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region at 21 cm reveal that these clouds may belong to two different expanding systems, with one possibly associated with our Local Bubble and the other with the boundary of the EXE. Combination of 21 cm data with interstellar Na D line observations toward stars in the directions of some of the X-ray absorbing clouds along (l,b) ~ (200(deg) ,-40(deg) ) indicate that the near side of the EXE is farther than 151 pc and the distance to the center of the EXE at this latitude is about 226 pc. The density and the thermal pressure found for this X-ray emitting superbubble are 0.015 cm(-3) and 4.9 times 10(4) cm(-3) K.

  5. K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl and Lα, Lβ X-ray production cross sections of Ba by 6-30 keV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl and Lα, Lβ X-ray production cross sections of Ba by 6-30 keV electron impact have been measured. The target was prepared by evaporating the thin film of compound BaCl2 to the thick pure carbon substrate. The effects of multiple scattering of electrons penetrating the target films, electrons reflected from the thick pure carbon substrates and Bremsstrahlung photons produced when incident electrons impacted on the targets are corrected by using Monte Carlo method. For Ba L-shell X-ray characteristic peaks, the spectra were fitted by using spectrum-fitting program ALLFIT to extract more accurately the Lα and Lβ peak counts. The experimental results, reported here for the first time in the energy region of 6-30 keV, were compared with some theoretical results developed recently.

  6. Massively parallel X-ray holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, John C.H [Arizona State University; Marchesini, Stefano [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley; Boutet, Sebastien [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; Sakdinawat, Anne E. [, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Bogan, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Bajt, Sasa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Barty, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Chapman, Henry N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Frank, Matthias [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Hau-Riege, Stefan P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Szöke, Abraham [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Cui, Congwu [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Shapiro, David A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Howells, MAlcolm R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Shaevitz, Joshua W [Lewis-Sigler Institute; Lee, Joanna Y. [University of California, Berkeley; Hajdu, Janos [3Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; Seibert, Marvin M. [Uppsala University

    2008-08-01

    Advances in the development of free-electron lasers offer the realistic prospect of nanoscale imaging on the timescale of atomic motions. We identify X-ray Fourier-transform holography1,2,3 as a promising but, so far, inefficient scheme to do this. We show that a uniformly redundant array4 placed next to the sample, multiplies the efficiency of X-ray Fourier transform holography by more than three orders of magnitude, approaching that of a perfect lens, and provides holographic images with both amplitude- and phase-contrast information. The experiments reported here demonstrate this concept by imaging a nano-fabricated object at a synchrotron source, and a bacterial cell with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser, where illumination by a single 15-fs pulse was successfully used in producing the holographic image. As X-ray lasers move to shorter wavelengths we expect to obtain higher spatial resolution ultrafast movies of transient states of matter

  7. Duodenal X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication provides an overview of duodenal X-ray diagnostics with the aid of barium meals in 1362 patients. The introducing paragraphs deal with the topographic anatomy of the region and the methodics of X-ray investigation. The chapter entitled ''processes at the duodenum itself'' describes mainly ulcers, diverticula, congenital anomalies, tumors and inflammations. The neighbourhood processes comprise in the first place diseases having their origin at the pancreas and bile ducts. As a conclusion, endoscopic rectograde cholangio-pancreaticography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are pointed out as advanced X-ray investigation methods. In the annex of X-ray images some of the described phenomena are shown in exemplary manner. (orig./MG)

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like a photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  11. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru; Klestov, S. A., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray tube is connected to ... equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  17. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  20. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  2. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  3. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  4. X-ray diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A falling load type X-ray diagnostic apparatus comprises a low voltage power source, AC-DC converting means connected to the low voltage power source so as to apply a rectified low DC voltage, chopping means connected to the AC-DC converting means and chopping said DC voltage into a low AC voltage, high voltage applying means for transforming said low AC voltage into a high AC voltage, said high AC voltage being applied as a tube voltage to an X-ray tube from which X-rays are irradiated toward an object to be examined, means for controlling a filament heating power of the X-ray tube, programming means for supplying a control signal to said filament heating control means so as to reduce the emission current of said X-ray tube during the irradiation, and chopper control means for controlling the chopping ratio of said chopping means by evaluating said rectified DC voltage with a preset tube voltage generated in said programming means, said programming means compensating said tube voltage by receiving said control signal in such a manner that said tube voltage is maintained substantially constant during the irradiation by varying said preset tube voltage so as to control the chopping ratio based upon the reduction of the filament heating power for the X-ray tube

  5. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  6. Coherence effects in nuclear bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, H

    2002-01-01

    The production of nuclear bremsstrahlung (Egamma > 30 MeV) has been studied in heavy-ion collisions, as well as proton and alpha-particle collisions with nuclei. In heavy-ion reactions the measured photon spectra show an exponential shape dominated by the incoherent sum of photons produced in first-

  7. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  8. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  9. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, S. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.; Churazov, E. M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g. conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is ˜0.1 per cent at energies ≳kT. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scales, which are impossible to resolve spatially. The absence of the effect at the predicted level may set a lower limit on the electron collisionality in the ICM. At the same time, the small value of the effect implies that it does not preclude the use of clusters as (unpolarized) calibration sources for X-ray polarimeters at this level of accuracy.

  10. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  11. Bremsstrahlung-induced highly penetrating probes for nondestructive assay and defect analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, F. A.; Wells, D. P.; Harmon, J. F.; Kwofie, J.; Spaulding, R.; Erickson, G.; Roney, T.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive assay and defect analysis probes based on bremsstrahlung-induced processes have been developed to identify elements and probe defects in large volume samples. Bremsstrahlung beams from (electron accelerators) with end-point energies both above and below neutron emission threshold have been used. Below neutron emission threshold these beams (from 6 MeV small pulsed linacs), which exhibit high penetration, create positrons via pair production inside the material and produce X-ray fluorescence (XRF) radiation. Chemical assays of heavy elements in thick samples up to 10 g/cm 2 thick are provided by energy dispersive XRF measurements. The pair-produced positrons annihilate within the material, thereby emitting 511 keV gamma radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511 keV radiation can be performed to characterize the material and measure defects in samples of any desired thickness. This technique has successfully measured induced strain due to tensile stress in steel samples of 0.64 cm thick. Bremsstrahlung beams above neutron emission threshold, from a 20 MeV pulsed electron linac, have also been used to produce residual nuclei in excited states via photonuclear reactions allowing the detection of heavy elements via their characteristic γ-rays. This can be developed into a technique to trace some heavy metals in large rocks and soils for environmental applications.

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video ... Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: About Us | ...

  13. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  14. Exploring coherent phenomena and energy discrimination in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Thomas

    2011-05-04

    Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the generation of photons in materials that are selected for different applications according to their densities, dimensions, and atomic numbers. The photons produced in these targets are commonly detected by measuring the integrated amount of energy released in films or digital imaging systems. This thesis aims at extending these two paradigms. First, it is shown that the use of single-crystalline, i.e. well-ordered targets, can significantly soften photon spectra created by megavoltage electrons when compared to usual targets. The reason for this is an effect called ''coherent bremsstrahlung''. It is shown that this type of radiation bears the potential of increasing the quality of megavoltage images and reducing radiation dose for image guided radiotherapy. Second, new spectroscopic pixel detectors of the Medipix2 family operated with cadmium telluride sensors are characterised and thus potential benefits and difficulties for X-ray imaging are investigated. Besides describing in detail how to calibrate these detectors, emphasis is placed on determining their energy responses, modulation transfer functions, and detective quantum efficiencies. Requirements for photon counting megavoltage imaging are discussed. The detector systems studied are finally used to perform spectral computed tomography and to illustrate the benefits of energy discrimination for coherent scatter imaging. (orig.)

  15. Exploring coherent phenomena and energy discrimination in X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the generation of photons in materials that are selected for different applications according to their densities, dimensions, and atomic numbers. The photons produced in these targets are commonly detected by measuring the integrated amount of energy released in films or digital imaging systems. This thesis aims at extending these two paradigms. First, it is shown that the use of single-crystalline, i.e. well-ordered targets, can significantly soften photon spectra created by megavoltage electrons when compared to usual targets. The reason for this is an effect called ''coherent bremsstrahlung''. It is shown that this type of radiation bears the potential of increasing the quality of megavoltage images and reducing radiation dose for image guided radiotherapy. Second, new spectroscopic pixel detectors of the Medipix2 family operated with cadmium telluride sensors are characterised and thus potential benefits and difficulties for X-ray imaging are investigated. Besides describing in detail how to calibrate these detectors, emphasis is placed on determining their energy responses, modulation transfer functions, and detective quantum efficiencies. Requirements for photon counting megavoltage imaging are discussed. The detector systems studied are finally used to perform spectral computed tomography and to illustrate the benefits of energy discrimination for coherent scatter imaging. (orig.)

  16. SN X-ray Progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Identifying stars that explode, right before they explode, is a tricky proposition since the end of starlife comes swiftly: in thermonuclear deflagrations, in nuclear exhaustion, or maybe in a rapid swirling merger of two dead stellar cores. On the right in the image above is an image of the galaxy NGC 1404 taken by the UV/optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift observatory. The circle surrounds SN 2007on, a supernova of Type Ia produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary system. These types of supernovae are important since they are believed to be 'standard candles', events which have the same intrinsic brightness which can serve as an important yardstick to measure cosmic distances. On the left is an image of the same galaxy taken by the Chandra X-ray observatory four years before the supernova. Conspicuous in the SN source circle is a bright source in the Chandra image, believed to be emission from a compact object+normal star companion: a similar system to the supposed precursor of SN 2007on. If true this would be the first time a Type Ia supernova precursor has ever been seen. But astronomers are still debating whether the Chandra source really is the precursor or not; it seems there's a slight but significant difference in the location of the Chandra source and the supernova. Stay tuned for more developments.

  17. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission Around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Miyoshi, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to 6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of 3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts and the bright spot seemed to move according to the Io's motion. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. We hence examined three mechanisms: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon related to Io.

  18. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  19. Multi-Kilovolt X-Ray Conversion Efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Davis, J L; Grun, J; Landen, O L; Miller, M C; Suter, L J

    2001-08-23

    X-ray sources in the 3-7 keV energy regime can be produced by laser-irradiating mid- and high-Z gas-filled targets with high-powered lasers. A series of experiments have been performed using underdense targets that are supersonically heated with {approx} 35 kJ of 0.35 {micro}m laser light. These targets were cylindrical Be enclosures that were filled with 1-2 atms of Xe or Ar gas. L-shell x-ray emission is emitted from the plasma and detected by Bragg crystal spectrometers and x-ray diodes. Absolute flux measurements show conversion efficiencies of {approx} 10% in the multi-kilovolt x-ray emission. These sources can be used as bright x-ray backlighters or for material testing.

  20. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, G.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  1. Models for x-ray emission from Tycho's remnant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors reexamine the x-ray emission from Tycho's remnant using results from hydrodynamic models computed with a detailed spherically symmetric code. The observed synchrotron radio contours appear to require a cloudy circumstellar medium. The authors explore the x-ray emission properties of similar models. They find that they tend to produce broad shells of x-ray emission that resemble the observed x-ray observations, but it has little similarity to the evolution of remnants in cloudy media dominated by thermal conduction. More work needs to be done to ensure that the spectrum as well as the x-ray map can be modeled with the same cloudy circumstellar medium, although we believe it will not be difficult to obtain as good as statistical agreement with the spectral data as other models have achieved

  2. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  3. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  4. Experimental studies of high-energy X-ray emission and bootstrap current generation in high [epsilon][beta][sub p] lower-hybrid driven plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.P.; Porkolab, M.; Colborn, J.A.; Villasenor, J. (Plasma Fusion Center and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States))

    1994-10-15

    High poloidal beta ([epsilon][beta][sub p]-1) plasma equilibria have been produced by injection of lower-hybrid waves with both asymmetric (current-drive) and symmetric (heating) spectra in the Versator II tokamak. Asymmetric and symmetric injection both generate nearly the same plasma current (5kA), with the loop voltage measured as zero. We studied the rf-created high energy electron distribution with a radial and tangential array of X-ray spectrometers (1[double prime][times]3[double prime] NaI), along with a single soft X-ray spectrometer (SiLi). Analysis of the X-ray data is carried out using a bremsstrahlung emission code. We find that nearly all of the plasma current in the current-drive case can be accounted for by the asymmetric electron tail. In the heating case, the soft X-ray data indicates the presence of an enhanced population of intermediate energy electrons ([similar to]10 keV) consistent with that of the launched LH wave spectrum. Our estimates show that bootstrap current generated by these electrons can account for a majority of the plasma current.

  5. Real-time digital x-ray subtraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing visible difference images derived from an x-ray image of an anatomical subject is described. X-rays are directed through the subject, and the image is converted into television fields comprising trains of analog video signals. The analog signals are converted into digital signals, which are then integrated over a predetermined time corresponding to several television fields. Difference video signals are produced by performing a subtraction between the ongoing video signals and the corresponding integrated signals, and are converted into visible television difference images representing changes in the x-ray image

  6. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  7. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  8. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  9. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  10. Pioneering New Filters for X-ray Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to produce filters with holes so small that longer wavelength photons are unable to propagate through, whereas the shorter wavelength x-ray photons simply...

  11. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory; Miller, Cameron; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 107 photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam's inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  12. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral X-ray apparatus which reduces the number of exposures necessary to obtain panoramic dental radiographs is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun, a tubular target carrier projecting from the gun along the beam axis and carrying at its distal end a target surrounded by a shield of X-ray opaque material. This shield extends forward and laterally of the target and has surfaces which define a wedge or cone-shaped radiation pattern delimited vertically by the root tips of the patient's teeth. A film holder is located externally of the patient's mouth. A disposable member can fit on the target carrier to depress the patient's tongue out of the radiation pattern and to further shield the roof of the mouth. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  13. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  14. THE SOFT X-RAY LASER PROGRAM AT LI VERMORE

    OpenAIRE

    London, R.; Ceglio, N.; Eder, D.; Hazi, A.; Keane, C.; Macgowan, B.; Matthews, D; Maxon, M.; Phillips, T.; Rosen, M; Scofield, J.; Stearns, D.; Trebes, J.; Whelan, D.; Whitten, B.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the experiments and supporting theoretical modelling to develop and characterize soft x-ray lasers. The x-ray lasers are created in dense plasmas produced by optical laser irradiation of solid targets with line focussed beams. We use mainly thin foil targets, which upon appropriate illumination, produce rather uniform plasmas. We consider laser schemes pumped by electron collisional excitation and dielectronic recombination in Ne-like and Ni-like ions, and schemes pumped by collis...

  15. Saturated output tabletop X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.; Osterheld, A.L.; Nilsen, J.; Hunter, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Yuelin Li [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); ILSA, Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Shlyaptsev, V.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); DAS, Univ. of California Davis-Livermore, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The high efficiency method of transient collisional excitation has been successfully demonstrated for Ne-like and Ni-like ion X-ray laser schemes with small 5-10 J laser facilities. Our recent studies using the tabletop COMET (compact multipulse terawatt) laser system at the Lawrence livermore national laboratory (LLNL) have produced several X-ray lasers operating in the saturation regime. Output energy of 10-15 {mu}J corresponding to a gL product of 18 has been achieved on the Ni-like Pd 4d{yields}4p transition at 147 A with a total energy of 5-7 J in a 600 ps pulse followed by a 1.2 ps pulse. Analysis of the laser beam angular profile indicates that refraction plays an important role in the amplification and propagation process in the plasma column. We report further improvement in the extraction efficiency by varying a number of laser driver parameters. In particular, the duration of the second short pulse producing the inversion has an observed effect on the X-ray laser output. (orig.)

  16. Saturated output tabletop x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Osterheld, A L; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Li, Y; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Shlyaptsev, N

    2000-12-01

    The high efficiency method of transient collisional excitation has been successfully demonstrated for Ne-like and Ni-like ion x-ray laser schemes with small 5-10 J laser facilities. Our recent studies using the tabletop COMET (Compact Multipulse Terawatt) laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have produced several x-ray lasers operating in the saturation regime. Output energy of 10-15 {micro}J corresponding to a gL product of 18 has been achieved on the Ni-like Pd 4d {yields} 4p transition at 147 {angstrom} with a total energy of 5-7 J in a 600 ps pulse followed by a 1.2 ps pulse. Analysis of the laser beam angular profile indicates that refraction plays an important role in the amplification and propagation process in the plasma column. We report further improvement in the extraction efficiency by varying a number of laser driver parameters. In particular, the duration of the second short pulse producing the inversion has an observed effect on the x-ray laser output.

  17. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  18. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  19. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  20. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  1. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  2. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  3. Observation of X-rays generated by relativistic electrons in waveguide target mounted inside a betatron

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplin, V V; Uglov, S R; Bulaev, O F; Voronin, A A; Piestrup, M; Gary, C

    2006-01-01

    In this work we have observed x-ray emission from x-ray waveguide radiator excited by relativistic electrons. The experiment carried out at Tomsk betatron B-35. Such new type stratified target was mounted on goniometer head inside the betatron toroid. The target is consisted of the W-C-W layers placed on Si substrate. The photographs of the angular distributions of the radiation generated in the target by 20-33 MeV electrons have shown the waveguide effect of the three-layer structure on x-rays generated in the target. The effect proved in an angular distribution of radiation as an additional narrow peak of guided x-rays intensity inside a wide cone of usual Bremsstrahlung.

  4. Characterization of a radiographic system with broad energy band X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy X-ray beams with broad band energy spectra allow performing radiographic analysis on different materials and objects of relevant interest that cannot be investigated with conventional X-ray sources. The quality of a radiographic image strongly depends on the characteristics of radiation source as the size of the X-ray emitting area, or focal spot, and the energy spectrum of the radiation. In this work the characterization of a broad-band energy Bremsstrahlung source obtained from a linac providing a 5.5 MeV electron beam colliding with a tungsten target is presented. In order to measure the focal-spot size an ad hoc slit camera has been designed and built and a specific technique was used. Furthermore an analysis of the energy spectrum of the beam was performed using a method based on X-ray diffraction by a mosaic crystal.

  5. An arrangement for irradiating cultured mammalian cells with aluminium characteristic ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasoft X-rays are useful for testing the validity of mechanistic models of biological damage caused by radiation. Described here is the construction and operation of a cold-cathode transmission-target discharge tube for irradiating mammalian cells in vitro with aluminium characteristic X-rays (1.487 keV). Particular attention is given to the problems of sample preparation and dosimetry for this shallowly penetrating radiation. The proportion of contaminating bremsstrahlung radiation is measured to establish the optimum operating conditions. Preliminary data from experiments using V79 Chinese hamster cells show that aluminium characteristic X-rays are about twice as effective at inactivating the cells as 250 kVsub(P) X-rays. (author)

  6. X-ray hot plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray plasma emission study is powerful diagnostic tool of hot plasmas. In this review article the main techniques of X-ray plasma emission measurement are shortly presented: X-ray spectrometry using absorbent filters, crystal and grating spectrometers, imaging techniques using pinhole cameras, X-ray microscopes and Fresnel zone plate cameras, X-ray plasma emission calorimetry. Advances in these techniques with examples for different hot plasma devices are also presentes. (author)

  7. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  8. Ten years of Vela x-ray observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela spacecraft, particularly Vela 5B, produced all-sky X-ray data of unprecedented length and completeness. The data led to the discovery of X-ray bursts and numerous transient outbursts. Recent re-analysis has put the data in the form of 10-day skymaps covering a 7-year period, which have led to the discovery or confirmation of a number of long-term periodicities, and have made possible a time-lapse movie of the X-ray sky

  9. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ...

  11. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  12. X-ray film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray films have to be highly sensitive, for radiation protection reasons. The films used in radiology are coated on both sides with a photosensitive emulsion. This applies to all dental films. Their properties and the development of the different exposed films are explained. (DG)

  13. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  17. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  18. A whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in cargo inspection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Ryge, Peter; Sinha, Shrabani; Shaw, Tim; Strellis, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum used in high-energy, high-intensity x-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by the materials in the cargo in a Z-dependent way. Therefore, spectroscopy of the detected x rays yields information about the Z of the x-rayed cargo material. It has previously been shown that such ZSpectroscopy (Z-SPEC) is possible under certain circumstances. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), has also been shown to be effective, and it can be used either by itself or in conjunction with Z-SPEC when the x-ray count rate is too high for individual x-ray spectroscopy. Both techniques require fast x-ray detectors and fast digitization electronics. It is desirable (and possible) to combine all techniques, including x-ray imaging of the cargo, in a single detector array, to reduce costs, weight, and overall complexity. In this paper, we take a whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in x-ray cargo inspection systems, and show how the various parts interact with one another. Faster detectors and read-out electronics are beneficial for both techniques. A higher duty-factor x-ray source allows lower instantaneous count rates at the same overall x-ray intensity, improving the range of applicability of Z-SPEC in particular. Using an intensity-modulated advanced x-ray source (IMAXS) allows reducing the x-ray count rate for cargoes with higher transmission, and a stacked-detector approach may help material discrimination for the lowest attenuations. Image processing and segmentation allow derivation of results for entire objects, and subtraction of backgrounds. We discuss R&D performed under a number of different programs, showing progress made in each of the interacting subsystems. We discuss results of studies into faster scintillation detectors, including ZnO, BaF2 and PbWO4, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out and digitization electronics. We discuss high-duty-factor linear

  19. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M; Cebrián, S; Davenport, M; Elefteriadis, C; Englhauser, J; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Hartmann, R; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Hoffmeister, G; Joux, J N; Königsmann, K C; Kang, D; Kotthaus, R; Lasseur, C; Lippitsch, A; Lutz, G; Morales, J; Papaevangelou, T; Rodríguez, A; Strüder, L; Vogel, J; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  20. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption pro

  1. Modificação da virulência do virus do mixoma provocada pelos raios X Changes in virulence of the mixoma virus produced by X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rocha Lagôa

    1952-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a ação dos raios X sôbre a vírus sêco do mixoma dos coelhos. Ao atingir a incidência dos raios X a concentração de 294.000 r até 378.000, quando desapareceu tôda a atividade patogênica do vírus, nem todos os animais inoculados adquiriam a moléstia, passando a evoluir a mesma em alguns dêsses animais de forma muito mais lenta que a presente nas testemunhas. concordando com esta sintomatologia, o exame histopatológico do material colhido no ponto de lesão mais intensa de animais atacados com mixoma de evolução lenta, revelou a existência de lesões menos extensas e intesas que aquelas presentes nos animais inoculados com o vírus normal, o que mostra terem os raios X determinado uma diminuição da virulência do vírus do mixoma, mas não uma mutação. Os animais inoculados sucessivamente com vírus irradiado acima de 378.000 r, portanto inativados, foram, após 30 dias, inoculados com vírus de virulência íntegra, adquirindo, no entanto, a infecção mixomatosa com todos os caracteres típicos, o que revelou não conservar o vírus do mixoma inativado pelos raios X as suas propriedades antigênicas, não conferindo, portanto, proteção contra inoculações ulteriores de vírus mixomatoso virulento.The action of X Rays on the dried virus of myxoma of the rabbits has been studied. When the incidence of X-Rays reaches the concentration of 294.000 r to 378.000, a dosage which results in the destruction of all the pathogenic activity of the virus, not all the inoculated animals acquired the disease, which, when developing; has in several of these animals, a much slower than in the control animals. In accordance, with this symptomatology, the histopathological study of the material collected on the point of where the lesions are more marked in the animals suffering from a myxomatous infection of slow evolution, shows that the lesions are less extensive and less severe that the ones produced in the animals inoculated

  2. The Classification of Extragalactic X-ray Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. E.; Massaro, F.; Cheung, C. C.

    2010-07-01

    The overall classification of X-ray jets has clung to that prevalent in the radio: FRI vs. FRO (including quasars). Indeed, the common perception is that X-ray emission from FRI's is synchrotron emission whereas that from FRII's may be IC/CMB and/or synchrotron. Now that we have a sizable collection of sources with detected X-ray emission from jets and hotspots, it seems that a more unbiased study of these objects could yield additional insights on jets and their X-ray emission. The current contribution is a first step in the process of analyzing all of the relevant parameters for each detected component for the sources collected in the XJET website. This initial effort involves measuring the ratio of X-ray to radio fluxes and evaluating correlations with other jet parameters. For single zone synchrotron X-ray emission, we anticipate that larger values of fx/fr should correlate inversely with the average magnetic field strength (if the acceleration process is limited by loss time equals acceleration time). Beamed IC/CMB X-rays should produce larger values of fx/fr for smaller values of the angle between the jet direction and the line of sight but will also be affected by the low frequency radio spectral index.

  3. X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce high-strength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications-namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  4. Recent X-Ray Laser Experiments on the COMET Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Barbee, T W; Shlyaptsev, V N; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A

    2001-09-22

    The development of the transient collisional excitation x-ray laser scheme using tabletop laser systems with multiple pulse capability has progressed rapidly in the last three years. The high small-signal gain and strong x-ray output have been demonstrated for laser drive energies of typically less than 10 J. We report recent x-ray laser experiments on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) tabletop facility using this technique. In particular, the saturated output from the Ni-like Pd ion 4d - 4p x-ray laser at 146.8 {angstrom} has been well characterized and has potential towards a useable x-ray source in a number of applications. One important application of a short wavelength x-ray laser beam with picosecond pulse duration is the study of a high density laser-produced plasma. We report the implementation of a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer using diffraction grating optics as beam splitters designed for the Ni-like Pd laser and show results from probing a 600 ps heated plasma. In addition, gas puff targets are investigated as an x-ray laser gain medium and we report results of strong lasing on the n = 3 - 3 transitions of Ne-like Ar.

  5. Charge exchange X-rays from the heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, M. V.; Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Zank, G. P.; Florinski, V.

    2006-09-01

    X-rays are produced throughout the heliosphere as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and neutral atoms. After such a collision the solar wind ion is left in a highly excited state and emits extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray photons. In the outer heliosphere, solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission is mainly due to charge exchange with neutral interstellar hydrogen. We have combined MHD simulations with a comprehensive charge exchange computation code. We trace the full evolution of solar wind ions along stream line in order to produce three-dimensional emissivities and, subsequently, two-dimensional X-ray brightness and spectral maps of the heliosphere as would be observed from the outside. The model treats both the collisionally thin and the collisionally thick regimes. This model can be a diagnostic tool for studying stellar wind properties of nearby Sun-like stars.

  6. X-ray spectroscopic characterization of laser produced hot dense plasmas; Caracterisation par spectroscopie X de plasmas chauds et denses crees par lasers de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontogiannopoulos, N

    2007-12-15

    In this work we performed experiments of emission and absorption spectroscopy of laser produced plasmas, to provide well characterized spectral data which permit to benchmark atomic physics codes. More precisely, we produced xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions and studied their emission spectra. In a second experiment, we characterized the absorption spectra of zinc sulfide and aluminium plasmas in LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions.The first two chapters give an outline of the theory involved in the study of the emission and absorption plasma spectroscopy. Chapter 1 describes the different atomic processes occurring in a plasma. The LTE and the NLTE statistics ruling the equilibrium of the atomic processes are presented. Then, we give a brief description of the different codes of plasma atomic physics used in the analysis of our experimental data, namely HULLAC, SCO and TRANSPEC/AVERROES. In Chapter 2 the macroscopic theory of the radiation transport through a plasma is given. We describe also the self-similar model of Basko and the view factor approach, which permits us to calculate the heating conditions of the absorption foils achieved in the interior of the spherical gold cavity. Chapter 3 gives a description of the instruments used for realizing the two experiments, as well as the technical characteristics of the LULI2000 laser facility used to perform the experiments. Chapter 4 presents the experiment realized to characterize the emission spectra of the xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE, as well the analysis of the experimental data with TRANSPEC/AVERROES. Finally, the experiment for measuring the absorption spectrum of the ZnS plasma mixture and the analysis of the experimental data with the code SCO are given in Chapter 5.

  7. Electron Storage Ring For The Compact X-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Poseryaev, A V; Shvedunov, V I

    2004-01-01

    Lattice design of a compact storage ring for laser-electron X-ray generator at the energy 45 Mev is discussed. A quasi-monochromatic X-ray radiation is produced in the process of Compton backscattering of laser photons by counter propagating relativistic electrons. Requirements to characteristics of the electron beam and lattice structure are formulated. The basic parameters of the storage ring are listed.

  8. Power distribution from insertion device x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insertion device (ID) synchrotron x-ray sources on present day and next-generation synchrotron facilities have very attractive spectral properties. In addition however, they are capable of producing x-ray beams with large powers and in some cases, unprecedented power densities. An overview of the spatial and frequency distributions of these sources including the effects of synchrotron particle beam emittance is presented

  9. Quantifying mesoscale neuroanatomy using X-ray microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Eva L.; Roncal, William Gray; Fernandes, Hugo L.; Gürsoy, Doga; Xiao, Xianghui; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Jacobsen, Chris; Körding, Konrad P.; Kasthuri, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Common methods for imaging the 3D microstructure of the brain often require slicing the brain, imaging these slices, and stitching the images back together. In contrast, X-rays allow access into centimeter-thick samples without sectioning, providing an unique and largely untapped approach for producing large 3D mesoscale brain maps. Here we demonstrate the use of synchrotron X-ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) for brain science and provide a much needed toolkit for analyzing the large datasets af...

  10. Hard x-ray spectrometers for NIF (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, John; Holland, Glenn; Brown, Charles; Deslattes, Richard; Hudson, Lawrence; Bell, Perry; Miller, Michael; Back, Christina

    2001-01-01

    A National Ignition Facility (NIF) core diagnostic instrument has been designed and will be fabricated to record x-ray spectra in the 1.2-20 keV energy range. The high-energy electronic x-ray instrument has four reflection crystals with overlapping coverage of 1.2-10.9 keV and one transmission crystal covering 8.6-20 keV. The spectral resolving power varies from approximately 1000 at low energies to 315 at 20 keV. The spectrum produced by each crystal is recorded by a modified commercial dental x-ray charge coupled device (CCD) detector. The scintillators on the CCD detectors are optimized for the energy ranges. A one-channel x-ray spectrometer, using one transmission crystal covering 12-60 keV, will be fabricated for the OMEGA laser facility. The transmission crystal spectrometers are based on instruments originally designed at National Institute for Standards and Technology for the purpose of characterizing the x-ray flux from medical radiography sources. Utilizing one of those instruments and a commercial dental x-ray CCD detector, x-ray images were recorded using a single pulse from a laboratory x-ray source with a peak charging voltage of 200 kV. A resolving power of 300 was demonstrated by recording on film the Kα1 and Kα2 characteristic x-ray lines near 17 keV from a molybdenum anode. The continuum radiation from a tungsten anode was recorded in the 20-50 keV energy range. The transmission crystal spectrometer has sufficient spectral resolution and sensitivity to record the line and continuum radiation from high-Z targets irradiated by the NIF laser and the OMEGA laser.

  11. Theoretical analysis of hard x-ray generation by nonperturbative interaction of ultrashort light pulses with a metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannick Weisshaupt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of intense femtosecond pulses with metals allows for generating ultrashort hard x-rays. In contrast to plasma theories, tunneling from the target into vacuum is introduced as electron generation step, followed by vacuum acceleration in the laser field and re-entrance into the target to generate characteristic x-rays and Bremsstrahlung. For negligible space charge in vacuum, the Kα flux is proportional to the incident intensity and the wavelength squared, suggesting a strong enhancement of the x-ray flux by mid-infrared driving pulses. This prediction is in quantitative agreement with experiments on femtosecond Cu Kα generation.

  12. 极化X光谱诊断铝激光等离子体的电子密度%Diagnosis of Electron Density by Polarized X-ray Lines for Al Laser-produced Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪建; 肖沙里; 施军

    2011-01-01

    为了准确诊断激光等离子体的电子密度,提出了一种基于极化光谱的类氦共振线与互组合线相对强度比诊断电子密度的方法.该法考虑了激光等离子体发射的X射线存在极化的特性,用极化光谱理论对测量的类氦共振线和互组合线光谱相对强度比进行精密校正,再推导等离子体的电子密度.在2×10 J激光装置上进行了实验,使用极化PET(002)晶体谱仪测量了Al类氦离子光谱,利用光谱的极化特性推出A1等离子体的电子密度约为1.5×1020 cm-3.结果表明极化X光谱推导等离子体电子密度方法适合激光高温高密等离子体诊断.%In order to accurately diagnose the electron density of laser-produced plasma, the method of relative intensity ratio of helium-like resonance to combination lines was proposed based on the polarization spectrum. It took into account polarization characteristics of the X-ray in laser-produced plasma, modified the real intensity ratios of the resonance to intercombination lines of He-like ions, then derivated the density of plasma. The experiment was carried out at the 2 X 10 J laser facility at Laser Fusion Research Center of. China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). X-ray spectra emitted from the aluminum plasmas were recorded by polarized PET (002) crystal spectrometer. By correcting two Al helium-like spectra, it was calculated that the electron density was about 1.5×1 020 cm-3. The experimental results showed that the arithmetic was adapted to diagnose laser-produced high temperature high-density plasmas.

  13. State analysis of high power laser induced hot electrons by simulation of x-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou; Utsumi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Neyagawa Office, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    X-ray generation due to hot electrons induced by ultra-short pulse laser irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo Method. Mass attenuation coefficients of photons by scatter, photoelectric effect, or pair production, and stopping powers of hot electrons due to collisions and radiation are shown. The initial distribution of hot electrons is assumed to be Maxwellian, and the x-ray spectrum due to bremsstrahlung and the number of K{sub {alpha}} photons are calculated. As a result, the temperature of hot electrons could be estimated by comparing with the simulation results and the measurements. (author)

  14. X-ray imaging of JET. A design study for a streak camera application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single dimensional imaging system is proposed which will image a strip of the JET plasma up to 320 times per shot with a time resolution of better than 50 μs using the bremsstrahlung X-rays. The images are obtained by means of a pinhole camera followed by an X-ray image intensifier system the output of which is in turn digitised by a photodiode array. The information is stored digitally in a fast memory and is immediately available for display or analysis. (author)

  15. Observable Properties of X-ray Heated Winds in AGN: Warm Reflectors and Warm Absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Krolik, Julian H.; Kriss, Gerard A.

    1995-01-01

    When an AGN is obscured, the warm reflecting gas nearby can be seen by a combination of bremsstrahlung, intrinsic line emission, and reflection of the nuclear continuum, both by electron scattering and by resonance line scattering. Resonance lines, due both to intrinsic emission and scattering, are particularly prominent in the soft X-ray band. When our line of sight to the nucleus is not obscured, the dominant effect is absorption. In the soft X-ray band, ionization edges of highly ionized s...

  16. Observation of Tri-photon K-Shell X-Rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yao; XIA Bing; LI Jin

    2006-01-01

    @@ We report the observation of coincidence of three K-shell x-rays generated from the long-lived rhodium isomer excited by bremsstrahlung irradiation. Our previous report revealed that the E3 Mossbauer transition has anisotropic emission due to anisotropic gravitational acceleration [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 2530]. Now, from broader energy-resolved spectra, we further discover abnormal coincidences and abnormalsum energies of the three K-shell x-rays. The coincidence cannot be explained by currently understood photon statistics, since the measured tri-photon count and the pile-up estimate differ by three orders of magnitude.

  17. SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN A BEAM-HEATED AND IONIZED CHROMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by Kontar et al. using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager have shown that HXR source sizes are three to six times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionization (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionized plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionized region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to this effect, along with the associated density enhancement in the upper chromosphere, injection of a beam of electrons into a partially ionized plasma should result in an HXR source that is substantially more vertically extended relative to that for a neutral target. Here we present the results of a modification to the CTTM, which takes into account both a localized form of chromospheric NUI and an increased target density. We find 50 keV HXR source widths, with and without the inclusion of a locally ionized region, of ∼3 Mm and ∼0.7 Mm, respectively. This helps to provide a theoretical solution to the currently open question of overly extended HXR sources

  18. SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN A BEAM-HEATED AND IONIZED CHROMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flannagain, Aidan M.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Brown, John C. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by Kontar et al. using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager have shown that HXR source sizes are three to six times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionization (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionized plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionized region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to this effect, along with the associated density enhancement in the upper chromosphere, injection of a beam of electrons into a partially ionized plasma should result in an HXR source that is substantially more vertically extended relative to that for a neutral target. Here we present the results of a modification to the CTTM, which takes into account both a localized form of chromospheric NUI and an increased target density. We find 50 keV HXR source widths, with and without the inclusion of a locally ionized region, of ∼3 Mm and ∼0.7 Mm, respectively. This helps to provide a theoretical solution to the currently open question of overly extended HXR sources.

  19. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers

  20. Eta Carinae's Thermal X-ray Tail Measured with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian W; Yuasa, Takayuki; Stuhlinger, Martin; Russell, Christopher M P; Moffat, Anthony F J; Sharma, Neetika; Madura, Thomas I; Richardson, Noel D; Groh, Jose; Pittard, Julian M; Owocki, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    The evolved, massive highly eccentric binary system, eta Carinae, underwent a periastron passage in the summer of 2014. We obtained two coordinated X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the elevated X-ray flux state and just before the X-ray minimum flux state around this passage. These NuSTAR observations clearly detected X-ray emission associated with eta Car extending up to ~50 keV for the first time. The NuSTAR spectrum above 10 keV can be fit with the bremsstrahlung tail from a kT ~6 keV plasma. This temperature is Delta kT ~2 keV higher than those measured from the iron K emission line complex, if the shocked gas is in collisional ionization equilibrium. This result may suggest that the companion star's pre-shock wind velocity is underestimated. The NuSTAR observation near the X-ray minimum state showed a gradual decline in the X-ray emission by 40% at energies above 5 keV in a day, the largest rate of change of the X-ray flux yet observed in individual eta Car observations. The column de...

  1. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.1016 W/cm2), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements.

  2. X-ray studies of solar system objects: now and the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-06-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra have revealed the multiplicity of X-ray emissions from planets, comets and minor bodies in our solar system. This presentation will review the main findings so far and will look forward to the unique contributions that XMM-Newton can continue to provide in solar system exploration. As a prime example, Jupiter's polar regions show bright soft X-ray aurorae with a line-rich spectrum arising from charge exchange interactions of atmospheric neutrals with local and/or solar wind high charge-state heavy ions. At energies above ˜3 keV the auroral X-ray spectrum is featureless, pointing to an origin from electron bremsstrahlung. Jupiter's atmosphere scatters solar X-rays, so that the planet's disk displays an X-ray spectrum that closely resembles that of solar flares. The arrival of Juno at Jupiter this July will enable in situ measurements simultaneous with XMM-Newton observations, offering unique opportunities to validate models developed to describe the planet's behaviour. Unlike Jupiter, Mars and Venus lack a strong magnetic field, yet they show X-ray emissions from their disks and exospheres, via solar X-ray scattering and charge exchange. Future XMM-Newton observations of solar system targets, under different solar activity conditions, will provide ever deeper insights into their close relationships with their parent star.

  3. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography. (paper)

  4. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    OpenAIRE

    Guehrs, E.; Stadler, A.M.; Flewett, S.; Frömmel, S.; Geilhufe, J.; Pfau, B; Rander, T.; Schaffert, S.; Büldt, G; Eisebitt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography ('tomoholography') for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  5. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  6. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  7. X-ray-powered macronovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakar, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B. Although the $r$-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose that the X-ray excess simultaneously observed with the infrared excess can naturally heat the ejecta, leading to the thermal re-emission as observed in infrared. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source by the central engine like a black hole, and allows for broader parameter region, in particular smaller ejecta mass $\\sim10^{-3}-10^{-2}M_{\\odot}$ with iron mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers, than the previous models. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  8. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  9. A new beamstop for microfocus X-ray capillary beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englich, Ulrich, E-mail: ue22@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Macromolecular Diffraction at CHESS (MacCHESS), Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, 200L Wilson Laboratory, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Revesz, Peter [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Miller, William [Cornell University, Macromolecular Diffraction at CHESS (MacCHESS), Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, 200L Wilson Laboratory, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In order to accurately measure the photon flux and to assist in aligning the beam, we have designed a modified beamstop device based on a photo diode integrated with the beamstop. The beamstop contains a small CdWO{sub 4} crystal that completely stops the X-rays and at the same time produces photoluminescence proportional to the X-ray flux. The light is then guided to a photosensitive diode using a flexible light pipe to monitor the flux. With this device we achieve the goal of stopping the primary X-ray beam and simultaneously monitoring the X-ray intensity, thus eliminating the need for integrating ion-chambers into the capillary or collimator mount.

  10. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 μm and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 107 cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils

  11. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    The report concerns simultaneous non-destructive measurements of water content and density of wood. Theoretically, this should be possible using a x-ray equipment newly build at BKM, and this work is an attempt to use the equipment for assessing water content and density of wood samples under...... laboratory conditions. A number of wood samples with different densities are placed at different relative humidities from 0.5 to 97 %RH. When equilibrium is obtained the samples are measured with the x-ray equipment such that 10 points are measured in the sample followed by measurements outside the sample...... (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  12. X-RAY LASER RESEARCH AT PALAISEAU

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeglé, P.; Jamelot, G.; Carillon, A.; Klisnick, A.

    1986-01-01

    We present the soft X-ray laser experiments performed at Greco "Interaction Laser-Matière" (Palaiseau). They are mainly concerned with Lithium-like ions of aluminum in plasmas produced by 1.06 µ Nd-laser. We describe the experimental set-up which performs time-dependent gain measurements. We report results showing a gain-length product of 2 - 2.5 for the 3d - 5f line at 105.7 A . Comparison is made between experiment and computational model. The possible limiting role of radiation trapping fo...

  13. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kuster(Technische Universität Darmstadt); Bräuninger, H.; Cébrian, S.; Davenport, M.; Elefteriadis, C.; Englhauser, J.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Hartmann, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Hoffmann, D H H; Hoffmeister, G.; Joux, J. N.; Kang, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and...

  14. Development and applications of X ray micro focusing optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ablett, J M

    2001-01-01

    The motivation for this thesis is the design and implementation of novel elliptical x-ray reflective micro-focusing optics. The advancement of x-ray micro-beam applications is a primary objective. Sputtering of a heavy metal onto a spherical substrate can produce the required elliptical profile, and the combination of two mirrors in an orthogonal arrangement can deliver intense x-ray micro-beams at an x-ray synchrotron source. It is believed that this new deposition process offers the best way of obtaining accurate elliptical profiles. Traditionally, reflective x-ray micro-focusing has been achieved by bending a smooth flat substrate, and the new deposition technique renders a much simpler experimental arrangement. Moreover, producing enhanced mirror profiles has the opportunity to provide sub-micron focused x-ray beams with larger apertures and longer working distances. Grazing-incidence rhodium-coated spherical substrates were employed to investigate a variety of systems, using several experimental methods:...

  15. On the X-ray heated skin of Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for the Thomson depth of the X-rayheated skin of accretion disks valid at any radius and for a broad range ofspectral indices of the incident X-rays, accretion rates and black hole masses.We expect that this formula may find useful applications in studies of geometryof the inner part of accretion flows around compact objects, and in severalother astrophysically important problems, such as the recently observed X-ray``Baldwin'' effect (i.e., monotonic decrease of Fe line's equivalent width withthe X-ray luminosity of AGN), the problem of missing Lyman edge in AGN, andline and continuum variability studies in accretion disks around compactobjects. We compute the reflected X-ray spectra for several representativecases and show that for hard X-ray spectra and large ionizing fluxes the skinrepresents a perfect mirror that does not produce any Fe lines or absorptionfeatures. At the same time, for soft X-ray spectra or small ionizing fluxes,the skin produces very strong ionized...

  16. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  17. Stabilized x-ray generator power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis are very much adopted in laboratories to determine the type and structure of the constituent compounds in solid materials, chemical composition of materials, stress developed on metals etc. These experiments need X-ray beam of fixed intensity and wave length. This can only be achieved by X-ray generator having highly stabilized tube voltage and tube current. This paper describes how X-ray tube high voltage and electron beam current are stabilized. This paper also highlights generation of X-rays, diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and their wide applications. Principle of operation for stabilizing the X-ray tube voltage and current, different protection circuits adopted, special features of the mains H.V. transformer and H.T. tank are described in this report. (author)

  18. Direct detection of x-rays for protein crystallography employing a thick, large area CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for directly determining the crystalline structure of a protein crystal. The crystal is irradiated by a finely collimated x-ray beam. The interaction of the x-ray beam with the crystal produces scattered x-rays. These scattered x-rays are detected by means of a large area, thick CCD which is capable of measuring a significant number of scattered x-rays which impact its surface. The CCD is capable of detecting the position of impact of the scattered x-ray on the surface of the CCD and the quantity of scattered x-rays which impact the same cell or pixel. This data is then processed in real-time and the processed data is outputted to produce a image of the structure of the crystal. If this crystal is a protein the molecular structure of the protein can be determined from the data received.

  19. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  20. Direct and bulk-scattered forward-shock emissions: sources of X-ray afterglow diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Panaitescu, A.

    2008-01-01

    I describe the modifications to the standard forward-shock model required to account for the X-ray light-curve features discovered by Swift in the early afterglow emission and propose that a delayed, pair-enriched, and highly relativistic outflow, which bulk-scatters the forward-shock synchrotron emission, yields sometimes a brighter X-ray emission, producing short-lived X-ray flares, X-ray light-curve plateaus ending with chromatic breaks, and fast post-plateau X-ray decays.

  1. Real-time digital x-ray subtraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a method of producing visible difference images derived from an X-ray image of an anatomical subject, comprising the steps of directing X-rays through the anatomical subject for producing an image, converting the image into television fields comprising trains of on-going video signals, digitally storing and integrating the on-going video signals over a time interval corresponding to several successive television fields and thereby producing stored and integrated video signals, recovering the video signals from storage and producing integrated video signals, producing video difference signals by performing a subtraction between the integrated video signals and the on-going video signals outside the time interval, and converting the difference signals into visible television difference images representing on-going changes in the X-ray image

  2. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  3. Optical element for X-ray microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chadzitaskos, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present a proposal for a X-ray optical element suitable for X-ray microscopy and other X-ray-based display systems. Its principle is based on the Fresnel lenses condition and the Bragg condition for X-ray scattering on a slice of monocrystal. These conditions are fulfilled simultaneously due to a properly machined shape of the monocrystal with a stress at its ends.

  4. Characteristics of radiation safety for synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshihiro

    2011-07-01

    Radiation safety problems are discussed for typical electron accelerators, synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. The radiation sources at the beamline of the facilities are SR, including XFEL, gas bremsstrahlung and high-energy gamma ray and photo-neutrons due to electron beam loss. The radiation safety problems for each source are compared by using 8 GeV class SR and XFEL facilities as an example.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray emission by kilovolt electron bombardment

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Eva; Llovet Ximenes, Xavier; Coleoni, Enrique Andrés; Riveros, J. A.; Salvat Gavaldà, Francesc

    1998-01-01

    A physical model for the simulation of x-ray emission spectra from samples irradiated with kilovolt electron beams is proposed. Inner shell ionization by electron impact is described by means of total cross sections evaluated from an optical-data model. A double differential cross section is proposed for bremsstrahlung emission, which reproduces the radiative stopping powers derived from the partial wave calculations of Kissel, Quarles and Pratt [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 28, 381 (1983)]. Th...

  6. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  7. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source

  8. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-ray tracing using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an extension to the Geant4 software package that allows it to be used as a general purpose X-ray tracing package. We demonstrate the use of our extension by building a model of the X-ray optics of the X-ray observatory XMM-Newton, calculating its effective area, and comparing the results with the published calibration curves.

  10. X-ray Performance of Back-Side Illuminated Type of Kyoto's X-ray Astronomical SOI Pixel Sensor, XRPIX

    CERN Document Server

    Itou, Makoto; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takeda, Ayaki; Matsumura, Hideaki; Ohmura, Shunichi; Nakashima, Shinya; Arai, Yasuo; Mori, Koji; Takenaka, Ryota; Nishioka, Yusuke; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Tamasawa, Koki; Tindall, Craig

    2016-01-01

    We have been developing X-ray SOI pixel Sensors, called "XRPIX", for future X-ray astronomy satellites that enable us to observe in the wide energy band of 0.5-40 keV. Since XRPIXs have the circuitry layer with a thickness of about 8 {\\mu}m in the front side of the sensor, it is impossible to detect low energy X-rays with a front-illuminated type. So, we have been developing back-illuminated type of XRPIX with a less 1 {\\mu}m dead layer in the back-side, which enables the sensitivity to reach 0.5 keV. We produced two types of back-side illuminated (BI) XRPIXs, one of which is produced in "Pizza process" which LBNL developed and the other is processed in the ion implantation and laser annealing. We irradiated both of the BI-XRPIXs with soft X-ray and investigate soft X-ray performance of them. We report results from soft X-ray evaluation test of the device.

  11. Bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, N; Hagino, K; Ono, A; Brink, D M

    1999-01-01

    A quantum mechanical analysis of the bremsstrahlung in $\\alpha$ decay of $^{210}$Po is performed in close reference to a semiclassical theory. We clarify the contribution from the tunneling, mixed, outside barrier regions and from the wall of the inner potential well to the final spectral distribution, and discuss their interplay. We also comment on the validity of semiclassical calculations, and the possibility to eliminate the ambiguity in the nuclear potential between the alpha particle and daughter nucleus using the bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  12. Comparison of two models for the X-ray dispersion produced in a Novillo Tokamak with measurements make with thermoluminescent dosemeters; Comparacion de dos modelos para la dispersion de rayos X producidos en un Novillo Tokamak con mediciones efectuadas con dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores O, A.; Castillo, A.; Barocio, S.R.; Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Cruz C, G.J.; Lopez, R.; Olayo, M.G.; Gonzalez M, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    It was presented the results to study about the X-ray dispersion produced in the Novillo Tokamak using thermoluminescent dosemeters (DTL). The measurements were make in the equatorial plane of Tokamak, along twelve radial directions. The dispersion is observed due to the radiation interaction with walls surrounding the machine. It was proposed two types of heuristic mathematical methods for describing the X-ray dispersion, comparing them with the experimental data obtained with Dtl. The predictions of both models are adjusted well to the experimental data. (Author)

  13. X-ray generation by MeV electrons in silicon: temperature, tilt, and thickness dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When relativistic electrons strike a single crystal target, sharp peaks are observed in the x-ray spectrum generated. One type of radiation, called coherent bremsstrahlung, results from coherent electron scattering by atoms arranged on the crystal lattice. The other type of radiation is channeling radiation. The electrons channeling near major crystal axes enter quantized orbits and emit x-ray photons as a consequence of transitions between orbits. Observations of channeling and coherent bremsstrahlung spectra using 2 to 3 MeV electrons incident on targets 1 and 3 μm thick are described. Large changes in channeling x-ray energies and intensities are observed over a narrow range of temperature from room temperature to 20000C. There are no such large changes in the coherent bremsstrahlung spectra under the same conditions. Intensity measurements over a range of thicknesses for both types of radiation are reported. Finally, changes in the energy of the highest energy channeling peak are found as the channeling axis is tilted away from the electron beam

  14. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  15. The X-ray Spectrum of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Michael, E; McCray, R; Hwang, U; Burrows, D N; Park, S; Garmire, G P; Holt, S S; Hasinger, G; Michael, Eli; Zhekov, Svetozar; Cray, Richard Mc; Hwang, Una; Burrows, David N.; Park, Sangwook; Garmire, Gordon P.; Holt, Stephen S.; Hasinger, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the X-ray emission observed from Supernova Remnant 1987A with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We analyze a high resolution spectrum obtained in 1999 October with the high energy transmission grating (HETG). From this spectrum we measure the strengths and an average profile of the observed X-ray lines. We also analyze a high signal-to-noise ratio CCD spectrum obtained in 2000 December. The good statistics (~ 9250 counts) of this spectrum and the high spatial resolution provided by the telescope allow us to perform spectroscopic analyses of different regions of the remnant. We discuss the relevant shock physics that can explain the observed X-ray emission. The X-ray spectra are well fit by plane parallel shock models with post-shock electron temperatures of ~ 2.6 keV and ionization ages of ~ 6 x 10^10 cm^3/s. The combined X-ray line profile has a FWHM of ~ 5000 km/s, indicating a blast wave speed of ~ 3500 km/s. At this speed, plasma with a mean post-shock temperature of ~ 17 keV is produced. This is ...

  16. Using strong electromagnetic fields to control x-ray processes

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Linda; Dunford, Robert W; Ho, Phay J; Kanter, Elliot P; Krässig, Bertold; Peterson, Emily R; Rohringer, Nina; Santra, Robin; Southworth, Stephen H

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of a new ultrafast-ultrasmall frontier in atomic and molecular physics has begun. Not only is is possible to control outer-shell electron dynamics with intense ultrafast optical lasers, but now control of inner-shell processes has become possible by combining intense infrared/optical lasers with tunable sources of x-ray radiation. This marriage of strong-field laser and x-ray physics has led to the discovery of methods to control reversibly resonant x-ray absorption in atoms and molecules on ultrafast timescales. Using a strong optical dressing field, resonant x-ray absorption in atoms can be markedly suppressed, yielding an example of electromagnetically induced transparency for x rays. Resonant x-ray absorption can also be controlled in molecules using strong non-resonant, polarized laser fields to align the framework of a molecule, and therefore its unoccupied molecular orbitals to which resonant absorption occurs. At higher laser intensities, ultrafast field ionization produces an irreversible...

  17. Protonium X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D

    1999-01-01

    The Lyman and Balmer transitions from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were studied extensively at the low-energy-antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. A first series of experiments $9 was performed with semiconductor and gaseous X-ray detectors. In the last years of LEAR operation using a Bragg crystal spectrometer, strong interaction parameters in the 2p states of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were measured $9 directly. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (39 refs).

  18. Discovery of an X-Ray-emitting Contact Binary System 2MASS J11201034-2201340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Yi; Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Li, K. L.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chen, W. P.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2016-06-01

    We report the detection of orbital modulation, a model solution, and the X-ray properties of a newly discovered contact binary, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) J11201034-2201340. We serendipitously found this X-ray point source outside the error ellipse when searching for possible X-ray counterparts of γ-ray millisecond pulsars among the unidentified objects detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source (unrelated to the γ-ray source) was then identified using archival databases. The long-term Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey detected a precise signal with a period of P=0.28876208(56) days. A follow-up observation made by the Super Light Telescope of Lulin Observatory revealed the binary nature of the object. Utilizing archived photometric data of multi-band surveys, we construct the spectral energy distribution (SED), which is well fit by a K2V spectral template. The fitting result of the orbital profile using the Wilson-Devinney code suggests that 2MASS J11201034-2201340 is a short-period A-type contact binary and the more massive component has a cool spot. The X-ray emission was first noted in observations made by Swift, and then further confirmed and characterized by an XMM-Newton observation. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law or thermal Bremsstrahlung. Unfortunately, we could not observe significant X-ray orbital modulation. Finally, according to the SED, this system is estimated to be 690 pc from Earth with a calculated X-ray intensity of (0.7-1.5)× {10}30 erg s-1, which is in the expected range of an X-ray emitting contact binary.

  19. X-ray Pulsations in the Supersoft X-ray Binary CAL 83

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Cowley, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray data reveal that the supersoft X-ray binary CAL 83 exhibits 38.4 minute pulsations at some epochs. These X-ray variations are similar to those found in some novae and are likely to be caused by nonradial pulsations the white dwarf. This is the first detection of pulsations in a classical supersoft X-ray binary.

  20. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  1. Swift Observations of X-ray supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K. L.; Pun, Chun. S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a result of X-ray supernovae (SNe) survey using the Swift satellite public archive. An automatic searching program was designed to search X-ray SNe among all of the Swift archival observations between November 2004 and February 2011. Using the C++ program, 24 X-ray detectable supernovae have been found in the archive and 3 of them were newly-discovered in X-rays which are SN 1986L, SN 2003lx, and SN 2007od. In addition, SN 2003lx is a Type Ia supernova which may be the second X-ray...

  2. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K; Nelson, T.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbi...

  3. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  4. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Kingman [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University,Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences,Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Wei-Chih [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,London (United Kingdom); Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-05-26

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  5. Non-abelian Dark Matter Solutions for Galactic Gamma-ray Excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray Line

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Kingman; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2014-01-01

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian $SU(2)$ DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a "dark" $SU(2)$ doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses t...

  6. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state

  7. Determination of X-ray excitation spectra in micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R. D.; Sosa, C.; Sbarato, V.; Leani, J.; Sánchez, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    The quantitative X-ray fluorescence microanalysis by fundamental parameters requires the knowledge of the energy distribution of the excitation beam. When this beam is produced by capillary optics, its high intensity and anisotropy complicate a direct determination. An alternative is an indirect determination based on measurement of induced X-ray fluorescence in a set of targets. In this work the X-ray excitation spectrum is determined by an iterative deconvolution process of the fundamental parameter expression for the X-ray fluorescence intensities. The method has the advantage that it does not require any assumption about the energy distribution of the X-ray source or the energy dependence of the lens transmission. Numerous XRF targets of pure elements with emission lines covering the full energy range of the X-ray source are employed. The only requirement on the targets is a high homogeneity in its composition. In fact, it does not impose any condition on the sample thickness. The accuracy observed in the validation process implemented with reference materials is similar to that reported with alternative approaches: 5% for main components, 10% for minor elements and 15% for trace elements.

  8. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  9. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, B R; Akin, M C; Teruya, A; Hunt, D; Hahn, D; Cradick, J; Morgan, D V

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10(7) molybdenum Kα photons.

  10. Observations of a hard X-ray component in the spectrum of Nova Ophiuchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. K.; Rothschild, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum and time variation of Nova Ophiuchi (H1705-25) in the 10-200 keV range as measured by the UCSD/MIT instruments aboard HEAO 1 during the period 1977 August 25 to September 28 are reported. The composite curve is best fitted by a kT = 2 keV thin thermal bremsstrahlung model below 10 keV and a separate hard X-ray component fitted equally well by a power-law component with photon index 2.19 + or - 0.06 or a kT = 32.1 + or - 2.4 keV thermal bremsstrahlung model. This is the first observation of a hard tail in the spectrum of a transient X-ray source with sufficient statistical significance to allow a detailed study of its spectral and temporal variability. It is found that the intensity variations of the high-energy X-rays are consistent with the variability at lower energies (3-6 keV), but no hard X-ray spectral index variability is found on time scales from 2 days to 2 weeks. The results can be interpreted as due to accretion onto a neutron star (or possibly onto a black hole) that may also be surrounded by an extended corona.

  11. Coherent X-ray scattering and lensless imaging at the European XFEL Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Vartanyants, I. A.; Robinson, I. K.; McNulty, I.; David, C.; Wochner, P.; Tschentscher, Th.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a rapidly advancing form of lensless microscopy. The phase information of the diffraction pattern is embedded in a sufficiently sampled coherent diffraction pattern. Using advanced computational methods, this diffraction pattern can be inverted to produce an image of a sample with diffraction-limited resolution. It is attractive to use high-power coherent X-ray beams produced by future X-ray free-electron lasers for imaging nanoscale condensed matter, mat...

  12. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  13. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    White, Stephen M; Christe, Steven; Farnik, Frantislav; Kundu, Mukul R; Mann, Gottfried; Ning, Zongjun; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Silva-Valio, Adriana V R; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Vilmer, Nicole; Warmuth, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard X-ray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, includ...

  14. X-ray imaging for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray screening of luggage by aviation security personnel may be badly hindered by the lack of visual cues to depth in an image that has been produced by transmitted radiation. Two-dimensional "shadowgraphs" with "organic" and "metallic" objects encoded using two different colors (usually orange and blue) are still in common use. In the context of luggage screening there are no reliable cues to depth present in individual shadowgraph X-ray images. Therefore, the screener is required to convert the 'zero depth resolution' shadowgraph into a three-dimensional mental picture to be able to interpret the relative spatial relationship of the objects under inspection. Consequently, additional cognitive processing is required e.g. integration, inference and memory. However, these processes can lead to serious misinterpretations of the actual physical structure being examined. This paper describes the development of a stereoscopic imaging technique enabling the screener to utilise binocular stereopsis and kinetic depth to enhance their interpretation of the actual nature of the objects under examination. Further work has led to the development of a technique to combine parallax data (to calculate the thickness of a target material) with the results of a basis material subtraction technique to approximate the target's effective atomic number and density. This has been achieved in preliminary experiments with a novel spatially interleaved dual-energy sensor which reduces the number of scintillation elements required by 50% in comparison to conventional sensor configurations.

  15. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. [Ritsumeikan Univ., Shiga (Japan); Amano, D.; Miyade, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tanashi-City (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  16. A HARD X-RAY POWER-LAW SPECTRAL CUTOFF IN CENTAURUS X-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Nowak, Michael A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [Division of Astrophysics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, William W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wilms, Jörn, E-mail: deepto@mit.edu [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1×10{sup 33} D{sub kpc}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1}, with ≅60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT{sub e} = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245–2452, and XSS J12270–4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  17. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  18. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  19. X-ray Properties of Young Stars and Stellar Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Feigelson, Eric; Townsley, Leisa; Gudel, Manuel; Stassun, Keivan

    2006-01-01

    Although the environments of star and planet formation are thermodynamically cold, substantial X-ray emission from 10-100 MK plasmas is present. In low mass pre-main sequence stars, X-rays are produced by violent magnetic reconnection flares. In high mass O stars, they are produced by wind shocks on both stellar and parsec scales. The recent Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project, XMM-Newton Extended Survey of Taurus, and Chandra studies of more distant high-mass star forming regions reveal a wealth...

  20. High resolution X-ray micro calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we have produced X-ray micro calorimeters with resolving powers approaching 2000 at 5.9keV using a spare XRS microcalorimeter array. In these experiments, we attached 400μm square, 8μm thick HgTe absorbers using a variety of attachment methods to an XRS array and tested the detector array at temperatures between 40 and 60mK. The best results were for absorbers attached using the standard XRS absorber-pixel thermal isolation scheme utilizing SU-8 polymer tubes. In this scenario we achieved a resolution of 3.2eV FWHM at 5.9keV. Substituting a silicon spacer for the SU-8 tubes also yielded sub-5eV results. In contrast, absorbers attached directly to the thermistor produced significant position dependence and thus degraded resolution. We discuss these new high resolution results, the various absorber attachment schemes, and planned future improvements