WorldWideScience

Sample records for bremsstrahlung x-rays produced

  1. Jovian bremsstrahlung X-rays - A Ulysses prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Boice, D. C.; Hurley, K. C.; Stern, S. A.; Sommer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling results reported here show that precipitating auroral electrons with sufficient energy to be consistent with the Voyager UVS observations produce bremsstrahlung X-rays with sufficient energy and intensity to be detected by the Solar Flare X-ray and Cosmic-Ray-Burst Instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft. The detection of such bremsstrahlung X-rays at Jupiter would provide strong evidence for the electron-precipitation mechanism, although it does not rule out the possibility of some heavy ion involvement, and thus makes a significant contribution toward solving the mystery of the Jovian aurora.

  2. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  3. Development of a low-energy x-ray camera for the imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation for range estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation is a possible method for measurement of the proton beam distribution in phantom. However, it is not clear that the method is used for range estimation of protons. For this purpose, we developed a low-energy x-ray camera and conducted imaging of the bremsstrahlung x-ray produced during irradiation of proton beams. We used a 20 mm  ×  20 mm  ×  1 mm finely grooved GAGG scintillator that was optically coupled to a one-inch square high quantum efficiency (HQE)-type position-sensitive photomultiplier tube to form an imaging detector. The imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm-thick tungsten container, and a pinhole collimator was attached to its camera head. After performance of the camera was evaluated, secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray imaging was conducted during irradiation of the proton beams for three different proton energies, and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation as well as calculated value. The system spatial resolution and sensitivity of the developed x-ray camera with 1.5 mm-diameter pinhole collimator were estimated to be 32 mm FWHM and 5.2  ×  10-7 for ~35 keV x-ray photons at 100 cm from the collimator surface, respectively. We could image the proton beam tracks by measuring the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray during irradiation of the proton beams, and the ranges for different proton energies could be estimated from the images. The measured ranges from the images were well matched with the Monte Carlo simulation, and slightly smaller than the calculated values. We confirmed that the imaging of the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation with the developed x-ray camera has the potential to be a new tool for proton range estimations.

  4. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habsh; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativisitic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and space reuseable launch vehicles (sRLVs). The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremsstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  5. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash Krause, L.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, K.; Williams, A.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV) altitudes. The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symmetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremmstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry that relies on sRLVs with a nominal apogee of 100 km. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  6. Bremsstrahlung x ray spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: Predictions for future planetary spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Calculations of X ray spectra due to bremsstrahlung from precipitating auroral electrons at Jupiter and Saturn are presented. The model assumes that a field-aligned potential drop accelerates a primary beam of electrons into the atmosphere where a population of secondary electrons having a power law energy dependence is generated. The spectrum at Jupiter is normalized to the soft X ray observations of Metzger et al (1983) at the low-energy end and constrained at the high-energy end by UV auroral energy requirements. The spectrum at Saturn is constructed by analogy to the Jovian case allowing for variation of the beam energy, energy flux, and scale size of the Saturnian aurora. The resulting indicate that a significant flux of X rays is emanating from both planets which may serve as a basis for conducting planetary X ray astronomy as part of future spacecraft missions to the planets.

  7. Efficiency improvements of x-ray simulations in EGSnrc user-codes using bremsstrahlung cross-section enhancement (BCSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E S M; Rogers, D W O

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the bremsstrahlung cross-section enhancement (BCSE) variance-reduction technique into the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc system. BCSE makes the simulation of x-ray production from bremsstrahlung targets more efficient; it does so by artificially making the rare event of bremsstrahlung emission more abundant, which increases the number of statistically-independent photons that contribute to reducing the variance of the quantity of interest without increasing the CPU time appreciably. BCSE does not perturb the charged-particle transport in EGSnrc and it is made compatible with all other variance-reduction techniques already used in EGSnrc and BEAMnrc, including range rejection, uniform bremsstrahlung splitting, and directional bremsstrahlung splitting. When optimally combining BCSE with splitting to simulate typical situations of interest in medical physics research and in clinical practice, efficiencies can be up to five orders of magnitude larger than those obtained with analog simulations, and up to a full order of magnitude larger than those obtained with optimized splitting alone (which is the state-of-the-art of the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc system before this study was carried out). This study recommends that BCSE be combined with the existing splitting techniques for all EGSnrc/BEAMnrc simulations that involve bremsstrahlung targets, both in the kilovoltage and megavoltage range. Optimum crosssection enhancement factors for typical situations in diagnostic x-ray imaging and in radiotherapy are recommended, along with an easy algorithm for simulation optimization.

  8. Maximization Of Bremsstrahlung And K-Series Production Efficiencies In Flash X-Ray Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehl, Peter

    1986-08-01

    Historically, x-ray output of flash x-ray tubes was maximized empirically by changing the electrode geometry and varying the capacitance of the pulse generator. With the advent of high-voltage, low-impedance transmission lines, short-duration, high-current pulses could be generated with ease. An appropriate line scaling should assure that dose maximization is not reached at the expense of pulse prolongation which would reduce stop motion capability, but rather that dose rate should be maximized. Additionally, anode evaporation in the arc phase should be minimized to enhance tube life. Typically, the impedance of flash tubes changes during the discharge from infinity in the beginning to nearly zero in the arc phase and, either for field emission or high-vacuum discharge tubes, can well be modeled by a time-varying ohmic resistor Zx(t). Using a modification of Bergeron's method of travelling wave analysis, transient tube voltage and current can be determined out of a closed-form solution. This allows to calculate corresponding dose rate-time profiles of each spectrum. An ideal pulsed transmission line, charged up to a dc potential U0, has been assumed, characterized by its characteristic impedance Z0 and characteristic time T. Three typical examples illustrate the importance of optimum line scaling and K-series excitation voltage on tube performance such as dose, maximum dose rate, discharge delay time and pulse width. These examples encompass a transmission line with (a) constant initially stored energy E0 = UO2T/4Z0, but various combinations of Zo and T; (b) increasing energy E0 by decreasing Z0, but T = const; and (c) constant line parameters Z0 and T, but assumption of various Zx(t) profiles. Basic matching rules have been worked out in order to approach ideal operation for a given tube impedance time profile. A parametric analysis revealed that, with decreasing pulser impedance, there are increases in the bremsstrahlung and K-series radiation emissions, but that

  9. Using an electron beam to produce a bright isotropic subsurface x-ray source for back illumination in landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2005-06-01

    Why is it so difficult to detect concealed shallow buried landmines while it is relatively easy to image and detect cancers within the human body? One reason is that in medical x-ray imaging, the source is on one side of the body and the detectors are on the other. This is back-illumination, the optimal orientation for x-ray imaging. Can back-illumination be used in landmine detection? That is, is it possible to generate sufficient xrays 10 or more cm below the soil surface so that suitable detectors above ground could be used to image shallow buried objects including landmines? In an x-ray tube, high voltage electron beams produce x-rays by electron deceleration (bremsstrahlung) and induced orbital transitions. It may be possible to produce 1000 amp short pulses of electrons at 30 MeV using an electron gun with multiple field emitters. (This is a section of an antiballistic missile device proposed at SPIE Defense and Security 2004.) Electron beams of such energy have range of approximately 100 m in air and 10-15 cm in soil. This 5-10 m tall device could be carried by balloon, helicopter or land vehicle. X-ray production efficiency at 30 MeV is over 50 fold higher compared to medical x-ray tube efficiency. Such a device would produce a bright isotropic source of x-rays in a subsurface plume that might be usable in landmine detection.

  10. X-ray monochromator for divergent beam radiography using conventional and laser-produced x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnopper, Herbert W.; Romaine, Suzanne E.; Krol, Andrzej

    2001-12-01

    We discuss technology that will produce a wide angle monochromatic beam of X-rays that appears to diverge from a virtual point source. Although our ideas are discussed in the context of dual energy subtraction angiography (DESA) that we are developing to operate in a clinical setting, they are widely adaptable to all applications of x-ray radiography. The best DESA analysis is obtained from X-ray images made in narrow energy bands just below and just above the I K-absorption edge. Our monochromator will be used to isolate these narrow bands to produce high contrast, high spatial resolution, ECG gated angiographic images. Emission lines, that have X-ray energies below (E-) and above (E+) the I K-absorption edge at 33.2 keV, are readily available. We have deposited variable d-spacing artificial crystals, called multilayers, on optically flat, very smooth substrates, to create narrow pass band X-ray monochromators centered on La and Ba K-emission lines. We will record (E-) and (E+) exposures on either photographic plates or, in the future, with energy sensitive pixelated arrays of solid state detectors. After a suitable normalization, the exposures will be subtracted to yield a high resolution, high contrast image of the I filled arteries. Although initial results will be obtained with conventional X-ray tubes, our goal is to couple the monochromators to a high intensity, laser produced, X-ray plasma. We will present early test data that shows the multilayer performance.

  11. Forward directed x-ray from source produced by relativistic electrons from a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Shaw, Jessica; King, Paul; Milder, Avi; Marsh, Ken; Pak, Arthur; Joshi, Chan

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators are now able to provide the scientific community with novel light sources. Their applications span many disciplines, including high-energy density sciences, where they can be used as probes to explore the physics of dense plasmas and warm dense matter. A recent advance is in the experimental and theoretical characterization of x-ray emission from electrons in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA) where little is known about the x-ray properties. A series of experiments at the LLNL Jupiter Laser Facility, using the 1 ps 150 J Titan laser, have demonstrated low divergence electron beams with energies up to 300 MeV and 6 nCs of charge, and betatron x-rays with critical energies up to 20 keV. This work identifies two other mechanisms which produce high energy broadband x-rays and gamma-rays from the SMLWFA: Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We demonstrate the use of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung to generate x/Gamma-rays from 3 keV up to 1.5 MeV with a source size of 50um and a divergence of 100 mrad. This work is an important step towards developing this x-ray light source on large-scale international laser facilities, and also opens up the prospect of using them for applications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  12. Characterization of short-pulse laser-produced x-rays for diagnosing magnetically driven cylindrical isentropic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Daykin, Tyler; Bauer, Bruno; Beg, Farhat

    2017-10-01

    We have developed an experimental platform to study material properties of magnetically compressed cylinder using a 1 MA pulsed power generator Zebra and a 50 TW subpicosecond short-pulse laser Leopard at the UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. According to a MHD simulation, strong magnetic fields generated by 100 ns rise time Zebra current can quasi-isentropically compress a material to the strongly coupled plasma regime. Taking advantage of the cylindrical geometry, a metal rod can be brought to higher pressures than that in the planar geometry. To diagnose the compressed rod with high precision x-ray measurements, an initial laser-only experiment was carried out to characterize laser-produced x-rays. Interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with solids produces broadband and monochromatic x-rays with photon energies high enough to probe dense metal rods. Bremsstrahlung was measured with Imaging plate-based filter stack spectrometers and monochromatic 8.0 keV Cu K-alpha was recorded with an absolutely calibrated Bragg crystal spectrometer. The broadband x-ray source was applied to radiography of thick metal objects and different filter materials were tested. The experimental results and a design of a coupled experiment will be presented.

  13. Can isolated single black holes produce X-ray novae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Teraki, Yuto; Ioka, Kunihito

    2018-03-01

    Almost all black holes (BHs) and BH candidates in our Galaxy have been discovered as soft X-ray transients, so-called X-ray novae. X-ray novae are usually considered to arise from binary systems. Here, we propose that X-ray novae are also caused by isolated single BHs. We calculate the distribution of the accretion rate from interstellar matter to isolated BHs, and find that BHs in molecular clouds satisfy the condition of the hydrogen-ionization disc instability, which results in X-ray novae. The estimated event rate is consistent with the observed one. We also check an X-ray novae catalogue (Corral-Santana et al.) and find that 16/59 ˜ 0.27 of the observed X-ray novae are potentially powered by isolated BHs. The possible candidates include IGR J17454-2919, XTE J1908-094, and SAX J1711.6-3808. Near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic follow-ups can exclude companion stars for a BH census in our Galaxy.

  14. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  15. Line focus x-ray tubes—a new concept to produce high brilliance x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartzsch, Stefan; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-11-01

    Currently hard coherent x-ray radiation at high photon fluxes can only be produced with large and expensive radiation sources, such as 3rd generation synchrotrons. Especially in medicine, this limitation prevents various promising developments in imaging and therapy from being translated into clinical practice. Here we present a new concept of highly brilliant x-ray sources, line focus x-ray tubes (LFXTs), which may serve as a powerful and cheap alternative to synchrotrons and a range of other existing technologies. LFXTs employ an extremely thin focal spot and a rapidly rotating target for the electron beam which causes a change in the physical mechanism of target heating, allowing higher electron beam intensities at the focal spot. Monte Carlo simulations and numeric solutions of the heat equation are used to predict the characteristics of the LFXT. In terms of photon flux and coherence length, the performance of the line focus x-ray tube compares with inverse Compton scattering sources. Dose rates of up to 180 Gy s-1 can be reached in 50 cm distance from the focal spot. The results demonstrate that the line focus tube can serve as a powerful compact source for phase contrast imaging and microbeam radiation therapy. The production of a prototype seems technically feasible.

  16. Laser-produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source with BaF2 and rare-earth targets for application in dual-energy subtraction angiography (DESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Jiang, Zhiming; Yu, Jianfan; Chamberlain, Charles C.; Bassano, Daniel A.; Gallant, Pascal

    1999-05-01

    A laser produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source utilizing ultra- fast laser was investigated in the context of its utility for dual energy subtraction angiography. Experiments were performed with a Table Top Terawatt (TTT) laser using BaF2 and rare-earth metal targets including La, Ce, Nd and Gd. The laser was operated in a single-pulse or in a dual pulse mode with surface power density in the 1018 - 1019 Wcm-2 range with pulse duration of 150 or 450 fs. Infrared and/or green beams were utilized. Hot electrons' temperature was in the 35 - 50 keV range. The obtained LPP x- ray spectra were comprised of a continuous bremsstrahlung component as well as discrete characteristic lines. The bremsstrahlung extended to high energies with no evident cutoff energy below 100 keV. Its shape was best described by exp(-E/kTe), where Te is the hot electron temperature. The overall efficiency was equal to approximately 9 X 10-4 for 450 fs pulse and approximately 6 X 10-4 for 150 fs pulses. The x-ray focal spot size was in the range 13 to 50 microns. We have found that the LPP x- ray source with BaF2 and rare-earth targets provide x-ray spectra that might be suitable for DESA.

  17. X-ray optical diagnostic of laser produced plasmas for nuclear fusion and X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butzbach, R.

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, the conception, design and appliance of toroidally bent crystals for the X-ray optical diagnostics of laser produced plasmas is discussed. The first part of this work deals with the development, design and characterization of an X-Ray microscope for the observation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, which act against the confinement and ignition of the fuel in the inertial confinement fusion process. The aim of the second part of the present work was the diagnostic of the lasing medium for amplified spontaneous emission close to the water window. For this purpose, an one-dimensionally (1-D) imaging X-ray spectrometer based on toroidally bent quartz crystals was developed for the observation of the Ni-like 4f-3d transition of Yb, Hf, Ta, and W ions, which should be related to the amplified 4d-4p emission, since the 4f niveau is very close to the 4d niveau. Thus, the 4f-3d transition can serve as an indicator for the population of the 4d niveau. (orig.)

  18. X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenster, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, J.P. Robarts Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Yaffe, M.J. [Univ. of Toronto, Depts. of Medical Biophysics and Medical Imaging, North York, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    In this article, we briefly review the principles of x-ray imaging, consider some of its applications in medicine and describe some of the developments in this area which have taken place in Canada. X rays were first used for diagnosis and therapy in medicine almost immediately after the report of their discovery by Roentgen in 1895. X-ray imaging has remained the primary tool for the investigation of structures within the body up to the present time (Johns and Cunningham 1983). Medical x rays are produced in a vacuum tube by the electron bombardment of a metallic target. Electrons emitted from a heated cathode are accelerated through an electric field to energies of 20-150 keV (wavelength 6.2-0.83 nm) and strike a target anode. X rays appear in a spectrum of bremsstrahlung radiation with energies ranging from 0 to a value that is numerically equal to the peak voltage applied between the cathode and anode of the x-ray tube (Figure 1). In addition, where the energy of the impinging electrons exceeds the binding energy of inner atomic orbitals of the target material, electrons may be ejected from those shells. Filling of these shells by more loosely-bound electrons gives rise to x rays whose energies are equal to the difference of the binding energies of the donor and acceptor shells. The energies of these characteristic x rays are unique to the target material. Less than 1% of the energy of the incident electrons is converted to that of x rays, while the remainder is dissipated as heat in the target. For this reason, a tremendous amount of engineering has gone into the design of x-ray tubes that can yield a large fluence rate of quanta from a small effective source size, while withstanding the enormous applied heat loading (e.g. 10 kJ per exposure). Tungsten is by far the most common material used for targets in tubes for diagnostic radiology, because of its high melting point and its high atomic number; the efficiency of x-ray production is proportional to Z of the

  19. Thermal limits on MV x-ray production by bremsstrahlung targets in the context of novel linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Trovati, Stefania; Borchard, Philipp M; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    To study the impact of target geometrical and linac operational parameters, such as target material and thickness, electron beam size, repetition rate, and mean current on the ability of the radiotherapy treatment head to deliver high-dose-rate x-ray irradiation in the context of novel linear accelerators capable of higher repetition rates/duty cycle than conventional clinical linacs. The depth dose in a water phantom without a flattening filter and heat deposition in an x-ray target by 10 MeV pulsed electron beams were calculated using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX, and the transient temperature behavior of the target was simulated by ANSYS. Several parameters that affect both the dose distribution and temperature behavior were investigated. The target was tungsten with a thickness ranging from 0 to 3 mm and a copper heat remover layer. An electron beam with full width at half maximum (FWHM) between 0 and3 mm and mean current of 0.05-2 mA was used as the primary beam at repetition rates of 100, 200, 400, and 800 Hz. For a 10 MeV electron beam with FWHM of 1 mm, pulse length of 5 μs, by using a thin tungsten target with thickness of 0.2 mm instead of 1 mm, and by employing a high repetition rate of 800 Hz instead of 100 Hz, the maximum dose rate delivered can increase two times from 0.57 to 1.16 Gy/s. In this simple model, the limiting factor on dose rate is the copper heat remover's softening temperature, which was considered to be 500°C in our study. A high dose rate can be obtained by employing thin targets together with high repetition rate electron beams enabled by novel linac designs, whereas the benefit of thin targets is marginal at conventional repetition rates. Next generation linacs used to increase dose rate need different target designs compared to conventional linacs. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of bremsstrahlung produced at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Beam lines of SPring-8 storage ring is now under operation after 1997. An energy range necessary for safety analysis is from some keV synchrotrons radiation to 8 GeV electrons, photons and photoneutrons, some of them have directional distribution. Simulations which includes empirical data are needed in some cases, these are: (1) gas bremsstrahlung radiation produced by the interaction between storage electrons and residual gases, (2) high energy photon behaviors caused by inverse-compton scattering, (3) neutrons produced by photonuclear reaction. A leakage flux caused by ground-shine of synchrotrons radiation is also estimated by simulation. Usually the beam line is set up on the extrapolated position of the straight line of the storage ring. In this case, gas bremsstrahlung from the storage ring is not negligible at the beam line. The Monte Carlo code (EGS4) on electromagnetic cascade interaction is used for estimation. Accuracy of the result is discussed with availability of assumptions including radial distribution. SPring-8 has the beam line in which high energy photons are produced by laser-electron interaction. In this case a photon has an energy of about 3.5 GeV. Local shielding for this gamma radiation is one of the key issues in the beam line design. The EGS4 code is used to simulate the effective shielding structure. The EGS4 code is also used to obtain track length distribution for gas bremsstrahlung photon to impinge the lead target. Safety analysis is made by the MCNP4b code. The wiggler and/or undulator installed in the storage ring produce complicated radiation spectrum. Computer codes (STAC8, ITS3.0, EGS4) are used to analyze photon transport. In this case, attenuation is very large, and time consuming calculation is needed. (Y. Tanaka)

  1. Cellulose/inorganic-composite fibers for producing textile fabrics of high X-ray absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Karoline; Giebing, Christina; Askani, Antonia [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Saxray GmbH, Maria-Reiche-Str. 1, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Krieg, Marcus [TITK, Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, 07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Kyosev, Yordan; Weide, Thomas [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Mahltig, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Mahltig@hs-niederrhein.de [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    Common textile materials as cotton or polyester do not possess reliable X-ray absorption properties. This is due to their morphology and chemical composition in particular. Common fibers are built up from organic polymers containing mainly the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. These “light” elements only have low X-ray absorption coefficients. In contrast, inorganic materials composed of “heavy” elements with high atomic numbers, e.g. barium or bismuth, exhibit X-ray absorption coefficients higher by up to two orders of magnitude. To obtain a flexible yarn with high X-ray absorption properties both these materials, the organic polymer and the inorganic X-ray absorber, are combined to an inorganic/organic composite fiber material. Hence, as the organic component cellulose from modified Lyocell-process is used as carrier fiber and blended with inorganic absorber particles of low toxicity and high absorption coefficients, as bariumsulphate, bariumtitanate or bismuthoxide. A content of inorganic absorber particles equally distributed in the whole fiber of up to 20% is achieved. The composite fibers are produced as staple or filament fibers and processed to multifilament or staple fiber yarns. The staple fiber yarns are rotor-spinned to increase the comfort of the subsequent textile material. Several woven fabrics, considering multilayer structure and different warp/weft density, are developed. The energy dependent X-ray shielding properties are determined in dependence on the different yarn compositions, yarn types and structural parameters of the woven fabrics. As a result, a production process of textile materials with comfortable and dedicated X-ray absorption properties is established. It offers a promising opportunity for manufacturing of specialized textiles, working clothes or uniforms applicable for medicine, air craft and security personal, mining as well as for innovative composite materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of cellulosic

  2. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. Nov. & Dec. 2000 physics pp. 789–795. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions. V K SENECHA, Y B S R PRASAD, M P KAMATH, A S JOSHI, G S SOLANKI,. A P KULKARNI, S GUPTA, R PAREEK and H C PANT. Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 103, India.

  3. Effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on silicon semiconductor plasma X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Numakura, T; Minami, R; Watanabe, H; Sasuga, T; Nishizawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Nagashima, S; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S; Hirano, K; Maezawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on the X-ray energy responses of semiconductor detectors are characterized. The degradation of the response of position-sensitive X-ray tomography detectors in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak is found after neutron exposure produced by deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma fusion experiments. For the purpose of further detailed characterization of the neutron degradation effects, an azimuthally varying-field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator is employed using well-calibrated neutron fluence. These neutron effects on the detector responses are characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory (KEK). The effects of neutrons on X-ray sensitive semiconductor depletion thicknesses are also investigated using an impedance analyser. Novel findings of (i) the dependence of the response degradation on X-ray energies as well as (ii) the recovery of the degraded detector response due to the detector bias applic...

  4. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Witte, Katharina; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Kanngiesser, Birgit; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  6. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  7. Parameterization of x-ray production in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, J.M.

    1980-10-01

    A simple and algebraically tractable model is developed for the efficiency of x-ray production in a certain spectral region by laser driven plasmas. The model is used as a interpolation/extrapolation device for experimental and theoretical results from three different target concepts. These tests indicate that it is of use in its intended capacity. Certain relationships between independent parameters and scaling laws also result from this construction. Most notable among these is the prediction that the efficiency for producing line radiation in a certain narrow energy range scales like the inverse square of this energy.

  8. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adjei, D.; Ayele, M. G.; Wachulak, P.; Bartnik, A.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, A.; Lekki, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Pina, L.; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 364, Dec (2015), s. 27-32 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GA13-28721S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * soft X-rays * radiobiology * gas puff target * water window Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  9. Thermonuclear ignition by Z-pinch X-ray radiation produced by current of an explosive magnetic generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garanin, S. G.; Ivanovskiy, A. V., E-mail: ivanovsky@elph.vniief.ru [All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The scheme of a device based a superpower disk-type magnetic explosion generator to produce a pulse of X-ray radiation with the energy exceeding the target ignition threshold is described and validated.

  10. Two populations of X-ray pulsars produced by two types of supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knigge, Christian; Coe, Malcolm J; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2011-11-09

    Two types of supernova are thought to produce the overwhelming majority of neutron stars in the Universe. The first type, iron-core-collapse supernovae, occurs when a high-mass star develops a degenerate iron core that exceeds the Chandrasekhar limit. The second type, electron-capture supernovae, is associated with the collapse of a lower-mass oxygen-neon-magnesium core as it loses pressure support owing to the sudden capture of electrons by neon and/or magnesium nuclei. It has hitherto been impossible to identify the two distinct families of neutron stars produced in these formation channels. Here we report that a large, well-known class of neutron-star-hosting X-ray pulsars is actually composed of two distinct subpopulations with different characteristic spin periods, orbital periods and orbital eccentricities. This class, the Be/X-ray binaries, contains neutron stars that accrete material from a more massive companion star. The two subpopulations are most probably associated with the two distinct types of neutron-star-forming supernova, with electron-capture supernovae preferentially producing systems with short spin periods, short orbital periods and low eccentricities. Intriguingly, the split between the two subpopulations is clearest in the distribution of the logarithm of spin period, a result that had not been predicted and which still remains to be explained. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  11. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  12. Precision gamma-ray polarimetry applied to studies of bremsstrahlung produced by polarized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovtun, Oleksiy

    2015-12-16

    The thesis reports on the measurement of bremsstrahlung linear polarization produced in collisions of longitudinally and transversely polarized electrons with gold atoms. The experiment was performed at the Mainzer Microtron MAMI in the Institut fuer Kernphysik of Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Germany. Spin-oriented electrons with 2.15 MeV kinetic energy collided with a thin golden target and produced bremsstrahlung. Linear polarization of the emitted photons was measured by means of Compton polarimetry applied to a segmented high-purity germanium detector. Experimental results reveal a strong correlation between the electron spin orientation and bremsstrahlung linear polarization. This indicates a dominant role of the electron spin in atomic-field bremsstrahlung and Coulomb scattering.

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  14. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Email: yprasad@cat.ernet.in. Abstract. The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 μm,. 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 10. Ѕѕ and 10. ½. W/cm. ¾ has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum.

  15. Space- and time-resolved soft x-ray emission from laser-produced magnesium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S.; Bindhu, C.V.; Kunze, H.J. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik V, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)]. E-mail: hans-joachim.kunze@ep5.ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2001-02-21

    Soft x-ray emission from plasmas produced by ablation from a magnesium target employing a ruby laser is studied using a grazing incidence spectrograph in the spectral region 3-12 nm. Emission intensities are investigated for different ionic lines as a function of position, time after the maximum of the laser pulse and laser irradiance. A gated pinhole camera is employed for studying the evolution of the plasma at early stages. The propagation distances and velocities are measured. Our results show that the line intensities of all ionic lines increase with laser irradiance until a saturation plateau is observed at high irradiance levels. The increase in ionization and intensity saturation with varying laser irradiance seems to suggest strong interaction of the laser pulse with the dense plasma formed near the target within the pulse duration. (author)

  16. Investigation of high-temperature bright plasma X-ray sources produced in 5-MA X-pinch experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinars, D B; McBride, R D; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Wenger, D F; Cuneo, M E; Yu, E P; Chittenden, J P; Harding, E C; Hansen, S B; Peyton, B P; Ampleford, D J; Jennings, C A

    2012-10-12

    Using solid, machined X-pinch targets driven by currents rising from 0 to 5-6 MA in 60 ns, we observed bright spots of 5-9-keV continuum radiation from 5±2-μm diameter regions. The >6-keV radiation is emitted in about 0.4 ns, and the bright spots are roughly 75 times brighter than the bright spots measured at 1 MA. A total x-ray power of 10 TW peak and yields of 165±20 kJ were emitted from a 3-mm height. The 3-5-keV continuum radiation had a 50-90-GW peak power and 0.15-0.35-kJ yield. The continuum is plausibly from a 1275±75-eV blackbody or alternatively from a 3500±500-eV bremsstrahlung source.

  17. Zone-doubling technique to produce ultrahigh-resolution x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefimovs, K; Vila-Comamala, J; Pilvi, T; Raabe, J; Ritala, M; David, C

    2007-12-31

    A method for the fabrication of ultrahigh-resolution Fresnel zone plate lenses for x-ray microscopy is demonstrated. It is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (Ir) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (Si) using an atomic layer deposition technique. This results in a doubling of the effective zone density, thus improving the achievable resolution of x-ray microscopes. Test structures with lines and spaces down to 15 nm were resolved in a scanning transmission x-ray microscope at 1 keV photon energy.

  18. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  19. Studies of some isomeric yield ratios produced with bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, D

    1998-01-01

    The experimental isomeric ratios for sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Mn, sup 8 sup 6 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 7 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 9 sup m sup , sup g Zr, sup 1 sup 1 sup 0 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 1 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 1 sup , sup g Pm, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 2 sup , sup m sup 1 Eu, sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Ho, sup 1 sup 6 sup 4 sup m sup , sup g Ho and sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 sup m sup , sup g Lu measured by the activation technique from different targets in (gamma, xnp) reactions (x<=3) at the bremsstrahlung end-point energy of 43 MeV are presented. The predictions of calculations performed by means of compound nucleus particle evaporation and final gamma-deexcitation were critically discussed. The importance of inclusion in the calculations of nonequilibrium particle emission and an adequate gamma-decay mode of isomeric nuclei was considered for some of the reactions investigated.

  20. A novel technique to produce x-rays for XRF, medical, and scientific purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Carlos G.; Putterman, Seth J.; Kotowski, Andy

    2015-08-01

    A long-standing mystery in science is the process whereby charge spontaneously exchanges between different materials that are brought into contact. After thousands of years of study there is no ab initio theory of tribocharging. As such it is an area of R&D that is not yet tethered to the first principles of physics and is wide open for new inventions. In 2008, Camara et al at UCLA discovered that tribocharging in a moderate vacuum could be used to take X-ray images. Since then, we have improved the X-ray output by 6 orders of magnitude and controlled the emission for use in a commercial product. Here we present an overview of this technology for use in X-ray fluorescence and X-ray imaging.

  1. K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of laser produced aluminum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Channprit; Chaurasia, S.; Poswal, A. K.; Munda, D. S.; Rossall, A. K.; Deo, M. N.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2017-01-01

    Optimization of a laser produced plasma (LPP) X-ray source has been performed by analyzing K-shell emission spectra of Al plasma at a laser intensity of 1013-1014 W/cm2. The effect of varying the laser intensity on the emissivity of the K-shell resonance lines is studied and found to follow a power law, Ix =(IL) α with α=2.2, 2.3, 2.4 for Heβ, Heγ, Heδ respectively. The emission of these resonance lines has been found to be heavily anisotropic. A Python language based code has been developed to generate an intensity profile of K-shell spectral lines from the raw data. In theoretical calculations, the temperature is estimated by taking the ratio of the Li-like satellite (1s22p-1s2p3p) and the Heβ (1s2-1s3p) resonance line and the ratio of the He-like satellite (1s2p-2p2) and the Lyα (1s-2p) resonance line. To determine the plasma density, stark broadening of the Lyβ spectral line is used. Simulation was carried out using the FLYCHK code to generate a synthetic emission spectrum. The results obtained by FLYCHK are Te=160 eV, Th=1 keV, f=0.008, ne=5×1020 cm-3 and the analytical model resulted Te=260-419 eV and ne=3x1020 cm-3.

  2. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  3. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since this line lies in the water window spectral region, it has potential application in x-ray microscopic imaging of biological sample in wet condition. ... Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India; Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 ...

  4. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David

    formation are not fully understood or agreed upon in the literature. In this research, the method of pyrolysis of boron tribromide (hydrogen reduction of boron tribromide) was used to deposit boron on a tantalum filament. The goal was to refine this method, or potentially use it in combination with a second method (amorphous boron crystallization), to the point where it is possible to grow large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals with consistency. A pyrolysis apparatus was designed and built, and a number of trials were run to determine the conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary for alpha-rhombohedral boron production. This work was focused on the x-ray diffraction analysis of the boron deposits; x-ray diffraction was performed on a number of samples to determine the types of boron (and other compounds) formed in each trial and to guide the choices of test conditions for subsequent trials. It was found that at low reaction temperatures (in the range of around 830-950 °C), amorphous boron was the primary form of boron produced. Reaction temperatures in the range of around 950-1000 °C yielded various combinations of crystalline boron and amorphous boron. In the first trial performed at a temperature of 950 °C, a mix of amorphous boron and alpha-rhombohedral boron was formed. Using a scanning electron microscope, it was possible to see small alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals (on the order of ~1 micron in size) embedded in the surface of the deposit. In subsequent trials carried out at reaction temperatures in the range of 950 °C -- 1000 °C, it was found that various combinations of alpha-rhombohedral boron, beta-rhombohedral boron, and amorphous boron were produced; the results tended to be unpredictable (alpha-rhombohedral boron was not produced in every trial), and the factors leading to success/failure were difficult to pinpoint. These results illustrate how sensitive of a process producing alpha-rhombohedral boron can be, and indicate that

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  9. Mechanisms of mercury removal by biochars produced from different feedstocks determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Ptacek, Carol J., E-mail: ptacek@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Blowes, David W. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Landis, Richard C. [E I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, 974 Centre Road, Wilmington, DE 19805 (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Dissolved Hg decreases by >90% with high-T biochars (600 and 700 °C). • Elevated SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} (up to 1000 mg L{sup −1}) is released from manure-derived biochar. • XRF results indicate Hg is distributed heterogeneously throughout biochar particles. • S XANES indicates presence of reduced and oxidized S species in biochar. • Hg EXAFS indicate Hg is bound to S atoms in biochar particle when S content is high. - Abstract: Thirty-six biochars produced from distinct feedstocks at different temperatures were evaluated for their potential to remove mercury (Hg) from aqueous solution at environmentally relevant concentrations. Concentrations of total Hg (THg) decreased by >90% in batch systems containing biochars produced at 600 and 700 °C and by 40–90% for biochars produced at 300 °C. Elevated concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} (up to 1000 mg L{sup −1}) were observed in solutions mixed with manure-based biochars. Sulfur X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses indicate the presence of both reduced and oxidized S species in both unwashed and washed biochars. Sulfur XANES spectra obtained from biochars with adsorbed Hg were similar to those of washed biochars. Micro-X-ray fluorescence mapping results indicate that Hg was heterogeneously distributed across biochar particles. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure modeling indicates Hg was bound to S in biochars with high S content and to O and Cl in biochars with low S content. The predominant mechanisms of Hg removal are likely the formation of chemical bonds between Hg and various functional groups on the biochar. This investigation provides information on the effectiveness and mechanisms of Hg removal that is critical for evaluating biochar applications for stabilization of Hg in surface water, groundwater, soils, and sediments.

  10. In vivo determination of radiographic projection errors produced by a novel filmholder and an x-ray beam manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, U; Simona, C; Graf, H; van Aken, J

    1991-11-01

    Subtraction radiography requires radiographs made with identical projection geometry. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop and evaluate a new in vivo method to measure angular radiographic projection error. This included the development of a system for accurate control of the x-ray beam angulation relative to the intraoral film and the evaluation of the in vivo projection errors (equivalent to the "angular difference" between repeated exposures) produced by the new system. A filmholder, an x-ray beam manipulator, and an aiming device were newly constructed. Reference wires were attached for measuring the projection error on the filmholder and on the 22 bicuspids at the sites of investigation in 16 patients. Two exposures using standardized projection conditions were made of each site. The relative position of the reference wires on the duplicate radiographs was used to calculate the angular difference in the direction of the x-ray beam which occurred between the 2 exposures. Triplicate measurements allowed the determination of measurement error. The angular projection errors were measured in a horizontal and vertical direction. The reference wires allowed determination of the angular projection errors relative to the filmholder, relative to the dentition and the angular error due to the repositioning of the filmholder in the patient's mouth. The average projection errors deviated only slightly from zero. The largest deviation registered was -0.11 degrees. This applies to the horizontal and vertical direction and all relationships. The standard deviations varied between 0.403 degrees and 0.697 degrees. This applies to the standard deviation for all relationships in the horizontal, the vertical, and the oblique directions. The measuring error found from the triplicate measurements had a standard deviation of 0.08 degrees to 0.19 degrees depending on the distance between the reference wires. This new system for controlling in vivo projection errors

  11. Small angle X-ray study of cellulose macromolecules produced by tunicates and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Mudrika; Windle, Alan H

    2014-07-01

    The organisation of poly-glucan chains into cellulose macromolecular microfibrils has been studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Three kinds of cellulose - bacterial cellulose (BC), nata-de-coco (NdC) (food grade bacterial cellulose) and tunicate cellulose (TC) have been investigated. Given the large ambiguity in literature on the microfibril dimensions owing to different methods and data analysis strategies, a method to extract dimensions of cellulose microfibrils using SAXS has been shown, which was found to be consistent across all the samples. The results have been verified with microscopy data. Two populations of microfibrils with different cross-section dimensions were identified. The dimensions of the rectangular cross-sections of BC were found to be 32nm by 16nm and 21nm by 10nm. The dimensions for NdC were calculated to be 25nm×8nm and 14nm×6nm and that for TC were determined to be 25nm×10nm and 15nm×8nm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma instability control toward high fluence, high energy x-ray continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Kirkwood, Robert; Wilks, Scott; Blue, Brent

    2017-10-01

    X-ray source development at Omega and NIF seeks to produce powerful radiation with high conversion efficiency for material effects studies in extreme fluence environments. While current K-shell emission sources can achieve tens of kJ on NIF up to 22 keV, the conversion efficiency drops rapidly for higher Z K-alpha energies. Pulsed power devices are efficient generators of MeV bremsstrahlung x-rays but are unable to produce lower energy photons in isolation, and so a capability gap exists for high fluence x-rays in the 30 - 100 keV range. A continuum source under development utilizes instabilities like Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) to generate plasma waves that accelerate electrons into high-Z converter walls. Optimizing instabilities using existing knowledge on their elimination will allow sufficiently hot and high yield electron distributions to create a superior bremsstrahlung x-ray source. An Omega experiment has been performed to investigate the optimization of SRS and high energy x-rays using Au hohlraums with parylene inner lining and foam fills, producing 10× greater x-ray yield at 50 keV than conventional direct drive experiments on the facility. Experiment and simulation details on this campaign will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. On the Performance of X-ray Imaging Plates in Gamma Radiography employing Reactor-produced Radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Furieri, Rosanne C.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-08-01

    Gamma-radiography employing radiographic films is a well established technique for non-destructive assays. The advent of X-ray sensitive Imaging Plates opens up new possibilities to apply this technique thanks to the advantages exhibited by this new device. Indeed, besides a sensitivity about 20 times higher then the conventional photographic film, requiring thus a shorter exposure time, it does not require a dark room for a cumbersome and time-consuming chemical processing associated to the development, an can be erased to be reused many times. Moreover, its development carried out by means of a laser beam produces digitalized images which can be promptly stored in a computer. Although its resolution is still poorer than that of the conventional film, those advantages overwhelms this specific parameter when it is not an essential feature for the intended application. This work evaluates the feasibility of employing X-ray Imaging Plates as detector for higher photon energies as those emitted by reactor-produced radioisotopes. Within this frame, radioisotopes such as 198Au and 56Mn, produced at the Argonauta research reactor in the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear-CNEN have been employed as sources to acquire radiographic images of several pieces of equipment, devices and components. In order to keep the source appearance—with regard to the detector—as punctual as possible, reducing hence the penumbra effect, the mass of the irradiated material had to be limited. Therefore, due to the low neutron flux available at the main port of the reactor, the exposure times have to be extended along several hours or even a couple of days in order to reach an image with adequate contrast. This demand, nevertheless, does not constitute a serious hindrance as the exposure process can be carried out without any intervention or surveillance. Results have shown that in spite of the higher photon energies used, surpassing the X-ray range for which the imaging plates have been

  14. Thermal casting of polymers in centrifuge for producing X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Randy M [Livermore, CA; Decker, Todd A [Livermore, CA

    2012-03-27

    An optic is produced by the steps of placing a polymer inside a rotateable cylindrical chamber, the rotateable cylindrical chamber having an outside wall, rotating the cylindrical chamber, heating the rotating chamber forcing the polymer to the outside wall of the cylindrical chamber, allowing the rotateable cylindrical chamber to cool while rotating producing an optic substrate with a substrate surface, sizing the optic substrate, and coating the substrate surface of the optic substrate to produce the optic with an optic surface.

  15. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for X-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.; Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.; Quest, K.B. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). ECE Dept.; Shapiro, V.D. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Kellett, B.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper it is argued that recently observed X-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002) can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce X-ray emission. (orig.)

  16. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for x-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bingham

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that recently observed x-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002 can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce x-ray emission.

  17. Comparison of methods of measuring the primary charge-cloud shape produced by an X-ray photon inside the CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Yoshita, K; Miyata, E; Ohtani, M

    2000-01-01

    We report here the comparison of two methods of directly measuring the charge-cloud shapes produced by X-ray photons inside a CCD. The measurements are performed using a mesh technique in which we can confine the X-ray interaction location with subpixel resolution. There are two methods: a DD (double differential) method employs all X-ray events and a CG (center of gravity) method employs only split events. The DD method reveals the mean charge-cloud shape generated in a relatively shallow region, while the CG method reveals one generated in a relatively deep region. We performed the measurement using Al-K X-rays and Mo-L X-rays. The charge-cloud sizes generated by these X-rays are 0.7 approx 1.7 mu m (standard deviation). The charge-clouds clearly show asymmetric shape, elongated perpendicular to the charge transfer direction. This is probably due to the nonuniformity of the electric field inside the CCD.

  18. Monochromatic plasma x-ray generator and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Takahashi, Kei; Ichimaru, Toshio; Aiba, Wataru; Kumagai, Shigehito; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ido, Hideaki; Sakamaki, Kimio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    1998-07-01

    The constructions of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a cold-cathode radiation tube and its application to soft radiography are described. The x-ray generator employs a high- voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high- voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is a demountable triode which is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. This tube consists of a rod-shaped carbon cathode, a trigger electrode made from a copper wire, a stainless-steel vacuum chamber, insulators, a polyethylene terephthalate x-ray window, and two anode electrodes (targets) of molybdenum and silver. The space between the anode and cathode electrodes had a constant value of approximately 20 mm, and the trigger electrode is set in the center of the cathode electrode. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x-ray source which consists of metal ions and electrons is produced by the target evaporating. Because the bremsstrahlung spectra are absorbed by the monochromatic filter, K-series characteristic x-rays are obtained. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was almost equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the intensities of the K-series characteristic x-rays increased. Next, the intensities

  19. Gold nanoparticles: BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) coating and X-ray irradiation produce variable-spectrum photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuo-Hao [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Sheng-Feng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ong, Edwin B.L. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tan, Hui-Ru [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Yang, C.S. [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hwu, Y., E-mail: phhwu@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    We show that by using different x-ray irradiation times of BSA-coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) we can change their ultraviolet-stimulated photoluminescence and shift the spectral weight over the visible spectral range. This is due to the interplay of two emission bands, one due to BSA and the other related to gold. The emission properties did not change with time over a period of several months. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coated with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) are synthesized by x-ray irradiation. • BSA coated AuNPs with ∼1 nm size show strong photoluminescence in red by UV excitation. • The blue photoluminescence of BSA increase with x-ray irradiation. • Increase x-ray irradiation time during the synthesis shift the color of the colloid from red to blue.

  20. Unoccupied density of states of La2–xSrxNiO4+δ studied by polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, P.; Elp, J. van; Sawatzky, G.A.; Fujimori, A.; Hosoya, S.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen 1s x-ray-absorption measurements of La2–xSrxNiO4+δ (0≤x≤1.15) are presented, together with O 1s polarization-dependent x-ray absorption on single-crystal La1.85Sr0.15NiO4. It is concluded that the charge-compensating holes have mainly oxygen 2p character. The Ni 3d9 final states reached

  1. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio...... spectrum and we calculate some of the physical parameters for thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron self-Compton models. We conclude that no simple model is consistent with the data but if the knot contains small regions with flat spectra, these could produce the observed X-rays (via synchrotron emission...

  2. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  4. Beta Emission and Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-13

    Bremsstrahlung is continuous radiation produced by beta particles decelerating in matter; different beta emitters have different endpoint energies; high-energy betas interacting with high-Z materials will more likely produce bremsstrahlung; depending on the data, sometimes all you can say is that a beta emitter is present.

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is ... a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays ...

  6. A tomographic UV-sheet scanning technique for producing 3D fluorescence images of x-ray beams in a radio-fluorogenic gel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, T.; Gasparini, A.; de Haas, M.P.; Luthjens, L.H.; Denkova, A.G.; Warman, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work a 40 mm cube of an optically clear, radio-fluorogenic gel composed of partially-polymerized tertiary-butyl acrylate and maleimido-pyrene (~0.01%) is irradiated with orthogonally-crossed, 10 mm square and round, 200 kVp x-ray beams. A thin sheet of UV light is produced between two

  7. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  8. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-ray Polycapillary Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2000-01-01

    .... Monochromatic x rays can be used to produce higher contrast images. Polycapillary x-ray optics technology can produce a highly parallel, monochromatic, x-ray beam from a conventional radiographic source...

  9. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S., E-mail: scott.williams@angelo.edu

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  10. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  11. Effective X-ray beam size measurements of an X-ray tube and polycapillary X-ray lens system using a scanning X-ray fluorescence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherase, Mihai R., E-mail: mgherase@csufresno.edu; Vargas, Andres Felipe

    2017-03-15

    Size measurements of an X-ray beam produced by an integrated polycapillary X-ray lens (PXL) and X-ray tube system were performed by means of a scanning X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) method using three different metallic wires. The beam size was obtained by fitting the SXRF data with the analytical convolution between a Gaussian and a constant functions. For each chemical element in the wire an effective energy was calculated based on the incident X-ray spectrum and its photoelectric cross section. The proposed method can be used to measure the effective X-ray beam size in XRF microscopy studies.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones ... x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to ...

  14. Total bremsstrahlung spectra of thick lead compounds produced by {sup 90}Sr beta emitter in photon energy region of 10–100 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Suhansar Jit [Department of Physics, B.B.S.B Polytechnic, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Tajinder, E-mail: tajindersingh2k9@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mata Gujri College, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Doordarshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.B.S.B Engineering College, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (India); Singh, Amrit [Department of Physics, Baba Ajay Singh Khalsa College, Gurdas Nangal, Gurdaspur, Punjab (India); Dhaliwal, A.S. [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology, Longowal (Sangrur), Punjab (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Total bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Pb compounds by {sup 90}Sr in energy range 10–100 keV. • Experimental results show better agreement with the model which includes PB in SA up to 30 keV. • At higher photon energy region 30–100 keV the model which describes OB is more accurate. • Experimental results show positive deviations from the entire models at higher energy end spectrum. - Abstract: The total bremsstrahlung spectra in the thick targets of lead acetate trihydrate (Pb(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O), lead nitrate Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and lead chloride (PbCl{sub 2}) produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles have been investigated in the photon energy region of 10–100 keV. The experimental bremsstrahlung spectra have been compared with the theoretical models Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung and modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe Heitler theory which includes polarization bremsstrahlung in the stripped atom approximation. The experimental results show better agreement with theoretical model that includes polarization bremsstrahlung in stripped approximation in the photon energy region below 30 keV. However, at higher photon energy region 30–100 keV, the theoretical model which describes ordinary bremsstrahlung is more accurate to describe the experimental bremsstrahlung spectra. The experimental results show positive deviations from the entire theoretical models at higher energy end of the spectrum. The results indicate that polarization bremsstrahlung plays important role in the formation of total bremsstrahlung spectra in lead compounds produced by continuous beta particles at low photon energy region of 10–30 keV.

  15. Investigation of fast-electron-induced Kα x rays in laser-produced blow-off plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, H; Wei, M S; Chawla, S; Morace, A; Akli, K; Yabuuchi, T; Nakanii, N; Key, M H; Patel, P K; Mackinnon, A J; McLean, H S; Stephens, R B; Beg, F N

    2014-03-01

    Refluxing of fast electrons generated by high-intensity, short-pulse lasers was investigated by measuring electron-induced Kα x rays from a buried tracer layer. Using planar foils of Au/Cu/CH, the 150-J, 0.7-ps TITAN short-pulse laser was focused on the gold foil to generate fast electrons and the 3-ns, 300-J long pulse beam irradiated on the CH side to create expanding plasma as a conducting medium. By delaying the short-pulse beam timing from the long pulse laser irradiation, the plasma size was varied to change electron refluxing in the target rear. The total yields and two-dimensional images of 8.05-keV Cu-Kα x ray were recorded with an x-ray spectrometer and two monochromatic crystal imagers. The measurements show that the integrated yields decrease by a factor of 10 from refluxing to the nonrefluxing limit. Similar radial profiles of the Kα images in the rear were observed at all delays. Hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations using plasma profiles calculated by a radiation-hydrodynamic code HYDRA agree well with the measured Kα yields. The simulations suggest that conducting plasma with the size of ∼300 μm in the laser direction and ∼600 μm in the lateral direction at the density of 2 × 1020 1/cm3 is sufficiently large to prevent electrons from refluxing in the target. The parameters found in this study can be useful in designing experiments utilizing a Kα x-ray source in refluxing regime or a tracer layer in nonrefluxing regime.

  16. Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of 1 cm plasma channels produced by self-guided pulse propagation in elongated cluster jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K Y; Milchberg, H M; Faenov, A Ya; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu

    2006-06-01

    We diagnose the self-channeled propagation of intense femtosecond pulses over an extended distance in a N2O cluster gas target using high resolution kilovolt x-ray pinhole images of the channel and spatially resolved x-ray spectra. The x-ray images are consistent with femtosecond optical scattering, shadowgraphy, and interferometry images. We observe extended plasma channels (approximately 9 mm) limited either by the cluster jet length or by absorption, for injected laser intensities in the range of 10(16)-10(17) W/cm2. Spectral line shapes for the OVII 1s2-1s3p and OVIII 1s-2p transitions (at 1.8627 and 1.8969 nm, respectively) show significant broadening to the blue side and with truncated emission on the red side. We attribute this effect to Doppler blueshifted emission from fast ions from exploding clusters moving toward the spectrometer; redshifted emission from the opposite side of the cluster is absorbed.

  18. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  19. Optimization of X-ray sources from a high-average-power ND:Glass laser-produced plasma for proximity lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The concept of a laser-based proximity lithography system for electronic microcircuit production has advanced to the point where a detailed design of a prototype system capable of exposing wafers at 40 wafer levels per hr is technically feasible with high-average-power laser technology. In proximity x-ray lithography, a photoresist composed of polymethyl- methacrylate (PMMA) or similar material is exposed to x rays transmitted through a mask placed near the photoresist, a procedure which is similar to making a photographic contact print. The mask contains a pattern of opaque metal features, with line widths as small as 0.12 {mu}m, placed on a thin (1-{mu}m thick) Si membrane. During the exposure, the shadow of the mask projected onto the resist produces in the physical and chemical properties of the resist a pattern of variation with the same size and shape as the features contained in the metal mask. This pattern can be further processed to produce microscopic structures in the Si substrate. The main application envisioned for this technology is the production of electronic microcircuits with spatial features significantly smaller than currently achievable with conventional optical lithographic techniques (0.12 {micro}m vs 0.25 {micro}m). This article describes work on optimizing a laser-produced plasma x-ray source intended for microcircuit production by proximity lithography.

  20. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  1. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  3. Nonlinear coherent Thomson scattering from relativistic electron sheets as a means to produce isolated ultrabright attosecond x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-C. Wu (武慧春

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A new way to generate intense attosecond x-ray pulses is discussed. It relies on coherent Thomson scattering (CTS from relativistic electron sheets. A double layer technique is used to generate planar solid-density sheets of monochromatic high-γ electrons with zero transverse momentum such that coherently backscattered light is frequency upshifted by factors up to 4γ^{2}. Here previous work [H.-C. Wu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 234801 (2010PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.234801] is extended to the regime of high-intensity probe light with normalized amplitude a_{0}>1 leading to nonlinear CTS effects such as pulse contraction and steepening. The results are derived both by particle-in-cell (PIC simulation in a boosted frame and by analytic theory. PIC simulation shows that powerful x-ray pulses (1 keV, 10   gigawatt can be generated. They call for experimental verification. Required prerequisites such as manufacture of nanometer-thick target foils is ready and ultrahigh contrast laser pulses should be within reach in the near future.

  4. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  5. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... show up on chest X-rays. Breast cancer. Mammography is a special type of X-ray test used to examine breast tissue. Enlarged heart. This sign of congestive heart failure shows up clearly on X-rays. Blocked blood vessels. Injecting a contrast material that contains iodine can help highlight sections ...

  6. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary and can be chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L β1- and L β2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature R of 500 mm. These experimental results will be presented. Work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  8. Laboratory Measurements of X-Ray Emissions From Centimeter-Long Streamer Corona Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, C. L.; Millan, R. M.; McGaw, D. G.; Yu, C. T.; Putter, A. S.; LaBelle, J.; Dwyer, J.

    2017-11-01

    We provide extensive evidence that runaway electron acceleration and subsequent bremsstrahlung X-ray emission are a common feature in negative electrical discharges with voltages as low as 100 kV, indicating that all negative lightning could potentially produce runaway electrons. Centimeter long streamer corona discharges produce bursts of X-ray radiation, emitted by a source highly compact in space and time, leading to photon pileup. Median photon burst energies vary between 33 and 96 keV in 100 kV discharges. Statistical analysis of 5,000+ discharges shows that X-rays are observed in as many as 60% of the triggers, depending on the configuration. X-ray detection is more frequent when streamers are not followed by a spark, the detector is oriented perpendicular to the gap, and a thicker anode is used. In an 8-cm-long gap, X-rays are produced when runaway electrons hit the anode, and the electron acceleration is not necessarily correlated with streamer collisions.

  9. ANALYSIS OF X-RAY SPECTRA EMITTED FROM THE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, J.; Leitner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Versatile Electron Cyclotron resonance ion source for Nuclear Science (VENUS), located at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s 88-inch cyclotron, extracts ion beams from a plasma created by ionizing a gas with energetic electrons. Liquid-helium cooled superconducting coils produce magnetic fi elds that confi ne the plasma and high microwave frequencies heat the electrons enough to allow for successive ionizations of the neutral gas atoms. The combination of strong plasma confi nement and high microwave frequencies results in VENUS’ production of record breaking ion beam currents and high charge state distributions. While in operation, VENUS produces signifi cant quantities of bremsstrahlung, in the form of x-rays, primarily through two processes: 1) electron-ion collisions within the plasma, and 2) electrons are lost from the plasma, collide with the plasma chamber wall, and radiate bremsstrahlung due to their sudden deceleration. The bremsstrahlung deposited into the plasma chamber wall is absorbed by the cold mass used to maintain superconductivity in the magnets and poses an additional heat load on the cryostat. In order for VENUS to reach its maximum operating potential of 10 kW of 28 GHz microwave heating frequency, the heat load posed by the emitted bremsstrahlung must be understood. In addition, studying the bremsstrahlung under various conditions will help further our understanding of the dynamics within the plasma. A code has been written, using the Python programming language, to analyze the recorded bremsstrahlung spectra emitted from the extraction end of VENUS. The code outputs a spectral temperature, which is relatively indicative of the temperature of the hot electrons, and total integrated count number corresponding to each spectra. Bremsstrahlung spectra are analyzed and compared by varying two parameters: 1) the heating frequency, 18 GHz and 28 GHz, and 2) the ratio between the minimum magnetic fi eld and the resonant magnetic fi eld, .44 and

  10. Model-based x-ray energy spectrum estimation algorithm from CT scanning data with spectrum filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of technology, the traditional X-ray CT can't meet the modern medical and industry needs for component distinguish and identification. This is due to the inconsistency of X-ray imaging system and reconstruction algorithm. In the current CT systems, X-ray spectrum produced by X-ray source is continuous in energy range determined by tube voltage and energy filter, and the attenuation coefficient of object is varied with the X-ray energy. So the distribution of X-ray energy spectrum plays an important role for beam-hardening correction, dual energy CT image reconstruction or dose calculation. However, due to high ill-condition and ill-posed feature of system equations of transmission measurement data, statistical fluctuations of X ray quantum and noise pollution, it is very hard to get stable and accurate spectrum estimation using existing methods. In this paper, a model-based X-ray energy spectrum estimation method from CT scanning data with energy spectrum filter is proposed. First, transmission measurement data were accurately acquired by CT scan and measurement using phantoms with different energy spectrum filter. Second, a physical meaningful X-ray tube spectrum model was established with weighted gaussian functions and priori information such as continuity of bremsstrahlung and specificity of characteristic emission and estimation information of average attenuation coefficient. The parameter in model was optimized to get the best estimation result for filtered spectrum. Finally, the original energy spectrum was reconstructed from filtered spectrum estimation with filter priori information. Experimental results demonstrate that the stability and accuracy of X ray energy spectrum estimation using the proposed method are improved significantly.

  11. Advances in X-ray spectroscopy contributions in honour of professor Y. Cauchois

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    1982-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Spectroscopy covers topics relevant to the advancement of X-ray spectroscopy technology. The book is a collection of papers written by specialists in X-ray spectroscopy and pays tribute to the scientific work of Prof. Yvette Cauchois. The text is organized into four parts. Part I covers the analysis of X-ray transitions between atomic levels and relativistic theories of X-ray emission satellites and electron BremsStrahlung. Part II reviews the means provided by X-ray spectroscopy for the determination of the electronic structure of solids, while Part III discusses methods of

  12. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  13. High Resolution X-ray Views of Solar System Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade Chandra, and XMM-Newton, have revealed the beauty and multiplicity of X-ray emissions in our solar system: high resolution data, in both spectral and spatial domains, have been crucial in disentangling the physical processes at work. The talk will review the main findings in this area at the boundary between astrophysics and planetary science, and will show how the solar system offers `next door’ examples of widespread astrophysical phenomena. Jupiter shows bright X-ray aurorae, arising from the interactions of local and/or solar wind ions, and electrons, with its powerful magnetic environment: the ions undergo charge exchange with atmospheric neutrals and generate soft X-ray line emission, and the electrons give rise to bremsstrahlung X-rays. Chandra's unparalleled spatial resolution has shown how the X-ray footprints of the electrons in the aurorae coincide with the bright FUV auroral oval, indicating that the same electron population is likely to be at the origin of both emissions. Moreover, Jupiter's disk scatters solar X-rays, displaying a spectrum that closely resembles that of solar flares. Saturn has not revealed X-ray aurorae (yet), but its disk X-ray brightness, like Jupiter's, is strictly correlated with the Sun's X-ray output. A bright X-ray spot has also been resolved by Chandra on the eastern ansa of Saturn's rings, and its spectrum suggests an origin in the fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays on the rings icy particles. Both Mars and Venus have X-ray emitting disks and exospheres, which can be clearly resolved at high spectral and spatial resolution. And the Earth has bright X-ray aurorae that have been targets of Chandra observations. Finally, comets, with their extended neutral comae and extremely line-rich X-ray spectra, are spectacular X-ray sources, and ideal probes of the conditions of the solar wind in the Sun's proximity.

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ...

  16. X-ray insights into star and planet formation

    OpenAIRE

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA’s (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the...

  17. X-ray microdiffraction of biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Biominerals have complex and heterogeneous architectures, hence diffraction experiments with spatial resolutions between 500 nm and 10 μm are extremely useful to characterize them. X-ray beams in this size range are now routinely produced at many synchrotrons. This chapter provides a review of the different hard X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques, used in conjunction with efficient, state-of-the-art X-ray focusing optics. These include monochromatic X-ray microdiffraction, polychromatic (Laue) X-ray microdiffraction, and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering. We present some of the most relevant discoveries made in the field of biomineralization using these approaches. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P; 10.1118/1.4767770

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Cent...

  19. Investigation of Bremsstrahlung spectra of 6 MV medical linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Song Bai; Bao Shang Lian; Zhao Hong Bin; Han Shu Kui

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of the Bremsstrahlung X-rays from the 6 MV medical linear accelerator are measured by attenuation analysis of the transmission data. An universal Monte-Carlo program EGS4 is also used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung spectra of the 6 MV medical linear accelerator. The measurement results are in good agreement with the calculation results

  20. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd Raymond [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1996-01-08

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF6 (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 1015 to 1017 W/cm2 is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  1. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  2. X-ray Observations at Gaisberg Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasan Hettiarachchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of X-rays at ground level due to cloud-to-ground flashes of upward-initiated lightning from Gaisberg Tower, in Austria, which is located at an altitude of 1300 m. This is the first observation of X-ray emissions from upward lightning from a tower top located at high altitude. Measurements were carried out using scintillation detectors installed close to the tower top in two phases from 2011 to 2015. X-rays were recorded in three subsequent strokes of three flashes out of the total of 108 flashes recorded in the system during both phases. In contrast to the observations from downward natural or triggered lightning, X-rays were observed only within 10 µs before the subsequent return stroke. This shows that X-rays were emitted when the dart leader was in the vicinity of the tower top, hence during the most intense phase of the dart leader. Both the detected energy and the fluence of X-rays are far lower compared to X-rays from downward natural or rocket-triggered lightning. In addition to the above 108 flashes, an interesting observation of X-rays produced by a nearby downward flash is also presented. The shorter length of dart-leader channels in Gaisberg is suggested as a possible cause of this apparently weaker X-ray production.

  3. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  6. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  7. X-ray spectroscopy of super-intense laser-produced plasmas for the study of nonlinear processes. Comparison with PIC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, E.; Faenov, A. Ya; Oks, E.; Angelo, P.; Pikuz, T. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Andreev, A.; Koga, J.; Sakaki, H.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Hayashi, Y.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Kawachi, T.; Kando, M.; Kondo, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Tubman, E.; Butler, N. M. H.; Dance, R. J.; Alkhimova, M. A.; Booth, N.; Green, J.; Gregory, C.; McKenna, P.; Woolsey, N.; Kodama, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present X-ray spectroscopic diagnostics in femto-second laser-driven experiments revealing nonlinear phenomena caused by the strong coupling of the laser radiation with the created plasma. Among those nonlinear phenomena, we found the signatures of the Two Plasmon Decay (TPD) instability in a laser-driven CO2 cluster-based plasma by analyzing the Langmuir dips in the profile of the O VIII Lyε line, caused by the Langmuir waves created at the high laser intensity 3 1018Wcm-2. With similar laser intensities, we reveal also the nonlinear phenomenon of the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of the laser frequency by analyzing the nonlinear phenomenon of satellites of Lyman δ and ε lines of Ar XVII. In the case of relativistic laser-plasma interaction we discovered the Parametric Decay Instability (PDI)-induced ion acoustic turbulence produced simultaneously with Langmuir waves via irradiation of thin Si foils by laser intensities of 1021Wcm-2.

  8. Diagnostic X-ray sources-present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf; Grüner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This paper compares very different physical principles of X-ray production to spur ideation. Since more than 120 years, bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes has been the workhorse of medical diagnostics. Generated by X-ray segments comprised of X-ray tubes and high-voltage generators in the various medical systems, X-ray photons in the spectral range between about 16 keV and 150 keV deliver information about anatomy and function of human patients and in pre-clinical animal studies. Despite of strides to employ the wave nature of X-rays as phase sensitive means, commercial diagnostic X-ray systems available until the time of writing still rely exclusively on measuring the attenuation and scattering of X-rays by matter. Significant activities in research aim at building highly brilliant short pulse X-ray sources, based on e.g. synchrotron radiation, free electron lasers and/or laser wake-field acceleration of electrons followed by wiggling with magnetic structures or Thomson scattering in bunches of light. While both approaches, non-brilliant and brilliant sources, have different scope of application, we speculate that a combination may expand the efficacy in medical application. At this point, however, severe technical and commercial difficulties hinder closing this gap. This article may inspire further development and spark innovation in this important field.

  9. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight February is American Heart Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  16. Sinus x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an infection and inflammation of the sinuses called sinusitis . A sinus x-ray is ordered when you have any of the following: Symptoms of sinusitis Other sinus disorders, such as a deviated septum ( ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight November is National Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  19. X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-ray References Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ... Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. ... University in Durham, North Carolina. I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. Quasi-Monochromatic Flash X-Ray Generator Utilizing Disk-Cathode Molybdenum Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Tanaka, Etsuro; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-10-01

    High-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -40 to -60 kV using a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an X-ray tube after closing the gap switches in the surge generator using a trigger device. The X-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Sharp K-series characteristic X-rays of molybdenum are produced without using a monochromatic filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. The peak tube voltage increased with increasing charging voltage and increasing space between the target and cathode electrodes. At a charging voltage of -60 kV and a target-cathode space of 1.0 mm, the peak tube voltage and current were 110 kV and 0.75 kA, respectively. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the maximum dimension of the X-ray source was 3.0 mm in diameter. The number of generator-produced K photons was approximately 7× 1014 photons/cm2\\cdots at 0.5 m from the source.

  3. X-ray fluorescence activities at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) system was developed to analyse alloys by exposing them directly under the tube bremsstrahlung and also under monochromatic X-rays obtained from secondary targets. In both the cases, no standard sample is required. Using the above principle, some archaeological objects were analysed.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  10. Exploration of Monoenergetic X-Ray Mammography with Syncrotron Radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Richard

    1998-01-01

    .... Specifically developed as part of our x-ray mammography program utilizing monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, this technique has produced images of test objects and tissue whose contrast...

  11. Simulation of recombination-pumped soft x-ray lasers in wall-confined laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miura, E.; Nakai, S. (Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka Suita Osaka 565, Japan (JP))

    1990-03-01

    We describe the physical mechanisms of the recombination-pumped laser action of the carbon VI Balmer-{alpha} line (18.2 nm), which is expected to have a gain duration of as long as 10 nsec in the cylindrical-wall-confinement plasmas produced by a CO{sub 2} laser. We present the modeling of the laser action with the combination of the one-dimensional hydrodynamic code and the multilevel atomic rate equation code. The gain coefficient derived from the calculated dynamics of the level populations is somewhat smaller than the experimental data. Additional expansion cooling may account for the discrepancy. The higher gain coefficient of the order of 5 cm{sup {minus}1} is expected when we irradiate a high-{ital Z} doped cylinder-type target.

  12. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  13. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used ...

  15. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight November is National Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, ...

  18. Pelvis x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    The x-ray is used to look for: Fractures Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... Abnormal results may suggest: Pelvic fractures Arthritis of the hip joint ... spondylitis (abnormal stiffness of the spine and joint) ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  20. Lamination of ultra-thin silicon wafers for producing high-quality and low-cost x-ray telescope mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youwei; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2017-08-01

    We present a thin wafer lamination method for producing X-ray telescope mirrors aiming at 1-10'' optics quality and low fabrication cost. Traditional grinding/polishing and hot slumping methods find difficulty to meet the required figure accuracy when the mirror thickness is below 1 mm. In this paper, we introduce a new fabrication procedure to satisfy those requirements: first, we laminate flat and ultra-thin silicon wafers on a well polished mandrel via direct bonding until the wafer stack achieves the designed thickness. Second, we release the stack from the mandrel since the direct bonding is temporary. Third, we anneal the stack to create permanent bonding and stabilize the deformation. In such a manner, the intrinsic waviness of each wafer can be alleviated. Our FEA simulation shows the RMS slope error of the stack surface released from a flat mandrel is improved by a factor of 6 when the layer number is doubled, regardless of the total thickness. In the case of a cylindrical mandrel, the local waviness could be improved by a factor of 4000, while a cone angle problem appears and needs to be resolved in future work. We also developed the fabrication method and successfully optimized our wafer cleaning process.

  1. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Daiji; Tokuoka, Atsushi; Katori, Megumi; Minamiyama, Yasuto; Yamashita, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Hattori, Tadashi

    2012-07-01

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  2. Dual Energy X-Ray CT by Compton Scattering Hard X-Ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Torikoshi, Masami

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a compact Compton scattering hard X-ray source at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. The compact hard X-ray source can produce tunable monochromatic hard X-rays. The monochromatic hard X-rays are required in large field of medical and biological applications. We are planning to perform dual-energy X-ray CT, which enables us to measure atomic number Z distribution and electron density re distribution in a material. The hard X-ray source has an advantage to perform dual-energy X-ray CT. The X-ray energy can be changed quickly by introducing a fundamental frequency and a second harmonic frequency lasers. This quick energy change is indispensable to medical imaging and very difficult in a large SR light source and others. The information on the atomic number and electron density will be used for treatment plan in radiotherapy as well as for identification of materials in a nondestructive test. We examined applicability of the dual-energy X-ray CT for atomic number meas...

  3. X-ray radiography for testing wood structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musyankov, S.I. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Introskopii, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and calculation values of the attenuation factor of a bremsstrahlung spectrum longwave X radiation for wood in the 0.02-0.2 g/cm/sup 2/ mass thickness range are given. A formular for calculating the attenuation factor of bremsstrahlung in wood is derived. On the basis of investigations into the behaviour of sensitivity functions of X-ray radiographic recommendations on choice of radiation energy are given. Experimental data on the sensitivity of pine tree samples in the density range investigated are given.

  4. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  5. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  6. Development of cable fed flash X-ray (FXR) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Rakhee; Mitra, S.; Patel, A. S.; Kumar, R.; Singh, G.; Senthil, K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Kolge, T. S.; Roy, Amitava; Acharya, S.; Biswas, D.; Sharma, Archana

    2017-08-01

    Flash X-ray sources driven by pulsed power find applications in industrial radiography, and a portable X-ray source is ideal where the radiography needs to be taken at the test site. A compact and portable flash X-ray (FXR) system based on a Marx generator has been developed with the high voltage fed to the FXR tube via a cable feed-through arrangement. Hard bremsstrahlung X-rays of few tens of nanosecond duration are generated by impinging intense electron beams on an anode target of high Z material. An industrial X-ray source is developed with source size as low as 1 mm. The system can be operated from 150 kV to 450 kV peak voltages and a dose of 10 mR has been measured at 1 m distance from the source window. The modeling of the FXR source has been carried out using particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations for the electron beam dynamics and X-ray generation, respectively. The angular dose profile of X-ray has been measured and compared with the simulation.

  7. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  8. X-Ray and electron beam source characterization from Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration experiments at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul; Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Shaw, Jessica; Milder, Avi; Marsh, Ken; Pak, Art; Hegelich, Bjorn; Joshi, Chan

    2017-10-01

    The development of a directional, low-divergence, and short-duration (ps and sub-ps) x-ray probes with energies of tens of keV is desirable for the fields of astrophysics, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In this work we focused the Titan laser beam (1 ps and 150 Joules) into a 4mm helium gas jet to produce an electron beam that in turn generates an x-ray beam. The measured Raman Forward Scattering satellites present in the laser spectrum after the interaction, indicate the generation of a Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator. This accelerator produced an electron beam with energies up to 250 MeV, a divergence of 16 x 40 mrad and a total charge of 6 nC. Using this high-charge relativistic electron beam we explored the combination of three mechanisms to produce an x-ray beam: Betatron, Compton scattering and Bremsstrahlung. We show the generation of a low divergence (mrad), small source size (um) broadband (keV to MeV) x-ray beam that can be used as a backlighter for time-resolved spectroscopy, imaging, and Compton radiography. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. [LLNL-ABS-734746].

  9. Polarization Bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Korol, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces and reviews both theory and applications of polarizational bremsstrahlung, i.e. the electromagnetic radiation emitted during collisions of charged particles with structured, thus polarizable targets, such as atoms, molecules and clusters.   The subject, following the first experimental evidence a few decades ago, has gained importance through a number of modern applications.  Thus, the study of several radiative mechanisms is expected to lead to the design of novel light sources, operating in various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conversely, the analysis of the spectral and angular distribution of the photon emission constitutes a new tool for extracting information on the interaction of the colliding particles, and on their internal structure and dynamical properties.   Last but not least, accurate quantitative descriptions of the photon emission processes determine the radiative energy losses of particles in various media, thereby providing essential  information required f...

  10. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  11. Microfabrication of hard x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik

    This thesis deals with the development of silicon compound refractive lenses (Si-CRLs) for shaping hard x-ray beams. The CRLs are to be fabricated using state of the art microfabrication techniques. The primary goal of the thesis work is to produce Si-CRLs with considerably increased structure...... developed. Inverse replica molding in PDMS of the CRLs was established as an effective way to circumvent the limitations AFM probes have when concave surfaces need to be characterized, e.g. due to the finite lengths of AFM probes. Four different x-ray optical components have been designed, manufactured...... of space for sample surroundings and ensure low-divergent and wide x-ray beams with narrow waists. Both results are substantial improvements to what was available at the start of this thesis work. The challenge of making x-ray objectives in silicon by interdigitation of lenslets alternately focusing...

  12. A novel nuclear pyrometry for the characterization of high-energy bremsstrahlung and electrons produced in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, M. M.; Sonnabend, K.; Harres, K.; Roth, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstr. 9, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Brambrink, E. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Universite Paris VI, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Vogt, K.; Bagnoud, V. [GSI - Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    We present a novel nuclear activation-based method for the investigation of high-energy bremsstrahlung produced by electrons above 7 MeV generated by a high-power laser. The main component is a novel high-density activation target that is a pseudo alloy of several selected isotopes with different photo-disintegration reaction thresholds. The gamma spectrum emitted by the activated targets is used for the reconstruction of the bremsstrahlung spectrum using an analysis method based on Penfold and Leiss. This nuclear activation-based technique allows for the determination of the number of bremsstrahlung photons per energy bin in a wide range energy without any anticipated fit procedures. Furthermore, the analysis method also allows for the determination of the absolute yield, the energy distribution, and the temperature of high-energy electrons at the relativistic laser-plasma interaction region. The pyrometry is sensitive to energies above 7 MeV only, i.e., this diagnostic is insensitive to any low-energy processes.

  13. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode silver tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf K. F., II; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Onagawa, Jun; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-09-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean silver Kα lines are produced using a 30-μm-thick palladium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current are 90 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths are approximately 80 ns, and the instantaneous number of generator-produced Kα photons is approximately 4×107photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.3 m from the source 3.0 mm in diameter.

  14. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing disk-cathode silver tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf K.; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean silver Kα lines are produced using a 30 μm-thick palladium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 90 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 80 ns, and the instantaneous number of generator-produced Kα photons was approximately 40 M photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.3 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  15. Monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing copper-target diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Komatsu, Makoto; Germer, Rudolf; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    High-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV using a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing the gap switches in the surge generator using a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean copper Kα lines are produced using a 10-μm-thick nickel filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. The peak tube voltage increased with increasing charging voltage. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the peak tube voltage and current were 140 kV and 0.8 kA, respectively. The pulse widths were approximately 30 ns, and the maximum dimension of the x-ray source was 3.0 mm in diameter. The number of generator-produced Kα photons was approximately 2.5x106 photons/cm2 at 0.5 m per pulse.

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film ... assist you in finding the most comfortable position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  19. Coherent x-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Paganin, David M

    2006-01-01

    'Coherent X-Ray Optics' gives a thorough treatment of the rapidly expanding field of coherent x-ray optics, which has recently experienced something of a renaissance with the availability of third-generation synchrotron sources.

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require ... is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ... and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used ... placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  12. Determination of the size and structure of an X-pinch x-ray source from the diffraction pattern produced by microfabricated slits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung Moo; Pikuz, Sergei A; Shelkovenko, Tatiania A; Hammer, David A

    2005-04-20

    X-pinch plasma emits subnanosecond bursts of x rays in the 3-10-keV energy range from a small source. As such, it has been used for high-resolution point-projection imaging of small, dense, rapidly changing plasmas as well as for submillimeter-thick biological samples. In addition to the effect of source size on geometric resolution, a small source size can also provide high spatial coherence of x rays, enabling the rays to be used for imaging weakly absorbing objects with excellent spatial resolution by a method called phase-contrast imaging. To determine the source size, we microfabricated gold slits and imaged them in a point-projection radiography configuration. The shape of the shadow image pattern depends on the source size and energy band of the x rays, the shape and material used for the slits, and the geometry of the experiment. Experimental results have been compared with wave-optics calculations of the expected image pattern as a function of all the parameters listed above. For example, assuming a Gaussiansource distribution, an effective source size in 2.5-4.1 A radiation (1 A = 0.1 nm) of 1.2 +/- 0.5 microm (full width at half-maximum) was determined for a 20-microm Mo wire X pinch. Characterization of the size and structure of the x-ray bursts from X pinches by the use of different wire materials and different slit structures is made.

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be taken to minimize radiation exposure to the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of an x-ray tube suspended over a table on which the patient ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recorded on a computer or special X-ray film. This image shows the soft tissues and bones of the forearm. The X-ray image is black and white. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as the bones, appear white on the ...

  16. Jovian X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  17. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  18. Polarization bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov' yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Frankfurt Inst. for Advanced Studies

    2014-03-01

    Authored by leading experts in the field. Self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Suitable as graduate text on the topic. This book introduces and reviews both theory and applications of polarizational bremsstrahlung, i.e. the electromagnetic radiation emitted during collisions of charged particles with structured, thus polarizable targets, such as atoms, molecules and clusters. The subject, following the first experimental evidence a few decades ago, has gained importance through a number of modern applications. Thus, the study of several radiative mechanisms is expected to lead to the design of novel light sources, operating in various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conversely, the analysis of the spectral and angular distribution of the photon emission constitutes a new tool for extracting information on the interaction of the colliding particles, and on their internal structure and dynamical properties. Last but not least, accurate quantitative descriptions of the photon emission processes determine the radiative energy losses of particles in various media, thereby providing essential information required for e.g. plasma diagnostics as well as astrophysical and medical applications (such as radiation therapy). This book primarily addresses graduate students and researchers with a background in atomic, molecular, optical or plasma physics, but will also be of benefit to anyone wishing to enter the field.

  19. Test facility for astronomical x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Lewis, Robert A.; Bordas, J.

    1990-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions; however, the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area while still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes, is described. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  20. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions, however the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area whilst still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes is described below. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  1. Characterization of a triboelectric x-ray spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya-Sanchez, E. Ulises; Romo-Espejel, J. A.; Aceves-Aldrete, F. J. [Departamento de Fisica, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Low-energy X-ray imaging system has been useful in medical diagnostic in order to obtain high contrast in soft tissue. Recently, Camara et al. and most recently Hird et al. have produced low-energy X-rays using a triboelectric effect. The main aim of this work is to characterize the penetration (beam quality) of a triboelectric X-ray source in terms of the computed Half Value Layer (HVL). Additionally, the computed HVL of the triboelectric X-ray source has been compared with the HVL of X-ray tube Mo-anode (Apogee 5000). According to our computations the triboelectric X-ray source has a similar penetration such as a X-ray tube source.

  2. Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Colgan, James; Abdallah, Joseph; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Pikuz, Tatiana A; Fukuda, Yuji; Yamakawa, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration-average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. We reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

  3. Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30 fs Ti:Sa laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. Additionally, we reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

  4. XMM-Newton X-Ray Observation of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray emission has been observed from the disk of both Jupiter and Saturn as well as from the auroral regions of these planets. The low-latitude disk emission as observed by ROSAT, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton appears to be uniformly distributed across the disk and to be correlated with solar activity. These characteristics suggest that the disk x-rays are produced by: (1) the elastic scattering of solar X-rays by atmospheric neutrals and (2) the absorption of solar X-rays in the carbon K-shell followed by fluorescent emission. The carbon atoms are found in methane molecules located below the homopause. In this paper we present the results of calculations of the scattering albedo for soft x-rays. We also show the calculated x-ray intensity for a range of atmospheric abundances for Jupiter and Saturn and for a number of solar irradiance spectra. The model calculations are compared with recent x-ray observations of Jupiter and Saturn. We conclude that the emission of soft x-rays from the disks of Jupiter and Saturn can be largely explained by the scattering and fluorescence of soft x-rays. We suggest that measured x-ray intensities from the disk regions of Jupiter

  5. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  6. The spectrometer/telescope for imaging X-rays on board the ESA Solar Orbiter spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krucker, S. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Benz, A.O. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Hurford, G.J. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Arnold, N.G. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Orleański, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Research Center of Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Gröbelbauer, H.-P.; Casadei, D.; Kobler, S.; Iseli, L.; Wiehl, H.J.; Csillaghy, A.; Etesi, L.; Hochmuth, N.; Battaglia, M. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Bednarzik, M.; Resanovic, R. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Grimm, O., E-mail: oliver.grimm@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Viertel, G.; Commichau, V.; Howard, A. [ETH Zürich (Switzerland); and others

    2013-12-21

    Solar Orbiter is a Sun-observing mission led by the European Space Agency, addressing the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. It will carry ten instruments, among them the X-ray imaging spectrometer STIX. STIX will determine the intensity, spectrum, timing, and location of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their bremsstrahlung X-ray emission. This report gives a brief overview of the STIX scientific goals and covers in more detail the instrument design and challenges.

  7. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  8. Review of laser produced multi-keV X-ray sources from metallic foils, cylinders with liner, and low density aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Frédéric [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2016-04-15

    Experimental results obtained within the last fifteen years on multi-keV X-ray sources irradiated with nanosecond scale pulse duration 3ω laser light at TW power levels by CEA and collaborators are discussed in this review paper. Experiments were carried out on OMEGA and GEKKO XII laser facilities where emitting materials in the 5–10 keV multi-keV energy range are intermediate Z value metals from titanium to germanium. Results focused on conversion efficiency improvement by a factor of 2 when an underdense plasma is created using a laser pre-pulse on a metallic foil, which is then heated by a second laser pulse delayed in time. Metal coated inner surface walls of plastic cylindrical tube ablated by laser beam impacts showed that plasma confinement doubles X-ray emission duration as it gives adequate plasma conditions (electron temperature and density) over a long period of time. Low-density aerogels (doped with metal atoms uniformly distributed throughout their volume or metal oxides) contained in a plastic cylinder have been developed and their results are comparable to gas targets. A hybrid target concept consisting of a thin metal foil placed at the end of a cylinder filled with low density aerogel has emerged as it could collect benefits from pre-exploded thin foils, efficient laser absorption in aerogel, and confinement by cylinder walls. All target geometry performances are relatively close together at a given photon energy and mainly depend on laser irradiation condition optimizations. Results are compared with gas target performances from recent NIF experiments allowing high electron temperatures over large dimension low density plasmas, which are the principal parameters for efficient multi-keV X-ray production.

  9. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  10. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  11. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  12. X-ray detectors for digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, M.J.; Rowlands, J.A. [Imaging Research Program, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    Digital radiography offers the potential of improved image quality as well as providing opportunities for advances in medical image management, computer-aided diagnosis and teleradiology. Image quality is intimately inked to the precise and accurate acquisition of information from the x-ray beam transmitted by the patient, i.e. to the performance of the x-ray detector. Detectors for digital radiography must meet the needs of the specific radiological procedure where they will be used. Key parameters are partial resolution, uniformity of response, contrast sensitivity, dynamic range, acquisition speed and frame rate. The underlying physical considerations defining the performance of x-ray detectors for radiography will be reviewed. Some of the more promising existing and experimental detector technologies which may be suitable for digital radiography will be considered. Devices that can be employed in full-area detectors and also those more appropriate for scanning x-ray systems will be discussed. These include various approaches based on phosphor x-ray converters, where light quanta are produced as an intermediate stage, as well as direct -ray-to-charge conversion materials such as zinc cadmium telluride, amorphous selenium and crystalline silicon. (author)

  13. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  14. X-ray microanalysis as applied to fungal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, M; Ansel, M; de Azevedo Carneiro, J

    1977-04-01

    Analytical electron microscopy combines the techniques of high-resolution electron microscopy and high-sensitivity X-ray microanalysis of samples. Spectrometry of the elements (characteristic X-rays produced by a scanning electron microprobe) was employed to detect some elements of Mendeleev's classification in pathogenic fungi for humans. X-ray microanalysis applied in wavelength dispersive spectrometry was used to study Coccidioïdes immitis, Paracoccidioïdes brasiliensis and Trichosporum cutaneum.

  15. Development of online quasimonochromatic X-ray backlighter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gold plasma produces continuous X-ray spectrum (M band) in this range. The spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions of the system measured are 30 mÅ, 50 μm and 1.5 ns respectively. The spectral width of the X-ray pulse is 2 Å ( E = 0.39 keV). Keywords. X-ray backlighter; quasimonochromatic; crystal spectrometer.

  16. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  17. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barbee, T.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Yun, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  18. A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filters with image plate dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C D; King, J A; Key, M H; Akli, K U; Beg, F N; Chen, H; Freeman, R R; Link, A; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R B; Van Woerkom, L D

    2008-10-01

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with image plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code INTEGRATED TIGER SERIES 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. An electron distribution with a slope temperature of 1.3 MeV is inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  19. A Bremsstrahlung Spectrometer using k-edge and Differential Filters with Image plate dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C; Mackinnon, A; Beg, F; Chen, H; Key, M; King, J A; Link, A; MacPhee, A; Patel, P; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Akli, K; Freeman, R

    2008-05-02

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with Image Plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. Electron distributions with slope temperatures in the MeV range are inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment. No radiation remains in a patient's body after an x-ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it convenient for both patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is ... Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to use ...

  3. Chandra's X-ray Vision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999-07-23

    Jul 23, 1999 ... GENERAL I ARTICLE. Chandra's X-ray Vision. K P Singh. Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) is a scientific satellite (moon/ chandra), named after the Indian-born Nobel laureate. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar - one of the foremost astro- physicists of the twentieth century and popularly known as. Chandra.

  4. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation through the ankle, and black and white images of the bones and soft tissues are recorded on a computer or special X-ray film. Dense structures that block the passage of the X-ray beam through the body, such as bones, appear white. Softer body tissues, ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ...

  6. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  7. X-rays from the eclipsing pulsar 1957+20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Bookbinder, J.; Garcia, M. R.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The detection of soft X-rays of about 1 keV energy from the eclipsing pulsar PSR1957+20 is reported. This high-energy radiation should be a valuable diagnostic of the wind in this recycled pulsar system. Possible sources of the X-ray emission are the interstellar nebula driven by the pulsar wind, the interaction between the pulsar and its evaporating companion, and the pulsar itself. The small apparent size of the X-ray object argues against the first of these possibilities and suggests that the X-rays are produced within the binary.

  8. Coherence effects in nuclear bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, H

    The production of nuclear bremsstrahlung (Egamma > 30 MeV) has been studied in heavy-ion collisions, as well as proton and alpha-particle collisions with nuclei. In heavy-ion reactions the measured photon spectra show an exponential shape dominated by the incoherent sum of photons produced in

  9. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  10. X-ray insights into star and planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D

    2010-04-20

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases.

  11. X-Ray Optics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-20

    OF FUNDING NUMBERS Building 410 PORM POET TS OKUI Bolig FBDC2032648ELEMENT NO. NO. NO ACCESiON NO 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) X - Ray Optics Research...by block number) This report describes work conducted during the period I October 1987 through 30 April 1990, under Contract AFOSR-88-00l0, " X - Ray Optics Research...growth and structure of multilayer interfaces. This capability is central to the development of future materials for multilayer x - ray optics , because

  12. Real-time x-ray diffraction measurements of shocked polycrystalline tin and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dane V.; Macy, Don; Stevens, Gerald

    2008-11-01

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35 ns pulse. The characteristic Kα lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic Kβ line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3×6 mm2 spot and 1° full width half maximum angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device camera through a coherent fiber-optic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1 mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  13. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  14. X-ray analysis of nonMaxwellian distributions (current drive)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.

    1983-06-01

    The plasma bremsstrahlung emission is utilized to determine the shape of the electron velocity distribution in situations where it deviates strongly from a Maxwellian distribution. The instrumentation used to measure the hard x-ray emission is briefly discussed. Model calculations show that polarization measurements give best results for unrelativistic tails with tail temperatures T/sub b/ < 50 keV, whereas measurements of the angular distribution of the x-ray emission based on the forward scattering of bremsstrahlung for relativistic electrons yields the best information for T/sub b/ > 50 keV. The techniques were originally developed in order to analyze runaway discharges. Recently, they found new interest because of the formation of energetic electron tails during current drive. The first x-ray results from the current drive during LH heating on PLT are discussed.

  15. Photoionized plasmas induced in neon with extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray pulses produced using low and high energy laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 23 Hery St., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague, Czech Republic and Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    A comparative study of photoionized plasmas created by two soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (SXR/EUV) laser plasma sources with different parameters is presented. The two sources are based on double-stream Xe/He gas-puff targets irradiated with high (500 J/0.3 ns) and low energy (10 J/1 ns) laser pulses. In both cases, the SXR/EUV beam irradiated the gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the radiation pulse. Irradiation of gases resulted in formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the SXR/EUV range. The measured Ne plasma radiation spectra are dominated by emission lines corresponding to radiative transitions in singly charged ions. A significant difference concerns origin of the lines: K-shell or L-shell emissions occur in case of the high and low energy irradiating system, respectively. In high energy system, the electron density measurements were also performed by laser interferometry, employing a femtosecond laser system. A maximum electron density for Ne plasma reached the value of 2·10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. For the low energy system, a detection limit was too high for the interferometric measurements, thus only an upper estimation for electron density could be made.

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  17. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiological technologist preparing to take an arm x-ray on a patient. View ... and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... in evaluating the hips of children with congenital problems. top of page This page was reviewed on ... Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. ... who will discuss the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... is used to: diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... radiation dose for this procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg ( ... x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up ... for a physician to view and assess bone injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and ...

  14. X-ray shout echoing through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 3991 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in hours. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. a flash of X-rays hi-res Size hi-res: 2153 Kb Credits: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays (Please choose "hi-res" version for animation) XMM-Newton's X-ray EPIC camera shows the expanding rings caused by a flash of X-rays scattered by dust in our Galaxy. The X-rays were produced by a powerful gamma-ray burst that took place on 3 December 2003. The slowly fading afterglow of the gamma-ray burst is at the centre of the expanding rings. Other, unrelated, X-ray sources can also be seen. The time since the gamma-ray explosion is shown in each panel in seconds. At their largest size, the rings would appear in the sky about five times smaller than the full moon. This echo forms when the powerful radiation of a gamma-ray burst, coming from far away, crosses a slab of dust in our Galaxy and is scattered by it, like the beam of a lighthouse in clouds. Using the expanding rings to precisely pin-point the location of this dust, astronomers can identify places where new stars and planets are likely to form. On 3 December 2003 ESA's observatory, Integral, detected a burst of gamma rays, lasting about 30 seconds, from the direction of a distant galaxy. Within minutes of the detection, thanks to a sophisticated alert network, many

  15. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  16. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  17. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects The History of ... Sets the Record Straight on Dental X-Rays Types of X-Rays X-Rays Help Predict Permanent ...

  18. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  19. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  20. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  1. Simultaneous modelling of X-ray emission and optical polarization of intermediate polars: the case of V405 Aur

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Lima, I.; Vilega Rodrigues, C.; Medeiros Gomes Silva, K.; Luna, G.; D Amico, F.; Goulart Coelho, J.

    2017-10-01

    Intermediate polars are compact binaries in which mass transfer occurs from a low-mass star onto a magnetic white dwarf. A shock structure is formed in the magnetic accretion column nearby the white-dwarf surface. High-energy emission is produced in the post-shock region and the main physical process envolved is bremsstrahlung and line emission. Some systems show optical polarization, which may be also originated in the post-shock region. Our main goal is to study the magnetic structure of intermediate polars by simultaneously modelling optical polarimetry and X-ray data using the CYCLOPS code. This code was developed by our group to peform multi-wavelength fitting of the accretion column flux. It considers cyclotron and free-free emission from a 3D post-shock region, which is non-homogeneous in terms of density, temperature, and magnetic field. In this study, we present our modelling of the optical polarization and X-ray emission of V405 Aurigae, the intermediate polar that has the highest magnetic field. Previous studies of this system were not successful in proposing a geometry that explains both the optical and X-ray emissions.

  2. Mystery of Cometary X-Rays Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    On July 14, 2000 NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory imaged Comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) and detected X-rays from oxygen and nitrogen ions. The details of the X-ray emission, as recorded on Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, show that they are produced by collisions of ions racing away from the Sun with gas in the comet. "This observation solves one mystery. It proves how comets produce X-rays," said Dr. Carey Lisse of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) leader of a team of scientists from STScI, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Max Planck Institute in Germany, Johns Hopkins University, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "With an instrument like Chandra, we can now study the chemistry of the solar wind, and observe the X-ray glow from the atmospheres of comets as well as planets such as Venus. It may even be possible to observe other, nearby solar systems." Comets, which resemble "dirty snow balls" a few miles in diameter, were thought to be too cold for such energetic emission, so the detection of X-rays by the ROSAT observatory from comet Hyakutake in 1996 was a surprise. Several explanations were suggested, but the source of cometary X-ray emission remained a puzzle until the Chandra observation of Comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR). Chandra's imaging spectrometer revealed a strong X-ray signal from oxygen and nitrogen ions, clinching the case for the production of X-rays due to the exchange of electrons in collisions between nitrogen and oxygen ions in the solar wind and electrically neutral elements (predominantly hydrogen) in the comets atmosphere. The Chandra observation was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on July 14, 2000 for a total of 2 ½ hours. The comet will be re-observed with Chandra during the weeks of July 29 - Aug 13. Comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) was discovered in September 1999 by the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) project, which is operated by the

  3. Soft X-ray spectrometer design for warm dense plasma measurements on DARHT Axis-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, Nicholas Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, John Oliver [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-11

    A preliminary design study is being performed on a soft X-ray spectrometer to measure K-shell spectra emitted by a warm dense plasma generated on Axis-I of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100-ns-long intense, relativistic electron pulse with a beam current of 1.7 kA and energy of 19.8 MeV deposits energy into a thin metal foil heating it to a warm dense plasma. The collisional ionization of the target by the electron beam produces an anisotropic angular distribution of K-shell radiation and a continuum of both scattered electrons and Bremsstrahlung up to the beam energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal goal of this project is to characterize these angular distributions to determine the optimal location to deploy the soft X-ray spectrometer. In addition, a proof-of-principle design will be presented. The ultimate goal of the spectrometer is to obtain measurements of the plasma temperature and density to benchmark equation-of-state models of the warm dense matter regime.

  4. Exploring coherent phenomena and energy discrimination in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Thomas

    2011-05-04

    Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the generation of photons in materials that are selected for different applications according to their densities, dimensions, and atomic numbers. The photons produced in these targets are commonly detected by measuring the integrated amount of energy released in films or digital imaging systems. This thesis aims at extending these two paradigms. First, it is shown that the use of single-crystalline, i.e. well-ordered targets, can significantly soften photon spectra created by megavoltage electrons when compared to usual targets. The reason for this is an effect called ''coherent bremsstrahlung''. It is shown that this type of radiation bears the potential of increasing the quality of megavoltage images and reducing radiation dose for image guided radiotherapy. Second, new spectroscopic pixel detectors of the Medipix2 family operated with cadmium telluride sensors are characterised and thus potential benefits and difficulties for X-ray imaging are investigated. Besides describing in detail how to calibrate these detectors, emphasis is placed on determining their energy responses, modulation transfer functions, and detective quantum efficiencies. Requirements for photon counting megavoltage imaging are discussed. The detector systems studied are finally used to perform spectral computed tomography and to illustrate the benefits of energy discrimination for coherent scatter imaging. (orig.)

  5. Anecdotes about the Early Days of X-Ray Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, A V

    1997-01-01

    An anecdotal description of the trials and tribulations encountered by the first investigators in the field of x-ray optics starting in the late 1940s and how they managed to overcome them is provided. Some of the players, in addition to the author, included Paul Kirkpatrick, Hussein El Sum, and Howard Pattee of Stanford. At the University of Redlands we became interested in producing an x-ray microscope based on the concepts of holography which Dennis Gabor had demonstrated. This led to correspondence with Gabor and the opportunity to meet him and many other investigators at the first International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy and Microradiography held in Cambridge, England, in 1956. With the help of V.E. Cosslett and William Nixon, a point-focus x-ray tube was obtained by the University of Redlands for its experiments in x-ray holography in the1950s.

  6. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cheung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  7. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  8. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  9. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  10. Printable organometallic perovskite enables large-area, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Churl; Kim, Kwang Hee; Son, Dae-Yong; Jeong, Dong-Nyuk; Seo, Ja-Young; Choi, Yeong Suk; Han, In Taek; Lee, Sang Yoon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Medical X-ray imaging procedures require digital flat detectors operating at low doses to reduce radiation health risks. Solution-processed organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites have characteristics that make them good candidates for the photoconductive layer of such sensitive detectors. However, such detectors have not yet been built on thin-film transistor arrays because it has been difficult to prepare thick perovskite films (more than a few hundred micrometres) over large areas (a detector is typically 50 centimetres by 50 centimetres). We report here an all-solution-based (in contrast to conventional vacuum processing) synthetic route to producing printable polycrystalline perovskites with sharply faceted large grains having morphologies and optoelectronic properties comparable to those of single crystals. High sensitivities of up to 11 microcoulombs per air KERMA of milligray per square centimetre (μC mGyair‑1 cm‑2) are achieved under irradiation with a 100-kilovolt bremsstrahlung source, which are at least one order of magnitude higher than the sensitivities achieved with currently used amorphous selenium or thallium-doped cesium iodide detectors. We demonstrate X-ray imaging in a conventional thin-film transistor substrate by embedding an 830-micrometre-thick perovskite film and an additional two interlayers of polymer/perovskite composites to provide conformal interfaces between perovskite films and electrodes that control dark currents and temporal charge carrier transportation. Such an all-solution-based perovskite detector could enable low-dose X-ray imaging, and could also be used in photoconductive devices for radiation imaging, sensing and energy harvesting.

  11. Modelling microscopic features of streamer encounters, electric fields, electron beams and X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, C.; Kochkin, P.; Ebert, U.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms emit terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), beams of photons with quantum energies ofup to 40 MeV. Likewise electric discharges in the laboratory, mimicing lightning on a small spatial andenergetic scale, emit X-rays whose energies are limited by the available potential difference betweenthe two electrodes. For a maximal available difference of 1 MV and a gap distance of 1 m between the twoelectrodes, we will present the energy and spatial distribution of generated X-rays.For that we have followed the motion of preaccelerated, monoenergetic and monodirectional electronbeams with energies between 100 keV and the maximal available energy of 1 MeV for different electricfield configurations using a particle Monte Carlo code. Omitting any field, we present the subsequent energy and spatial distribution of X-raysand analyse how the photon number depends on the initial electron energy. Fig. 1 shows the position and energy of photons generated by Bremsstrahlung after 0.3 ns by beams of 500 000 electrons with initial energies of 1 MeV moving in the zdirection in STP air. The electrons have generated electron avalanches and all have cooleddown and attached to oxygen after 0.3 ns. Every cross represents one photon projected onto the xz plane; the photon energies Eγ are color coded. We see that photons with energies of approx. 1 MeV can be produced and that the high-energy tail of X-rays is beamedtowards the direction of the initial electron beam whereas low-energy photons show a more isotropicbehaviour. Analysing the cross sections of photons interacting with air we conclude that photons travelseveral meters in air and can reach detectors several meters from the position of the discharge. Byestimating the electric field ahead of the discharge corona and by simulating the motion of electronbeams in these fields, we exclude that electrons travel as far as photons and disturb the measured X-raysignal.

  12. Soft x-ray excitonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulet, A.; Bertrand, J. B.; Klostermann, T.; Guggenmos, A.; Karpowicz, N.; Goulielmakis, E.

    2017-09-01

    The dynamic response of excitons in solids is central to modern condensed-phase physics, material sciences, and photonic technologies. However, study and control have hitherto been limited to photon energies lower than the fundamental band gap. Here we report application of attosecond soft x-ray and attosecond optical pulses to study the dynamics of core-excitons at the L2,3 edge of Si in silicon dioxide (SiO2). This attosecond x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (AXANES) technique enables direct probing of the excitons’ quasiparticle character, tracking of their subfemtosecond relaxation, the measurement of excitonic polarizability, and observation of dark core-excitonic states. Direct measurement and control of core-excitons in solids lay the foundation of x-ray excitonics.

  13. X-ray tensor tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  14. Detection of pulsed, bremsstrahlung-induced, prompt neutron capture gamma-rays with HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation technique which uses a pulsed, high-energy (up to 8-MeV) electron accelerator and gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating pulses of bremsstrahlung photons are produced by each pulse of electrons. Interrogating neutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting within a photoneutron source material. The interactions of the neutrons within a target result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the photoneutron-induced prompt gamma-rays acquired between accelerator pulses with a unique, high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detection system using a modified transistor reset preamplifier. The detection system, the experimental configuration, and the accelerator operation used to characterize the detection system performance are described. Using a 6.5 MeV electron accelerator and a beryllium metal photoneutron source, gamma-ray spectra were successfully acquired for Al, Cu, polyethylene, NaC1, and depleted uranium targets as soon as 30 {mu}s after each bremsstrahlung (or x-ray) flash.

  15. Monochromatic Mammographic Imaging Using X-Ray Polycapillary Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugiro, Francisca

    2002-01-01

    .... However, conventionaI laboratory sources normally have insufficient intensity. Polycapillary x-ray optics can be used to efficiently produce an intense parallel beam, which can be diffracted from a crystal to create monochromatic radiation...

  16. Pioneering New Filters for X-ray Astrophysics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to produce filters with holes so small that longer wavelength photons are unable to propagate through, whereas the shorter wavelength x-ray photons simply...

  17. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  18. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  19. Katherine E. Weimer Award: X-ray light sources from laser-plasma and laser-electron interaction: development and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie

    2017-10-01

    Bright sources of x-rays, such as synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) are transformational tools for many fields of science. They are used for biology, material science, medicine, or industry. Such sources rely on conventional particle accelerators, where electrons are accelerated to gigaelectronvolts (GeV) energies. The accelerated particles are wiggled in magnetic structures to emit x-ray radiation that is commonly used for molecular crystallography, fluorescence studies, chemical analysis, medical imaging, and many other applications. One of the drawbacks of these machines is their size and cost, because electric field gradients are limited to about 100 V/M in conventional accelerators. Particle acceleration in laser-driven plasmas is an alternative to generate x-rays via betatron emission, Compton scattering, or bremsstrahlung. A plasma can sustain electrical fields many orders of magnitude higher than that in conventional radiofrequency accelerator structures. When short, intense laser pulses are focused into a gas, it produces electron plasma waves in which electrons can be trapped and accelerated to GeV energies. X-ray sources, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, have unique properties that are analogous to synchrotron radiation, with a 1000-fold shorter pulse. An important use of x-rays from laser plasma accelerators is in High Energy Density (HED) science, which requires laser and XFEL facilities to create in the laboratory extreme conditions of temperatures and pressures that are usually found in the interiors of stars and planets. To diagnose such extreme states of matter, the development of efficient, versatile and fast (sub-picosecond scale) x-ray probes has become essential. In these experiments, x-ray photons can pass through dense material, and absorption of the x-rays can be directly measured, via spectroscopy or imaging, to inform scientists about the temperature and density of the targets being studied. Performed

  20. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  1. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  2. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  3. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false X-ray radiation therapy system. 892.5900 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5900 X-ray radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. An x-ray radiation therapy system is a device intended to produce and control x...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dislocations. In elderly or patients with osteoporosis, a hip fracture may be clearly seen on a CT scan, while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine injury or other ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation ... x-ray images are among the clearest, most detailed views of ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... may be placed over your pelvic area or breasts when feasible to protect from ... chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  9. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor ... shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the ... bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony ...

  11. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle or occult fractures or bone bruises (also called bone contusions or microfractures) not visible on x-ray images. CT is being used widely to assess trauma patients in ... fractures, subtle fractures or dislocations. In elderly or patients ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pelvis and an image is recorded on special film or a computer. This image shows the bones of the pelvis, which include the two hip bones, plus the sacrum and the coccyx (tailbone). The X-ray image is black and white. Dense body parts that block the passage of the X- ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing ... imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little ... way for a physician to view and assess bone injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a physician to view and assess bone injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it ...

  19. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  20. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M.; Cebrian, S.; Davenport, M.; Elefteriadis, C.; Englhauser, J.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Hartmann, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joux, J.N.; Kang, D.; Konigsmann, Kay; Kotthaus, R.; Papaevangelou, T.; Lasseur, C.; Lippitsch, A.; Lutz, G.; Morales, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Struder, L.; Vogel, J.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  1. X-ray optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-05-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce highstrength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications—namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  2. X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce high-strength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications-namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  3. X-rays: what the nurse needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Rebecca

    2017-08-30

    Rationale and key points X-ray imaging is a form of electromagnetic radiation that is able to pass through the human body producing an image of the internal structures. X-rays are one of the main investigations for confirming a suspected diagnosis. Developing an understanding of the underlying mechanism and the rationale for requesting an X-ray will increase nurses' understanding of the process and enable improved patient preparation through explanation and reassurance. This article provides an overview of the fundamental principles underlying the process of obtaining an X-ray. » X-ray imaging is a common diagnostic tool that nurses will encounter on a regular basis. » Several factors affect the production of a clear X-ray image, including patient movement. » Radiation safety and avoidance of unnecessary exposure are paramount. » Co-operation and communication by the multidisciplinary team are vital to ensure that X-ray imaging can be requested, performed, interpreted and acted on, and the findings communicated to the patient.

  4. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  5. Optical and X-ray luminosities of expanding nebulae around ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, Magdalena; Sądowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh; Roberts, Timothy P.; Soria, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    We have performed a set of simulations of expanding, spherically symmetric nebulae inflated by winds from accreting black holes in ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). We implemented a realistic cooling function to account for free-free and bound-free cooling. For all model parameters we considered, the forward shock in the interstellar medium becomes radiative at a radius ˜100 pc. The emission is primarily in optical and UV, and the radiative luminosity is about 50 per cent of the total kinetic luminosity of the wind. In contrast, the reverse shock in the wind is adiabatic so long as the terminal outflow velocity of the wind vw ≳ 0.003c. The shocked wind in these models radiates in X-rays, but with a luminosity of only ˜1035 erg s-1. For wind velocities vw ≲ 0.001c, the shocked wind becomes radiative, but it is no longer hot enough to produce X-rays. Instead it emits in optical and UV, and the radiative luminosity is comparable to 100 per cent of the wind kinetic luminosity. We suggest that measuring the optical luminosities and putting limits on the X-ray and radio emission from shock-ionized ULX bubbles may help in estimating the mass outflow rate of the central accretion disc and the velocity of the outflow.

  6. Modificação da virulência do virus do mixoma provocada pelos raios X Changes in virulence of the mixoma virus produced by X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rocha Lagôa

    1952-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a ação dos raios X sôbre a vírus sêco do mixoma dos coelhos. Ao atingir a incidência dos raios X a concentração de 294.000 r até 378.000, quando desapareceu tôda a atividade patogênica do vírus, nem todos os animais inoculados adquiriam a moléstia, passando a evoluir a mesma em alguns dêsses animais de forma muito mais lenta que a presente nas testemunhas. concordando com esta sintomatologia, o exame histopatológico do material colhido no ponto de lesão mais intensa de animais atacados com mixoma de evolução lenta, revelou a existência de lesões menos extensas e intesas que aquelas presentes nos animais inoculados com o vírus normal, o que mostra terem os raios X determinado uma diminuição da virulência do vírus do mixoma, mas não uma mutação. Os animais inoculados sucessivamente com vírus irradiado acima de 378.000 r, portanto inativados, foram, após 30 dias, inoculados com vírus de virulência íntegra, adquirindo, no entanto, a infecção mixomatosa com todos os caracteres típicos, o que revelou não conservar o vírus do mixoma inativado pelos raios X as suas propriedades antigênicas, não conferindo, portanto, proteção contra inoculações ulteriores de vírus mixomatoso virulento.The action of X Rays on the dried virus of myxoma of the rabbits has been studied. When the incidence of X-Rays reaches the concentration of 294.000 r to 378.000, a dosage which results in the destruction of all the pathogenic activity of the virus, not all the inoculated animals acquired the disease, which, when developing; has in several of these animals, a much slower than in the control animals. In accordance, with this symptomatology, the histopathological study of the material collected on the point of where the lesions are more marked in the animals suffering from a myxomatous infection of slow evolution, shows that the lesions are less extensive and less severe that the ones produced in the animals inoculated

  7. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super...

  8. X-ray spectroscopic characterization of laser produced hot dense plasmas; Caracterisation par spectroscopie X de plasmas chauds et denses crees par lasers de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontogiannopoulos, N

    2007-12-15

    In this work we performed experiments of emission and absorption spectroscopy of laser produced plasmas, to provide well characterized spectral data which permit to benchmark atomic physics codes. More precisely, we produced xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions and studied their emission spectra. In a second experiment, we characterized the absorption spectra of zinc sulfide and aluminium plasmas in LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions.The first two chapters give an outline of the theory involved in the study of the emission and absorption plasma spectroscopy. Chapter 1 describes the different atomic processes occurring in a plasma. The LTE and the NLTE statistics ruling the equilibrium of the atomic processes are presented. Then, we give a brief description of the different codes of plasma atomic physics used in the analysis of our experimental data, namely HULLAC, SCO and TRANSPEC/AVERROES. In Chapter 2 the macroscopic theory of the radiation transport through a plasma is given. We describe also the self-similar model of Basko and the view factor approach, which permits us to calculate the heating conditions of the absorption foils achieved in the interior of the spherical gold cavity. Chapter 3 gives a description of the instruments used for realizing the two experiments, as well as the technical characteristics of the LULI2000 laser facility used to perform the experiments. Chapter 4 presents the experiment realized to characterize the emission spectra of the xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE, as well the analysis of the experimental data with TRANSPEC/AVERROES. Finally, the experiment for measuring the absorption spectrum of the ZnS plasma mixture and the analysis of the experimental data with the code SCO are given in Chapter 5.

  9. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  10. Flexible digital x-ray technology for far-forward remote diagnostic and conformal x-ray imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph; Marrs, Michael; Strnad, Mark; Apte, Raj B.; Bert, Julie; Allee, David; Colaneri, Nicholas; Forsythe, Eric; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    Today's flat panel digital x-ray image sensors, which have been in production since the mid-1990s, are produced exclusively on glass substrates. While acceptable for use in a hospital or doctor's office, conventional glass substrate digital x-ray sensors are too fragile for use outside these controlled environments without extensive reinforcement. Reinforcement, however, significantly increases weight, bulk, and cost, making them impractical for far-forward remote diagnostic applications, which demand rugged and lightweight x-ray detectors. Additionally, glass substrate x-ray detectors are inherently rigid. This limits their use in curved or bendable, conformal x-ray imaging applications such as the non-destructive testing (NDT) of oil pipelines. However, by extending low-temperature thin-film transistor (TFT) technology previously demonstrated on plastic substrate- based electrophoretic and organic light emitting diode (OLED) flexible displays, it is now possible to manufacture durable, lightweight, as well as flexible digital x-ray detectors. In this paper, we discuss the principal technical approaches used to apply flexible display technology to two new large-area flexible digital x-ray sensors for defense, security, and industrial applications and demonstrate their imaging capabilities. Our results include a 4.8″ diagonal, 353 x 463 resolution, flexible digital x-ray detector, fabricated on a 6″ polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) plastic substrate; and a larger, 7.9″ diagonal, 720 x 640 resolution, flexible digital x-ray detector also fabricated on PEN and manufactured on a gen 2 (370 x 470 mm) substrate.

  11. X-ray measurements on wood - spectra measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Kamp; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Gerward, Leif

    The report concerns simultaneous non-destructive measurements of water content and density of wood. Theoretically, this should be possible using a x-ray equipment newly build at BKM, and this work is an attempt to use the equipment for assessing water content and density of wood samples under...... laboratory conditions. A number of wood samples with different densities are placed at different relative humidities from 0.5 to 97 %RH. When equilibrium is obtained the samples are measured with the x-ray equipment such that 10 points are measured in the sample followed by measurements outside the sample...... (free-scanning). In this way 100 points are measured for each wood sample. This produces information about moisture content and density of the samples as water and wood attenuations of the x-rays are different for the different energy levels contained in the x-rays. The "real" density and moisture...

  12. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannavò Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2 and high (1018 W/cm2 intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  13. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Antonino; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Ceccio, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Calcagno, Lucia; Sciuto, Antonella; Mazzillo, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2) and high (1018 W/cm2) intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  14. Analysis of particles produced during airbag deployment by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and their deposition on surrounding surfaces: a mid-research summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J. Matney

    2011-06-01

    Airbags can be encountered in forensic work when investigating a car crash and are typically constructed with primerlike material to begin the deployment apparatus. The mechanisms of airbag deployment can produce particles ideal for scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. A recent study published by Berk studied airbags with vents and showed that it is possible for particles generated from the deployment of these airbags to deposit on surfaces in the vehicle as the airbags deflate.1 Another paper published by Berk reported particles similar in morphology and composition to primer gunshot residue (GSR) are produced by side impact airbags.2 This paper's aim will be to show mid-point results of a study still in progress in which non-vented airbags were analyzed to determine if they exhibited the same particle depositing features as their vented airbag counterparts. Further investigation in this study is being performed to find more airbags which produce primer gunshot residue-like particles containing lead, barium, and antimony from airbag deployment. To date, the study has resulted in (1) non-vented airbags exhibiting deposition of particles suitable for SEM/EDS analysis and (2) no gunshot residue-like particles being detected from the airbag residues studied thus far.

  15. A miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube for an intraoral dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Han Beom; Lee, Ju Hyuk; Cho, Sung Oh [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The number of human teeth that can be radiographically taken is limited. Moreover, at least two X-ray shots are required to get images of teeth from both sides of the mouth. In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional dental radiography, a dental radiograph has been proposed in which an X-ray tube is inserted into the mouth while an X-ray detector is placed outside the mouth. The miniature X-ray tube is required small size to insert into the mouth. Recently, we have fabricated a miniature x-ray tube with the diameter of 7 mm using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field. But, commercialized miniature X-ray tube were adopted a thermionic type using tungsten filament. The X-ray tubes adopted thermionic emission has a disadvantage of increasing temperature of x-ray tube. So it need to cooling system to cool x-ray tube. On the other hands, X-ray tubes adopted CNT field emitters don't need cooling systems because electrons are emitted from CNT by applying high voltage without heating. We have developed the miniature x-ray tube that produce x-ray with uniform spatial distribution based on carbon nanotube field emitters. The fabricated miniature x-ray tube can be stably and reliably operated at 50kV without any vacuum pump. The developed miniature X-ray tube was applied for intraoral dental radiography that employs an intra-oral CNT-based miniature X-ray tube and extra-oral X-ray detectors. An X-ray image of many teeth was successfully obtained by a single X-ray shot using the intra-oral miniature X-ray tube system. Furthermore, images of both molar teeth of pig were simultaneously obtained by a single X-ray shot. These results show that the intraoral dental radiography, which employs an intraoral miniature X-ray tube and an extraoral X-ray detector, performs better than conventional dental radiography.

  16. Development and applications of X ray micro focusing optics

    CERN Document Server

    Ablett, J M

    2001-01-01

    The motivation for this thesis is the design and implementation of novel elliptical x-ray reflective micro-focusing optics. The advancement of x-ray micro-beam applications is a primary objective. Sputtering of a heavy metal onto a spherical substrate can produce the required elliptical profile, and the combination of two mirrors in an orthogonal arrangement can deliver intense x-ray micro-beams at an x-ray synchrotron source. It is believed that this new deposition process offers the best way of obtaining accurate elliptical profiles. Traditionally, reflective x-ray micro-focusing has been achieved by bending a smooth flat substrate, and the new deposition technique renders a much simpler experimental arrangement. Moreover, producing enhanced mirror profiles has the opportunity to provide sub-micron focused x-ray beams with larger apertures and longer working distances. Grazing-incidence rhodium-coated spherical substrates were employed to investigate a variety of systems, using several experimental methods:...

  17. Understanding the Nature of X-ray Weak Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William

    Eddington ratio. Specifically, we will measure if/how the fraction of X-ray weak quasars declines when considering quasar samples with increasing C IV emission-line equivalent width. X-ray spectral measurements will also be used to search for heavy X-ray absorption and Compton-reflection signatures occurring when our line of sight intercepts the thick inner disk. These measurements will clarify if inner-disk shielding plays a broader role in setting the high-ionization emission-line strengths of quasars. Furthermore, our new sample of X-ray weak quasars will let us identify reliably the UV emission-line, UV continuum, and spectral energy distribution properties that trace X-ray weakness, so that physical modeling of identified connections can proceed with confidence. There is mounting evidence that some X-ray weak quasars, including a significant fraction of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, simply lack the means to produce a typical level of X-ray emission. We will utilize both individual spectroscopic and X-ray stacking analyses to determine the frequency of BAL quasars with intrinsically weak Xray emission, thereby clarifying the overall importance of intrinsic X-ray weakness for the launching of quasar winds. Utilizing quasars with multiple X-ray observations, we will also assess how often extreme X-ray variability causes transient X-ray weakness. Finally, given our past results, we expect our greatly improved sample to reveal new unexpected X-ray weak quasars that can provide fresh insights. The proposed program will probe the nature of black holes, explore the extreme physical conditions of the Universe, and investigate outstanding issues in the development of galaxies over cosmic time. It thereby directly addresses NASA's strategic objective to discover how the Universe works, and how it began and evolved (Objective 1.6 of the 2014 NASA Strategic Plan).

  18. Thin Films for X-ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Raymond

    Laue lens, however my advancements in MLL fabrication technology led to new generations of deposition instruments that were better suited. In order to re-purpose the APS Rotary Deposition System, a concept to upgrade the machine with a suborbital planetary is discussed. The APS Modular Deposition System (MDS) is the state of the art instrument that was designed to keep APS at the forefront of x-ray optics technology for the foreseeable future. By including flexibility in the design, the machine is ideally suited for research on all types of multilayers and thin-films for x-ray optics applications. A new method for in-situ surface metrology is presented which relies on the infrastructure provided by the MDS. The chapter concludes with discussion on several types of reflective multilayers that span a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, from soft x-rays (below 5-10 keV) to hard x-rays (above 5-10keV). A method for fabrication of precision elliptically-figured mirrors called profile coating (conceived at the APS) is covered in Chapter 3. Profile-coating is a technique where a specially shaped mask is designed to partially obscure the sputtering source in order to produce a coating with a specially defined film thickness profile perpendicular to substrate translation. Source shape modeling and mask calculation is presented. Initially, Au was used as the filler material for profile coating, however I found that Pt offered better performance. Rh has also been used to fabricate profile-coated KB mirrors. Performance and commissioning results for the APS profile-coating deposition system (another machine designed by myself) is included. Chapter 4 covers my work on multilayer Laue lens. Motivation and current status are presented, and the nomenclature we devised to name the various MLL types is listed. Following this, a theoretical overview is provided. Important advancements I have spearhead in this field are included, such as the introduction of metal silicides, reactive

  19. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  20. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  1. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  2. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless ...

  3. Techniques in X-ray Astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray telescopes in space, leading to a veritable revolution. Stich telescopes require distortion free focusing of X-rays and the use of position sensitive X- ray detectors. In this article I shall describe the importance of X-ray imaging, the optical ...

  4. Toward a New Spectral Modeling Capability for Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Marcu, D.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2013-04-01

    Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near the neutron star compact objects in high mass X-ray binary systems. In such systems the accreting plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field into a funneled supersonic flow onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broadband Comptonized power-law X-ray continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. We are undertaking a new program to develop a spectral analysis tool based on the analytical work of Becker & Wolff (2007) for accreting X-ray pulsar spectra inside the XSPEC spectral analysis framework. We will apply this new analysis tool to the large amount of data on numerous bright accreting X-ray pulsars currently residing in the HEASARC archive. In this presentation we discuss the physical processes that are likely to occur in such a flow and how one might self-consistently model the broadband pulsar X-ray spectrum. A previous attempt at developing such a modeling capability made significant contributions to the understanding of one source in particular, namely, 4U0115+634 (Ferrigno et al. 2010) and we expect to build on that success. Our models will incorporate bremsstrahlung emission, black body emission, and cyclotron emission, all in a strongly Comptonizing environment inside the shock-heated accreting plasma. We will discuss how we will include these physical processes in the calculations as well as the algorithm such a tool will use to converge to a solution. This program is both feasible and timely in light of the expected launch of the LOFT X-ray timing mission. This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysical Data Analysis Program and the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Method for spatially modulating X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2015-03-10

    A method and apparatus are provided for spatially modulating X-rays or X-ray pulses using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based X-ray optics. A torsionally-oscillating MEMS micromirror and a method of leveraging the grazing-angle reflection property are provided to modulate X-ray pulses with a high-degree of controllability.

  6. NIKOLA TESLA AND THE X-RAY

    OpenAIRE

    Rade R. Babic

    2005-01-01

    After professor Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen published his study of an x-ray discovery (Academy Bulletin, Berlin, 08. 11. 1895.), Nikola Tesla published his first study of an x-ray on the 11th of March in 1896. (X-ray, Electrical Review). Until the 11th of August in 1897 he had published ten studies on this subject. All Tesla,s x-ray studies were experimental, which is specific to his work. Studying the nature of the x-ray, he established a new medical branch-radiology. He wrote:” There’s no doubt...

  7. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  8. New trends in space x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Maršíková, V.; Pína, L.; Inneman, A.; Skulinová, M.

    2017-11-01

    The X-ray optics is a key element of various X-ray telescopes, X-ray microscopes, as well as other X-ray imaging instruments. The grazing incidence X-ray lenses represent the important class of X-ray optics. Most of grazing incidence (reflective) X-ray imaging systems used in astronomy but also in other (laboratory) applications are based on the Wolter 1 (or modified) arrangement. But there are also other designs and configurations proposed, used and considered for future applications both in space and in laboratory. The Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) lenses as well as various types of Lobster-Eye optics and MCP/Micropore optics serve as an example. Analogously to Wolter lenses, the X-rays are mostly reflected twice in these systems to create focal images. Various future projects in X-ray astronomy and astrophysics will require large segments with multiple thin shells or foils. The large Kirkpatrick-Baez modules, as well as the large Lobster-Eye X-ray telescope modules in Schmidt arrangement may serve as examples. All these space projects will require high quality and light segmented shells (bent or flat foils) with high X-ray reflectivity and excellent mechanical stability. The Multi Foil Optics (MFO) approach represent a promising alternative for both LE and K-B X-ray optical modules. Several types of reflecting substrates may be considered for these applications, with emphasis on thin float glass sheets and, more recently, high quality silicon wafers. This confirms the importance of non- Wolter X-ray optics designs for the future. Future large space X-ray telescopes (such as IXO) require precise and light-weight X-ray optics based on numerous thin reflecting shells. Novel approaches and advanced technologies are to be exploited and developed. In this contribution, we refer on results of tested X-ray mirror shells produced by glass thermal forming (GTF) and by shaping Si wafers. Both glass foils and Si wafers are commercially available, have excellent surface

  9. Advantages of intermediate X-ray energies in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Hong, Youli; Ge, Xin; Wang, Dajiang; Pan, Zhiyun; Zhu, Peiping; Yun, Wenbing; Jacobsen, Chris; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organizations of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. Light microscopy is a powerful tool for observations of the dynamics of live cells, its resolution attainable is limited and insufficient. While electron microscopy can produce images with astonishing resolution and clarity of ultra-thin (microscopy offers superior imaging resolution compared to light microscopy, and unique capability of nondestructive three-dimensional imaging of hydrated unstained biological cells, complementary to existing light and electron microscopy. Until now, X-ray microscopes operating in the "water window" energy range between carbon and oxygen k-shell absorption edges have produced outstanding 3D images of cryo-preserved cells. The relatively low X-ray energy (phase contrast can overcome the above limitations and reduces radiation dose to the specimen. Using a hydrated model cell with an average chemical composition reported in literature, we calculated the image contrast and the radiation dose for absorption and Zernike phase contrast, respectively. The results show that an X-ray microscope operating at ~2.5 keV using Zernike phase contrast offers substantial advantages in terms of specimen size, radiation dose and depth-of-focus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  11. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  12. X-ray observations of SN 1006 with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalemci, E.; Reynolds, S.P.; Boggs, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    The remnant of the supernova of 1006 AD, the remnant first showing evidence for the presence of X-ray synchrotron emission from shock-accelerated electrons, was observed for similar to 1000 ks with INTEGRAL in order to study electron acceleration to very high energies. The aim of the observation...... was to characterize the synchrotron emission and attempt to detect nonthermal bremsstrahlung using the combination of IBIS and JEM-X spatial and spectral coverage. The source was detected with JEM-X between the 2.4 and 8.4 keV bands and was not detected with either ISGRI or SPI above 20 keV. The ISGRI upper limit...

  13. Toward active x-ray telescopes II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-10-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the observation time required to achieve a given sensitivity has decreased by eight orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope, culminating with the exquisite subarcsecond imaging performance of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (technologically challenging—requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes current progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  14. On stellar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar X-ray astronomy represents an entirely new astronomical discipline which has emerged during the past five years. It lies at the crossroads of solar physics, stellar physics, and general astrophysics. The present review is concerned with the main physical problems which arise in connection with a study of the stellar X-ray data. A central issue is the extent to which the extrapolation from solar physics is justified and the definition (if possible) of the limits to such extrapolation. The observational properties of X-ray emission from stars are considered along with the solar analogy and the modeling of X-ray emission from late-type stars, the modeling of X-ray emission from early-type stars, the physics of stellar X-ray emission, stellar X-ray emission in the more general astrophysical context, and future prospects.

  15. Monitoring moisture movements in building materials using x-ray attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Scheffler, Gregor A.; Janssen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    X-ray attenuation measurements are commonly used as a non-destructive method to monitor internal concentration changes of moisture (i.e., moisture content) and other chemical compounds in porous building materials. The technique provides direct measurements of moisture content changes through......, consistent energy) and that interactions between the x-ray photons and the materials (water and porous material) are independent. However, x-ray sources typically used by researchers in this field of study produce x-ray photon beams over a spectrum of energy levels, or polychromatic x-ray photons...... analysis with a composite model consisting of a dry porous material and a thickness of water equivalent to the moisture content of the material. The current formulation of this composite model relies on certain assumptions, including a monochromatic x-ray photon beam source (i.e., x-ray photons of a single...

  16. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  17. X-ray (17 -- 99-keV) diagnostics for the 200-TW Trident Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobble, James; Workman, Jonathan; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2008-11-01

    The sub-ps Trident laser can deliver >100 J on target. The target irradiance is ˜10^20 W/cm^2. X-ray diagnostics include a Laue x-ray spectrograph, a Ross filter pair to measure conversion efficiency of laser light to K-shell emission, and a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. For the Laue instrument, we discuss design features used to limit corruption of the recorded spectra by ˜MeV electrons and bremsstrahlung: a tungsten shield in the front, low-Z, thick-wall construction materials, magnetic traps, light traps, and a special sandwich-style film holder. For the Laue geometry where a LiF 200 crystal has a bandpass of 17 - 70 keV, LiF 220 shifts the bandpass to 24 - 99 keV. The sensitivity of Si p-i-n diodes is adequate to record x-ray emission up to ˜100 keV. With a carefully matched Ross filter pair, we may estimate the signal between the filter edges of two channels through subtraction of signals. The K-shell emission is expected to exceed the continuum contribution to the signal. These instruments will be employed to optimize the efficiency of x-ray backlighters in this energy range. The x-ray CCD is discussed in a parallel poster.

  18. Comparison of two models for the X-ray dispersion produced in a Novillo Tokamak with measurements make with thermoluminescent dosemeters; Comparacion de dos modelos para la dispersion de rayos X producidos en un Novillo Tokamak con mediciones efectuadas con dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores O, A.; Castillo, A.; Barocio, S.R.; Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Cruz C, G.J.; Lopez, R.; Olayo, M.G.; Gonzalez M, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    It was presented the results to study about the X-ray dispersion produced in the Novillo Tokamak using thermoluminescent dosemeters (DTL). The measurements were make in the equatorial plane of Tokamak, along twelve radial directions. The dispersion is observed due to the radiation interaction with walls surrounding the machine. It was proposed two types of heuristic mathematical methods for describing the X-ray dispersion, comparing them with the experimental data obtained with Dtl. The predictions of both models are adjusted well to the experimental data. (Author)

  19. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  20. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  1. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  2. Bremsstrahlung-induced highly penetrating probes for nondestructive assay and defect analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Selim, F A; Harmon, J F; Kwofie, J; Spaulding, R; Erickson, G; Roney, T

    2002-01-01

    Nondestructive assay and defect analysis probes based on bremsstrahlung-induced processes have been developed to identify elements and probe defects in large volume samples. Bremsstrahlung beams from (electron accelerators) with end-point energies both above and below neutron emission threshold have been used. Below neutron emission threshold these beams (from 6 MeV small pulsed linacs), which exhibit high penetration, create positrons via pair production inside the material and produce X-ray fluorescence (XRF) radiation. Chemical assays of heavy elements in thick samples up to 10 g/cm sup 2 thick are provided by energy dispersive XRF measurements. The pair-produced positrons annihilate within the material, thereby emitting 511 keV gamma radiation. Doppler broadening spectroscopy of the 511 keV radiation can be performed to characterize the material and measure defects in samples of any desired thickness. This technique has successfully measured induced strain due to tensile stress in steel samples of 0.64 cm...

  3. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. [Ritsumeikan Univ., Shiga (Japan); Amano, D.; Miyade, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tanashi-City (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  4. A HARD X-RAY POWER-LAW SPECTRAL CUTOFF IN CENTAURUS X-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Nowak, Michael A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [Division of Astrophysics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, William W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wilms, Jörn, E-mail: deepto@mit.edu [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1×10{sup 33} D{sub kpc}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1}, with ≅60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT{sub e} = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245–2452, and XSS J12270–4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  5. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  6. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  7. 11th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ciaran L. S; X-Ray Lasers 2008

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a thorough account of the current status of achievements made in the area of soft X-ray laser source development and of the increasingly diverse applications being demonstrated using such radiation sources. There is significant effort worldwide to develop very bright, short duration radiation sources in the X-ray spectral region – driven by the multitude of potential applications in all branches of science. This book contains updates on several different approaches for comparative purposes but concentrates on developments in the area of laser-produced plasmas, whereby transient population inversion and gain between ion states is pumped by optical lasers interacting with pre-formed plasmas. The most significant development here is the demonstrated increasing feasibility to produce useful soft X-ray laser beams with high repetition rates in a typical, small, university-class laboratory – as opposed to the requirement of access to a national facility some 20 years ago. Experimental progres...

  8. Catalyst analysis using synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. W.; Spanne, P.; Webb, S. W.; Conner, W. C.; Beyerlein, R. A.; Reagan, W. J.; Dautzenberg, F. M.

    1991-05-01

    Synchrotron X-ray microscopy techniques have been used to characterize several different types of heterogeneous catalysts. Using a collimator to produce microbeams with a size of less than 10μm, maps of the elemental distributions based on detection of the fluorescent X-rays were made, and computed microtomography (CMT) techniques were applied to produce " phase/density contrast" maps. CMT techniques were also used to determine the distribution of a specific major element by making measurements above and below the K X-ray absorption edge. The measurements were made using bending magnet radiation and, in one case, radiation from a 4 T superconducting wiggler at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Examples of applications to the study of polyethylene polymerization particles, fluid catalytic cracking catalysts, and hydrotreating catalysts are given.

  9. Development and evaluation of gallium nitride-based thin films for x-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D.; Stutzmann, Martin; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    X-ray radiation plays an important role in medical procedures ranging from diagnostics to therapeutics. Due to the harm such ionizing radiation can cause, it has become common practice to closely monitor the dosages received by patients. To this end, precise online dosimeters have been developed with the dual objectives of monitoring radiation in the region of interest and improving therapeutic methods. In this work, we evaluate GaN thin film high electron mobility heterostructures with sub-mm2 detection areas as x-ray radiation detectors. Devices were tested using 40-300 kV Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources. We find that the photoconductive device response exhibits a large gain, is almost independent of the angle of irradiation, and is constant to within 2% of the signal throughout this medical diagnostic x-ray range, indicating that these sensors do not require recalibration for geometry or energy. Furthermore, the devices show a high sensitivity to x-ray intensity and can measure in the air kerma rate (free-in-air) range of 1 µGy s-1 to 10 mGy s-1 with a signal stability of ±1% and a linear total dose response over time. Medical conditions were simulated by measurements of device responses to irradiation through human torso phantoms. Direct x-ray imaging is demonstrated using the index finger and wrist sections of a human phantom. The results presented here indicate that GaN-based thin film devices exhibit a wide range of properties, which make them promising candidates for dosimetry applications. In addition, with potential detection volumes smaller than 10-6 cm3, they are well suited for high-resolution x-ray imaging. Moreover, with additional engineering steps, these devices can be adapted to potentially provide both in vivo biosensing and x-ray dosimetry.

  10. Eta Carinae's Thermal X-Ray Tail Measured with XMM-Newton and NuStar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore R.; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian; Yuasa, Takayuki; Stuhlinger, Martin; Russell, Christopher; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Madura, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The evolved, massive highly eccentric binary system, Car, underwent a periastron passage in the summer of 2014. We obtained two coordinated X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the elevated X-ray flux state and just before the X-ray minimum flux state around this passage. These NuSTAR observations clearly detected X-ray emission associated with eta Car extending up to approx. 50 keV for the first time. The NuSTAR spectrum above 10 keV can be fit with the bremsstrahlung tail from a kT approx. 6 keV plasma. This temperature is delta kT 2 keV higher than those measured from the iron K emission line complex, if the shocked gas is in collisional ionization equilibrium. This result may suggest that the companion star's pre-shock wind velocity is underestimated. The NuSTAR observation near the X-ray minimum state showed a gradual decline in the X-ray emission by 40% at energies above 5 keV in a day, the largest rate of change of the X-ray flux yet observed in individual eta Car observations. The column density to the hardest emission component, N(sub H) approx. 10(exp24) H cm(exp-2), marked one of the highest values ever observed for eta Car, strongly suggesting the increased obscuration of the wind-wind colliding X-ray emission by the thick primary stellar wind prior to superior conjunction. Neither observation detected the power-law component in the extremely hard band that INTEGRAL and Suzaku observed prior to 2011. The power-law source might have faded before these observations.

  11. Development and evaluation of gallium nitride-based thin films for x-ray dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Markus; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2011-06-07

    X-ray radiation plays an important role in medical procedures ranging from diagnostics to therapeutics. Due to the harm such ionizing radiation can cause, it has become common practice to closely monitor the dosages received by patients. To this end, precise online dosimeters have been developed with the dual objectives of monitoring radiation in the region of interest and improving therapeutic methods. In this work, we evaluate GaN thin film high electron mobility heterostructures with sub-mm(2) detection areas as x-ray radiation detectors. Devices were tested using 40-300 kV Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources. We find that the photoconductive device response exhibits a large gain, is almost independent of the angle of irradiation, and is constant to within 2% of the signal throughout this medical diagnostic x-ray range, indicating that these sensors do not require recalibration for geometry or energy. Furthermore, the devices show a high sensitivity to x-ray intensity and can measure in the air kerma rate (free-in-air) range of 1 µGy s(-1) to 10 mGy s(-1) with a signal stability of ±1% and a linear total dose response over time. Medical conditions were simulated by measurements of device responses to irradiation through human torso phantoms. Direct x-ray imaging is demonstrated using the index finger and wrist sections of a human phantom. The results presented here indicate that GaN-based thin film devices exhibit a wide range of properties, which make them promising candidates for dosimetry applications. In addition, with potential detection volumes smaller than 10(-6) cm(3), they are well suited for high-resolution x-ray imaging. Moreover, with additional engineering steps, these devices can be adapted to potentially provide both in vivo biosensing and x-ray dosimetry.

  12. Intense picosecond x-rays from structured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsar, Gabor

    Laser plasmas from a new type of nanostructured surface are studied. This nanowire surface is especially useful as a very high absorption target for high power (1 TW) subpicosecond laser-matter interaction. The ensemble of oriented 10-200 nm metallic fibers of this material have linear absorption of 1 m m light greater than 95%. When irradiated by 1 ps pulses at intensities up to 1017 W/cm-2, these targets produce a pulse of x-rays (average energy > 1.5 keV) 30 times more efficiently than do uniform solid targets, while preserving several-picosecond emission times. X-ray conversion efficiencies from the nanowire target and from previously investigated grating and `smoke' targets are compared to those of flat targets for various angles of incidence and polarizations. Streak camera results show that a bright picosecond measure x-ray pulse is emitted from the near-solid density plasma created from the nanowire target. The measured x-ray pulse length is resolution-limited ( glass system is based on a feedback-controlled mode-locked oscillator capable of providing high contrast 1 ps pulses at a wavelength of 1.054 m m, with energies up to 5 m J/pulse. The characteristics of the CPA system are described. A new detector was developed to measure absolute x-ray yield, in various spectral ranges, radiated from the solid-density plasma. A calibrated silicon PIN photodiode connected to a charge-sensitive amplifier circuit allows x-ray yield measurements from picosecond pulses. If properly filtered the detector can measure the amount of x-rays radiated in a narrow spectral range. The electrical and spectral characteristics of the PIN photodiode detectors are given.

  13. Mutual control of X-rays and nuclear transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunst, Jonas Friedrich

    2015-12-14

    In the course of this Thesis the mutual control between X-rays and nuclear transitions is investigated theoretically. In the first Part, we study the nuclear photoexcitation with the highly brilliant and coherent X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Apart from amplifying the direct resonant interaction with nuclear transitions, the super-intense XFEL can produce new states of matter like cold, high-density plasmas where secondary nuclear excitation channels may come into play, e.g., nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC). Our results predict that in the case of {sup 57}Fe targets secondary NEEC can be safely neglected, whereas it is surprisingly the dominating contribution (in comparison to the direct photoexcitation) for the XFEL-induced {sup 93m}Mo isomer triggering. Based on these case studies, we elaborate a general set of criteria to identify the prevailing excitation channel for a certain nuclear isotope. These criteria may be most relevant for future nuclear resonance experiments at XFEL facilities. On the opposite frontier, the interplay between single X-ray photons and nuclear transitions offer potential storage and processing applications for information science in their most compact form. In the second Part of this Thesis, we show that nuclear forward scattering off {sup 57}Fe targets can be employed to process polarization-encoded single X-rays via timed magnetic field rotations. Apart from the realization of logical gates with X-rays, the polarization encoding is used to design an X-ray quantum eraser scheme where the interference between scattering paths can be switched off and on in a controlled manner. Such setups may advance time-energy complementarity tests to so far unexplored parameter regimes, e.g., to the domain of X-ray quanta.

  14. The X-ray corona of Procyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray emission from the nearby system Procyon A/B (F5 IV + DF) was detected, using the IPC (Imaging Proportional Counter) on board the Einstein Observatory. Analysis of the X-ray pulse height spectrum suggests that the observed X-ray emission originates in Procyon A rather than in the white dwarf companion Procyon B, since the derived X-ray temperature, log T = 6.2, agrees well with temperatures found for quiescent solar X-ray emission. Modeling Procyon's corona with loops characterized by some apex temperature Tmax and emission length scale L, it is found that Tmax is well constrained, but L, and consequently the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas, are essentially unconstrained even when EUV emission from the transition region is included in the analysis.

  15. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  16. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2.

  17. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Andrew M; Boone, John M

    2014-04-01

    Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R(2)) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, "Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector," Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505-517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 keV at 20 kV and 169 keV at 640 k

  18. Chandra ACIS Observations of Jovian X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, Gordon; Elsner, Ronald; Feigelson, Eric; Ford, Peter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Hurley, Kevin; Metzger, Albert; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On November 25 and 26, 1999, the Chandra X-ray spacecraft conducted a set of four 19,000 sec observations of Jupiter. The ACIS-S instrument configuration was used for its good low energy efficiency and spatial resolution. An anomalous response was obtained which was subsequently attributed to strong jovian infrared radiation penetrating the detector and piling up spurious events across the entire X-ray range. However, the pre-observation establishment of an offsetting bias field has allowed the recovery of data from that portion of Jupiter's disc which remained within the elevated portion of the bias field during the observation. This ranges from fewer than 3000 sec to the entire observing time for about 10% of the planet. Auroral emission is seen near both poles in each observation. The northern aurora ia overall more intense than the southern, consistent with prior Einstein and ROSAT Observatory results. The southern aurora shows more modulation with Jupiter's rotation than the northern. Spatial resolution has been improved by at least a factor of two over prior measurements but convincing evidence of structure has not been seen. Lower latitude emission, first observed by ROSAT, is confirmed with flux levels averaging more than a factor of five below peak auroral values. Pronounced variation in the observed emission has occurred over the observing period. The spectral response extends from 0.24 keV, below which noise dominates, to about 1.2 keV. For all four observations the spectrum is clearly enhanced between 0.45 and 0.85 keV. This is apparently unequivocal evidence that Jupiter's X-ray emission is the result of oxygen and perhaps sulfur ions precipitating into the planet's atmosphere, where they undergo charge exchange interactions. The identification of specific transitions lines in the spectrum is among the ongoing efforts. A bremsstrahlung component has not yet been identified.

  19. Handbook of X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith; Smith, Randall; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Ellis, Richard; Huchra, John; Kahn, Steve; Rieke, George; Stetson, Peter B.

    2011-11-01

    Practical guide to X-ray astronomy for graduate students, professional astronomers and researchers. Presenting X-ray optics, basic detector physics and data analysis. It introduces the reduction and calibration of X-ray data, scientific analysis, archives, statistical issues and the particular problems of highly extended sources. The appendices provide reference material often required during data analysis. The handbook web page contains figures and tables: http://xrayastronomyhandbook.com/

  20. Sandia Mark II X-Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, L.W.

    1979-11-01

    The Sandia Mark II X-Ray System was designed and developed to provide an intense source of mononergetic, ultra-soft x rays with energies between 0.282 and 1.486 keV. The x-ray tube design is similar to one developed by B.L. Henke and incorporates modifications made by Tom Ellsberry. An operations manual section is incorporated to help the experimenter/operator.

  1. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  2. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  3. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  4. Detector development for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, M. A.; Herr, D. A.; Brewer, K. J.; Ojason, N.; Tarpine, H. A.

    2010-02-01

    X-ray imaging requires unique optical detector system configuration for optimization of image quality, resolution, and contrast ratio. A system is described whereby x-ray photons from multiple anode sources create a series of repetitive images on fast-decay scintillator screens, from which an intensified image is transferred to a fast phosphor on a GEN II image intensifier and collected as a cineradiographic video with high speed digital imagery. The work addresses scintillator material formulation, flash x-ray implementation, image intensification, and high speed video processing and display. Novel determination of optimal scintillator absorption, x-ray energy and dose relationships, contrast ratio determination, and test results are presented.

  5. X-ray Observations of "Recycled" Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-11-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has been instrumental in establishing the X-ray properties of the Galactic population of rotation-powered ("recycled") millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will provide a summary of deep X-ray studies of globular cluster millisecond pulsars, as well as several nearby field millisecond pulsars. These include thermally-emitting recycled pulsars that may provide stringent constraints on the elusive neutron star equation of state, and so-called "redback" binary pulsars, which seem to sporadically revert to an X-ray binary-like state.

  6. X-ray spectrometry using polycapillary X-ray optics and position sensitive detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Xie, J; He, Y; Pan, Q; Yan, Y

    2000-10-02

    Polycapillary X-ray optics (capillary X-ray lens) are now popular in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Such an X-ray lens can collect X-rays emitted from an X-ray source in a large solid angle and form a very intense X-ray microbeam which is very convenient for microbeam X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) analysis giving low minimum detection limits (MDLs) in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). A new method called position sensitive X-ray spectrometry (PSXS) which combines an X-ray lens used to form an intense XRF source and a position sensitive detector (PSD) used for wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS) measurement was developed recently in the X-ray Optics Laboratory of Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics (ILENP) at Beijing Normal University. Such a method can give high energy and spacial resolution and high detection efficiency simultaneously. A short view of development of both the EDXRF using a capillary X-ray lens and the new PSXS is given in this paper.

  7. Accretion Disks and Coronae in the X-Ray Flashlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenaar, Nathalie; Ballantyne, David R.; Belloni, Tomaso; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Chen, Yu-Peng; Ji, Long; Kretschmar, Peter; Kuulkers, Erik; Li, Jian; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Malzac, Julien; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2018-02-01

    Plasma accreted onto the surface of a neutron star can ignite due to unstable thermonuclear burning and produce a bright flash of X-ray emission called a Type-I X-ray burst. Such events are very common; thousands have been observed to date from over a hundred accreting neutron stars. The intense, often Eddington-limited, radiation generated in these thermonuclear explosions can have a discernible effect on the surrounding accretion flow that consists of an accretion disk and a hot electron corona. Type-I X-ray bursts can therefore serve as direct, repeating probes of the internal dynamics of the accretion process. In this work we review and interpret the observational evidence for the impact that Type-I X-ray bursts have on accretion disks and coronae. We also provide an outlook of how to make further progress in this research field with prospective experiments and analysis techniques, and by exploiting the technical capabilities of the new and concept X-ray missions ASTROSAT, NICER, Insight-HXMT, eXTP, and STROBE-X.

  8. X-ray reverberation around accreting black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, P.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Wilkins, D. R.

    2014-08-01

    Luminous accreting stellar mass and supermassive black holes produce power-law continuum X-ray emission from a compact central corona. Reverberation time lags occur due to light travel time delays between changes in the direct coronal emission and corresponding variations in its reflection from the accretion flow. Reverberation is detectable using light curves made in different X-ray energy bands, since the direct and reflected components have different spectral shapes. Larger, lower frequency, lags are also seen and are identified with propagation of fluctuations through the accretion flow and associated corona. We review the evidence for X-ray reverberation in active galactic nuclei and black hole X-ray binaries, showing how it can be best measured and how it may be modelled. The timescales and energy dependence of the high-frequency reverberation lags show that much of the signal is originating from very close to the black hole in some objects, within a few gravitational radii of the event horizon. We consider how these signals can be studied in the future to carry out X-ray reverberation mapping of the regions closest to black holes.

  9. pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, John A.; Hallman, Eric. J.

    2016-08-01

    pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

  10. A pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G R; Waite, J H; Grodent, D; Lewis, W S; Crary, F J; Elsner, R F; Weisskopf, M C; Majeed, T; Jahn, J-M; Bhardwaj, A; Clarke, J T; Young, D T; Dougherty, M K; Espinosa, S A; Cravens, T E

    2002-02-28

    Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions. Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared and ultraviolet emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths.

  11. Composite materials for x-ray protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, M.J.; Mawdsley, G.E.; Lilley, M.; Servant, R.; Reh, G. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario, (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation protection material that provides similar attenuation for diagnostic x-ray spectra to that of conventional Pb apron materials with approximately 30% reduced weight. By combining a number of elements with different K absorption energies, such as Ba, W, and Pb, energy attenuation for given spectra can be optimized with respect to total cross-sectional mass loading. Alternatively, garments with much higher protective factors at equivalent weight to conventional garments could be produced. The reduction in the amount of Pb used also reduces problems associated with the toxicity of the material during manufacture and disposal. Back strain can be reduced for personnel performing special radiological procedures that require wearing protective garments for long periods of time.

  12. X-ray diffraction with novel geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopiou, Danae [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Rogers, Keith, E-mail: k.d.rogers@cranfield.ac.uk [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Evans, Paul; Godber, Simon [Imaging Science Group, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University Clifton Campus, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Shackel, James [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Dicken, Anthony [Imaging Science Group, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University Clifton Campus, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-21

    An innovative geometry for high efficiency harvesting of diffracted X-rays is explored. Further to previous work where planar samples were fixed normal to the primary axis, this work extends focal construct geometry (FCG), to samples randomly oriented with respect to the incident beam. The effect of independent sample rotation around two axes upon the scattering distributions was investigated in analytical, simulation and empirical manners. It was found that, although the profile of Bragg maxima were modified when the sample was rotated, high intensity diffraction data was still acquired. Modelling produced a good match to the empirical data and it was shown that the distortions caused by sample rotation were not severe and predictable even when sample rotations were large. The implications for this are discussed.

  13. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  14. Simulation of Bremsstrahlung production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patau, J.P.; Malbert, M.; Terrissol, M. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    Electron slowing down and related phenomena are often greatly affected by bremsstrahlung production. Each creation of photon is individually simulated on the basis of a cross-section pack advised by Koch and Motz with corrections in the high energy frequency limit region. An accurate and fast sampling method is described. Its applicability covers a range between 50 keV and 80 MeV for target atoms whose atomic number is from 5 up to 90.

  15. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation.

  16. Skull x-ray in the evaluation of endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Li, Y P; Hindo, W

    1978-06-01

    The skull x-ray remains invaluable as a first step in the diagnosis of many endocrine disorders. Pituitary tumors commonly cause enlargement or distortion of the sella turcica, which can be seen on skull x-ray. Pinealomas and craniopharyngiomas may also be detected. Hyperparathyroidism can cause granular decalcification in the skull. Hypoparathyroidism produces calcification of the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Lesions due due to metastatic malignancies or eosinophilic granulomas may be noted in cases of diabetes insipidus. Sellar enlargement may be due to the "empty sella" syndrome. Twenty-five percent of all cases of enlarged sella may be accounted for by this syndrome.

  17. Screening in resonant X-ray emission of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Hans; Luo, Yi; Gelmukhanov, Faris

    1996-01-01

    We explore the effects of screening in resonant X-ray emission from molecules by means of unconstrained multi-configurational self-consistent field optimizations of each state involved in the resonant and nonresonant X-ray processes. It is found that, although screening can produce shifts...... in transition energies of a few eV, its effect on the transition intensities is relatively minor. Using results from the investigated molecules, we find that the screening is quite dependent on the type of molecule - saturated versus unsaturated - and on the core site, but depends little on the particular core...

  18. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  19. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertin, F., E-mail: fauzia.albertin@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Astolfo, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); ETHZ, Zürich (Switzerland); Peccenini, Eva [University of Ferrara (Italy); Technopole of Ferrara (Italy); Hwu, Y. [Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kaplan, F. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-01-30

    The heavy-element content of ink in ancient administrative documents makes it possible to detect the characters with different synchrotron imaging techniques, based on attenuation or refraction. This is the first step in the direction of non-interactive virtual X-ray reading. Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project.

  20. Vanadium Oxidation State Determination by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Marc A.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Hu, Yongfeng; MacLennan, Aimee; Hughes, Robin W.; Bennett, James; Nakano, Anna

    Vanadium is found in slags produced during metal refinement and fossil fuel combustion/gasification. The oxidation state of vanadium in slag has technological and environmental implications. For example, it may affect slag flow and refractory wear inside reactors, as well as leachability and toxicity of industrial by-products. Determination of vanadium's oxidation state in crystalline phases can be achieved via the widely adopted X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. However, this technique does not provide information on vanadium in amorphous phases. The objective of this research is to determine the oxidation state of vanadium in petroleum coke gasification samples and laboratory samples using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Canadian Light Source's soft X-ray micro-characterization beamline (SXRMB). Linear combination fitting of XAS spectra with reference samples allowed quantitative determination of vanadium speciation.

  1. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  2. Jovian X-Ray Aurora and Energetic Oxygen Ion Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weihong; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-11-20

    The X-ray line spectra of highly charged oxygen ions excited by charge transfer interaction with the molecular hydrogen in the auroral atmosphere of Jupiter are calculated. The calculations utilize our calculated cross sections of state-selective charge transfer and the available cross-section data of ionization and stripping. Comparison of these spectra with high-resolution spectral observations may provide a sensitive probe of the characteristics of the heavy ions precipitating into the Jovian auroral atmosphere. On the basis of the much higher X-ray efficiency of heavy ions than of electrons, it is concluded that the Jovian aurora may be accounted for by a combination of energetic heavy-ion precipitation and energetic electron precipitation, which produces the auroral X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, respectively. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  3. Short-time X-ray diffraction with an efficient-optimized, high repetition-rate laser-plasma X-ray-source; Kurzzeit-Roentgenbeugung mit Hilfe einer Effizienz-optimierten, hochrepetierenden Laser-Plasma-Roentgenquelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaehle, Stephan

    2009-04-23

    This thesis deals with the production and application of ultrashort X-ray pulses. In the beginning different possibilities for the production of X-ray pulses with pulse durations of below one picosecond are presented, whereby the main topic lies on the so called laser-plasma X-ray sources with high repetition rate. In this case ultrashort laser pulses are focused on a metal, so that in the focus intensities of above 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} dominate. In the ideal case in such way ultrafast electrons are produced, which are responsible for line radiation. In these experiments titanium K{sub {alpha}} radiation is produced, thes photons possess an energy of 4.51 keV. For the efficient production of line radiation here the Ti:Sa laser is optimized in view of the laser energy and the pulse shape and the influence of the different parameters on the K{sub {alpha}} production systematically studied. The influences of laser intensity, system-conditioned pre-pulses and of phase modulation are checked. It turns out that beside the increasement of the K{sub {alpha}} radiation by a suited laser intensity a reduction of the X-ray background radiation is of deciding importance for the obtaining of clear diffraction images. This background radiation is mainly composed of bremsstrahlung. It can be suppressed by the avoidance of intrinsic pre-pulses and by means of 2nd-order phase modulation. By means of optical excitation and X-ray exploration experiments the production of acoustic waves after ultrashort optical excitation in a 150 nm thick Ge(111) film on Si(111) is studied. These acoustic waves are driven by thermal (in this time scale time-independent) and electronic (time dependent) pressure amounts. As essential results it turns out that the relative amount of the electronic pressure increases with decreasing excitation density. [German] Diese Arbeit befasst sich mit der Erzeugung und Anwendung ultrakurzer Roentgenimpulse. Zu Beginn werden verschiedene Moeglichkeiten zur

  4. Combined x-ray/electron/optical Monte Carlo code based on PENELOPE and DETECT-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Sempau, Josep; Boswell, Jonathan S.

    2005-04-01

    We describe MANTIS (Monte carlo x-rAy electroN opTical Imaging Simulation), a tool for simulating imaging systems that tracks x rays, electrons, and optical photons in the same geometric model. The x-ray and electron transport and involved physics models are from the PENELOPE package and include elastic and inelastic scattering, and bremsstrahlung from 100 eV to 1 GeV. The optical transport and corresponding physics models are from DETECT-II and include Fresnel refraction and reflection at material boundaries, bulk absorption and scattering. X rays are generated using the flexible source description from PENELOPE. When x rays or electrons interact and deposit energy in the scintillator, the code generates a number of optical quanta at that location, according to a model for the conversion process. The optical photons are then tracked until they reach an absorption event that in some cases contributes to the electronic signal. We demonstrate the capabilities of the new tool with respect to x-ray source, object to be imaged, and detector models. Of particular importance is the improved geometric description of structured phosphors that can handle tilted columns in needle-like phosphor screens. Examples of the simulation output with respect to signal blur and pulse-height distributions of the scintillation light are discussed and compared with previously published experimental results.

  5. Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

    2006-09-11

    Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

  6. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  7. Mapping misoriented fibers using X-ray dark field tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal; Feidenhans’l, Robert

    2014-01-01

    X-ray grating interferometers produce three distinct signals; an absorption signal, a differential phase signal and a dark field signal. Until now a method for successfully creating dark field tomograms of nonisotropic samples has not been demonstrated. In this paper we test a method for creating...

  8. X-ray reverberation around accreting black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uttley, P.; Cackett, E.M.; Fabian, A.C.; Kara, E.; Wilkins, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Luminous accreting stellar mass and supermassive black holes produce power-law continuum X-ray emission from a compact central corona. Reverberation time lags occur due to light travel time delays between changes in the direct coronal emission and corresponding variations in its reflection from the

  9. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  10. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    rage atomic arrangement of the atoms. It may be noted that in X-ray holography methods, the concept of unit cell is not required. We know from the optical reciprocity principle that if we exchange the detector with the source, then we obtain the same experiment. We now have a source in the far field producing a plane wave ...

  11. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  12. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    ray Analysis, 18, 26 (1975). practicA !ity of thermal recording of intense x-rays. 2. R.P. Godwin, Adv. in X-rays Analysis, 19, 533 Many optical...the 15. T. W. Barbee Jr., in "National Science Foundation behavior of LSM dispersion elements. - Twenty Sixth Annual Report for Fiscal Year Extension

  13. Instrumental technique in X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed review of the development of instruments for X-ray astronomy is given with major emphasis on nonfocusing high-sensitivity counter techniques used to detect cosmic photons in the energy range between 0.20 and 300 keV. The present status of X-ray astronomy is summarized together with significant results of the Uhuru observations, and photon interactions of importance for the detection of X-rays in space are noted. The three principal devices used in X-ray astronomy (proportional, scintillation, and solid-state counters) are described in detail, data-processing systems for these devices are briefly discussed, and the statistics of nuclear counting as applied to X-ray astronomy is outlined analytically. Effects of the near-earth X-ray environment and atmospheric gamma-ray production on X-ray detection by low-orbit satellites are considered. Several contemporary instruments are described (proportional-counter systems, scintillation-counter telescopes, modulation collimators), and X-ray astronomical satellite missions are tabulated.

  14. X-ray Galaxy Clusters & Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2011-09-01

    I present a summary of the four lectures given on these topics: (i) Galaxy Clusters in a cosmological context: an introduction; (ii) Galaxy Clusters in X-ray: how and what we observe, limits and prospects; (iii) X-ray Galaxy Clusters and Cosmology: total mass, gas mass & systematics; (iv) Properties of the ICM: scaling laws and metallicity.

  15. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  16. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Those were the days when Science was hovering around the wave–particle duality. William. Henry Bragg was toying with the idea that X-rays are particles and the observation made by Max von Laue that X-rays are diffracted by crystals could indeed lead to the understanding of crystal structures. On the other hand, his son, ...

  17. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS. 1915+105 and the Evolution of Hard X-ray Spectrum. R. K. Manchanda, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India,. Received 1999 December 28; accepted 2000 February 9. Abstract. We report the spectral measurement of GRS 1915+105 ...

  18. Evidence For Quasi-Periodic X-ray Dips From An Ultraluminous X-ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approx.1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6 +/- 4 days, the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve, and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243 +/- 23 days, in contrast to the 115.5 day quasi-sinusoidal period previously reported by Strohmayer (2009). We discuss the overall X-ray modulation within the framework of accretion via Roche-lobe overflow of the donor star. In addition, if the X-ray modulation is caused by vertically structured obscuring material in the accretion disk, this would imply a high value for the inclination of the orbit. A comparison with estimates from accreting X-ray binaries suggests an inclination > or approx.70deg. We note that, in principle, a precessing accretion disk could also produce the observed X-ray modulations.

  19. Dark-field X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, F., E-mail: fei.yang@empa.ch, E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Di Bella, C.; Lura, P. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland); Institute for Building Materials (IfB), ETH Zurich, Zürich 8093 (Switzerland); Prade, F.; Herzen, J.; Sarapata, A.; Pfeiffer, F. [Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Griffa, M., E-mail: fei.yang@empa.ch, E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Jerjen, I. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf 8600 (Switzerland)

    2014-10-13

    We introduce in this Letter an approach to X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials based upon the intrinsic X-ray scattering produced by the material microstructural heterogeneity at a length scale below the imaging system spatial resolution. The basic principle for image contrast creation consists in a reduction of such scattering by permeation of the porosity by water. The implementation of the approach is based upon X-ray dark-field imaging via Talbot-Lau interferometry. The proof-of-concept is provided by performing laboratory-scale dark-field X-ray radiography of mortar samples during a water capillary uptake experiment. The results suggest that the proposed approach to visualizing unsaturated water transport in porous materials is complementary to neutron and magnetic resonance imaging and alternative to standard X-ray imaging, the latter requiring the use of contrast agents because based upon X-ray attenuation only.

  20. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, O., E-mail: o.mueller@uni-wuppertal.de; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  1. Radiation diagnostics and x-ray output from 1213 mega-ampere plasma implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oona, H.; Idzorek, G.C.; Goforth, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Procyon explosive pulsed power system has been used to drive 12--13 Ma, 2 {mu} second plasma implosions. These experiments have produced more than 1.5 MJ of soft x-rays in a 250 ns FWHM pulse. Data from bolometers, x-ray photodiodes, and curved crystal x-ray spectrometers are compared and analyzed for the fluence and the plasma temperature. Fitting of the x-ray continuum to a Planckian has suggested temperatures in the 90ev range. Images from high speed electronic cameras show a time sequence of instability growth that indicate effects on the x-ray output. X-ray images taken with filtered pinhole cameras show the location, shape, and size of the pinch. In this report the authors present details of this data from several Procyon experiments, point out methods for minimizing instability growth and discuss the diagnostics that are used in the harsh, explosive environment.

  2. Multilayer on-chip stacked Fresnel zone plates: Hard x-ray fabrication and soft x-ray simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kenan; Wojcik, Michael J.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Jacobsen, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Fresnel zone plates are widely used as x-ray nanofocusing optics. To achieve high spatial resolution combined with good focusing efficiency, high aspect ratio nanolithography is required, and one way to achieve that is through multiple e-beam lithography writing steps to achieve on-chip stacking. A two-step writing process producing 50 nm finest zone width at a zone thickness of 1.14 µm for possible hard x-ray applications is shown here. The authors also consider in simulations the case of soft x-ray focusing where the zone thickness might exceed the depth of focus. In this case, the authors compare on-chip stacking with, and without, adjustment of zone positions and show that the offset zones lead to improved focusing efficiency. The simulations were carried out using a multislice propagation method employing Hankel transforms.

  3. The X-ray imager on AXO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2001-01-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated....... Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray...... Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active...

  4. Hybrid scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clifford; Rairden, Richard L.; Betz, Robert A.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to improve x-ray absorption and light production while maintaining high spatial resolution in x-ray imaging phosphor screens. Our current target is to improve screen absorption efficiency and screen brightness by factors of 2 or greater over existing screens that have 10-1p/mm resolution. In this program, commercial phosphor screens are combined with highly absorbing, high-resolution scintillating fiber-optic (SFO) face plates to provide a hybrid sensor that exhibits superior spatial resolution, x-ray absorption, and brightness values over the phosphor material alone. These characteristics of hybrid scintillators can be adjusted to meet specific x-ray imaging requirements over a wide range of x-ray energy. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, and testing of a new series of hybrid scintillators.

  5. X-ray modeling for SMILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, F.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zheng, J.; Yu, X. Z.; Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-12-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) is a novel mission to explore the coupling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system via providing global images of the magnetosphere and aurora. As the X-ray imaging is a brand new technique applied to study the large scale magnetopause, modeling of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions in the magnetosheath and cusps is vital in various aspects: it helps the design of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) on SMILE, selection of satellite orbits, as well as the analysis of expected scientific outcomes. Based on the PPMLR-MHD code, we present the simulation results of the X-ray emissions in geospace during storm time. Both the polar orbit and the Molniya orbit are used. From the X-ray images of the magnetosheath and cusps, the magnetospheric responses to an interplanetary shock and IMF southward turning are analyzed.

  6. The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays on Solar Orbiter: Flight design, challenges and trade-offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krucker, S. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Bednarzik, M. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Grimm, O., E-mail: oliver.grimm@phys.ethz.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Hurford, G.J. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley (United States); Limousin, O.; Meuris, A. [CEA Saclay (France); Orleański, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch (Switzerland); Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN), Warsaw (Poland); Seweryn, K.; Skup, K.R. [Space Research Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN), Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-07-11

    STIX is the X-ray spectral imaging instrument on-board the Solar Orbiter space mission of the European Space Agency, and together with nine other instruments will address questions of the interaction between the Sun and the heliosphere. STIX will study the properties of thermal and accelerated electrons near the Sun through their Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission, addressing in particular the emission from flaring regions on the Sun. The design phase of STIX has been concluded. This paper reports the final flight design of the instrument, focusing on design challenges that were faced recently and how they were addressed.

  7. AN OSCILLATOR CONFIGURATION FOR FULL REALIZATION OF HARD X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.-J.; Kolodziej, T.; Lindberg, R. R.; Shu, D.; Shvyd' ko, Y.; Stoupin, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Fawley, W. M.; Hastings, J.; Huang, Z; Krzywinski, J.; Marcus, G.; Qin, Weilun; Medvedev, N.; Zemella, J.; Blank, V.; Terentyev, S.

    2017-06-01

    An x-ray free electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is feasible by employing an X-ray cavity with Bragg mirrors such as diamond crystals. An XFELO at the 5th harmonic frequency may be implemented at the LCLS II using its 4 GeV superconducting linac, producing stable, fully coherent, high-spectral-purity hard x-rays. In addition, its output can be a coherent seed to the LCLS amplifier for stable, high-power, femto-second x-ray pulses. We summarize the recent progress in various R&D efforts addressing critical issues for realizing an XFELO at LCLS II.

  8. Identification of a Population of X-Ray-Emitting Massive Stars in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    gravitational accretion onto a compact object such as a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH). The two main classes of HMXBs are the Be X-ray binary systems...The Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) surveyed the inner region of the Galactic plane, detecting 163 X-ray sources with...star, X-rays produced through gravitation accretion in an HMXB or X-rays from shock-heated gas in a CWB. We now discuss each possibility in detail

  9. Influence of the voltage-time derivative in X-ray emission from laboratory sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Víctor; Montanyà, Joan

    2010-10-01

    X-rays produced by laboratory sparks in air at atmospheric pressure for rod-rod and rod-plane configurations were observed. A total of 510 sparks were applied for both polarities. The paper shows the effects of the voltage rise time and the peak voltage in the generation of X-rays. It is found here that shorter rise times and high peak voltages tend to produce more X-rays emissions with higher energies than longer front waveforms or lower peak voltages. In a similar way, higher voltage variations produce more energetic emissions. This finding suggests that the variation of the electric field before the breakdown can play a fundamental role in the X-ray production. The results are similar with the observations of X-rays produced in natural lightning where detections have been associated to leader steps before the return stroke.

  10. Impact of X-ray irradiation on PMMA thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Saman, E-mail: saman.khan343@gmail.com [Physics Department, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Physics Department, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Anjum, Safia [Physics Department, Lahore College for Woman University, Lahore (Pakistan); Hayat, Asma [Physics Department, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Iqbal, Nida [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Health Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PMMA thin films were deposited at 300 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C using PLD technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These films were irradiated with different fluence of laser produced X-rays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation affects the ordered packing as well as surface morphology of film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness of film decreases up to certain value of X-ray fluence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption in UV-visible range exhibits a non linear behavior. - Abstract: The objective of this project is to explore the effect of X-ray irradiation of thin polymeric films deposited at various substrate temperatures. pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is used for the deposition of PMMA thin films on glass substrate at 300 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C. These films have been irradiated with various X-rays fluences ranging from 2.56 to 5.76 mJ cm{sup -2}. Characterization of the films (before and after the irradiation) is done with help of X-ray Diffractrometer, Optical Microscope, Vickers hardness tester and UV-vis spectroscopy techniques. From XRD data, it is revealed that ordered packing has been improved for the films deposited at 300 Degree-Sign C. However after irradiation the films exhibited the amorphous behavior regardless of the X-ray fluence. Film deposited at 500 Degree-Sign C shows amorphous structure before and after irradiation. Hardness and particle size of thin film have also increased with the increasing substrate temperature. However, the irradiation has reverse effect i.e. the particle size as well as the hardness has reduced. Irradiation has also enhanced the absorption in the UV-visible region.

  11. X-ray study of bow shocks in runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, M.; del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.

    2017-11-01

    Massive runaway stars produce bow shocks through the interaction of their winds with the interstellar medium, with the prospect for particle acceleration by the shocks. These objects are consequently candidates for non-thermal emission. Our aim is to investigate the X-ray emission from these sources. We observed with XMM-Newton a sample of five bow shock runaways, which constitutes a significant improvement of the sample of bow shock runaways studied in X-rays so far. A careful analysis of the data did not reveal any X-ray emission related to the bow shocks. However, X-ray emission from the stars is detected, in agreement with the expected thermal emission from stellar winds. On the basis of background measurements we derive conservative upper limits between 0.3 and 10 keV on the bow shocks emission. Using a simple radiation model, these limits together with radio upper limits allow us to constrain some of the main physical quantities involved in the non-thermal emission processes, such as the magnetic field strength and the amount of incident infrared photons. The reasons likely responsible for the non-detection of non-thermal radiation are discussed. Finally, using energy budget arguments, we investigate the detectability of inverse Compton X-rays in a more extended sample of catalogued runaway star bow shocks. From our analysis we conclude that a clear identification of non-thermal X-rays from massive runaway bow shocks requires one order of magnitude (or higher) sensitivity improvement with respect to present observatories.

  12. Silver coins analyses by X-ray fluorescence methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Italiano, A; Cutroneo, M; Gentile, C; Torrisi, A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation on the differences occurring in the manufacture of silver coins allows to get information on their elemental composition and represents a powerful support to the methodology to identify the producing technologies, workshops being also instrumental to distinguish between original and counterfeit ones. Aim of the present work is to study recent and old silver coins through non-destructive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The XRF was applied to extend the analysis to the deepest layers of the coins; for surface layers an X-ray tube or an electron beam were employed to induce the atom fluorescence to obtain information on the surface elemental composition. Moreover, a detailed study has been performed to evaluate the influence of the surface curvature on the measurement, by deducing a proper corrective factor to keep into account in the data analysis. The elemental atomic composition was measured for each coin, mainly by means of the X-ray tube excitation for the bulk and the electron Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) microbeam probe for the surface patina analysis. Ionization was induced by an X-ray tube using an Ag anode for the bulk and by an electron microprobe for the surface composition. X-ray detection was performed by using a semiconductor Si device cooled by a Peltier system. The Ag L-lines X-ray yield is affected by coin surface morphology and geometry. The comparison between coin spectra and standard samples, shows that the Ag quantitative analysis is influenced by error of the atomic concentration lower that 10%.

  13. Toward Adaptive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Tim W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peer; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Future x-ray observatories will require high-resolution (less than 1 inch) optics with very-large-aperture (greater than 25 square meter) areas. Even with the next generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles, launch-mass constraints and aperture-area requirements will limit the surface areal density of the grazing-incidence mirrors to about 1 kilogram per square meter or less. Achieving sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with such lightweight mirrors will require excellent mirror surfaces, precise and stable alignment, and exceptional stiffness or deformation compensation. Attaining and maintaining alignment and figure control will likely involve adaptive (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. In contrast with infrared and visible astronomy, adaptive optics for x-ray astronomy is in its infancy. In the middle of the past decade, two efforts began to advance technologies for adaptive x-ray telescopes: The Generation-X (Gen-X) concept studies in the United States, and the Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project in the United Kingdom. This paper discusses relevant technological issues and summarizes progress toward adaptive x-ray telescopes.

  14. Multiple beam x-ray diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kewish, C.M.; Davis, J.R.; Coyle, R.A. [Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Department of Physics

    1999-12-01

    Full text: X-ray diffraction computed tomography (XDT) is an imaging modality that utilises scattered x-rays to reconstruct an image. Since its inception in 1985, various detection scenarios and imaging techniques have been developed to demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of XDT. Many of the previous methods for measuring the scattered x-rays from an object utilise detectors that accept x-rays scattered from the entire length of the raypath through the object. The detector apertures must therefore have dimensions similar to the largest width of the scanned object. This creates a situation where the detected x-rays are not derived from a single scattering angle. A new method of scanning the x-rays scattered from an object is presented which allows quantitative determination of the spatial distribution of differential scattering cross section within a cross-sectional plane of the object. The new method incorporates a position sensitive detector and an arrangement of Soller slits. The acquired data represents both spatial and angular information. For each raypath through the object, a partial diffraction projection is measured at the off-axis detector and a set of diffraction projections is assembled by combining the diffracted signal from all rays through the object. A reconstruction strategy that accounts for attenuation of the primary beam and the scattered beam allows us to reconstruct a map of the differential scattering cross section in the sample for a given angle. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc. 3 refs.

  15. Pinhole X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Gadolinium Nanoparticles: A Preliminary Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seong Moon; Sung, Won Mo; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a modality for the element-specific imaging of a subject through analysis of characteristic x-rays produced by exploiting the interaction of high atomic number elements and incoming x-rays. Previous studies have utilized a polychromatic x-ray source to investigate the production of in vivo x-ray fluorescence images for the assessment of concentrations and locations of gold nanoparticles. However, previous efforts have so far been unable to detect low concentrations, such as 0.001% gold by weight, which is an expected concentration accumulated in tumors. We examined the feasibility of a monochromatic synchrotron x-rays implementation of pinhole x-ray fluorescence imaging by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5. In the current study, gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles, which have been widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and also as a dose enhancer in radiation therapy, were chosen for tumor targeting. Since a monochromatic x-ray source is used, the increased x-ray fluorescence signals allow the detection of low concentrations of Gd. Two different monochromatic x-ray beam energies, 50.5 keV near the Kedge energy (i.e., 50.207 keV) of Gd and 55 keV, were compared by their respective imaging results. Using Monte Carlo simulations the feasibility of imaging low concentrations of Gd nanoparticles (e.g., 0.001 wt%) with x-ray fluorescence using monochromatic synchrotron x-rays of two different energies was shown. In the case of imaging a single Gd column inserted in the center of a water phantom, the fluorescence signals from 0.05 wt% and 0.1 wt% Gd columns irradiated with a 50.5 keV photon beam were higher than those irradiated with 55 keV. Below 0.05 wt% region no significant differences were found.

  16. Hard X-ray bursts and DD microfusion neutrons from complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str.,. 125412 Moscow, Russia ... explosive destruction of micrograins is accompanied by X-ray radiation (during hydrody- namic expansion, cooling ... makes it possible to produce lasing in hard X-rays due to the effects of multiple scattering.

  17. Mapping strain fields in ultrathin bonded Si wafers by x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Poulsen, Mette; Bunk, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    X-ray scattering reveals the atomic displacements arising from rotational misalignment in ultrathin silicon bonded wafers. For a 4.3 nm top wafer, the strain field penetrates from the bonded interface to the surface and produces distinctive finite-size oscillations in x-ray data. Analytical...... calculations permit the atomic displacements throughout the thin top wafer to be modeled....

  18. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  19. X-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry with a portable CdTe device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbene, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: abbene@difter.unipa.it; La Manna, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Fauci, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Gerardi, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Stumbo, Simone [Struttura Dipartimentale di Matematica e Fisica dell' Universita degli studi di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); INFN Sezione di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Raso, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    X-ray spectra and dosimetry information are very important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) in medical diagnostic X-ray systems. An accurate knowledge of the diagnostic X-ray spectra would improve the patient dose optimization, without compromising image information. In this work, we performed direct diagnostic X-ray spectra measurements with a portable device, based on a CdTe solid-state detector. The portable device is able to directly measure X-ray spectra at high photon fluence rates, as typical of clinical radiography. We investigated on the spectral performances of the system in the mammographic energy range (up to {approx}40 keV). Good system response to monoenergetic photons was measured (energy resolution of 5% FWHM at 22.1 keV). We measured the molybdenum X-ray spectra produced by a mammographic X-ray unit (GE Senographe DMR) at 28 kV and 30 kV under clinical conditions. The results showed the good reproducibility of the system and low pile-up distortions. Preliminary dosimetric measurements have been regarded as exposure and half value layer (HVL) values obtained from direct measurements and from measured X-ray spectral data, and a good agreement between exposure attenuation curves and the HVL values was obtained. The results indicated that the portable device is suitable for mammographic X-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions.

  20. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to a flat silicon (111 crystal. 10^{2} diffracted photons were detected. The spectrum of the detected x rays is compared to simulation. The diffraction and detection of 10^{2} x rays is a key step to a more efficient time resolved diagnostic in which the number of observed x rays might reach 10^{4}; enabling a unique, flexible x-ray source as a sub-ps resolution diagnostic for studying the evolution of chemical reactions, lattice deformation and melting, and magnetism.

  1. X- rays and matter- the basic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory article we attempt to provide the theoretical basis for developing the interaction between X-rays and matter, so that one can unravel properties of matter by interpretation of X-ray experiments on samples. We emphasize that we are dealing with the basics, which means that we...... shall limit ourselves to a discussion of the interaction of an X-ray photon with an isolated atom, or rather with a single electron in a Hartree-Fock atom. Subsequent articles in this issue deal with more complicated - and interesting - forms of matter encompassing many atoms or molecules. To cite...

  2. X-ray Emission from Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    Isolated (solitary or non-accreting) millisecond pulsars with observed X-ray emission can be divided in two distinct groups: those emitting nonthermal (magnetospheric) radiation and pulsars with the bulk of X-rays of a thermal origin, presumably emitted from small hot spots around the magnetic poles on the neutron star surface (polar caps). I will discuss properties of X-ray emission detected with Chandra and XMM-Newton from a number of millisecond pulsars, with emphasis on those of the thermal component, and compare them with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  3. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  4. Materials for refractive x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, M W

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray lens using refraction has been proposed by Tomie, and demonstrated for 14 keV X-rays by Snigirev et al. This type of lens is made from a series of very weak lens elements. I calculate the properties of such lenses constructed of various chemical elements and compounds over the range of 1 to 30 keV. In general, I find that X-ray optics made from low density, low Z materials have the widest useful apertures, but require more lens elements than denser and higher Z materials.

  5. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  6. The ROSAT X-ray Background Dipole

    OpenAIRE

    Plionis, M.; Georgantopoulos, I.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the dipole of the diffuse 1.5 keV X-ray background from the ROSAT all-sky survey map of Snowden et al (1995). We first subtract the diffuse Galactic emission by fitting to the data an exponential scale height, finite radius, disk model. We further exclude regions of low galactic latitudes, of local X-ray emission (eg the North Polar Spur) and model them using two different methods. We find that the ROSAT X-ray background (XRB) dipole points towards $(l,b) ~ (288, 25) \\pm 19 degree...

  7. Two methods for studying the X-ray variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Ji, Li; Méndez, Mariano; Wang, Na; Liu, Siming; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray aperiodic variability and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) are the important tools to study the structure of the accretion flow of X-ray binaries. However, the origin of the complex X-ray variability from X-ray binaries remains yet unsolved. We proposed two methods for studying the X-ray

  8. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  9. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  10. Insights from soft X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction pattern of a protein crystal is normally a product of the interference of electromagnetic waves scattered by electrons of the crystalline sample. The diffraction pattern undergoes systematic changes in case additionally X-ray absorption occurs, meaning if the wavelength of the pri......The diffraction pattern of a protein crystal is normally a product of the interference of electromagnetic waves scattered by electrons of the crystalline sample. The diffraction pattern undergoes systematic changes in case additionally X-ray absorption occurs, meaning if the wavelength...... of the primary X-ray beam is relatively close to the absorption edge of selected elements of the sample. The resulting effects are summarized as "anomalous dispersion" and can be always observed with "soft" X-rays (wavelength around 2 A) since they match the absorption edges of sulfur and chlorine...

  11. Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for X-Ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory works to further science and technology using short wavelength optical systems and techniques....

  12. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung tissue absorbs little radiation and will appear dark on the image. Until recently, x-ray images ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  13. X-ray Optics Development at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharma P.

    2017-01-01

    Development of high resolution focusing telescopes has led to a tremendous leap in sensitivity, revolutionizing observational X-ray astronomy. High sensitivity and high spatial resolution X-ray observations have been possible due to use of grazing incidence optics (paraboloid/hyperboloid) coupled with high spatial resolution and high efficiency detectors/imagers. The best X-ray telescope flown so far is mounted onboard Chandra observatory launched on July 23,1999. The telescope has a spatial resolution of 0.5 arc seconds with compatible imaging instruments in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV. The Chandra observatory has been responsible for a large number of discoveries and has provided X-ray insights on a large number of celestial objects including stars, supernova remnants, pulsars, magnetars, black holes, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, clusters and our own solar system.

  14. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  15. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  16. Nonrelativistic quantum X-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2015-01-01

    Providing a solid theoretical background in photon-matter interaction, Nonrelativistic Quantum X-Ray Physics enables readers to understand experiments performed at XFEL-facilities and x-ray synchrotrons. As a result, after reading this book, scientists and students will be able to outline and perform calculations of some important x-ray-matter interaction processes. Key features of the contents are that the scope reaches beyond the dipole approximation when necessary and that it includes short-pulse interactions. To aid the reader in this transition, some relevant examples are discussed in detail, while non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics help readers to obtain an in-depth understanding of the formalisms and processes. The text presupposes a basic (undergraduate-level) understanding of mechanics, electrodynamics, and quantum mechanics. However, more specialized concepts in these fields are introduced and the reader is directed to appropriate references. While primarily benefiting users of x-ray light-sou...

  17. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-09-09

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  18. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Durbin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4, a semiconductor (gallium arsenide, GaAs, and a metal (gold, Au, obtained with ∼100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  19. Milli X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Eagle III Micro XRF unit is similar to a traditional XRF unit, with the primary difference being that the X-rays are focused by a polycapillary optic into a spot...

  20. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks;(1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  1. Quantum optics with X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2017-11-01

    The demonstration of strong coupling between two nuclear polariton modes in the X-ray spectral region using two coupled cavities each containing a thin layer of iron brings new opportunities for exploring quantum science.

  2. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) system, and an X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: US2012008736A An X-ray diffraction contrast tomography system (DCT) comprising a laboratory X-ray source (2), a staging device (5) rotating a polycrystalline material sample in the direct path of the X-ray beam, a first X-ray detector (6) detecting the direct X-ray beam being transmitted...

  3. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenbeugung an einkristallinem Indiumantimonid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Sebastian

    2014-11-07

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit behandelt die experimentelle Untersuchung der strukturellen Aenderung des Halbleiters Indiumantimonid (InSB) nach der Anregung durch einen ultrakurzen Laserpuls (60 fs). Die Untersuchung erfolgt durch ultrakurze Roentgenpulse (rund 100 fs). Als Quelle der ultrakurzen Roentgenpulse dient eine Laser-Plasma Roentgenquelle. Bei dieser Quelle wird ein ultrakurzer intensiver optischer Laserpuls auf eine Metallfolie fokussiert (Intensitaet bis 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), durch das entstehende Plasma kommt es zu einer Emission von Roentgenstrahlung. Zur Charakterisierung der Roentgenquelle stand ein neuartiger Timepix- Detektor zu Verfuegung, der

  4. Development of a 3-D X-ray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James Paul Owain

    The interpretation of standard two-dimensional x-ray images by humans is often very difficult. This is due to the lack of visual cues to depth in an image which has been produced by transmitted radiation. The solution put forward in this research is to introduce binocular parallax, a powerful physiological depth cue, into the resultant shadowgraph x-ray image. This has been achieved by developing a binocular stereoscopic x-ray imaging technique, which can be used for both visual inspection by human observers and also for the extraction of three-dimensional co-ordinate information. The technique is implemented in the design and development of two experimental x-ray systems and also the development of measurement algorithms. The first experimental machine is based on standard linear x-ray detector arrays and was designed as an optimum configuration for visual inspection by human observers. However, it was felt that a combination of the 3-D visual inspection capability together with a measurement facility would enhance the usefulness of the technique. Therefore, both a theoretical and an empirical analysis of the co-ordinate measurement capability of the machine has been carried out. The measurement is based on close-range photogrammetric techniques. The accuracy of the measurement has been found to be of the order of 4mm in x, 3mm in y and 6mm in z. A second experimental machine was developed and based on the same technique as that used for the first machine. However, a major departure has been the introduction of a dual energy linear x-ray detector array which will allow, in general, the discrimination between organic and inorganic substances. The second design is a compromise between ease of visual inspection for human observers and optimum three-dimensional co-ordinate measurement capability. The system is part of an on going research programme into the possibility of introducing psychological depth cues into the resultant x-ray images. The research presented in

  5. Linking Jet Emission, X-Ray States, and Hard X-Ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary GX 17+2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Fender, R.P.; Homan, J.; di Salvo, T.; Rothschild, R.E.; Rupen, M.P.; Tomsick, J.A.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (RXTE) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX 17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These

  6. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas (IIT); (Rad. Monitoring)

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  7. Digital radiography can reduce scoliosis x-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, T.F. Jr.; Cohen, M.J.; Lindseth, R.E.; De Rosa, G.P. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Digital radiology is a new computerized system of acquiring x-rays in a digital (electronic) format. It possesses a greatly expanded dose response curve that allows a very broad range of x-ray dose to produce a diagnostic image. Potential advantages include significantly reduced radiation exposure without loss of image quality, acquisition of images of constant density irrespective of under or over exposure, and reduced repeat rates for unsatisfactory films. The authors prospectively studied 30 adolescents with scoliosis who had both conventional (full dose) and digital (full, one-half, or one-third dose) x-rays. They found digital made AP and lateral image with all anatomic areas clearly depicted at full and one-half dose. Digital laterals were better at full dose and equal to conventional at one-half dose. Cobb angles were easily measured on all one-third dose AP and on 8 of 10 one-third dose digital laterals. Digital clearly depicted the Risser sign at one-half and one-third dose and the repeat rate was nil in this study, indicating digital compensates well for exposure errors. The study indicates that digital does allow radiation dose to be reduced by at least one-half in scoliosis patients and that it does have improved image quality with good contrast over a wide range of x-ray exposure.

  8. Capacitor discharges, magnetohydrodynamics, X-rays, ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology, Volume 1: Capacitor Discharges - Magnetohydrodynamics - X-Rays - Ultrasonics deals with the theoretical and engineering problems that arise in the capacitor discharge technique.This book discusses the characteristics of dielectric material, symmetrical switch tubes with mercury filling, and compensation conductor forms. The transformed discharge for highest current peaks, ignition transformer for internal combustion engines, and X-ray irradiation of subjects in mechanical motion are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the transformed capacitor discharge in w

  9. Parametric X-rays at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays (PXR) in the photoinjector at the new FAST facility at Fermilab. Detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance with a diamond crystal are presented. We also report on expected results with PXR generated while the beam is channeling. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays.

  10. Nanofocusing Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Boye, Pit

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution x-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. ...

  11. Lacquer polishing of x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catura, R C; Joki, E G; Roethig, D T; Brookover, W J

    1987-04-15

    Techniques for polishing figured x-ray optics by a lacquer-coating process are described. This acrylic lacquer coating has been applied with an optical quality of an eighth wave in red light and very effectively covers surface roughness with spatial wavelengths less than ~0.2 mm. Tungsten films have been deposited on the lacquer coatings to provide highly efficient x-ray reflectivity.

  12. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  13. Soft X-ray observations of the supernova remnants HB 3 and 3C 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galas, C. M. F.; Tuohy, I. R.; Garmire, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    The HEAO 1 A-2 low energy detectors have discovered soft X-ray emission from a source positionally coincident with the supernova remnant HB 3. The flux in the energy range 0.3-2.2 keV is about 6 x 10 to the -11th ergs per sq cm s. The spectral data are fitted to a hydrogen thermal bremsstrahlung model, and the physical parameters of the supernova remnant are estimated. The age derived is about 21,000 years, and the initial blast energy is about 3.1 x 10 to the 50th ergs. Upper limits to the soft X-ray flux and the luminosity of the supernova remnant 3 C 58 are also derived.

  14. Exotic sources of x-rays for iodine K-edge angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.

    1993-08-01

    Digital Subtractive Angiography (DSA) has been performed to image human coronary arteries using wiggler radiation from electron storage rings. The significant medical promise of this procedure motivates the development of smaller and less costly x-ray sources. Several exotic sources are candidates for consideration, using effects such as Cherenkov, channeling, coherent bremsstrahlung, laser backscattering, microundulator, parametric, Smith-Purcell, and transition radiation. In this work we present an analysis of these effects as possible sources of intense x-rays at the iodine K-edge at 33.169 key. The criteria we use are energy, efficiency, flux, optical properties, and technical realizability. For each of the techniques, we find that they suffer either from low flux, a low energy cutoff, target materials heating, too high electron beam energy requirement, optical mismatch to angiography, or a combination of these. We conclude that the foreseeable state-of-the-art favors a compact storage ring design.

  15. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10171017 neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  16. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10{sup 17} neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  17. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Kilkenny, J D; Conder, A; Cerjan, C; Hagmann, C; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Moody, J; Teruya, A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Khater, H; Eckart, M J; Ayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10(17) neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  18. Gas bremsstrahlung shielding calculation for first optic enclosure of ILSF XPD beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigzadeh Jalali, H; Salimi, E; Rahighi, J

    2017-11-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated in high energy electron storage ring and accompanies the synchrotron radiation into the beamlines, where both strike the various components of the beamline. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations for secondary gas bremsstrahlung are performed for the First Optics Enclosure (FOE) of X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) beamline of the Iranian Light Source Facility. Dose equivalent rate (DER) calculations are accomplished using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comprehensive study of DER distribution at the back wall, sides and roof are given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optics Developments for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    X-ray optics has revolutionized x-ray astronomy. The degree of background suppression that these afford, have led to a tremendous increase in sensitivity. The current Chandra observatory has the same collecting area (approx. 10(exp 3)sq cm) as the non-imaging UHURU observatory, the first x-ray observatory which launched in 1970, but has 5 orders of magnitude more sensitivity due to its focusing optics. In addition, its 0.5 arcsec angular resolution has revealed a wealth of structure in many cosmic x-ray sources. The Chandra observatory achieved its resolution by using relatively thick pieces of Zerodur glass, which were meticulously figured and polished to form the four-shell nested array. The resulting optical assembly weighed around 1600 kg, and cost approximately $0.5B. The challenge for future x-ray astronomy missions is to greatly increase the collecting area (by one or more orders of magnitude) while maintaining high angular resolution, and all within realistic mass and budget constraints. A review of the current status of US optics for x-ray astronomy will be provided along with the challenges for future developments.

  20. X-ray emission from normal stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses the potential for future X-ray missions to determine the fundamental cause of stellar X-ray emissions based on available results and existing analyses. The determinants of stellar X-ray emission are listed, and the relation of stellar X-ray emissions to the 'universal' activity-rotation connection is discussed. The specific rotation-activity connection for evolved stars is mentioned, and the 'decay' of stellar activity at the low-mass end of the main sequence is related to observational data. The data from Einstein and EXOSAT missions that correspond to these issues are found to be sparse, and more observational work is found to be necessary. Also, it is concluded that some issues need to be addressed, such as the X-ray dividing line in evolved stars and the absence of X-ray emission from dA stars. The related observational requirements and instrumental capabilities are given for each significant research focus.

  1. X-ray Studies of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Rodolfo

    2017-10-01

    X-ray emission from planetary nebulae (PNe) provides unique insight on the formation and evolution of PNe. Past observations and the ongoing Chandra Planetary Nebulae Survey (ChanPlaNS) provide a consensus on the two types of X-ray emission detected from PNe: extended and compact point-like sources. Extended X-ray emission arises from a shocked ``hot bubble'' plasma that resides within the nebular shell. Cooler than expected hot bubble plasma temperatures spurred a number of potential solutions with one emerging as the likely dominate process. The origin of X-ray emission from compact sources at the location of the central star is less clear. These sources might arise from one or combinations of the following processes: self-shocking stellar winds, spun-up binary companions, and/or accretion, perhaps from mass transfer, PN fallback, or debris disks. In the discovery phase, X-ray studies of PNe have mainly focused on the origin of the various emission processes. New directions incorporate multi-wavelength observations to study the influence of X-ray emission on the rest of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  2. The universe in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hasinger, Günther

    2008-01-01

    In the last 45 years, X-ray astronomy has become an integral part of modern astrophysics and cosmology. There is a wide range of astrophysical objects and phenomena, where X-rays provide crucial diagnostics. In particular they are well suited to study hot plasmas and matter under extreme physical conditions in compact objects. This book summarizes the present status of X-ray astronomy in terms of observational results and their astrophysical interpretation. It is written for students, astrophysicists as well a growing community of physicists interested in the field. An introduction including historical material is followed by chapters on X-ray astronomical instrumentation. The next two parts summarize in 17 chapters the present knowledge on various classes of X-ray sources in the galactic and extragalactic realm. While the X-ray astronomical highlights discussed in this book are mainly based on results from ROSAT, ASCA, RXTE, BeppoSAX, Chandra and XMM-Newton, a final chapter provides an outlook on observation...

  3. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements using an X-ray phase retarder on the BM25 A-SpLine beamline at the ESRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Roberto; Laguna-Marco, María Ángeles; Gallastegui, Jon Ander; Castro, Germán R.; Chaboy, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Circularly polarized X-rays produced by a diamond X-ray phase retarder of thickness 0.5 mm in the Laue transmission configuration have been used for recording X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) on the bending-magnet beamline BM25A (SpLine) at the ESRF. Field reversal and helicity reversal techniques have been used to carry out the measurements. The performance of the experimental set-up has been demonstrated by recording XMCD in the energy range from 7 to 11 keV. PMID:20400827

  4. X-rays as a probe of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. X-rays as a probe of the Universe · Probing the Universe ….. Flux = sT4 umax = 1011 T (in Kelvin) · History of x-ray astronomy · X-ray Production · X-ray spectra · Celestial sphere as seen by UHURU (1970) · Slide 8 · X-rays from accreting binary systems · Slide 10 · Neutron stars: Black Hole: · Primary X-ray ...

  5. [X-ray hardening correction for ICT in testing workpiece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guang-han; Cai, Xin-hua; Han, Zhong; Yang, Xue-heng

    2008-06-01

    Since energy spectrum of X-ray is polychromatic source in X-ray industrial computerized tomography, the variation of attenuation coefficient with energy leads to the lower energy of X-ray radiation being absorbed preferentially when X-ray is transmitting the materials. And the higher the energy of X-ray, the lower the attenuation coefficient of X-ray. With the increase in the X-ray transmission thickness, it becomes easier for the X-ray to transmit the matter. Thus, the phenomenon of energy spectrum hardening of X-ray takes place, resulting from the interaction between X-ray and the materials. This results in false images in the reconstruction of X-ray industrial computerized tomography. Therefore, hardening correction of energy spectrum of X-ray has to be done. In the present paper, not only is the hardening phenomenon of X-ray transmitting the materials analyzed, but also the relation between the X-ray beam sum and the transmission thickness of X-ray is discussed. And according to the Beer law and the characteristics of interaction when X-ray is transmitting material, and by getting the data of X-ray beam sum, the relation equation is fitted between the X-ray beam sum and X-ray transmission thickness. Then, the relation and the method of equivalence are carried out for X-ray beam sum being corrected. Finally, the equivalent and monochromatic attenuation coefficient fitted value for X-ray transmitting the material is reasoned out. The attenuation coefficient fitted value is used for product back-projection image reconstruction in X-ray industrial computerized tomography. Thus, the effect caused by X-ray beam hardening is wiped off effectively in X-ray industrial computerized tomography.

  6. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of warm dense matter with betatron x-ray radiation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie

    2017-05-01

    Betatron x-ray radiation, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, has unique properties to probe high energy density (HED) plasmas and warm dense matter. Betatron radiation is produced when relativistic electrons oscillate in the plasma wake of a laser pulse. Its properties are similar to those of synchrotron radiation, with a 1000 fold shorter pulse. This presentation will focus on the experimental challenges and results related to the development of betatron radiation for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of HED matter at large-scale laser facilities. A detailed presentation of the source mechanisms and characteristics in the blowout regime of laser-wakefield acceleration will be followed by a description of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, we have recently commissioned the betatron x-ray source driven by the MEC short pulse laser (1 J, 40 fs). The source is used as a probe for investigating the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum at the K- or L-edge of iron and silicon oxide driven to a warm dense matter state (temperature of a few eV and solid densities). The driver is either LCLS itself or an optical laser. These experiments demonstrate the capability to study the electron-ion equilibration mechanisms in warm dense matter with sub-picosecond resolution.

  8. Digital X-ray Imaging in Dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    In dentistry, Radio Visio Graphy was introduced as a first electronic dental x-ray imaging modality in 1989. Thereafter, many types of direct digital radiographic systems have been produced in the last decade. They are based either on charge-coupled device (CCD) or on storage phosphor technology. In addition, new types of digital radiographic system using amorphous selenium, image intensifier etc. are under development. Advantages of digital radiographic system are elimination of chemical processing, reduction in radiation dose, image processing, computer storage, electronic transfer of images and so on. Image processing includes image enhancement, image reconstruction, digital subtraction, etc. Especially digital subtraction and reconstruction can be applied in many aspects of clinical practice and research. Electronic transfer of images enables filmless dental hospital and teleradiology/teledentistry system. Since the first image management and communications system (IMACS) for dentomaxillofacial radiology was reported in 1992, IMACS in dental hospital has been increasing. Meanwhile, researches about computer-assisted diagnosis, such as structural analysis of bone trabecular patterns of mandible, feature extraction, automated identification of normal landmarks on cephalometric radiograph and automated image analysis for caries or periodontitis, have been performed actively in the last decade. Further developments in digital radiographic imaging modalities, image transmission system, imaging processing and automated analysis software will change the traditional clinical dental practice in the 21st century.

  9. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  10. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump–x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The availability at x-ray free electron lasers of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to molecular dynamics. In diatomic molecules composed of low-Z elements, K-shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wavepackets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond timescale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasi-bound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K-shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K-shell ionization, Auger decay, and time evolution of the nuclear wavepackets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasi-bound states.

  11. X-ray dense cellular inclusions in the cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as seen by soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Page, A.M. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-rays, having a greater ability to penetrate biological material than electrons, have the potential for producing images of intact, living cells. In addition, by using the so-called {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes} area of the soft x-ray spectrum, a degree of natural contrast is introduced into the image due to differential absorption of the wavelengths by compounds with a high carbon content compared to those with a greater oxygen content. The variation in carbon concentration throughout a cell therefore generates an image which is dependent upon the carbon density within the specimen. Using soft x-ray contact microscopy the authors have previously examined the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the most prominent feature of the cells are the numerous x-ray absorbing spheres, But they were not seen by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Similar structures have also been reported by the Goettingen group using their cryo transmission x-ray microscope at BESSY. Despite the fact that these spheres appear to occupy up to 20% or more of the cell volume when seen by x-ray microscopy, they are not visible by transmission electron microscopy. Given the difficulties and criticisms associated with soft x-ray contact microscopy, the present study was aimed at confirming the existence of these cellular inclusions and learning more of their possible chemical composition.

  12. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, Jonathan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, Donald C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  13. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarry, M. B., E-mail: mbmcgarry@wisc.edu; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ∼6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  14. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, M B; Franz, P; Den Hartog, D J; Goetz, J A; Johnson, J

    2014-09-01

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ~6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or ... pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

  17. Handbook of X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith A. (Editor); Smith, Randall K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    X-ray astronomy was born in the aftermath of World War II as military rockets were repurposed to lift radiation detectors above the atmosphere for a few minutes at a time. These early flights detected and studied X-ray emission from the Solar corona. The first sources beyond the Solar System were detected during a rocket flight in 1962 by a team headed by Riccardo Giaccom at American Science and Engineering, a company founded by physicists from MIT. The rocket used Geiger counters with a system designed to reduce non-X-ray backgrounds and collimators limiting the region of sky seen by the counters. As the rocket spun, the field of view (FOV) happened to pass over what was later found to be the brightest non-Solar X-ray source; later designated See X-1. It also detected a uniform background glow which could not be resolved into individual sources. A follow-up campaign using X-ray detectors with better spatial resolution and optical telescopes identified See X-1 as an interacting binary with a compact (neutron star) primary. This success led to further suborbital rocket flights by a number of groups. More X-ray binaries were discovered, as well as X-ray emission from supernova remnants, the radio galaxies M87 and Cygnus-A, and the Coma cluster. Detectors were improved and Geiger counters were replaced by proportional counters, which provided information about energy spectra of the sources. A constant challenge was determining precise positions of sources as only collimators were available.

  18. X-ray flares from postmerger millisecond pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z G; Wang, X Y; Wu, X F; Zhang, B

    2006-02-24

    Recent observations support the suggestion that short-duration gamma-ray bursts are produced by compact star mergers. The x-ray flares discovered in two short gamma-ray bursts last much longer than the previously proposed postmerger energy-release time scales. Here, we show that they can be produced by differentially rotating, millisecond pulsars after the mergers of binary neutron stars. The differential rotation leads to windup of interior poloidal magnetic fields and the resulting toroidal fields are strong enough to float up and break through the stellar surface. Magnetic reconnection-driven explosive events then occur, leading to multiple x-ray flares minutes after the original gamma-ray burst.

  19. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  20. Thermal management of next-generation contact-cooled synchrotron x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A.

    1999-10-29

    In the past decade, several third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources have been constructed and commissioned around the world. Many of the major problems in the development and design of the optical components capable of handling the extremely high heat loads of the generated x-ray beams have been resolved. It is expected, however, that in the next few years even more powerful x-ray beams will be produced at these facilities, for example, by increasing the particle beam current. In this paper, the design of a next generation of synchrotron x-ray mirrors is discussed. The author shows that the design of contact-cooled mirrors capable of handing x-ray beam heat fluxes in excess of 500 W/mm{sup 2} - or more than three times the present level - is well within reach, and the limiting factor is the thermal stress rather then thermally induced slope error.

  1. Soft x-ray pulse length measurement by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom, H.W.K. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Sher, M.H.; Mohideen, U.; Wood, O.R. II; Aumiller, G.D. [AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (United States); McIlrath, T.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bokor, J.; Freeman, R.R. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Sugar, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have demonstrated a system for subpicosecond, soft-x-ray continuum, pump-probe absorption spectroscopy. Using multiphoton ionization to abruptly change the x-ray absorption spectra of a gas, they have measured the temporal profile of laser-generated x-ray pulses near 90 eV. Although the x-ray pulses from a laser-generated plasma here were only as short as {approximately}20 psec, the technique is extendible to higher energy x-rays which will have pulse durations approaching 100 fsec. They also present the absorption spectrum of Kr ions produced under conditions of high intensity non-resonant multiphoton ionization. The spectra are identified with a fit to the Cowan code.

  2. Ceramic foams porous microstructure characterization by X-ray microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Appoloni

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the porous structure of amorphous materials is of fundamental importance in calculating geometrical parameters such as total porosity, pore size distribution and physical parameters relating to fluid flow inside void space. The present work deals with the measurement of the microstructural parameters of porous ceramic filters. Microtomographic measurements of samples were taken using an X-ray tube. Bremsstrahlung radiation was filtered in transmission mode with a Sn filter at 58.5 and 28.3 keV and the images analyzed in two ways. The first method consisted in analyzing transepts of the images in order to calculate total porosity based on the average particle size and media linear attenuation coefficients. The second method involved a study of the images using an image analysis software, called Imago, which allows one to calculate total porosity and pore size distribution. The total measured porosity of the filter C90 was 73.8%, 71.1%, 74.4% and 71.5% by, respectively, the Arquimedes method, simple gamma ray transmission, transept analysis and analysis of the microtomographic images at 28.3 keV.

  3. Food Irradiation Using Electron Beams and X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce

    2003-04-01

    mass throughput (dM/dt in kg/s) of an accelerator-based system is proportional to the average beam power (P in kW), and inversely proportional to the minimum required dose (Dm in kGy, with 1 kGy = 1 kJ/kg). The constant of proportionality is the mass throughput efficiency. Throughput efficiencies of 0.4 or better are typical of electron beam installations, but are only 0.025-0.035 for x-ray installations, primarily because of the inefficiency of bremsstrahlung generation at 5 MeV (about 8an axially-coupled, standing-wave, L-band linac with an average power in excess of 100 kW to achieve reasonable throughput rates with x-ray processing. Various design aspects of this new machine will be presented.

  4. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  5. Comparative study of X-ray emission from plasma focus relative to different preionization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Qayyum, A.; Hassan, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-07-01

    A 2.7-kJ Mather-type plasma focus has been investigated for X-ray emission with preionization produced by an α-source, a β-source, and a shunt resistor. Time-resolved and time integrated measurements are carried out using a PIN-diode-based X-ray spectrometer and pinhole camera. The β-source (28Ni63) assisted preionization enhances the X-ray emission up to 25%, while preionization induced by depleted uranium (92U238) increases both Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 100%. The preionization caused by the optimum shunt resistor enhances the Cu-Kα and total X-ray yield of about 53%. It is found that preionization also broadens the working pressure range for the high X-ray yield and improves the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the system. Pinhole images reveal that the X-ray emission from the anode tip is dominant owing to impact of electron bombardment, while the X-ray emission from hot spots is also visible.

  6. The AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents. X-ray generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J A

    1997-01-01

    The x-ray generator delivers the electrical power to energize the x-ray tube and permits the selection of x-ray energy, x-ray quantity, and exposure time. Major internal components of the generator include transformers, diodes and rectifier circuits, filament and stator circuits, timer switches, and kilovolt and milliampere meters. Single-phase, three-phase, high-frequency, and constant potential generators produce different voltage waveforms (ripple) and x-ray beam spectra. Phototimer and automatic brightness control subsystems measure radiation exposure incident on the image receptor to give instantaneous feedback for optimal radiographic film densities and fluoroscopic image brightness, respectively. At the generator control console, the operator sets the tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, phototimer film density, spot film acquisition, and fluoroscopic parameters. Selection of generator power and options depends on the intended clinical use. X-ray tube focal spot size and power loading capability should be matched to the x-ray generator and clinical imaging requirements. Single and multiple exposure rating charts as well as anode and housing thermal characteristic charts indicate power input and dissipation rates specific to a generator and x-ray tube target and housing.

  7. Method of and device for measuring image lag in x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, J.N.; Schmal, F.

    1990-01-16

    This patent describes a method of measuring image lag in an x-ray system. The system comprises an x-ray source, an image intensifier and a video camera, in which a disc having a pattern of comparatively strongly and comparatively weakly x-ray-absorbing areas is placed between the x-ray source and the image intensifier with its axis substantially parallel to the axis of an x-ray beam emitted by the x-ray source, which disc is made to rotate bout its axis, and in which the image lag of the x-ray system is determined from the output signal of the video camera. The pattern of the disc comprises at least a coiled comparatively strongly x-ray-absorbing area which is coaxial with the disc, that at least one video line, that is situated in a part of the image on which the center of the disc is displayed, is selected from the video signal produced by the video camera that the signal amplitude of the selected video line is determined. The image lag is measured from the ratio of the signal amplitude measured while the disc is stationary and the signal amplitude measured while the disc is rotating at a given speed.

  8. X-Ray Point-source Populations Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken

    2013-03-01

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above ≈10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe Kα emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  9. X-Ray Phase Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    a contrast -detail phantom, an acrylic step- edge, and a breast tissue-equivalent phantom. As current breast imaging ( mammography and breast... contrast enhancement of x-ray mam- mography: A design study,” Phys. Med. Biol. 44, 2853–2866 (1999). 6F. Arfelli et al., “ Mammography with synchrotron...breast tissue produces very low attenuation contrast [5–7], which presents a considerable challenge for cancer detection in mammography . Unfortunately

  10. Study of exploding type pumping x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashiro, Hidehiko; Tomie, Toshihisa [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We are proposing a new x-ray pumping scheme named 'Exploding type pumping scheme'. A plasma is produced from a very thin membrane which is irradiated by a short pulse laser. Effective heating and ionization of a plasma from membrane is evaluated from Si spectral lines and theoretically hydrodynamic simulation. Effect of ASE from KrF amplifiers is experimentally evaluated as a negligible level when a short pulse laser is well-synchronized. (author)

  11. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  12. X-ray spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bipin K

    1979-01-01

    Rontgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895 launched a subject which became central to the development of modern physics. The verification of many of the predic­ tions of quantum theory by X-ray spectroscopy in the early part of the twen­ tieth century stimulated great interest in thi's area, which has subsequently influenced fields as diverse as chemical physics, nuclear physics, and the study of the electronic properties of solids, and led to the development of techniques such as Auger, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The improvement of the theoretical understanding of the physics underlying X-ray spectroscopy has been accompanied by advances in experimental techniques, and the subject provides an instructive example of how progress on both these fronts can be mutually beneficial. This book strikes a balance between his­ torical description, which illustrates this symbiosis, and the discussion of new developments. The application of X-ray spectroscopic methods to the in­ vestigation of chemical b...

  13. Globular cluster X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, D.

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual binary systems, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs), with formation rates per unit mass exceeding those in the Galactic disk by orders of magnitude. The high stellar densities in globular clusters trigger various dynamical interactions: exchange encounters, direct collisions, destruction of binaries, and tidal capture. This binary population is, in turn, critical to the stabilization of globular clusters against gravitational collapse; the long-term stability of a cluster is thought to depend on tapping into the gravitational binding energy of such close binaries. I will present an overview of the current state of globular cluster X-ray observations, as well as our work on deep Chandra observations of M4, where we reach some of the lowest X-ray luminosities in any globular cluster (comparable to the deep observations of 47 Tuc and NGC 6397). One of M4 X-ray sources previously classified as a white dwarf binary is likely a neutron star binary, and another X-ray source is a sub-subgiant, the nature of which is still unclear. skip=3pt

  14. X-Ray Emission in the Heliosphere: Ion-Neutral Collisions as a Plasma Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Tom; Sibeck, David; Collier, MIchael

    2015-04-01

    The solar corona is the most powerful source of x-rays in the solar system but x-ray emission has also been observed from planets, including the Earth and Jupiter, from the Moon, from comets, and from interstellar gas entering the heliosphere. Astrophysical x-ray emission primarily comes from hot plasmas, such as in the million degree solar corona. The gas and plasma in planetary atmospheres are rather cold and the x-ray emission is driven by solar radiation and/or the solar wind. For example, x-rays from Venus come from the scattering and K-shell fluorescence of solar x-rays from the neutral atmosphere. Auroral x-ray emission at Earth and Jupiter is produced by energetic electron and ion precipitation from the magnetospheres into the atmospheres. Cometary and heliospheric x-ray emission is caused by charge transfer of high charge state solar wind ions (e.g., O7+, C6+,…) with neutral hydrogen and helium.An important source of solar system x-rays is the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) mechanism. The solar wind originates in the hot solar corona and species heavier than helium (comprising about 0.1% of the gas) are highly-charged (e.g., O7+, C6+, Fe12+,….). Such ions undergo charge transfer collisions when they encounter neutral gas (e.g., cometary or interstellar gas or the Earth’s geocoronal hydrogen). The product ions are in highly-excited states and, subsequently, emit soft x-ray photons. The SWCX mechanism can explain the observed cometary x-ray emission and can also explain part of the soft x-ray background (the other part of which originates in the hot interstellar medium).The Earth has an extensive hot hydrogen exosphere, or geocorona, that is visible in scattered solar Lyman alpha. X-ray emission is produced in the magnetosheath due to the SWCX mechanism as the solar wind interacts with the exospheric gas. The most intense x-ray emission comes from the subsolar sheath region and from the cusp regions. Imaging of this emission by a spacecraft located

  15. The analysis of scalp irritation by coacervates produced in hair shampoo via FTIR with focal plane array detector, X-ray photoelectron microscopy and HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, I K; Park, S C; Kim, S H; Kim, J H; Cha, N R; Bae, W R; Kim, H N; Cho, S A; Yoo, J W; Kim, B M; Lee, J H

    2017-04-01

    Coacervates are inevitably formed on scalp on using hair washing products. Our goal was to analyse the coacervates in detail to identify the part responsible for scalp stimulation. Shampoo that increases coacervate formation was applied to in vitro skin and was washed. The residue was then analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-focal plane array (FTIR-FPA) and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). And HaCaT cells were used for irritant test of coacervate. Through this research, it was confirmed that the coacervate was a macromolecule structurally similar to a cationic polymer and contains an anionic surfactant. Its anionic surfactant was structurally semi-stable so that it released onto scalp when it absorbs moisture. Coacervate releases sulphate bonding into the matrix when it is exposed to water. Thus, the scalp stimulation would be expected. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  17. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Powder X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on doped lithium niobate for phase identification. High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique was used to study the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. The refractive index values are more for doped samples than for pure sample as determined by ...

  18. X-ray optics developments at ESA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.; Wallace, K.

    2013-01-01

    Future high energy astrophysics missions will require high performance novel X-ray optics to explore the Universe beyond the limits of the currently operating Chandra and Newton observatories. Innovative optics technologies are therefore being developed and matured by the European Space Agency (ESA......) in collaboration with research institutions and industry, enabling leading-edge future science missions. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) [1 to 21] and Slumped Glass Optics (SGO) [22 to 29] are lightweight high performance X-ray optics technologies being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class...... reflective coatings [30 to 35]. In addition, the progress with the X-ray test facilities and associated beam-lines is discussed [36]. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  19. The quantum X-ray radiology apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Hilt, B; Prevot, G

    2000-01-01

    The paper entitled 'New Quantum Detection System for Very Low Dose X-ray Radiology', presented at the talk session, discusses the preliminary data obtained using a new quantum X-ray radiology system with a high-efficiency solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, making it possible to reduce significantly the dose administered to a patient in X-ray radiology examinations. The present paper focuses more on the technological aspects of the apparatus, such as the integration of the detector with the two Asics, and the computer system. Namely, it is shown how the computer system calibrates the detection system, acquires the data in real time, and controls the scan parameters and image filtering process.

  20. X-ray optics of tapered capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaic, D X; Nugent, K A

    1995-11-01

    The optics of x-ray concentration by tapered glass capillaries is analyzed in terms of a phase-space construction describing their transmission efficiency. The parameters defining the intensity gain are given in terms of parameters describing the x-ray source used, the capillary taper profile, and glass characteristics. We introduce some key concepts in understanding these devices: the extreme ray and a phase-space description of sources and optics. They are used to develop an analytical formulation for the optimum gain characteristics of generalized tapers for use with synchrotrons and other low-divergence sources. This general solution is solved further for the case of conical taper profile. The predictions of this theory are compared with the results of three-dimensional, ray-tracing simulations of x-ray concentration efficiency for conical and paraboloidal tapers.