WorldWideScience

Sample records for bremsstrahlung x-rays produced

  1. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120 degree to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL

  2. Intravenous coronary angiography utilizing K-emission and bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by electron bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with synchrotron radiation at SSRL and NSLS have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an intense source of monochromatic X-rays. Because of the high cost of an electron synchrotron, theoretical analysis and experiments using inanimate phantoms has been undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using the spectrum produced by two appropriately chosen anode materials when bombarded with electrons in the 100--500 keV energy range for angiography. By using the X-rays emitted at 120{degree} to the incident electron direction, about 20--30% of the X-ray intensity would be due to K-emission lines. Calculations using the TIGERP Monte Carlo Code, have shown that high quality angiograms of human coronary arteries should be possible with a contrast agent containing ytterbium, if an electron beam pulses of 16 kJ were used for each anode target. The experimental program supported in part by the DOE has consisted of these theoretical calculations and experiments at the Dynamitron Electron Accelerator Facility at BNL.

  3. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the theoretical background and computer codes for the calculation of soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation. These calculations are then used to calculate the effective Z of a plasma from the measured enhancement of the continuum radiation over that of pure hydrogen bremsstrahlung

  4. Vircator in regime of x-ray Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power vircator with multi-flight electrons cross optical thin anode foil power pulses generation of X-ray radiation created and operated in first. The vircator realized on the base of direct action electron accelerator with supplies of inductive energy storage with plasma switch of current. In paper results of 2-D self-consistent calculations of electron beam dynamics in vircator camera and determined spectra of arise UHF-radiation. The results of first experiments on vircator X-ray Bremsstrahlung for thin (10 mkm, Ta) and thick (100 mkm, Ta) anode foils are presented. The dose of X-ray radiation for thin foil (Eγ > 30 keV) in 8 greater than dose received for thick anode, middle photon energy reduced from 80 keV to 30 keV

  5. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  6. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung are calculated from electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the...

  7. Dynamical diffraction theory for the parametric X-rays and coherent bremsstrahlung

    OpenAIRE

    Feranchuk, Ilya D.; Lugovskaya, O.; Ulyanenkov, A.

    2005-01-01

    The various mechanisms of X-ray radiation from relativistically charged particles in a crystal are analyzed from a common point of view, based on quantum electrodynamics in a medium. Parametric X-rays (PXR), diffraction radiation (DR) and coherent bremsstrahlung (CB) lead to different contributions to the amplitude of the radiation process but because of their interference they cannot be considered separately in the radiation intensity. The role of the dynamical diffraction effect...

  8. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habsh; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativisitic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and space reuseable launch vehicles (sRLVs). The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremsstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  9. Observation of material, thickness, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity dependent effects in moderate and high Z targets in a gamma and x-ray LIDAR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Laubach, Mitchell A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, Jason P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A high energy gamma and x-ray LIDAR system consisting of a fast pulse (~50 ps, FWHM) LINAC and a Cherenkov detection system was used to investigate response differences among materials, their thicknesses, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities. The energies and pulse width of electrons used to produce bremsstrahlung x-rays were set at 20 or 40 MeV and 50 ps FWHM duration, respectively. The Cherenkov detector was built with a fused silica glass optically coupled to a 51 mm fast timing photomultiplier tube, which has an intrinsic energy threshold of 340.7 keV for Compton backscattered gammas. Such a fast detection system yields a coincidence resolving time of 93 ps FWHM, which is equivalent to a depth resolving capability of about 3 cm FWHM. The thicknesses of iron and lead targets were varied from 1 in. to 7 in. with a step of 1 in., and the thicknesses of DU were varied from 1/3 in. to 1 in. with a step of 1/3 in. The experimental results show that iron targets tend to produce a factor of five less observed x-rays and gammas, with less energetic photoelectron frequency distributions, compared with DU and lead targets for the same beam intensity and target thicknesses. Additionally, the self-shielding effect causes the lead to yield more gammas than the DU considering the experimental observation point. For the setup used in this study, a charge per pulse in the range of 1–2.5 nC yields the best resolving capability between the DU and lead targets.

  10. Observation of material, thickness, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity dependent effects in moderate and high Z targets in a gamma and x-ray LIDAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Laubach, Mitchell A.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2015-06-01

    A high energy gamma and x-ray LIDAR system consisting of a fast pulse (~50 ps, FWHM) LINAC and a Cherenkov detection system was used to investigate response differences among materials, their thicknesses, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities. The energies and pulse width of electrons used to produce bremsstrahlung x-rays were set at 20 or 40 MeV and 50 ps FWHM duration, respectively. The Cherenkov detector was built with a fused silica glass optically coupled to a 51 mm fast timing photomultiplier tube, which has an intrinsic energy threshold of 340.7 keV for Compton backscattered gammas. Such a fast detection system yields a coincidence resolving time of 93 ps FWHM, which is equivalent to a depth resolving capability of about 3 cm FWHM. The thicknesses of iron and lead targets were varied from 1 in. to 7 in. with a step of 1 in., and the thicknesses of DU were varied from 1/3 in. to 1 in. with a step of 1/3 in. The experimental results show that iron targets tend to produce a factor of five less observed x-rays and gammas, with less energetic photoelectron frequency distributions, compared with DU and lead targets for the same beam intensity and target thicknesses. Additionally, the self-shielding effect causes the lead to yield more gammas than the DU considering the experimental observation point. For the setup used in this study, a charge per pulse in the range of 1-2.5 nC yields the best resolving capability between the DU and lead targets.

  11. Bremsstrahlung x ray spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: Predictions for future planetary spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of X ray spectra due to bremsstrahlung from precipitating auroral electrons at Jupiter and Saturn are presented. The model assumes that a field-aligned potential drop accelerates a primary beam of electrons into the atmosphere where a population of secondary electrons having a power law energy dependence is generated. The spectrum at Jupiter is normalized to the soft X ray observations of Metzger et al (1983) at the low-energy end and constrained at the high-energy end by UV auroral energy requirements. The spectrum at Saturn is constructed by analogy to the Jovian case allowing for variation of the beam energy, energy flux, and scale size of the Saturnian aurora. The resulting indicate that a significant flux of X rays is emanating from both planets which may serve as a basis for conducting planetary X ray astronomy as part of future spacecraft missions to the planets

  12. High-power vircator in the regime of warm bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents the results of 2D self-consistent calculations of electron beam dynamics in vircator cell alongside with the resulting spectra of the accompanying microwave radiation. Also presented are the results of 1D calculations of electron beam dynamics with consideration for dissipation at the anode foil alongside with the resulting spectra of X-ray radiation. Being presented are the results of the first experiments aimed at investigation of bremsstrahlung X-ray radiation of the vircator for thin (10 μm, Ta) and thick (100 μm, Ta) anode foil

  13. A high-power vircator operating as an X-ray bremsstrahlung generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vircator capable of generating high-power X-ray pulses due to the multiple transitions of electrons through a thin anode foil transparent to X radiation has been created and put into operation for the first time. The vircator is created on the basis of a direct-action electron accelerator supplied from an inductive energy storage operating with a plasma opening switch. Self-consistent two-dimensional simulations of the electron beam dynamics in the vircator chamber are performed, and the spectra of the generated microwave radiation are determined. Self-consistent one-dimensional simulations of the beam dynamics with allowance for electron scattering in the foil were also carried out, and the X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra were measured. Results are presented from the first experiments on the generation of X-ray bremsstrahlung in vircators with thin (10 μm) and thick (100 μm) tantalum anode foils. For a thin foil, the X-ray (Eγ > 30 keV) dose is eight times as high as that for a thick foil and the average photon energy is 30 keV (against 80 keV for a thick foil)

  14. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and fluorescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons which impact on the counter windows of soft X-ray detectors are discussed. The errors caused by X-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above a rocket-borne detector because of the resemblance to X-rays of cosmic origin are examined. The design and development of counter windows which make it possible to identify the atmospherically produced X-rays are described. Curves are presented to show the following: (1) preliminary low energy electron data from Atmospheric Explorer C, (2) X-ray flux in electron-excited nitrogen and oxygen, (3) typical proportional counter response to low energy cosmic rays, and (4) proportional counter response to X-radiation produced by electrons incident upon a gas of oxygen to nitrogen number of 0.4.

  15. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. Methods: HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung emission are calculated from various electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere to study the observed (primary and albedo) sources. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. Results: We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the extent of the HXR source at a given disk location. In the radial direction, the polarization magnitude and direction at specific positions along the HXR source will either increase or decrease with increased photon distribution directivity towards the photosphere. We also show how high electron cutoff energies influence the direction of polarization at above ~100 keV. Conclusions: Spatially resolved HXR polarization measurements can provide important information about the directivity and energetics of the electron distribution. Our results indicate the preferred angular resolution of polarization measurements required to distinguish between the scattered and primary components. We also show how spatially resolved polarization measurements could be used to probe the emission pattern of an HXR source, using both the magnitude and the direction of the polarization.

  16. X-rays from Proton Bremsstrahlung: Evidence from Fusion Reactors and Its Implication in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Nie

    2009-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, a proton and a neutron generated in previous reactions may again fuse with each other. Or they can in turn fuse with or be captured by an un-reacted deuteron. The average center-of-mass (COM) energy for such reaction is around 10 keV in a typical fusion reactor, but could be as low as 1 keV. At this low COM energy, the reacting nucleons are in an s-wave state in terms of their relative angular momentum. The single-gamma radiation process is thus strongly suppressed due to conservation laws. Instead the gamma ray released is likely to be accompanied by x-ray photons from a nuclear bremsstrahlung process. The x-ray thus generated has a continuous spectrum and peaks around a few hundred eV to a few keV. The average photon energy and spectrum properties of such a process are calculated with a semiclassical approach. The results give a peak near 1.1 keV for the proton-deuteron fusion and a power-to-the-minus-second law in the spectrum's high-energy limit. An analysis of some prior tokamak disc...

  17. The development of a high power bremsstrahlung radiator for the production of monochromatic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental setup for the production of monochromatic X-ray beams tunable in the energy region between 75 KeV and 700 KeV was built at our facility. The concept is based on monochromatization of a broad energy bremsstrahlung spectrum by Laue diffraction on a curved single crystal and by selection of the desired energy with an appropriate slit system, 10.45 meters behind the crystal. The bremsstrahlung spectrum is created when accelerated electrons from a high power 20 kW linac lose energy in a radiator. In this study, the radiator has been optimized for the creation of a bremsstrahlung spectrum suitable for monochromatization with a crystal. Monte-Carlo Simulations (using the BEAM-EGS4 code) of electrons incident with different energies on a radiator with varying composition (aluminum, carbon and tantalum) and thickness were carried out. Furthermore a study of the thermal properties of these materials when being exposed to a high power electron beam was done. This lead to the remarkable conclusion that a thin radiator composed of a low Z material should be used. This result is quite surprising as usually a high Z material is used for efficient transformation of charged particle energy to bremsstrahlung photons. A low Z radiator however will create a less divergent photon beam, leading to more photons on the effective surface area of the crystal. A set of radiators was designed to have an optimal configuration for different monochromatic beams needed. Because only a small fraction of the electrons are stopped in these thin radiators, a cleaning magnet and a beamstop need to be inserted in the setup. Due to the high power of the electron beam on the one hand and its divergency after traversing the radiator on the other, a special magnet system had to be designed to remove the electrons from the photon beam. This was done by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and a ray tracing program. Finally it was estimated that, when using this new setup, the intensity of the

  18. Integral (effective) and differential linear coefficients of X-ray bremsstrahlung attenuation and effective build up factors of scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer calculations of the values of integral (effective) and differential linear factors of X-ray bremsstrahlung attenuation for radiation flaw detection were conducted. The values of effective build up factors of scattered radiation were calculated as well. Calculations were conducted in geometry of ''narrow'' beam in 20-400 kV range of tube voltage for Mg, Al, Ti, Fe base alloys of 1-500 mm thickness. Calculation data are tabulated

  19. A FOURIER-TRANSFORMED BREMSSTRAHLUNG FLASH MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS IN ACCRETING BLACK HOLE SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accreting black hole sources show a wide variety of rapid time variability, including the manifestation of time lags during X-ray transients, in which a delay (phase shift) is observed between the Fourier components of the hard and soft spectra. Despite a large body of observational evidence for time lags, no fundamental physical explanation for the origin of this phenomenon has been presented. We develop a new theoretical model for the production of X-ray time lags based on an exact analytical solution for the Fourier transform describing the diffusion and Comptonization of seed photons propagating through a spherical corona. The resulting Green's function can be convolved with any source distribution to compute the associated Fourier transform and time lags, hence allowing us to explore a wide variety of injection scenarios. We show that thermal Comptonization is able to self-consistently explain both the X-ray time lags and the steady-state (quiescent) X-ray spectrum observed in the low-hard state of Cyg X-1. The reprocessing of bremsstrahlung seed photons produces X-ray time lags that diminish with increasing Fourier frequency, in agreement with the observations for a wide range of sources

  20. A FOURIER-TRANSFORMED BREMSSTRAHLUNG FLASH MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS IN ACCRETING BLACK HOLE SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A., E-mail: jkroon@gmu.edu, E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Accreting black hole sources show a wide variety of rapid time variability, including the manifestation of time lags during X-ray transients, in which a delay (phase shift) is observed between the Fourier components of the hard and soft spectra. Despite a large body of observational evidence for time lags, no fundamental physical explanation for the origin of this phenomenon has been presented. We develop a new theoretical model for the production of X-ray time lags based on an exact analytical solution for the Fourier transform describing the diffusion and Comptonization of seed photons propagating through a spherical corona. The resulting Green's function can be convolved with any source distribution to compute the associated Fourier transform and time lags, hence allowing us to explore a wide variety of injection scenarios. We show that thermal Comptonization is able to self-consistently explain both the X-ray time lags and the steady-state (quiescent) X-ray spectrum observed in the low-hard state of Cyg X-1. The reprocessing of bremsstrahlung seed photons produces X-ray time lags that diminish with increasing Fourier frequency, in agreement with the observations for a wide range of sources.

  1. The Impact of Hot Electrons on X-ray Spectra: e-e Bremsstrahlung and κ Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Cui, Xiaohong; Foster, Adam; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Shocks, turbulence, and winds all influence the electron velocity distribution in hot plasmas, exciting lower-energy electrons and generating a high-energy (typically power-law) tail. Sufficiently energetic electrons will emit via an electron-electron (e-e) bremsstrahlung, a process not previously included in the AtomDB. We have added this process and calculate the impact e-e bremsstrahlung has on the spectra from the post-shock regions of an accreting magnetic cataclysmic variable (CV). We find the contribution of e-e bremsstrahlung to the total spectra exceeds 10% at ~100 keV, with the total emissivity in the post-shock accretion stream differing by more than 10% at energies above 60 keV. More generally a Maxwellian with a power law tail, typically termed a κ distribution, can have significant effects on the line and continuum X-rays emitted. In addition to the e-e bremsstrahlung term, there will be effects due to the impact of the electrons on the charge state distribution and the collisional excitation rates. We use the ``Maxwellian decomposition'' approach as described in Hahn & Savin (2015) to generate the rate coefficients for a κ distributions based on the recently-released AtomDB v3.0 atomic database. These values are compared to exact calculations done for selected recombination and bremsstrahlung rates, and are also compared to results from the CHIANTI KAPPA package.

  2. A characterization and optimization study of Gamble II as an X-ray bremsstrahlung source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adverse effects of radiation on solid state devices are strongly spectrum dependent. It is thus essential that the radiation spectrum from flash x-ray sources be available when they are used as facilities for testing electronic components. This paper describes a preliminary study in which previously developed computer codes were used to calculate the radiation spectrum produced by NRL's Gamble II pulsed power generator. To determine how well the calculated spectrum matched the experimental one, doses in CaF2-Mn TLD's were computed for the dosimeters placed behind various thicknesses of Cu and Pb filters and compared with the experimentally measured doses. Using a diode model that was consistent with presently understood electron beam behavior, a spectrum was generated which predicted TLD doses to within about 15% of the experimentally measured values

  3. Internal Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 57Co in coincidence with K-X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the IB photons from 57Co are measured in coincidence with 6.4 keV x rays emitted due to the EC process. The IB photons are measured using a (1.75 x 2.0 ) NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and k-x rays are detected using a proportional counter

  4. Multi-keV X-Ray Conversion Efficiency in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C A; Landen, O L; Hammer, J H; Suter, L J; Miller, M C; Davis, J; Grun, J

    2002-10-31

    X-ray sources are created at the Nova and Omega laser by irradiating a confined volume of Ar, Xe, or Kr gas. The gas is heated by forty 0.35 {micro}m wavelength, 1-ns square laser beams to produce He-like ions that radiate K-shell emission over mm-sized dimensions. The targets are designed to be ''underdense'', meaning that the initial gas density is lower than the critical density of the laser, n{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The laser energy is primarily absorbed by inverse bremsstrahlung and a supersonic heat wave efficiently ionizes the gas. Results from time-resolved and time-integrated diagnostics over a range of experimental parameters are compared. This work represents an important, new method for development of efficient, large-area, tailored multi-keV x-ray sources.

  5. X-ray energy dependence of the properties of the focused beams produced by polycapillary x-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated x-ray energy distribution in an x-ray microbeam produced by a polycapillary x-ray lens in combination with a sealed-type x-ray tube. This polycapillary x-ray lens has an output focal distance (OFD) of approximately 15 mm. The size of the x-ray microbeam and its OFD were estimated by using a wire scanning method. In our case, the sizes of the x-ray microbeams at the output focal distance were 49 μm for Mo Lα, 36 μm for W Lα, and 28 μm for Mo Kα. The spot sizes depend on the energy of the x-ray fluorescence. The reason for the energy dependence is that x-ray capillary optics is based on the principle of propagation through glass capillaries by means of x-ray total external reflection. The evaluated OFD values of Mo Lα and Mo Kα were slightly changed in 17 μm. However, a deviation of 100 μm from the OFD caused only a 3% increase of the focal spot size. Therefore, we concluded that the OFD showed no significant dependence on x-ray energy. (author)

  6. X-ray imaging of laser produced plasmas by a compound 3D x-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot scheme for the study of plasma under extreme condition is implemented using a compound 3D X-ray lens. Hard X-ray image of laser plasma produced by irradiating of copper foil by intense laser pulse was recorded using this lens

  7. Bremsstrahlung spectra produced by kilovolt electron impact on thick targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of bremsstrahlung spectra generated by 5-25 keV electron impact on thick targets of aluminium, titanium, zirconium, molybdenum and tungsten are reported. The experimental data are compared with the simulation results of X-ray spectra obtained from the general-purpose Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, which implements accurate cross-sections for ordinary bremsstrahlung emission but disregards polarization bremsstrahlung. The agreement between the experimental and simulation results is satisfactory. This is in contrast with a recent study in which large discrepancies were observed between experimental and Monte Carlo simulation results. Our results provide evidence for the reliability of the combined choices of the interaction cross-sections and of the simulation algorithms implemented in PENELOPE for bremsstrahlung emission.

  8. Fast spectral fitting of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung from truncated power-law electron spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brown, J. C.; Kašparová, Jana; Massone, A.M.; Piana, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 486, č. 3 (2008), s. 1023-1029. ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/06/P135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : sun flares * X-rays * gamma rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  9. Soft x-ray bremsstrahlung and flourescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several clues, such as pulse height distribution and angular distribution, that reveal the presence of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons capable of by-passing magnetic rejection schemes and penetrating the counter windows of soft x-ray detectors are discussed. (U.S.)

  10. Coherent X-ray Cherenkov radiation produced by microbunched beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical and numerical results on the coherent X-ray Cherenkov radiation (CXCR) produced by microbunched beams in the region near the K-, L-edges of materials are obtained. The results show that CXCR can serve as a suitable mechanism for production intense beams of photons in the 'water window' region as well as for studying the important microbunching process at FLASH TESLA, LCLS and other FELs.

  11. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. III - Polarization, directivity, and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the spectrum, directivity, and state of polarization of the bremsstrahlung radiation expected from a beam of high-energy electrons spiraling along radial magnetic field lines toward the photosphere. A Monte Carlo method is then described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. The accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. The calculated characteristics of the incident X-rays are used to evaluate the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of the reflected and total X-ray fluxes. The results are compared with observations.

  12. Radiation processing of food products with 5 MV Bremsstrahlung x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foods and agricultural products are treated with ionizing radiation to accomplish many different goals. The desired goals may be the reduction of pathogenic bacteria, other microorganisms and parasites that cause food borne diseases; or inactivation of food spoilage organisms, including bacteria, molds, and yeasts; or lengthening the shelf-life of fresh fruits and vegetables by decreasing the normal biological changes associated with growth and maturation processes, such as ripening or sprouting. It has become more important due to mounting concern over food born diseases, and growing international trade in food products that must meet stiff import standards of quality and quarantine. A 10 MeV 10 kW LINAC based multi-product EB radiation processing facility is being established at CAT to meet the processing requirement of various food, agricultural and medical products. The facility will be operated in two modes: (a) Electron: 10 MeV, 10 kW (b) Photon: 5 MeV, 10 kW Treatment with electron beam provides the highest processing rate and lowest unit cost. But the electrons have relatively short range in the solid product, hence the maximum product areal density (density times depth) that can be processed using direct 10 MeV electron beam is limited to about 8.5 gm/cm2 (double sided irradiation). On the other hand x-rays are more penetrating, hence can be used to process the products having larger areal densities e.g. onions and potatoes packed in gunny bags. In order to address various issues related to food irradiation using 5 MV X-ray beam, a mathematical model is developed on the basis of the analytical calculations and experimental data presented by R.B.Miller, 2003, and J. Meissner et.al, 2000. (author)

  13. X-ray production ∼130 Angstrom from laser-produced plasmas for projection x-ray lithography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray production in the region around 130 Angstrom from laser-produced plasmas have been investigated as a source for projection x-ray lithography. The dependence of x-ray conversion efficiency on target material, intensity, and pulse length has been studied using a 0.53 μm laser with a maximum of 0.3 J. Conversion efficiency of 1% into a 3 Angstrom bandwidth has been demonstrated for Sn targets at intensities around 1011 W/cm2 using a 7.5 ns pulse. Intensity scaling suggests that laser spot size and two-dimensional expansion are important for optimizing x-ray production at these low irradiation intensities

  14. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x1011 is estimated. (author)

  15. X-ray line emission produced in clump bow shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassinelli, Joe P.; Ignace, R.; Waldron, W.; Cho, J.; Murphy, N; Lazarian, A.

    2008-01-01

    We summarize Chandra observations of the emission line profiles from 17 OB stars. The lines tend to be broad and unshifted. The forbidden/intercombination line ratios arising from Helium-like ions provide radial distance information for the X-ray emission sources, while the H-like to He-like line ratios provide X-ray temperatures, and thus also source temperature versus radius distributions. OB stars usually show power law differential emission measure distributions versus temperature. In mod...

  16. The use of CVD diamond to produce carbon K ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon K ultrasoft x-rays (278 eV) interact with biological material producing random, isolated tracks of single electrons with a range K ultrasoft x-rays for irradiation purposes. The system described produces an entrance absorbed dose rate to attached cells of ∼ 0.2 Gy min-1 which due to the long target lifetime is usable for low dose-rate CK x-ray studies. (note)

  17. X-ray optical diagnostic of laser produced plasmas for nuclear fusion and X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butzbach, R.

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, the conception, design and appliance of toroidally bent crystals for the X-ray optical diagnostics of laser produced plasmas is discussed. The first part of this work deals with the development, design and characterization of an X-Ray microscope for the observation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, which act against the confinement and ignition of the fuel in the inertial confinement fusion process. The aim of the second part of the present work was the diagnostic of the lasing medium for amplified spontaneous emission close to the water window. For this purpose, an one-dimensionally (1-D) imaging X-ray spectrometer based on toroidally bent quartz crystals was developed for the observation of the Ni-like 4f-3d transition of Yb, Hf, Ta, and W ions, which should be related to the amplified 4d-4p emission, since the 4f niveau is very close to the 4d niveau. Thus, the 4f-3d transition can serve as an indicator for the population of the 4d niveau. (orig.)

  18. X-ray optical diagnostic of laser produced plasmas for nuclear fusion and X-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the conception, design and appliance of toroidally bent crystals for the X-ray optical diagnostics of laser produced plasmas is discussed. The first part of this work deals with the development, design and characterization of an X-Ray microscope for the observation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, which act against the confinement and ignition of the fuel in the inertial confinement fusion process. The aim of the second part of the present work was the diagnostic of the lasing medium for amplified spontaneous emission close to the water window. For this purpose, an one-dimensionally (1-D) imaging X-ray spectrometer based on toroidally bent quartz crystals was developed for the observation of the Ni-like 4f-3d transition of Yb, Hf, Ta, and W ions, which should be related to the amplified 4d-4p emission, since the 4f niveau is very close to the 4d niveau. Thus, the 4f-3d transition can serve as an indicator for the population of the 4d niveau. (orig.)

  19. The effect of the dc bias voltage on the x-ray bremsstrahlung and beam intensities of medium and highly charged ions of argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G; Lakshmy, P S; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2010-02-01

    X-ray bremsstrahlung measurements from the 18 GHz High Temperature Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source, Pantechnik-Delhi Ion Source were measured as a function of negative dc bias voltage, keeping all other source operating parameters fixed and the extraction voltage in the off condition. The optimization of medium and highly charged ions of argon with similar source operating parameters is described. It is observed that the high temperature component of the electron is altered significantly with the help of bias voltage, and the electron population has to be maximized for obtaining higher current. PMID:20192344

  20. The effect of the dc bias voltage on the x-ray bremsstrahlung and beam intensities of medium and highly charged ions of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray bremsstrahlung measurements from the 18 GHz High Temperature Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source, Pantechnik-Delhi Ion Source were measured as a function of negative dc bias voltage, keeping all other source operating parameters fixed and the extraction voltage in the off condition. The optimization of medium and highly charged ions of argon with similar source operating parameters is described. It is observed that the high temperature component of the electron is altered significantly with the help of bias voltage, and the electron population has to be maximized for obtaining higher current.

  1. Emerging trends in X-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by intense laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray line emission from hot dense plasmas, produced by ultra-short high intensity laser systems, has been studied experimentally in recent years for applications in materials science as well as for back-lighter applications. By virtue of the CPA technology, several laser facilities delivering pulses with peak powers in excess of one petawatt (focused intensities > 1020 W-cm−2) have either been commissioned across the globe during the last few years or are presently under construction. On the other hand, hard x-ray sources on table top, generating ultra-short duration x-rays at a repetition rate up to 10 kHz, are routinely available for time resolved x-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, the recent experiments on x-ray spectroscopic studies of plasma produced by 45 fs, Ti:sapphire laser pulses (focused iintensity > 1018 W-cm−2) at RRCAT Indore will be presented

  2. Temporal and Spectral Resolved Measurement of Soft X-ray From Ultrashort Pulse Laser Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Theobald; L.Veisz; H.Schwoerer; R.Sauerbrey; X.Z.Tang

    2001-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse produced plasmas are powerful sources of incoherent XUV/soft X-ray radiation and have important applications range from microscopy to lithography. Adding a prepulse is one possible way to enhance soft X-ray emission. The experiment is performed on the Jena 10 TW laser system in IOQ, Germany. The main purpose is to measure the time-resolved soft X-ray spectrum, and study how a prepulse play an important role and enhance the X-ray emission as well as and pulse duration. We clarified the temporal behavior of X-ray emission from quartz plasma produced by intensive femtosecond 800 nm laser pulse, and obtained a quantitative pictures of the

  3. Preliminary study for producing higher harmonic hard X-rays from weakly ionized nickel plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the plasma flash X-ray generator, a 200 nF condenser is charged up to 50 kV by a power supply, and flash X-rays are produced by the discharging. The X-ray tube is a demountable triode with a trigger electrode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Target evaporation leads to the formation of weakly ionized linear plasma, consisting of nickel ions and electrons, around the fine target, and intense Kα lines are left using a 15-μm-thick cobalt filter. At a charging voltage of 50 kV, the maximum tube voltage was almost equal to the charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 18 kA. The K-series characteristic X-rays were clean and intense, and higher harmonic X-rays were observed. The X-ray pulse widths were approximately 300 ns, and the time-integrated X-ray intensity had a value of approximately 1.0 mGy at 1.0 m from the X-ray source with a charging voltage of 50 kV

  4. Electron-electron bremsstrahlung emission and the inference of electron flux spectra in solar flares

    OpenAIRE

    Kontar, E. P.; Emslie, A. G.; Massone, A. M.; Piana, M.; Brown, J.C.; Prato, M.

    2007-01-01

    Although both electron-ion and electron-electron bremsstrahlung contribute to the hard X-ray emission from solar flares, the latter is normally ignored. Such an omission is not justified at electron (and photon) energies above $\\sim 300$ keV, and inclusion of the additional electron-electron bremsstrahlung in general makes the electron spectrum required to produce a given hard X-ray spectrum steeper at high energies. Unlike electron-ion bremsstrahlung, electron-electron bremsstrahlung cannot ...

  5. Effect of an electron scattering cloud on X-ray oscillations produced by beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, J.; Lamb, F. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a scattering cloud on the amplitude of oscillations produced by a rotating beam of X-rays is investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The scattering cloud was modeled as a uniform density sphere, and the source was represented as an anistropic distribution of radiation emerging from a point at the center of the scattering cloud. The intensity distribution produced by the source beam is examined as a function of optical depth. The relation between electron scattering optical depth and the forward-backward ratio is studied. It is observed that the scattering in a central corona of various optical depths reduces the amplitude of the oscillation. The data suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the X-ray intensities of some luminous low-mass X-ray binaries are caused by oscillations in the luminosity of the X-ray star.

  6. Detection of 1 - 100 keV x-rays from high intensity, 500 fs laser- produced plasmas using charge-coupled devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.; Young, B.K.F.; Conder, A.D.; Stewart, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a compact, vacuum compatible, large format, charge- coupled device (CCD) camera for scientific imaging and detection of 1- 100 keV x rays in experiments at LLNL JANUS-1ps laser. A standard, front-illuminated, multi-pin phase device with 250 k electron full well capacity, low dark current (10 pA/cm{sup 2} at 20 C) and low read noise (5 electron rms) is cooled to -35 C to give the camera excellent 15-bit dynamic range and signal-to-noise response. Intensity and x-ray energy linear response were determined for optical and x-ray (<65 keV) photons and are in excellent agreement. Departure from linearity was less than 0.7%. Inherent linearity and energy dispersive characteristics of CCD cameras are well suited for hard x-ray photon counting. X-rays absorbed within the depletion and field-free regions can be distinguished by studying the pulse height spectrum. Results are presented for the detection of 1-100 keV Bremsstrahlung continuum, K-shell and L-shell fluorescence spectra emitted from high intensity (10{sup 18}W cm{sup -2}), 500 fs laser- produced plasmas.

  7. Characteristics of ultrafast K line hard x-ray source from femtosecond terawatt laser-produced plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏; 陈建文; 高鸿奕; 陆培祥; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical studies and analytical scalings were carried out to find the optimized laser parameters and target conditions so that ultrashort hard x-ray pulses and high x-ray power could be achieved. The dependence of laser intensity and wavelength on the yield of K-shell x-ray emission was studied. We propose an optimal design for a foil target for producing high-yield hard x-ray pulses of customizing duration.

  8. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Senecha; Y B S R Prasad; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; G S Solanki; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An investigation of x-ray emission from Cu plasma produced by 1.054 m Nd:glass laser pulses of 5 ns duration, at 2 × 1012-2 × 1013 W cm-2 is reported. The x-ray emission has been studied as a function of target position with respect to the laser beam focus position. It has been observed that x-ray emissions from ns duration plasma show a volume effect similar to subnanosecond plasmas. Due to this effect the x-ray yield increases when target is moved away relative to the best focal plane of the laser beam. This result supports the theoretical model of Tallents and has also been testified independently using suitably modified theoretical model for our experimental conditions. While above result is in good agreement with similar experimental results obtained for sub-nanosecond laser produced plasmas, it differs from result claiming filamentation rather than pure geometrical effect leading to x-ray enhancement for ns plasmas.

  9. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzi, M; Berucci, C; Bombelli, L; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R S; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Kienle, P; Sandri, P Levi; Longoni, A; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Ponta, T; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C22H10N2O5) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z = 6, 7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n = 5-8) were determined. The relative yield ratios of the successive transitions and those of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton.

  10. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700 STN CNC, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, Institutul National pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30, Magurele (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C.; D' Uffizi, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Fiorini, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R.S. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T., E-mail: tomoichi.ishiwatari@assoc.oeaw.ac.at [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-23

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C{sub 22}H{sub 10}N{sub 2}O{sub 5}) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z=6,7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n=5–8) were determined. The relative yields of the successive transitions in the same atoms and the yield ratios of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) for the same transitions were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton.

  11. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R. S.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2013-10-01

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C22H10N2O5) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z=6,7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n=5-8) were determined. The relative yields of the successive transitions in the same atoms and the yield ratios of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) for the same transitions were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton.

  12. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C22H10N2O5) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z=6,7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n=5–8) were determined. The relative yields of the successive transitions in the same atoms and the yield ratios of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) for the same transitions were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton

  13. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  14. Analysis of X-ray spectra emitted from laser-produced plasmas of uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, J P; Szabo, C I; Parente, F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we used the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method to generate theoretical X-ray spectra for Co-, Ni-, Cu-, Zn-, Ga-, Ge-, As-, Se-, Br-, Kr-, and Rb-like uranium ions. Using the distribution of these ions in a laser-produced plasma, for different plasma temperatures, we generate theoretical spectra, which are compared to experimental data.

  15. Characteristic and non-characteristic X-ray yields produced from thick Ti element by sub-relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The X-ray spectra of a thick Ti element by 10–25 keV electron impact are obtained. ► Measured Ti Kα yields are found to be in good agreement with PWBA theory. ► Doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields agree reasonably with MC simulation. ► Average value of the ratio Kα/(Kα + Kβ) of Ti is found to be 0.881 ± 0.003. -- Abstract: Measurements are performed to study the electron impact energy dependence of doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields (DDBY) and of characteristic Ti Kα line yields produced from sub-relativistic electrons (10–25 keV) colliding with a thick Ti (Z = 22) target. The emitted radiation is detected by a Si-PIN photo-diode detector with energy resolution (FWHM) of 180 eV at 5.9 keV. The measured data of DDBY are compared with the results predicted by Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations using the general purpose PENELOPE code. A reasonable agreement is found between experimental and simulation results within the experimental uncertainty of measurements of 12%. Characteristic Ti Kα yields are obtained for the considered impact energy range and they are compared with the existing theoretical results. A good agreement is found between the present measurements and the theoretical calculations. Furthermore, data are presented for impact energy dependence of the ratio Kα/(Kα+ Kβ) of a thick Ti target under impact of 10–25 keV electrons. The ratio shows a very weak dependence on impact energy in the studied range. The average value of the ratio is found to be 0.881 ± 0.003.

  16. Characteristic and non-characteristic X-ray yields produced from thick Ti element by sub-relativistic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Namita; Kumar, Sunil; Bhatt, Pragya; Singh, Raj; Singh, B.K. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X-ray spectra of a thick Ti element by 10-25 keV electron impact are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measured Ti K{sub {alpha}} yields are found to be in good agreement with PWBA theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields agree reasonably with MC simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Average value of the ratio K{sub {alpha}}/(K{sub {alpha}} + K{sub {beta}}) of Ti is found to be 0.881 {+-} 0.003. -- Abstract: Measurements are performed to study the electron impact energy dependence of doubly differential bremsstrahlung yields (DDBY) and of characteristic Ti K{sub {alpha}} line yields produced from sub-relativistic electrons (10-25 keV) colliding with a thick Ti (Z = 22) target. The emitted radiation is detected by a Si-PIN photo-diode detector with energy resolution (FWHM) of 180 eV at 5.9 keV. The measured data of DDBY are compared with the results predicted by Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations using the general purpose PENELOPE code. A reasonable agreement is found between experimental and simulation results within the experimental uncertainty of measurements of 12%. Characteristic Ti K{sub {alpha}} yields are obtained for the considered impact energy range and they are compared with the existing theoretical results. A good agreement is found between the present measurements and the theoretical calculations. Furthermore, data are presented for impact energy dependence of the ratio K{sub {alpha}}/(K{sub {alpha}}+ K{sub {beta}}) of a thick Ti target under impact of 10-25 keV electrons. The ratio shows a very weak dependence on impact energy in the studied range. The average value of the ratio is found to be 0.881 {+-} 0.003.

  17. Vertical profile of the environmental gamma-ray in Kashiwazaki Kariwa area. Detection of bremsstrahlung X-ray generated by winter thunderstorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumulative dose measurements have been performed at the points from 1 m to 117 m above the ground on the arrester tower located at the site of the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLD) and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). From the measurement results, the mean dose rates both from RPLD and TLD gradually decrease with height in summer season. On the other hand, the vertical profile of upper regions showed in the reverse attenuation in winter season. It was assumed that the increasing trend of dose rates with height is caused by some external radiation source peculiar to winter season. In this winter, many thunderstorms occurred and dose rates from both NaI(Tl) and ionization chamber (IC) detectors increased occasionally at monitoring stations. According to the Monte Carlo calculation of the behaviour of electrons and photons in the model thundercloud, it was suggested that bremsstrahlung X-rays generated at high altitude has been attributed to the radiation source. (author)

  18. Optimising hard X-ray generation from laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to increase the X-ray yield for a laser produced plasma by optimising the focusing conditions and temporal shape of the laser pulses. The focusing conditions are improved by introducing a control system that secures the laser target surface to exact focus within a range of a few micrometers, allowing continuously high laser intensity for plasma generation. The temporal shape of the laser pulses is changed by introducing a saturable absorber in the laser beam. The laser produces a substantial pre-pulse that heats and expands the target material prior to main pulse arrival. The saturable absorber can increase the main pulse/pre-pulse ratio of the laser pulse up to four orders of magnitude and consequently reduce expansion of the target material before the main pulse. The belief is that an increase in target density at the time of main pulse arrival will change the energy distribution of the X-rays, towards a more efficient X-ray production in the hard X-ray region. This report and the work connected to it, includes the preliminary measurements and results for these improvements. 17 refs

  19. Effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on silicon semiconductor plasma X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Numakura, T; Minami, R; Watanabe, H; Sasuga, T; Nishizawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Nagashima, S; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S; Hirano, K; Maezawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on the X-ray energy responses of semiconductor detectors are characterized. The degradation of the response of position-sensitive X-ray tomography detectors in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak is found after neutron exposure produced by deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma fusion experiments. For the purpose of further detailed characterization of the neutron degradation effects, an azimuthally varying-field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator is employed using well-calibrated neutron fluence. These neutron effects on the detector responses are characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory (KEK). The effects of neutrons on X-ray sensitive semiconductor depletion thicknesses are also investigated using an impedance analyser. Novel findings of (i) the dependence of the response degradation on X-ray energies as well as (ii) the recovery of the degraded detector response due to the detector bias applic...

  20. Ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE YuCheng

    2007-01-01

    The ways to produce and measure atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses are reported. The laser phase relation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) shows two different radiation energy distributions in time (or laser phase) domain. These energy-phase relations are helpful for realizing the dynamic processes of HHG. Two presented parameterized formulas can be used to calculate the durations of the energy distributions with a bandwidth of the pulse. These formulas are useful in calculating and simulating pulses transports and interactions with mediums. The time structures of atto- and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses can be directly measured with photoelectron spectrum transfer equations and the related laser phase determination methods without any previous pulse shape and the instantaneous frequency assumptions. These equations and methods can be used to evaluate and improve the technical parameters of the ultra-short X-ray sources. They have wide measurement ranges and high time resolutions, which may enable ultra-fast measurements to reach metrological precisions, and lead to a new tide of scientific researches in physics, chemistry, biochemistry, etc. The application of attoand femtosecond X-rays as well as the theoretical and technical problems in measurements are briefly discussed.

  1. Calibration of a flat field soft x-ray grating spectrometer for laser produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Brown, G V; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Beiersdorfer, P; Cone, K V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E W; May, M J; Porter, F S

    2010-10-01

    We have calibrated the x-ray response of a variable line spaced grating spectrometer, known as the VSG, at the Fusion and Astrophysics Data and Diagnostic Calibration Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VSG has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasmas, such as those created at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility at LLNL and at both the Omega and Omega EP lasers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The bandwidth of the VSG spans the range of ∼6-60 Å. The calibration results presented here include the VSG's dispersion and quantum efficiency. The dispersion is determined by measuring the x rays emitted from the hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and aluminum. The quantum efficiency is calibrated to an accuracy of 30% or better by normalizing the x-ray intensities recorded by the VSG to those simultaneously recorded by an x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer. PMID:21034017

  2. Bent crystal X-ray optics for the diagnosis and applications of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis discussed several aspects of X-ray optics based on bent crystals and a number of applications of these optics. First, a deeper insight into the reflection properties of elastically bent perfect crystal optics was gained by the consideration of all deformation effects. It was shown that the reflection properties depend on the lateral position on the crystal, an effect that was not addressed before, neither experimentally nor theoretically. To investigate this effect, an apparatus for the measurement of Bragg angles of bent crystals with high angular resolution was built. It was measured that the lattice plane distances of two-dimensionally bent crystals vary laterally by up to 10-4. This effect has to be considered in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy and imaging with these bent crystals. It can explain discrepancies in theoretical and experimental spectrometer resolution with spherically bent crystals. Besides these principal investigations, in this thesis a number of X-ray optics were presented that demonstrate the application potential of bent crystal optics. This includes two optics that are used in the field of applications of laser-produced plasmas as high repeating hard X-ray sources. It was shown that an X-ray spectrometer based on full cylinder rings of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is capable to record the rather weak single shot pulses from a high repeating 1 er-plasma X-ray source. This is possible due to the high collection efficiency of the instrument of up to 5.10-4. Furthermore, X-ray optics based on toroidally bent crystals that make it possible to spectrally select a bandwidth of ∝1 eV and focus the ultrashort X-ray pulses from such a laser-plasma source, were designed, prepared and characterized. It was shown that these bent crystals provide the calculated integrated reflectivity, the predicted bandwidth and focus to spot sizes smaller than 60 μm. A novel application of toroidally bent crystals was pointed out: a method

  3. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  4. Curved crystal spectrometer for the measurement of X-ray lines from laser-produced plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jun; XIAO Sha-li; WANG Hong-jian; TANG Chang-huan; LIU Shen-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to diagnose the laser-produced plasmas, a focusing curved crystal spectrometer has been developed for measuring the X-ray lines radiated from a laser-produced plasmas. The design is based on the fact that the ray emitted from a source located at one focus of an ellipse will converge on the other focus by the reflection of the elliptical surface. The focal length and the eccentricity of the ellipse are 1350 mm and 0.9586, respectively. The spectrometer can be used to measure the X-ray lines in the wavelength range of 0.2-0.37 nm, and a LiF crystal (200) (2d = 0.4027 nm) is used as dispersive element covering Bragg angle from 30° to 67.5°. The spectrometer was tested on Shenguang-Ⅱ which can deliver laser energy of 60-80 J/pulse and the laser wavelength is 0.35 μm. Photographs of spectra including the 1s2p 1p1-1s2 1S0 resonance line(w),the 1s2p 3P2-1s2 1S0 magnetic quadrupole line(x), the 1s2p 3p1 1s2 1S0 intercombination lines(y), the 1s2p 3S1-1s2 1S0 forbidden line(z) in helium-like Ti X XI and the 1s2s2p 2P3/2-1s22s 2S1/2 line(q) in lithium-like Ti X X have been recorded with a X-ray CCD camera. The experimental result shows that the wavelength resolution(λ/△λ) is above 1000 and the elliptical crystal spectrometer is suitable for X-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. 4: Polarization, directivity and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1976-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. the accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. Using the characteristics of the incident X-rays of the model for solar X-ray flares, the spectrum, directivity and polarization of the reflected and the total X-ray fluxes are evaluated. The results are compared with observations.

  6. X-ray production by laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray generation due to interaction of intense short pulse lasers with plasmas is discussed. In this interaction, relativistic electrons and ions can be produced. The energetic plasma electrons can directly produce x-ray beams via betatron oscillations under laser transverse fields. They can also interact with passing through various solid targets such as Mo, Sn, W, and Pb with different thicknesses to produce bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray beams. It is shown that shape of energy distributions of electrons can affect on the x-ray generation. The simulated results by MCNP code based on Monte Carlo method, represent that for target thickness larger than specific amount related to each sample, the efficiency of characteristic x-ray generated by quasi-monoenergetic electrons are higher than quasi-Maxwellian profile. Experimental setup for generation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons and x-ray beams are discussed. (author)

  7. Interaction of x-rays and food pyrolysis products in producing oncogenic transformation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years it has become evident from epidemiological and experimental data that a large number of environmental factors, including diet, play a role in modifying the incidence of cancer. Cell culture systems in which oncogenic transformation serves as an end point are powerful tools for evaluating these questions. Using such systems it has been shown recently that pyrolysis products from charred surfaces of broiled meat and fish can transform hamster embryo cells in vitro as well as produce tumors in the animal. Our studies in vitro have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of ionizing radiation in both hamster and human cells and have established in hamster cells the dose response relationship at doses ranging from 1 to 600 rad for x-rays and 0.1 to 150 rad for neutrons. The present work was aimed at evaluating whether there exists a cocarcinogenic interaction between a pyrolysis product and x-rays in their ability to transform hamster embryo cells in vitro. We have found that when cells are exposed to x-rays prior to treatment with the pyrolysis product there appears to be a synergistic interaction between the two agents in their ability to transform the cells

  8. X-ray studies of nanoporous carbon powders produced from silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the structure of nanoporous carbon powders produced directly by chlorination of polycrystalline α-SiC powders with various degrees of dispersion. Small-angle scattering data were used to derive the distribution function for scattering inhomogeneities with respect to inertia radii m(Rg). It is shown that the mean sizes and the fraction of large inhomogeneities increase with increasing size of grains in the starting powder. As follows from the diffraction patterns, the degree of 'graphitization' of nanocluster structure increases simultaneously, which is attributed to longer times required for carbonization of coarser grains. An analysis of photoelectron spectra for 1s electrons of carbon atoms shows that, for most of the C-C bonds (>65%), the hybridization of valence bonds is intermediate between those for graphite and diamond (spx, where 2 < x < 3), which is indicative of the bending of graphene-like layers in nanoclusters

  9. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  10. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Gang; Xiong Xian-cai; Zhong Xian-xin; Yang Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal includi...

  11. X-ray Astronomy in the Laboratory with a Miniature Compact Object Produced by Laser-Driven Implosion

    CERN Document Server

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Salzmann, David; Wang, Feilu; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Li, Yutong; Dong, Quanli; Wang, Shoujun; Zhang, Yi; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Yong-Woo; Han, Jae-Min; Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Yuto; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of non-thermal equilibrium plasmas photoionized by intense radiation is a key to understanding compact objects, such as black holes, based on astronomical observations. This paper describes an experiment to study photoionizing plasmas in laboratory under well-defined and genuine conditions. Photoionized plasma is here generated using a 0.5-keV Planckian x-ray source created by means of a laser-driven implosion. The measured x-ray spectrum from the photoionized silicon plasma resembles those observed from the binary stars Cygnus X-3 and Vela X-1 with the Chandra x-ray satellite. This demonstrates that an extreme radiation field was produced in the laboratory, however, the theoretical interpretation of the laboratory spectrum significantly contradicts the generally accepted explanations in x-ray astronomy. This model experiment offers a novel test bed for validation and verification of computational codes used in x-ray astronomy.

  12. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adjei, D.; Ayele, M.G.; Wachulak, P.; Bartnik, A.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, A.; Lekki, J.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Pina, L.; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 364, Dec (2015), s. 27-32. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GA13-28721S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASER LAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : laser -produced plasma * soft X-rays * radiobiology * gas puff target * water window Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  13. Measurements and effects of backstreaming ions produced at bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positive ions released from x-ray converter target impacted by electron beam of millimeter spot size can be trapped and accelerated in the incident beam's potential well. As the ions move upstream, the beam will be pinched first and then defocused at the target. Four Faraday cups are used to collect backstreaming ions produced at the bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator (LIA). Experimental and theoretical results show that the backstreaming positive ions density and velocity are about 1021/m3 and 2-3 mm/μs, respectively. The theoretical and experimental results of electron beam envelope with ions and without ions are also presented. The discussions show that the backstreaming positive ions will not affect the electron beam focusing and envelope radius in Dragon-I LIA.

  14. Development of a X-UV Michelson interferometer for probing laser produced plasmas with a X-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, S. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Zeitoun, Ph.; Vanbostal, L.; Carillon, A.; Fourcade, P.; Idir, M.; Pape, S. le; Ros, D.; Jamelot, G. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). LSAI; Bechir, E. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DAM/CEB.3/ODIR; Delmotte, F.; Ravet, M.F. [IOTA, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2001-07-01

    We have developed and used a soft X-ray Michelson interferometer to probe large laser-produced plasmas. The aim investigated is to obtain electron density profiles and thus important informations on the plasma dynamic. This paper describes our design and presents some preliminary results using a nickel-like X-ray laser operating at 13.9 nm. We present numericals results which show the interest of using X-ray laser to probe laser-produced plasma by interferometry. (orig.)

  15. The application of photoconductive detectors to the measurement of x-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) offer an attractive alternative for the measurement of pulsed x-rays from laser produced plasmas. These devices are fast (FWHM ∼100 ps), sensitive and simple to use. We have used InP, GaAs, and Type IIa diamond as PCDs to measure x-rays emission from 100 eV to 100 keV. Specifically, we have used these detectors to measure total radiation yields, corona temperatures, and hot electron generated x-rays from laser produced plasmas. 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Thermonuclear ignition by Z-pinch X-ray radiation produced by current of an explosive magnetic generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garanin, S. G.; Ivanovskiy, A. V., E-mail: ivanovsky@elph.vniief.ru [All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The scheme of a device based a superpower disk-type magnetic explosion generator to produce a pulse of X-ray radiation with the energy exceeding the target ignition threshold is described and validated.

  17. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2∼2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30 degree ∼ 67.5 degree, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4 degree ∼134 degree . The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional micro adjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  18. Development of a soft x-ray plasma camera with a Fresnel zone plate to image laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soft x-ray plasma camera operated at 3.35nm in the water window x-ray region is developed and demonstrated imaging gas jet plasmas of several spices produced with a 10TW Ti: sapphire laser. The plasma camera consists of a 300nm thick Ag/Ti/Si3N4 x-ray band pass filter with bandwidth of 1.43nm to cut visible light and also to reduce colour aberration of the Fresnel zone plate, a Fresnel zone plate with diameter of 1mm and outermost zone width of 300nm, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The magnification of the plasma camera is 10. The soft x-ray plasma camera powered by a Fresnel zone plate is a very powerful tool to observe laser produced plasmas since it is 1000 times brighter and has 5 times higher spatial resolution comparing ordinary x-ray pinhole camera. The soft x-ray images of helium, nitrogen, argon, krypton, and xenon gas jet plasmas are obtained changing gas pressure from 0.01MPa to 1MPa.

  19. Development of a laser produced plasma x-ray source by use of Au thin film targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser produced plasmas are attractive soft x-ray sources for a soft x-ray microscopy, because of their short duration time enough to stop the movement of living nature and the Brownian motion, and to capture images before the structural changes by radiation damages. To develop an intense soft x-ray source, soft x-ray emissions from laser produced plasmas using Au thin film targets were observed with respect to the film thickness. Au thin films having nano-meter order thicknesses evaporated on silicon nitride membranes were irradiated by a high contrast Nd:glass laser pulses with OPCPA system. The spectra of emitted soft x-rays were monitored by an x-ray spectrograph from the rear side to the surface of laser irradiation. The observed emission intensities showed a clear dependence on the film thickness. The results suggest that most of the irradiated laser energy is absorbed by the film, and is efficiently converted from laser to x-rays. (author)

  20. The anisotropy of molecular X-rays produced in heavy-ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photon energy dependent anisotropy of the molecular X-rays produced in quasiadiabatic heavy-ion-atom-collisions was predicted and observed by several authors. These and some additional new results can prove the molecular origin of this effect. The experimental data for six symmetric systems (Al-Al, Ca-Ca, Fe-Fe, Ni-Ni, Ag-Ag, I-I) and five asymmetric cases (Cl-Ni, Fe-Ni, Ni-Fe, Ag-I, I-Ag) at different beam energies in the range of 20 to 62.5 MeV give a check of the Z2-scaling not only for KX-rays but also for L- and M anisotropy peaks. The positions of the bumps are all as expected clearly above the united atom limit. They are independent of the beam energy. Some models to describe the anisotropy phenomena are discussed. A new striking feature was found with the fine structure of the X-ray anisotropies. These periodic intensity fluctuations appear if the evaluation is performed with sufficiently good energy resolution. There is an evidence, that the anisotropy effect can be used to perform spectroscopy of arbitrary two-centre levels. However caution is required if one is to apply these ideas to the spectroscopy of superheavy systems. (MKO)

  1. Low-Dose-Rate Computed Tomography System Utilizing 25 mm/s-Scan Silicon X-ray Diode and Its Application to Iodine K-Edge Imaging Using Filtered Bremsstrahlung Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Ryo; Sato, Eiichi; Yanbe, Yutaka; Chiba, Hiraku; Maeda, Tomoko; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A low-dose-rate X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for reducing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system with a tube current of sub-mA was developed using a silicon X-ray diode (Si-XD). The Si-XD is a high-sensitivity Si photodiode (PD) selected for detecting X-ray photons, and the X-ray sensitivity of the Si-XD was twice as high as that of Si-PD cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)]. X-ray photons are directly detected using the Si-XD without a scintillator, and the photocurrent from the diode is amplified using current-voltage and voltage-voltage amplifiers. The output voltage is converted into logical pulses using a voltage-frequency converter with a maximum frequency of 500 kHz, and the frequency is proportional to the voltage. The pulses from the converter are sent to the differentiator with a time constant of 500 ns to generate short positive pulses for counting, and the pulses are counted using a counter card. Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 5 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 3.0°. The tube current and voltage were 0.55 mA and 60 kV, respectively, and iodine K-edge CT was carried out using filtered bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra with a peak energy of 38 keV.

  2. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed

  3. Time-resolved x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for studying laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglio, N M; Kauffman, R L; Hawryluk, A M; Medecki, H

    1983-01-15

    The development of a new time-resolved x-ray spectrometer is reported in which a free-standing x-ray transmission grating is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera. The instrument measures continuous x-ray spectra with 20-psec temporal resolution and moderate spectral resolution (deltalambda >/= 1 A) over a broad spectral range (0.1-5 keV) with high sensitivity and large information recording capacity. Its capabilities are well suited to investigation of laser-generated plasmas, and they nicely complement the characteristics of other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques presently in use. The transmission grating spectrometer has been used on a variety of laser-plasma experiments. We report the first measurements of the temporal variation of continuous low-energy x-ray spectra from laser-irradiated disk targets. PMID:18195786

  4. X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  5. Global spectroscopy and imaging of atmospheric X-ray bremsstrahlung - Instrumentation and initial results from the PEM/AXIS instrument aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, D. L.; Datlowe, D. W.; Imhof, W. L.; Schumaker, T. L.; Tobin, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (PEM/AXIS) aboard NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite provides continuous horizon to horizon images, both day and night, of the 3- to 100-keV X-ray flux emitted from the top of the atmosphere. AXIS achieves a spatial resolution to better than 100 km using a one-dimensional array of 16 passively cooled silicon detectors. The primary purpose of this instrument is to provide a global monitor of electron energy input to the upper atmosphere. We describe the design, development, and calibration of AXIS and provide an assessment of its excellent on-orbit performance. The unique capabilities of X-ray imaging spectrometers are demonstrated through an analysis of specific examples from October and November 1991. Important new developments for follow-on instruments also will be described.

  6. Studies of some isomeric yield ratios produced with bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, D

    1998-01-01

    The experimental isomeric ratios for sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Mn, sup 8 sup 6 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 7 sup m sup , sup g Y, sup 8 sup 9 sup m sup , sup g Zr, sup 1 sup 1 sup 0 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 1 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 1 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g In, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 1 sup , sup g Pm, sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 sup m sup 2 sup , sup m sup 1 Eu, sup 1 sup 6 sup 2 sup m sup , sup g Ho, sup 1 sup 6 sup 4 sup m sup , sup g Ho and sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 sup m sup , sup g Lu measured by the activation technique from different targets in (gamma, xnp) reactions (x<=3) at the bremsstrahlung end-point energy of 43 MeV are presented. The predictions of calculations performed by means of compound nucleus particle evaporation and final gamma-deexcitation were critically discussed. The importance of inclusion in the calculations of nonequilibrium particle emission and an adequate gamma-decay mode of isomeric nuclei was considered for some of the reactions investigated.

  7. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-01

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. PMID:12791989

  8. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. 3: Polarization and directivity of bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1976-01-01

    The spectrum, directivity and state of polarization is presented of the bremsstrahlung radiation expected from a beam of high energy electrons spiraling along radial magnetic field lines toward the photosphere. The results are used for calculation of the characteristics of the reflected plus direct flux.

  9. Modification of gravitational redshift of x-ray burst produced by pulsar surface magnetoplasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jun; Ji Pei-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the propagation of x-ray bursts in the magnetoplasma of pulsar magnetosphere is discussed.The electromagnetic interaction between x-ray bursts and magnetoplasma is described as some geometry.The electromagnetic effects of surface superstrong magnetic field and dynamic effects of outflowing magnetoplasma of pulsars are treated as an optical metric.The Gordon metric is introduced to represent the gravitational metric and optical metric.So the propagation of x-ray bursts in magnetoplasma of pulsars can be described as x-ray bursts transmitting in an effective space characterized by Gordon metric.The modification of gravitational redshift,attributed to the flowing magnetoplasma of pulsars,is obtained and it is shown that the modification is of redshift and can reach the same magnitude as the gravitational redshift for ordinary pulsars.

  10. Observation of pulsed x-ray trains produced by laser-electron Compton scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray generation based on laser-electron Compton scattering is one attractive method to achieve a compact laboratory-sized high-brightness x-ray source. We have designed, built, and tested such a source; it combines a 50 MeV multibunch electron linac with a mode-locked 1064 nm laser stored and amplified in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We directly observed trains of pulsed x rays using a microchannel plate detector; the resultant yield was found to be 1.2x105 Hz in good agreement with prediction. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based compact x-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers, whose Z's range from 13 to 22, are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasms is changed from SiO2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  12. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y B S R Prasad; V K Senecha; H C Pant; M P Kamath; G S Solanki; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; S Gupta; R Pareek; A S Joshi; N Sreedhar; Sameer Nigam; C P Navathe

    2000-11-01

    The x-ray emission from slab targets of copper irradiated by Nd:glass laser (1.054 m, 5 and 15 ns) at intensities between 1012 and 1014W/cm2 has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances from the target position. The variation of the ion velocity with the laser intensity follows a scaling of the form where ∼ 0.22 which is in good agreement with the reported scaling factor values. The results on the x-ray emission from Cu plasma are reported.

  13. X-ray emission from a 650-fs laser-produced barium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used x rays in the 9--15-A band emitted from a solid target of BaF2 irradiated by ∼120 mJ of 248-nm radiation in a 650-fs full width at half maximum Gaussian laser pulse to characterize spectroscopically the resulting ultrashort-pulse laser-produced plasma. The emission was spectrally resolved but space and time integrated. By comparing the spectrum with unresolved-transition-array calculations and measurements of plasma emission from longer-pulse experiments, it is clear that ions as highly stripped as titaniumlike barium are present. We have successfully modeled the observed spectrum by assuming an optically thin source in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and using the super-transition-array theory [A. Bar-Shalom et al., Phys. Rev. A 40, 3183 (1989)] for emission from a hot, dense plasma. The model indicates that the emitting region is at comparatively low temperature (200--300 eV) and high electron density (1023--1024 cm-3). The degree of agreement between the model and the measured spectrum also suggests that the emitting plasma is near LTE. We conclude that the emission in this band arises from a solid-density plasma formed early in time, and is thus localized in both space and time. This interpretation is reinforced by LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 11, 51 (1975)] simulations that indicate that emission in this band closely tracks the laser pulse

  14. 3D-CT imaging using characteristic X-rays and visible lights produced by ion micro-beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Yamazaki, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Momose, G.; Kikuchi, Y.; Terakawa, A.; Galster, W.

    2006-08-01

    We improved the spatial resolution of a 3D-CT imaging system consisting of a micro-beam and an X-ray CCD camera of 1 mega pixels (Hamamatsu photonics C8800X), whose element size is 8 μm × 8 μm providing an image size of 8 mm × 8 mm. A small ant of ∼6 mm body length was placed in a small tube, rotated by a stepping motor, and a spatial resolution of 4 μm for X-ray micron-CT using characteristic Ti-K-X-rays (4.558 keV) produced by 3 MeV proton micro-beams was obtained. We applied the X-ray micron-CT to a small ant's head and obtained the fine structures of the head's interior. Because the CCD is sensitive to visible light, we also examined the capability of light micron-CT using visible red light from an Al2O3(Cr) ruby scintillator and applied the micron-CT to a small red tick. Though the red tick is highly transparent to Ti-K-X-rays, visible red light does not penetrate through the red tick. The most serious problem was dispersion of lights due to Thomson scattering resulting in obscure projection images.

  15. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  16. Laboratory-Produced X-Ray Photoionized Plasmas for Astrophysics Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Clement; Le Pape, Sebastien; Liedahl, Duane; Ma, Tammy; Berzak-Hopkins, Laura; Reverdin, Charles; Rousseaux, Christophe; Renaudin, Patrick; Blancard, Christophe; Nottet, Edouard; Bidault, Niels; Mancini, Roberto; Koenig, Michel

    2015-11-01

    X-ray photoionized plasmas are rare in the laboratory, but of broad importance in astrophysical objects such as active galactic nuclei, x-ray binaries. Indeed, existing models are not yet able to accurately describe these plasmas where ionization is driven by radiation rather than electron collisions. Here, we describe an experiment on the LULI2000 facility whose versatility allows for measuring the X-ray absorption of the plasma while independently probing its electron density and temperature. The bright X-ray source is created by the two main beams focused inside a gold hohlraum and is used to photoionise a Neon gas jet. Then, a thin gold foil serves as a source of backlit photons for absorption spectroscopy. The transmitted spectrum through the plasma is collected by a crystal spectrometer. We will present the experimental setup used to characterize both plasma conditions and X-ray emission. Then we will show the transmitted spectra through the plasma to observe the transition from collision dominated to radiation dominated ionization and compare it to model predictions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. X-ray microimaging of elemental composition and microstructure for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X rays have many advantages over electrons and other charged particles for the microcharacterization of materials. X rays are more efficient in photoejecting inner shell electrons which results in characteristic x-ray fluorescence. X rays also produce less Bremsstrahlung which yields far higher signal-to-background than obtained with electrons. Minimum detectable limits (MDL) for X ray excited fluorescence can be a few parts per billion; 10-3 to 10-5 less than for electron excitation. The third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source will for the first time provide x-ray sources as brilliant as the most advanced electron probes. It will therefore soon be possible to develop a submicron x-ray probe with unprecedented low levels of detection in diffraction, EXAFS, Auger, Photoelectron and fluorescence spectroscopies for structural and chemical characterization. Some applications to materials science are shown

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from F. nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria is responsible for oral malodour. Two homologous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzymes, Fn1220 and Cdl, from Fusobacterium nucleatum (which actively produces hydrogen sulfide) were overproduced, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from the crystals using a synchrotron-radiation source. The Fn1220 crystal belonged to tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.8, c = 99.2 Å) and the Cdl crystal belonged to monoclinic space group P21 (unit-cell parameters a = 84.9, b = 70.9, c = 87.6 Å, β = 90.3°)

  19. GLOBAL MODELING OF X-RAY SPECTRA PRODUCED IN O-TYPE STAR WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars revealed less wind absorption than expected from smooth winds with conventional mass-loss rates. Various solutions have been proposed, including porous winds, optically thick clumps, or an overall reduction of the mass-loss rates. The latter has a strong impact on the evolution of the star. Our final goal is to analyze high-resolution X-ray spectra of O-type stars with a multi-temperature plasma model in order to determine crucial stellar and wind parameters such as the mass-loss rate, the CNO abundances, and the X-ray temperature plasma distribution in the wind. In this context we are developing a modeling tool to calculate synthetic X-ray spectra. We present here the main ingredients and physics necessary for such a work. Our code uses the most recent version of the AtomDB emissivities to compute the intrinsic emissivity of the hot plasma as well as the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to evaluate the opacity of the cool wind. Following the comparison between two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation, we introduce, for the first time in X-rays, the effects of a tenuous inter-clump medium. We then explore the quantitative impact of different model parameters on the X-ray spectra such as the position in the wind of the X-ray emitting plasma. For the first time, we also show that the two formalisms of stellar wind fragmentation yield different results, although the differences for individual lines are small and can probably not be tested with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. As an illustration of our method, we compare various synthetic line profiles to the observed O VIII λ18.97 line in the spectrum of ζ Puppis. We illustrate how different combinations of parameters can actually lead to the same morphology of a single line, underlining the need to analyze the whole spectrum in a consistent way when attempting to constrain the parameters of the wind.

  20. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy of subpicosecond laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krushelnick, K. M.; Tighe, W.; Suckewer, S.

    1996-02-01

    Experiments that examine the interaction of high-intensity subpicosecond laser radiation ( \\similar 1018 W / cm2) with solid targets are performed. Soft-x-ray spectra from interactions with Teflon and aluminum targets that imply the creation of high-temperature ( > 200 eV) high-density ( > 10 23 cm -3 ) plasmas are obtained. Effects of a prepulse on the plasma characteristics are examined. The applicability of short, intense laser pulses for the formation of population inversions on x-ray transitions during recombination of high-density plasmas is discussed. 42.55.Vc.

  1. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  2. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David

    formation are not fully understood or agreed upon in the literature. In this research, the method of pyrolysis of boron tribromide (hydrogen reduction of boron tribromide) was used to deposit boron on a tantalum filament. The goal was to refine this method, or potentially use it in combination with a second method (amorphous boron crystallization), to the point where it is possible to grow large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals with consistency. A pyrolysis apparatus was designed and built, and a number of trials were run to determine the conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary for alpha-rhombohedral boron production. This work was focused on the x-ray diffraction analysis of the boron deposits; x-ray diffraction was performed on a number of samples to determine the types of boron (and other compounds) formed in each trial and to guide the choices of test conditions for subsequent trials. It was found that at low reaction temperatures (in the range of around 830-950 °C), amorphous boron was the primary form of boron produced. Reaction temperatures in the range of around 950-1000 °C yielded various combinations of crystalline boron and amorphous boron. In the first trial performed at a temperature of 950 °C, a mix of amorphous boron and alpha-rhombohedral boron was formed. Using a scanning electron microscope, it was possible to see small alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals (on the order of ~1 micron in size) embedded in the surface of the deposit. In subsequent trials carried out at reaction temperatures in the range of 950 °C -- 1000 °C, it was found that various combinations of alpha-rhombohedral boron, beta-rhombohedral boron, and amorphous boron were produced; the results tended to be unpredictable (alpha-rhombohedral boron was not produced in every trial), and the factors leading to success/failure were difficult to pinpoint. These results illustrate how sensitive of a process producing alpha-rhombohedral boron can be, and indicate that

  3. Planetary X-ray studies: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Our solar system is a fascinating physics laboratory and X-ray observations are now firmly established as a powerful diagnostic tool of the multiple processes taking place in it. The science that X-rays reveal encompasses solar, space plasma and planetary physics, and the response of bodies in the solar system to the impact of the Sun's activity. This talk will review what we know from past observations and what we expect to learn in the short, medium and long term. Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have demonstrated that the origin of Jupiter's bright soft X-ray aurorae lies in the Charge eXchange (CX) process, likely to involve the interaction with atmospheric neutrals of local magnetospheric ions, as well as those carried in the solar wind. At higher energies electron bremsstrahlung is thought to be the X-ray emitting mechanism, while the whole planetary disk acts as a mirror for the solar X-ray flux via Thomson and fluorescent scattering. This 'X-ray mirror' phenomenon is all that is observed from Saturn's disk, which otherwise lacks X-ray auroral features. The Earth's X-ray aurora is bright and variable and mostly due to electron bremsstrahlung and line emission from atmospheric species. Un-magnetised planets, Venus and Mars, do not show X-ray aurorae but display the interesting combination of mirroring the solar X-ray flux and producing X-rays by Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) in their exospheres. These processes respond to different solar stimulation (photons and solar wind plasma respectively) hence their relative contributions are seen to vary according to the Sun's output. Present and future of planetary X-ray studies are very bright. We are preparing for the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter this summer and for coordinated observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton on the approach and later during Juno's orbital phase. These will allow direct correlation of the local plasma conditions with the X-ray emissions and the establishment of the

  4. Polycrystalline lead iodide films produced by solution evaporation and tested in the mammography X-ray energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condeles, J. F.; Mulato, M.

    2016-02-01

    Lead iodide polycrystalline films have been deposited on corning glass substrates using solution evaporation in oven. Films 6 μm-thick were obtained with full coverage of the substrates as verified by scanning electron microscopy. Some pin-holes were observable. X-ray diffraction revealed a crystalline structure corresponding to the 4 H-PbI2 polytype formation. Polarized Raman scattering experiments indicated a lamellar structure. Anisotropy was also investigated using depolarization ratio calculations. The optical and electrical properties of the samples were investigated using photoluminescence and dark conductivity as a function of temperature, respectively. Activation energies of 0.10 up to 0.89 eV were related to two main electrical transport mechanisms. Films were also exposed to X-ray irradiation in the mammography X-ray energy range. The detector produced was also exposed to X-ray from 5 mR up to 1450 mR. A linear response was observed as a function of dose with a slope of 0.52 nA/mm2 per mR.

  5. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  6. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  7. Imaging X-ray crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) is a powerful technique for measuring state variables in dense plasmas. In this paper, we report on the development of a one-dimensional imaging spectrometer for use in characterizing spatially nonuniform, dense plasmas using XRTS. Diffraction of scattered x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal images along a one-dimensional spatial profile while simultaneously spectrally resolving along the other. An imaging spectrometer was fielded at the Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, yielding a FWHM spatial resolution of 3 mm. A geometrical analysis is performed yielding a simple analytical expression for the throughput of the imaging spectrometer scheme. The SHADOW code is used to perform a ray tracing analysis on the spectrometer fielded at the Trident Laser Facility understand the alignment tolerances on the spatial and spectral resolutions. The analytical expression for the throughput was found to agree well with the results from the ray tracing.

  8. Observation and modelling of hollow multicharged ion x-ray spectra radiated by laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallah, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faenov, A Ya [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Pikuz, T A [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Akobelev, I Yu [JAPAN/RUSSIA; Fukuda, Y [JAPAN/RUSSIA

    2008-01-01

    The role of the highly charged hollow ions in the X-Ray emission plasma spectTa is investigated for 2 cases: (1) plasma obtained under inadiation of Ar clusters by ultrashort laser pulses and (2) Mg-plasma heated by a short-wavelength long (nanosecond) laser pulse. Experimental measurements are presented. Calculations in support of these measurements have been performed using a detailed atomic kinetics model with the ion distributions found from solution of the time-dependent rate equations.

  9. Mechanisms of mercury removal by biochars produced from different feedstocks determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Landis, Richard C

    2016-05-01

    Thirty-six biochars produced from distinct feedstocks at different temperatures were evaluated for their potential to remove mercury (Hg) from aqueous solution at environmentally relevant concentrations. Concentrations of total Hg (THg) decreased by >90% in batch systems containing biochars produced at 600 and 700°C and by 40-90% for biochars produced at 300°C. Elevated concentrations of SO4(2-) (up to 1000mgL(-1)) were observed in solutions mixed with manure-based biochars. Sulfur X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses indicate the presence of both reduced and oxidized S species in both unwashed and washed biochars. Sulfur XANES spectra obtained from biochars with adsorbed Hg were similar to those of washed biochars. Micro-X-ray fluorescence mapping results indicate that Hg was heterogeneously distributed across biochar particles. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure modeling indicates Hg was bound to S in biochars with high S content and to O and Cl in biochars with low S content. The predominant mechanisms of Hg removal are likely the formation of chemical bonds between Hg and various functional groups on the biochar. This investigation provides information on the effectiveness and mechanisms of Hg removal that is critical for evaluating biochar applications for stabilization of Hg in surface water, groundwater, soils, and sediments. PMID:26844404

  10. Soft x-ray generation in gases by means of a pulsed electron beam produced in a high-voltage barier discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarov, A.V.; Peters, P.J.M.; Boller, K.-J.

    2007-01-01

    A large area pulsed electron beam is produced by a high-voltage barrier discharge. We compare the properties of the x-rays generated by stopping this beam of electrons in a thin metal foil with those generated by stopping the electrons directly in various gases. The generation of x-rays was investig

  11. X-ray diagnostics in the laser-initiated fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-density and high-temperature plasma conditions required for successful laser-initiated fusion make x-ray diagnostics a valuable tool in this exciting field. Measurements of the hard x-ray continuum emitted from laser targets provide insight into the complex laser-plasma coupling physics and the consequent energy transport through the bremsstrahlung signature of energetic electrons. X-ray techniques are important in the selection and assay of microballoon targets for current compression experiments. X-ray imaging experiments and diffraction spectroscopy of highly stripped atoms can provide information upon the symmetry, density and temperature of laser targets. Extremely high temporal and spatial resolution may be required for definitive diagnostic information on compressed targets. While laser-produced plasmas are interesting as possible intense x-ray sources and as a possible means of achieving x-ray lasing, those topics are outside the scope of this review. (auth)

  12. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  13. Measurements of the ambient dose equivalent of produced x-rays at the linear accelerator UNILAC of GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the UNILAC (UNIversal Linear ACcelerator) of the GSI (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, facility for the research with heavy ions, Darmstadt, Germany) two different pre-stripper sections deliver ions for further acceleration. One of these consists of an ECR - ion source (Electron Cyclotron Resonance), a RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) - and an IH (Interdigital H-field) - accelerating structure. After leaving the IH - structure the ions have a specific energy of 1.4 MeV/nucleon. The ion source and the accelerating structures produce x-rays during operation. Recently various accelerator facilities for carbon ion cancer treatment - consisting of linacs and synchrotrons - were planned, are under construction or are already in operation. It turned out that data of the radiation fields near linac structures (RFQ, IH) are scarce. The aim of this paper is to improve the knowledge of the production of x-rays in the ion source and the sections of the preaccelerator. Measurements have been performed by means of various passive and active dosemeter systems. For the passive dose measurements, TLD cards (Harshaw type with 4 TLD-700 elements) partially covered by absorption layers and surrounded by a polyethylene cylinder were used, in order to adapt their reading to the x-ray energy spectra at the measurement positions. A recently developed dosemeter at GSI suitable to measure the dose quantity H*(10) in the energy range 10 keV to several MeV was applied. The measurements are carried out in the vicinity of the ECR - ion source during the production of 7Li, 12C and 48Ca ion beams. A x-ray spectrum measured with a HPGe-detector near the ECR - ion source together with the dosemeter readings give hints on the fraction of the dose caused by low energy x-rays. Spatial dose distributions of the radiation fields around the RFQ and IH structures have been measured during their operation with different accelerating voltages (the produced radiation depends strongly on the

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the ...

  15. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4

  16. Oxidation of nanostructured Ti films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Monica de, E-mail: desimone@tasc.infm.it [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Snidero, Elena [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP, c/o Laboratorio TASC Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Bongiorno, Gero [Fondazione Filarete, v.le Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milano (Italy); Giorgetti, Luca [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Dip. di Oncologia Sperimentale, Via Adamello 16, 20139, Milano (Italy); Amati, Matteo [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [CNR-IOM Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    We used in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the oxidation process of a cluster-assembled metallic titanium film exposed to molecular oxygen at room temperature. The nanostructured film has been grown on a Si(111) substrate, in ultra high vacuum conditions, by coupling a supersonic cluster beam deposition system with an XPS experimental chamber. Our results show that upon in-situ oxygen exposure Ti{sup 3+} is the first oxidation state observed, followed by Ti{sup 4+}, whereas Ti{sup 2+} is practically absent during the whole process. Our results compare well with the existing literature on Ti films produced using other techniques.

  17. Operation Aurorozone: An experiment in sun/weather. [effects of aurorall produced X-rays on ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Hilsenrath, E.

    1977-01-01

    Operation Aurorozone was a highly coordinated sequence of 33 rocket flights launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, in September 1976. The effects of aurorally produced X-rays on stratospheric neutral and electrical parameters was studied. The sun/weather coupling between upper and lower regions of the atmosphere is thought to be related to these middle atmospheric parameters. The results show a consistent depletion of ozone above 1 mb during three independent auroral events, with magnitudes in excess of those expected from the measured energy radiation sources. Simultaneously, enhanced conductivity changes were observed to occur in accord with the measured ionizing radiations.

  18. Oxidation of nanostructured Ti films produced by low energy cluster beam deposition: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used in-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the oxidation process of a cluster-assembled metallic titanium film exposed to molecular oxygen at room temperature. The nanostructured film has been grown on a Si(111) substrate, in ultra high vacuum conditions, by coupling a supersonic cluster beam deposition system with an XPS experimental chamber. Our results show that upon in-situ oxygen exposure Ti3+ is the first oxidation state observed, followed by Ti4+, whereas Ti2+ is practically absent during the whole process. Our results compare well with the existing literature on Ti films produced using other techniques.

  19. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary X-ray data collection and analysis for crystals of chlorite dismutase, a haem-based enzyme that very effectively reduces chlorite to chloride while producing molecular oxygen, is reported to 2.1 Å resolution. Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (< 2 kU mg−1) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P21212 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available

  20. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  1. Neutron dosimetry of a medical accelerator which produces X-ray with high energy at Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycarbonate detector and albedo-neuton dosemeters which is innovated at radiiation protection of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran was used to measure neutron doses in and out of radiation field. Dose distribution in radiation field, out of field and around the collimator, at the head of equipment, and dose topology in the field is determined. The response of these dosimeters to neutron contamination dose at the therapy room, the corridor, control room was investigated. Also response to recieved dose of the personnel is determined. According to the results obtained, by increasing photon doses at a constant size of the field 20 mutipliy 20 2 cm, the neutron dose at the center of X radiation field, lineary by 2.8 multiply 10-3 sv/sv X rar coefficient and in a fix field 40 multiply 40 cm2 by 3.1 multiply 10-3 sv/svX ray is increased. Also in constant photon dose, by changing the field size, neutron doses variation at the center of radiation field is investigated. Outside radiation field, neutron leakage percentage at different sectors of the head is obtained. using albedo-neutron dosemeters tracks density register for thermal, albedo and fast neutrons at therapy room for photon doses of 1 sv respectively was 37, 5710, 5364. Also at the same condition, at the extreme end of corridor the particle track density was 11, 885, 800. Track density registered for thermal albedo and fast neutron at the control room for one month respectively was 256, 786, 745. At the back of therapy room the track density for thermal neutrons was 14408 track per square centimeters for one month, but at the same period no particle tracks was observed. Finally, three personnel of accelerator's section was monitored by neutron dosemeters

  2. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  3. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  4. Effects of X-Ray Irradiation Produced by Linear Accelerator on Biochemical Parameters of Irradiated Blood Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of blood and cellular blood components is currently practiced in developed and in a few developing countries. The purpose of this procedure is the prevention of transfusion associated graft versus host disease in immunodeficient patients. Dedicated blood irradiators are only available at limited number of facilities in developing countries. Therefore, irradiation remains a limitedly available service due to excessive cost. This study aims to assess the biochemical changes in samples of packed red blood cell units irradiated using X-rays produced by linear accelerator (LINAC), used for radiotherapy, as an efficient and cost-effective solution for hospitals in developing countries instead of a dedicated device. X-rays generated by linear accelerator were used to irradiate red blood cell units. Each unit was divided to two equal portions, one portion was subjected to irradiation and the other portion used as control, irradiation process was performed in 3 minutes.Ph, potassium levels and percentage of hemolysis were analyzed on different storage periods. Progressive increase in potassium and hemolysis percentage and decrease in Ph was noted in the irradiated units. All parameters were within acceptable ranges indicating that the component is suitable for transfusion. From the above results we conclude that packed RBCs (pRBCs) irradiation using radiotherapy linear accelerator is an efficacious and cost-effective solution for most of the hospitals in developing countries

  5. X-ray polarization measurement for fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma under oblique incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Y; Inubushi, Y; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Kai, T; Nakamura, T; Johzaki, T; Nagatomo, H; Mima, K [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D; Morace, A; Redaelli, R [University of Milan - Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C; Santos, J [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Malka, G [CENBG, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS - IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Boscheron, A [CEA/CESTA Le BARP (France); Casner, A [CEA-DAM He de France, Bruyres-le-Chtel (France); Koenig, M [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Cedex (France)], E-mail: okano-yas@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    Study on x-ray polarization spectroscopy was performed for intense-laser-produced plasma under laser-oblique incidence. The laser pulse was focused onto a polyvinylchloride target at angles of 67 degrees and 7 degrees to the target normal at average intensities of 10{sup 17-18} W/cm{sup 2}. There were differences in the spectra for shifted K{alpha} lines of C1 atoms between the oblique and nearly normal incidence, indicating the low laser-energy absorption in the oblique incidence. A difference in polarization degrees of C1 He{alpha} lines was also observed, and this means the polarization of incident laser pulse affect velocity distribution functions of fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma.

  6. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved form of x-ray tube is described which consists of a rotatable anode disc and an electron beam source enclosed in an envelope. The beam of electrons strikes the edge of the anode disc at an acute angle, producing x-rays which are transmitted through a window in the envelope. To improve performance and life of the anode disc it is additionally reciprocated back and forth along its axis of rotation. Dimensions are specified. (U.K.)

  7. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Choi, I.W. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering] (and others)

    2000-03-01

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  8. Investigation of laser produced x-ray plasma created from high pressure gas-puff target using Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterize a laser produced gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. Strong emission in 11.4 nm wavelength region was observed, using krypton and xenon gas puff targets irradiated by a Nd:YAG laser with an energy of 0.7 J/8 ns. Space resolved x-ray spectral measurement indicated that the source size on the Rayleigh length and the gas density profile. (author)

  9. Soft X-ray Emissions from Planets, Moons, and Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A I

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (10 keV) x-rays result mainly from the electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  10. Thermal casting of polymers in centrifuge for producing X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Randy M.; Decker, Todd A.

    2012-03-27

    An optic is produced by the steps of placing a polymer inside a rotateable cylindrical chamber, the rotateable cylindrical chamber having an outside wall, rotating the cylindrical chamber, heating the rotating chamber forcing the polymer to the outside wall of the cylindrical chamber, allowing the rotateable cylindrical chamber to cool while rotating producing an optic substrate with a substrate surface, sizing the optic substrate, and coating the substrate surface of the optic substrate to produce the optic with an optic surface.

  11. Meter-scale spark X-ray spectrumstatistics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B E; Kochkin, P; Grondahl, Ø; Nisi, R; Weber, K; Scherrer, Z; LeCaptain, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission by sparks implies bremsstrahlung from a population of energetic electrons, but the details of this process remain a mystery. We present detailed statistical analysis of X-ray spectra detected by multiple detectors during sparks produced by 1 MV negative high-voltage pulses with 1 $\\mu$s risetime. With over 900 shots, we statistically analyze the signals, assuming that the distribution of spark X-ray fluence behaves as a power law and that the energy spectrum of X-rays detectable after traversing $\\sim$2 m of air and a thin aluminum shield is exponential. We then determine the parameters of those distributions by fitting cumulative distribution functions to the observations. The fit results match the observations very well if the mean of the exponential X-ray energy distribution is 86 $\\pm$ 7 keV and the spark X-ray fluence power law distribution has index -1.29 $\\pm$ 0.04 and spans at least 3 orders of magnitude in fluence.

  12. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon plasma with laser intensity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; R A Joshi; G P Gupta; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2003-12-01

    Absolute measurement for He- resonance (1s2 10-1s2p 11, at 40.2 Å) line emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been studied as a function of laser intensity. The optimum laser intensity is found to be ≈ 1.3 × 1012 W/cm2 for the maximum emission of 3.2 × 1013 photons sr-1 pulse-1. Since this line lies in the water window spectral region, it has potential application in x-ray microscopic imaging of biological sample in wet condition. Theoretical calculation using corona model for the emission of this line is also carried out with appropriate ionization and radiative recombination rate coefficients.

  13. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>1013 photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  14. Electric field measurements in picosecond laser-produced plasma via X-ray spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Woolsey, N.C.; Howe, J.; Chambers, D.M.; Courtois, C.; Förster, E.; Gregory, C.D.; Hall, I.M.; Renner, Oldřich; Uschmann, I.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 292-296. ISSN 1574-1818 Grant ostatní: UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council(GB) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser -produced plasma * K-shell spectroscopy * laser -induced satellites Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s

  15. X-ray spectroscopic characterization of laser produced hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we performed experiments of emission and absorption spectroscopy of laser produced plasmas, to provide well characterized spectral data which permit to benchmark atomic physics codes. More precisely, we produced xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions and studied their emission spectra. In a second experiment, we characterized the absorption spectra of zinc sulfide and aluminium plasmas in LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) conditions.The first two chapters give an outline of the theory involved in the study of the emission and absorption plasma spectroscopy. Chapter 1 describes the different atomic processes occurring in a plasma. The LTE and the NLTE statistics ruling the equilibrium of the atomic processes are presented. Then, we give a brief description of the different codes of plasma atomic physics used in the analysis of our experimental data, namely HULLAC, SCO and TRANSPEC/AVERROES. In Chapter 2 the macroscopic theory of the radiation transport through a plasma is given. We describe also the self-similar model of Basko and the view factor approach, which permits us to calculate the heating conditions of the absorption foils achieved in the interior of the spherical gold cavity. Chapter 3 gives a description of the instruments used for realizing the two experiments, as well as the technical characteristics of the LULI2000 laser facility used to perform the experiments. Chapter 4 presents the experiment realized to characterize the emission spectra of the xenon and krypton plasmas in NLTE, as well the analysis of the experimental data with TRANSPEC/AVERROES. Finally, the experiment for measuring the absorption spectrum of the ZnS plasma mixture and the analysis of the experimental data with the code SCO are given in Chapter 5

  16. Studies of high repetition rate laser-produced plasma soft-X-ray amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress made as well on the Ti:Sa laser system, as in the control and the knowledge of laser produced X-UV sources allowed the construction of a X-UV laser station dedicated to the applications. My thesis work falls under the development of this station and more particularly on the characterization of a X-UV laser plasma amplifier. The experimental study relates to the coupling improvement of the pump infra-red laser with plasma within the framework of the transient collisional X-UV laser generation. These X-UV lasers are generated in a plasma formed by the interaction of a solid target and a laser pulse of approximately 500 ps duration, followed by a second infra-red laser pulse known as of pump (about 5 ps) impinging on the target in grazing incidence. For the first time, a complete parametric study was undertaken on the influence of the grazing angle on the pumping of the amplifying medium. One of the results was to reach very high peak brightness about 1028 ph/s/mm2/mrad2/(0.1%bandwidth), which compares well with the free-electron laser brightness. Moreover, we modified then used a new two-dimensional hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement in order to understand the influence of the space-time properties of the infra-red laser on the formation and the evolution of the amplifying plasma. Our modeling highlighted the interest to use a super Gaussian transverse profile for the line focus leading to an increase in a factor two of the gain region size and a reduction of the electron density gradient by three orders of magnitude. These improvements should strongly increase the energy contained in X-UV laser beam. We thus used X-UV laser to study the appearance of transient defects produced by a laser IR on a beam-splitter rear side. We also began research on the mechanisms of DNA damage induced by a very intense X-UV radiation. (author)

  17. AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-09-20

    Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

  18. Extragalactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 40% of the X-ray sources in the third UHURU catalogue are extragalactic. One, SMC X-1 has been identified with a binary star in the lesser Magellanic Cloud, while five sources, three probably binary stars, have been found in the greater Magellanic Cloud. X-ray sources in normal galaxies (M31), radiogalaxies (NGC5128), Seyfert galaxies (NGC4151), quasars (3C273) and galaxy clusters (Virgo X-1 and Perseus X-1) are briefly discussed. The most probable explanation for the origin of X-ray emissions from galaxy clusters appears at present to be that the cluster is filled with a thin, very hot gas which emits X-radiation by thermal bremsstrahlung. The main alternative is a socalled inverse Compton effect. (JIW)

  19. Simulation and experimental research of x-ray toroidally bent crystal imaging with laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyi, Wang; Shali, Xiao; jian, Lu; Yufen, Wu; Jun, Shi; Jiayu, Qian; Shenye, Liu; Minxi, Wei; Bolun, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Bragg law and imaging principle of bent crystal, the imaging properties of the monochromic backlighting system with a toroidally bent crystal were studied via ray-tracing simulations and experiments. Comparison experiments with both toroidally and spherically bent crystals using a Cr line as the backlighter were performed, showing that using toroidally bent crystal, a 2D image with the same magnifications in meridional and sagittal directions can be obtained with higher spatial resolution. Experiments with laser-produced plasmas using Mica crystal were carried out on the Shenguang II laser facility. Five laser beams were focused onto a Ti planar target producing a line at 4.75 keV as the backlighter and an image of a metal grid with size of 200 μm  ×  200 μm was recorded with an x-ray image plate. A spatial resolution of 40 μm was demonstrated with a magnification of 3 due to the restriction of the target chamber size. 10 μm spatial resolution might be possible if the detector can be located outside the chamber to enlarge the magnification.

  20. Quasi-monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing weakly ionized linear copper plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the plasma flash x-ray generator, a 200 nF condenser is charged up to 50 kV by a power supply, and flash x rays are produced by the discharging. The x-ray tube is a demountable triode with a trigger electrode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Target evaporation leads to the formation of weakly ionized linear plasma, consisting of copper ions and electrons, around the fine target, and intense characteristic x rays are produced. At a charging voltage of 50 kV, the maximum tube voltage was almost equal to the charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 20 kA. When the charging voltage was increased, the linear plasma formed, and the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities increased. The K lines were quite sharp and intense, and hardly any bremsstrahlung rays were detected at all. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 700 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of approximately 30 μC/kg at 1.0 m from the x-ray source with a charging voltage of 50 kV

  1. Characterization of a plasma produced using a high power laser with a gas puff target for x-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high temperature, high density plasma can be produced by using a nanosecond, high-power laser with a gas puff target. The gas puff target is formed by puffing a small amount of gas from a high-pressure reservoir through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber. In this paper we present the gas puff target specially designed for x-ray laser experiments. The solenoid valve with the nozzle in the form of a slit 0.3-mm wide and up to 40-mm long, allows to form an elongated gas puff suitable for the creation of an x-ray laser active medium by its perpendicular irradiation with the use of a laser beam focused to a line. Preliminary results of the experiments on the laser irradiation of the gas puff targets, produced by the new valve, show that hot plasma suitable for x-ray lasers is created

  2. Gold nanoparticles: BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) coating and X-ray irradiation produce variable-spectrum photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that by using different x-ray irradiation times of BSA-coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) we can change their ultraviolet-stimulated photoluminescence and shift the spectral weight over the visible spectral range. This is due to the interplay of two emission bands, one due to BSA and the other related to gold. The emission properties did not change with time over a period of several months. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coated with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) are synthesized by x-ray irradiation. • BSA coated AuNPs with ∼1 nm size show strong photoluminescence in red by UV excitation. • The blue photoluminescence of BSA increase with x-ray irradiation. • Increase x-ray irradiation time during the synthesis shift the color of the colloid from red to blue

  3. Gold nanoparticles: BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) coating and X-ray irradiation produce variable-spectrum photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuo-Hao [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Sheng-Feng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ong, Edwin B.L. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tan, Hui-Ru [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Yang, C.S. [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hwu, Y., E-mail: phhwu@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    We show that by using different x-ray irradiation times of BSA-coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) we can change their ultraviolet-stimulated photoluminescence and shift the spectral weight over the visible spectral range. This is due to the interplay of two emission bands, one due to BSA and the other related to gold. The emission properties did not change with time over a period of several months. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coated with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) are synthesized by x-ray irradiation. • BSA coated AuNPs with ∼1 nm size show strong photoluminescence in red by UV excitation. • The blue photoluminescence of BSA increase with x-ray irradiation. • Increase x-ray irradiation time during the synthesis shift the color of the colloid from red to blue.

  4. X-ray nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    A compact laboratory x-ray "nano-CT" scanner has been created for 3D non-invasive imaging with 150-200 nanometers 3D spatial resolution, using advanced x-ray technologies and specific physical phenomena for signal detection. This spatial resolution in volume terms is 3 orders better than can be achieved in synchrotron tomography, 5 orders better then in existing laboratory micro-CT instruments and 10-12 orders better in comparison to clinical CT. The instrument employs an x-ray source with a 300-400nm x-ray spot size and uses small-angle scattering to attain a detail detectability of 150-200nm. An object manipulator allows positioning and rotation with an accuracy of 150nm. The x-ray detector is based on an intensified CCD with single-photon sensitivity. A typical acquisition cycle for 3D reconstruction of the full object volume takes from 10 to 60 minutes, with the collection of several hundred angular views. Subsequent volumetric reconstruction produces results as a set of cross sections with isotropic voxel size down to 140 x 140 x 140nm, or as a 3D-model, which can be virtually manipulated and measured. This unique spatial resolution in non-invasive investigations gives previously unattainable 3D images in several application areas, such as composite materials, paper and wood microstructure, biomedical applications and others.

  5. Energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced by high energy bremsstrahlung in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron energy spectra in carbon, nitrogen and oxygen were calculated for various bremsstrahlung end-point energies and, from these, tissue spectra were calculated using the tissue equivalent molecular formula C5H40O18N. The method involves folding the known bremsstrahlung spectrum shape with the cross section for each possible decay mode in each element which leads to neutron production. The partial photoneutron cross sections used have been derived from published data

  6. Comparison of two models for the X-ray dispersion produced in a Novillo Tokamak with measurements make with thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was presented the results to study about the X-ray dispersion produced in the Novillo Tokamak using thermoluminescent dosemeters (DTL). The measurements were make in the equatorial plane of Tokamak, along twelve radial directions. The dispersion is observed due to the radiation interaction with walls surrounding the machine. It was proposed two types of heuristic mathematical methods for describing the X-ray dispersion, comparing them with the experimental data obtained with Dtl. The predictions of both models are adjusted well to the experimental data. (Author)

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  9. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector ('GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude

  10. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, D.; Claps, G.; De Angelis, R.; Murtas, F.

    2016-03-01

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector (`GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude.

  11. Femtosecond electron and X-ray generation by laser and plasma-based sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of ultra-short x-rays by Thomson scattering intense laser pulses from electron beams is discussed, including recent experimental results and methods for enhancing the x-ray flux. A high flux of x-rays in a femtosecond pulse requires the generation of femtosecond electron bunches and a head-on Thomson scattering geometry. The generation of ultrashort electron bunches in a plasma-based accelerator with an injection technique that uses two colliding laser pulses is discussed. Simulations indicate the bunches as short as a few fs can be produced. Conversion of the fs electron pulse to a fs x-ray pulse can be accomplished by Bremsstrahlung or Thomson scattering

  12. X-ray lithography sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron from dipole magnets in electron storage rings has emerged as a useful source of x-rays for lithography. To meet the need for these sources numerous groups around the world have embarked on projects to design and construct storage rings for x-ray lithography. Both conventional electromagnets as well as superconducting (SC) dipoles have been incorporated into the various designs. An overview of the worldwide effort to produce commercial x-ray sources will be presented. To better illustrate the elements involved in these sources a closer examination of the Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source Project (SXLS) at BNL will be presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  13. Heat conduction in X-ray clusters: Spitzer over 3

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    Effective heat conduction in a random variable magnetic field should be equal to one third of the Spitzer's value. Recent observations indicate that this heat conduction is sufficient to account for the bremsstrahlung in cooling X-ray clusters.

  14. Polychromatic X-ray Beam from the Acceleration of Energetic Electrons in Ultrafast Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Félicie; Taphuoc, Kim; Shah, Rahul; Burgy, Frederic; Rousseau, Jean Philippe; Rousse, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Polychromatic beams of hard X-rays from ultrafast laser plasma interaction are studied. Just as in a conventional synchrotron, electrons are accelerated and wiggled, but on a much shorter scale of a few millimeters. By focusing a 50 TW CPA laser system (30 fs duration) onto a helium gas jet, we obtained a polychromatic collimated beam (50 mrad) of X-ray radiation in the keV range. In addition, its perfect synchronization with the laser system, its ultrafast duration (≃30 fs) and its brightness (up to 108 photons/shot/solid angle at 0.1% BW) will make it applicable to both X-ray science and backlighting to address laboratory astrophysics research issues.

  15. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  16. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.;

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio...... spectrum and we calculate some of the physical parameters for thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron self-Compton models. We conclude that no simple model is consistent with the data but if the knot contains small regions with flat spectra, these could produce the observed X-rays (via synchrotron emission...

  17. Correlated x-ray and optical time variability of TT arietis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous X-ray and optical photometry of the cataclysmic variable TT Arietis has revealed correlated X-ray and opticl variability over a broad range of time scales. Large amplitude X-ray flickering with a time scale of approx.1000 s persists for the entire observation, is present at all orbital phases, and is correlated with optical flickering. The X-ray flickering is delayed by approx.1 minute with respect to the optical flickering. Transient hard X-ray oscillations with periods approx.32 s, approx.12 s, and approx.9 s and transient optical oscillations with periods approx.32 s and approx.12 s are observed. There is a modulation of the X-ray flux with a period consistent with the orbital period of approximately 200 minutes, but there is no apparent modulation of the X-ray spectrum. The optical flux is modulated with a similar period and may lag the X-ray modulation by approx.0.1 in phase. An X-ray photoelectric absorption event with a duration of about 1000 s is observed. An optical flux decrease of shorter duration (approx.500 s) occurs at the same time. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a thermal bremsstrahlung plus Gaunt factor model with kT> or approx. =10 keV, N/sub H/ = 1-2 x 1021 cm-2, and a received flux of approx.2 x 10-11 ergs cm-2 s-1 between 0.2 and 4 keV. The results of our observations suggest that the hard X-ray emission from TT Ari may be produced in a corona above and below the inner accretion disk

  18. Investigation of external bremsstrahlung produced in various elements by beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation of external bremsstrahlung yield with thickness of some elements with atomic numbers between 13 and 82, is determined by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector and multi-channel analyzer. It is observed that the thickness which corresponds to the maximum yield is a characteristic of target material. Assuming external bremsstrahlung yield changes with the empirical equation, I = KNZsup(n)exp(-σsub(B)t) suggested by Mudhole, the coefficient σsub(B) has been determined and the possibility of σsub(B) being the mass absorption coefficient is discussed. (author)

  19. Polarization effects in radiation from compact X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory of polarization of X rays emitted by magnetized neutron stars, white dwarfs and black hole accretion disks is presented and predictions are compared with polarimetric data. Polarization occurs in accreting neutron stars and white dwarfs in binary systems as plasma travels along magnetic field lines formed between the companions. Movement parallel to the field produces circular polarization, transverse propagation yields linear polarization and elliptical polarization arises from other angles. The actual mechanism is alterations in the absorption coefficients of magnetized plasma, changes introduced by available bremsstrahlung and electron scattering processes. Thomson scattering is an origin of X ray polarization in black hole and neutron star accretion disks, with the type of polarization being dependent on the radiation density near the boundary, the presence of Faraday rotation and the geometry of the disk magnetic field. Polarimetric data on 10 stellar objects are presented as supportive evidence for the theory. 14 references

  20. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences. Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons. This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning. This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes. During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields. These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air. Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away. As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited.

  1. Joint x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  2. Installation And Test Of Electron Beam Generation System To Produce Far-Infrared Radiation And X-Ray Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, aims to establish a facility to generate femtosecond electron beams. This electron beam can be used to generate high intensity far-infrared radiation and ultra-short X-ray pulses. The main components of the system are a 3 MeV RF electron gun with a thermionic cathode, an a-magnet as a bunch compressor, and post acceleration 15-20 MeV by a linear accelerator (linac). Between the main components, there are focusing quadrupole magnets and steering magnets to maintain the electron beam within a high vacuum tube. At the end of the beam transport line, a dipole magnet has been installed to function as a beam dump and an energy spectrometer. After the installation and testing of individual major components were completed, we have been investigating the generation of the electron beam, intense far- infrared radiation and ultra short X-ray pulses

  3. DXRaySMCS. First user friendly interface developed for prediction of diagnostic radiology X-ray spectra produced by Monte Carlo (MCNP-4C) simulation in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate knowledge of the output energy spectra of an x-ray tube is essential in many areas of radiological studies. It forms the basis of almost all image quality simulations and enable system designers to predict patient dose more accurately. Many radiological physics problems that can be solved by Monte Carlo simulation methods require an x-ray spectra as input data. Computer simulation of x-ray spectra is one of the most important tools for investigation of patient dose and image quality in diagnostic radiology systems. In this work the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP-4C) was used for the simulation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology, Electron's path in the target was followed until it's energy was reduced to 10 keV. A user friendly interface named 'Diagnostic X-ray Spectra by Monte Carlo Simulation (DXRaySMCS)' was developed to facilitate the application of MCNP-4C code for diagnostic radiology spectrum prediction. The program provides a user friendly interface for modifying the MCNP input file, launching the MCNP program to simulate electron and photon transport and processing the MCNP output file to yield a summary of the results (Relative Photon Number per Energy Bin). In this article the development and characteristics of DXRaySMCS are outlined. As part of the validation process, out put spectra for 46 diagnostic radiology system settings produced by DXRaySMCS were compared with the corresponding IPEM78. Generally, there is a good agreement between the two sets of spectra. No statistically significant differences have been observed between IPEM78 reported spectra and the simulated spectra generated in this study. (author)

  4. Design and characteristics of beta-excited X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports on recent work on beta-excited X-ray sources. Results of detailed experimental investigation on the X-rays produced by the fission products Pm147, Kr85 and Sr90 are described. X-ray yields and spectral distributions have been studied for target materials ranging from copper to uranium and in a variety of source-target geometries (transmission target, reflection target, sandwich target, intimate source-target mixtures). To interpret the experimental results, an analytical treatment of the processes involved in X-ray production by beta particles has been developed and is outlined. By taking into account bremsstrahlung, K-shell ionization, and fluorescent X-ray excitation, a convenient mathematical formulation may be derived for photon spectra and yields as functions of maximum β-energy, target thickness and source configuration. The agreement between calculated and experimentally determined yields is excellent and confirms the merit of the analysis. It thus becomes possible to optimize the design of isotopic X-ray sources for specific applications. Kr85 and Pm147 prototype sources have been designed and 'their performance in thickness and composition-analysis measurements is discussed. A high level Pm147 source for industrial radiography has also been designed and its performance, along with the utility of image intensifiers to extend its applicability, is considered. Finally, a general review of potentialities, advantages and limitations of isotopic X-ray sources is given. (author)

  5. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra

  6. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews II, Kenneth L.; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated...

  7. Independent determinations of temperature and ionization balance in a laser-produced plasma by use of L-shell x-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We outline a method for determining independently the electron temperature and charge state distribution in plasmas by use of ratios of sodiumlike satellite and neonlike resonance x-ray emission. The technique is applied to a bromine plasma produced by laser irradiation of a microdot. Results are consistent with the formation in the corona of a recombining plasma. The temperature is found to decrease with distance in the corona

  8. Experimental studies of emission of highly charged Au-ions and of X-rays from the laser-produced plasma at high laser intensities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Láska, Leoš; Cavallaro, S.; Jungwirth, Karel; Krása, Josef; Krouský, Eduard; Margarone, D.; Mezzasalma, A.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Ryc, L.; Skála, Jiří; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Velyhan, Andriy; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2009), 487-492. ISSN 1434-6060 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR IAA100100715 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * highly charged ions * x-ray generation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.420, year: 2009

  9. X-ray scanning of overhead aurorae from rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Nike Tomahawk rocket payloads were launched into energetic auroral events to investigate their structure and effects on the atmosphere. The instrument complement included X-ray scintillation detectors with energy discrimination in four ranges to measure the deposition of bremsstrahlung produced X-rays within the stratosphere and mesosphere. For this purpose, each instrument was designed for wide angle viewing; however, properties of the rocket motion have permitted coarse observation of distinct spatial X-ray structure. The detectors were mounted at a 450 angle with respect to the payload axis to permit scanning of the upper hemisphere, with rocket spin rates near 5 c/s during the upleg portion of each flight. Here, atmospheric shielding reduced energetic particle contamination effects to insignificant values below 65 to 75 km. Iterative computer techniques were used to reconstruct X-ray source maps at 100 km, taking atmospheric absorption effects into account. Payload 18.178 was launched on 21 September (0302 LMT) into an aurora observed to have two distinct azimuthal regions of optical brightness. Payload 18.179 (23 September, 0147 LMT) was launched into an aurora of more diffuse character. The presence of a two component spectrum is indicated for each event with the hard component originating in the more diffuse, optically faint regions. (author)

  10. Optimization of X-ray sources from a high-average-power ND:Glass laser-produced plasma for proximity lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The concept of a laser-based proximity lithography system for electronic microcircuit production has advanced to the point where a detailed design of a prototype system capable of exposing wafers at 40 wafer levels per hr is technically feasible with high-average-power laser technology. In proximity x-ray lithography, a photoresist composed of polymethyl- methacrylate (PMMA) or similar material is exposed to x rays transmitted through a mask placed near the photoresist, a procedure which is similar to making a photographic contact print. The mask contains a pattern of opaque metal features, with line widths as small as 0.12 {mu}m, placed on a thin (1-{mu}m thick) Si membrane. During the exposure, the shadow of the mask projected onto the resist produces in the physical and chemical properties of the resist a pattern of variation with the same size and shape as the features contained in the metal mask. This pattern can be further processed to produce microscopic structures in the Si substrate. The main application envisioned for this technology is the production of electronic microcircuits with spatial features significantly smaller than currently achievable with conventional optical lithographic techniques (0.12 {micro}m vs 0.25 {micro}m). This article describes work on optimizing a laser-produced plasma x-ray source intended for microcircuit production by proximity lithography.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x- ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems ...

  14. Studies for the development of a micro-focus monochromatic x-ray source with making use of a highly charged heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new scheme for a micro-focus monochromatic X-ray source using a focused highly charged ion beam colliding with a solid surface. When highly charged ion approaches a surface, many electrons are captured into the ion and the so-called hollow atom is produced. The hollow atom will decay by emitting X-rays before and after hitting the surface. Such X-rays do not contain any contribution from bremsstrahlung, so that monochromatic X-rays can be obtained by using proper filters. For the first step of realizing the proposed scheme, an ion focusing system with a glass capillary has been developed. In order to study the monochromaticity of the emission, X-ray spectra from hollow atoms produced in the collisions between highly charged heavy ions and several surfaces have been observed. (author)

  15. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  16. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions

  17. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma produced by ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; U Chakravarty; Manoranjan P Singh; J A Chakera; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the synthetic spectra generated using the spectroscopic code Prism-SPECT. It is observed that He-like resonance line emission occurs from the plasma region having sub-critical density, whereas K- emission arises from the bulk solid heated to a temperature of 10 eV by the impact of hot electrons. K- line from Be-like ions was used to estimate the hot electron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature showed a scaling of 0.47 with laser intensity.

  18. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Shao-yong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yuan, Yong-teng; Miao, Wen-yong; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Hu, Guang-yue, E-mail: gyhu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian [Department of Modern Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  19. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from plasma produced by the femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; B S Rao; P D Gupta

    2012-02-01

    We report here an experimental study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from magnesium plasma produced by laser pulses of three widely different pulse durations (FWHM) of 45 fs, 25 ps and 3 ns, at a constant laser fluence of ∼ 1.5 × 104 J cm-2. It is observed that the X-ray yield of the resonance lines from the higher ionization states such as H- and He-like ions decreases on decreasing the laser pulse duration, even though the peak laser intensities of 3.5 × 1017 W cm-2 for the 45 fs pulses and 6.2 × 1014 W cm-2 for the 25 ps pulses are much higher than 5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the 3 ns laser pulse. The results were explained in terms of the ionization equilibrium time for different ionization states in the heated plasma. The study can be useful to make optimum choice of the laser pulse duration to produce short pulse intense X-ray line emission from the plasma and to get the knowledge of the degree of ionization in the plasma.

  20. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  1. Dosimetry and monitoring of thin X-ray beam produced by linear particle accelerator, for application in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetry and monitoring characteristics of thin X-ray beams, and the application of 4MeV linear particle accelerator to radiosurgery are studied. An addition collimation system, consisted of 3 lead collimators, which allows to obtain thin beams of 6,10 and 15 mm of diameter, was fabricated. The stereo taxic system, together with modifications in dispositives, provide the accuracy required in volum-targed location. The dosimetric informations were determined with silicon detector inserted into water simulator. The isodose curves for each beam, and total isodoses simulating the treatment were established using radiographic emulsions in conditions which reproduce real circunstances of pacient irradiation. (M.C.K.)

  2. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  3. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC® EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 × 10 × 10-cm3 polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09–1.07, 1.23–1.17, and 1.27–1.19 for doses 50–200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV–4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  4. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  5. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter 90Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of FmodBH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the FmodBH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends

  6. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S., E-mail: dhaliwalas@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, Longowal(Sangrur) -148106, Punjab (India)

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  7. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter 90Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (FmodBH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of FmodBH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the FmodBH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  8. X-rays radiation directly produced favorable and harmful effects on the constituents of different medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Al-Nimer Marwan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ionizing radiation on the constituents of solid materials of medicinal plants was studied in few reports. The present study was performed to investigate the direct effect of 1.9Gy/min X-rays radiation on the dry leaves of Camellia sinensis (green tea, Salvia officinalis (sage, barks of Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon and tuberous of Zingiber officinale Rosc. (ginger. Three extracts (1% were prepared for each medicinal plant; aqueous, ethanol and methanol. The UV-Visible spectra, and biochemical constituents of each non irradiated and irradiated extract were determined. The results showed that X-rays radiation induced remarkable changes in UV-Visible spectra of irradiated compared with non irradiated medicinal plants. This effect was well observed with irradiated green tea leaves. Irradiated medicinal plants lost considerable percents of allantoin and higher percents of flavonoids as well as total polyphenols were lost from irradiated ginger and cinnamon. Irradiated medicinal plants were superior than non irradiated in releasing nitric oxide. It concludes that irradiated medicinal plants carried favorable and harmful effects on their constituents and their favorable effects can be clinically as well as experimentally applied.

  9. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser wakefield accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Arefiev, Alex; Downer, Mike; InstituteFusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin Team

    2014-10-01

    Compton backscatter (CBS) x-rays have been generated from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) electron beams by retro-reflecting the LWFA drive pulse with a plasma mirror (PM) and by backscattering a secondary pulse split from the driver pulse. However, tunable quasi-monoenergetic CBS x-rays have been produced only by the latter method, which requires challenging alignment. Here we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (~50% FWHM), bright (5 × 106 photon per shot) CBS x-rays with central energy tunability from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by combining a PM with a tunable LWFA. 30 TW, 30-fs (FWHM), laser pulses from the UT3 laser system were focused (f/12) to spot diameter 11 micron, intensity ~6 × 1018 W/cm2 (a = 1.5) at a 1-mm long Helium gas jet, yielding quasi-monoenergetic relativistic electrons. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflected the LWFA driving pulse into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detecting bremsstrahlung background. By changing gas jet backing pressure, electron energy was tuned from 60 to 90 MeV, thereby tuning the CBS x-ray energy, which was determined by measuring transmission through a metal filter pack. The x-ray beam profiles recorded on an image plate had 5-10-mrad divergence.

  10. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolutiona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N.; Lu, Jian; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the Lβ1- and Lβ2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

  11. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver R.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2015-08-01

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2-6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ˜20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ˜190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform's useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry.

  12. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver R; Seidler, Gerald T

    2015-08-01

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2-6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform's useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry. PMID:26329247

  13. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2–6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform’s useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry

  14. Note: A disposable x-ray camera based on mass produced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensors and single-board computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoidn, Oliver R.; Seidler, Gerald T., E-mail: seidler@uw.edu [Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We have integrated mass-produced commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and off-the-shelf single-board computers into an x-ray camera platform optimized for acquisition of x-ray spectra and radiographs at energies of 2–6 keV. The CMOS sensor and single-board computer are complemented by custom mounting and interface hardware that can be easily acquired from rapid prototyping services. For single-pixel detection events, i.e., events where the deposited energy from one photon is substantially localized in a single pixel, we establish ∼20% quantum efficiency at 2.6 keV with ∼190 eV resolution and a 100 kHz maximum detection rate. The detector platform’s useful intrinsic energy resolution, 5-μm pixel size, ease of use, and obvious potential for parallelization make it a promising candidate for many applications at synchrotron facilities, in laser-heating plasma physics studies, and in laboratory-based x-ray spectrometry.

  15. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  16. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  17. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  18. Theory of the X-ray emission of the extended galactic source Monogem Ring in the constellation Monoceros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the X-ray emission of the source Monogem Ring, for which a possible generation mechanism is thermal bremsstrahlung of hot gas filling the interior of a spherical shock wave produced by a supernova explosion. An analytic expression is obtained for the X-ray spectra for this generation mechanism in the cases when the undisturbed interstellar gas surrounding the supernova before the explosion has a constant uniform density distribution and a density distribution in accordance with a power law. The calculated spectra are compared with the observational data, and good agreement is obtained in both cases. 14 references

  19. Effect of dielectronic recombination on the charge-state distribution and soft X-ray line intensity of laser-produced carbon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chowdhury; G P Gupta; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2005-01-01

    The effect of dielectronic recombination in determining charge-state distribution and radiative emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been investigated in the collisional radiative ionization equilibrium. It is observed that the relative abundances of different ions in the plasma, and soft X-ray emission intensity get significantly altered when dielectronic recombination is included. Theoretical estimates of the relative population of CVI to CV ions and ratio of line intensity emitted from them for two representative formulations of dielectronic recombination are presented.

  20. Species and Tissue Differences Affecting the Relative Efficiency of Neutrons and X-Rays in Producing Chromosome Abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomes of both plants and animals gave 1-hit survival curves when irradiated at various intervals during the nuclear interphase by either X-rays (220 kV) or neutrons (16 MeV). The RBE was taken as the ratio of the slope of the survival curve on exposure to neutrons at a given time after irradiation to that for X-ray sat the same time. The time intervals studied were 3,8,12, 18 and 24 h after irradiation. The 3-h interval gave data for chromosomes which were at the end of the interphase and the 24-h interval gave data for chromosomes at the onset of the interphase. At the end of the inter- phase the RBE was a constant for all species studied (five plant, two mammal) and had the value 2.5. In one plant species where RBE was obtained for meiosis at pachytene as well as mitosis at the end of the interphase, it had the same value in both. The constancy of the RBE for mitotic chromosomes in diverse species at the end of the interphase and for meiotic chromosomes at pachytene indicates a uniform condition in all of these chromosomes with respect to ionizing radiation. At the other stages in the mitotic interphase, the RBE varied by as much as 260%. The pattern of RBE variation obtained for a lymphoma of the rat was similar to the pattern for a lymphoma in the mouse and did not resemble the pattern for a carcinoma in the rat. It follows that the chromosomes in these two types of cells in the rat were physiologically different with respect to radiation reponse even though they might be identical genetically. The V. faba root tip gave RBE patterns different from those obtained with any of the mammalian tissues. The factors mentioned above must be taken into account in an evaluation of the relative effects of neutrons on chromosomes. To the extent that survival of cells and organisms is determined by the continued operation of a normal chromosome complement, the RBE for survival will also be dependent upon these factors. (author)

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  2. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  3. X-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  4. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  5. On the inability of Comptonization to produce the broad X-ray iron lines observed in Seyfert nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S

    1999-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that Compton downscattering may give rise to the broad iron lines seen in the X-ray spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies. This challenges the standard model in which these lines originate from the innermost regions of the black hole accretion disk with Doppler shifts and gravitational redshifts giving rise to the broadened line profile. Here, we apply observational constraints to the Compton downscattering model for MCG-6-30-15 and NGC3516, the two best cases to date of Seyfert galaxies with relativistically broad lines. We show that the continuum source in MCG-6-30-15 required by the constrained model violates the black body limit. In the case of NGC3516, only a very small region of parameter space is compatible with the constraints. Hence, we conclude that the Comptonization model is not a viable one for the broad line seen in these two objects. The accretion disk model remains the best interpretation of these data.

  6. Energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced by high-energy bremsstrahlung in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy spectra of secondary neutrons produced when bremsstrahlung of end-point energy in the range 10-30 MeV is incident on oxygen, carbon and nitrogen have been calculated. Photonuclear reactions of the type (γ,n) and (γ,pn) have been included. The respective contributions of various nuclear reactions have been adjusted using the published values of experimentally determined cross-sections, or branching ratios, where these are available. Where no such information exists in the literature, the values have been empirically estimated. Agreement has been obtained between the calculated photoneutron spectra from C, N and O at various energies and the available experimentally-measured spectra. The photoneutron spectra from C,N and O have been combined in the right proportion (C5H40O18N) to compute the spectra of secondary neutrons from tissue irradiated with bremsstrahlung of end-point energy from 10-30 MeV. Mean neutron energies and kerma factors for these spectra have been calculated. (author)

  7. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  9. Electron polarimetry with bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the spin-orbit interaction, the electron scattering from the nucleus is sensitive to the spin orientation of that electron. This is used for polarimetry of electron beams in the Mott method. The spin-orbit interaction was also observed in bremsstrahlung. In this article we analyze its potential for polarimetry as an alternative to the Mott method. It can simultaneously measure all three electron polarization components. It should work in the energy range of 50 keV up to several MeV and can be applied at beam intensities higher than 100 nA. It needs a thin heavy element target, two or four x-ray detectors and one x-ray linear polarimeter

  10. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  11. Can field portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) produce high quality data for application in environmental contamination research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Taylor, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    This research evaluates the analytical capabilities of a field portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF) for the measurement of contaminated soil samples using a matrix-matched calibration. The calibrated pXRF generated exceptional data quality from the measurement of ten soil reference materials. Elemental recoveries improved for all 11 elements post-calibration with reduced measurement variation and detection limits in most cases. Measurement repeatability of reference values ranged between 0.2 and 10% relative standard deviation, while the majority (82%) of reference recoveries were between 90 and 110%. Definitive data quality, the highest of the US EPA's three level quality ranking, was achieved for 15 of 19 elemental datasets. Measurement comparability against inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) values was excellent for most elements (e.g, r(2) 0.999 for Mn and Pb, r(2) > 0.995 for Cu, Zn and Cd). Parallel measurement of reference materials revealed ICP-AES and ICP-MS measured Ti and Cr poorly when compared to pXRF. Individual recoveries of soil reference materials by both ICP-AES and pXRF showed that pXRF was equivalent to or better than ICP-AES values for all but two elements (Ni, As). This study demonstrates pXRF as a suitable alternative to ICP-AES analysis in the measurement of Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, and Pb in metal-contaminated soils. Where funds are limited, pXRF provides a low-cost, high quality solution to increasing sample density for a more complete geochemical investigation. PMID:27100216

  12. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P; 10.1118/1.4767770

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Cent...

  13. Modeling and characterization of X-ray yield in a polychromatic, lab-scale, X-ray computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modular X-ray computed micro-tomography (µXCT) system is characterized in terms of X-ray yield resulting both from the generated X-ray spectrum and from X-ray detection with an energy-sensitive detector. The X-ray computed tomography system is composed of a commercially available cone-beam microfocus X-ray source and a modular optically-coupled-CCD-scintillator X-ray detector. The X-ray yield is measured and reported in units independent from exposure time, X-ray tube beam target current, and cone-beam-to-detector geometry. The polychromatic X-ray source is modeled as a broad Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in order to understand the effect of the controllable parameters, that is, X-ray tube accelerating voltage and X-ray beam filtering. An approach is adopted which expresses the absolute number of emitted X-rays. The response of the energy-sensitive detector to the modeled spectrum is modeled as a function of scintillator composition and thickness. The detection efficiency model for the polychromatic X-ray detector considers the response of the light collection system and the electronic imaging array in order to predict absolute count yield under the studied conditions. The modeling approach is applied to the specific hardware implemented in the current µXCT system. The model's predictions for absolute detection rate are in reasonable agreement with measured values under a range of conditions applied to the system for X-ray microtomography imaging, particularly for the LuAG:Ce scintillator material

  14. Modeling and characterization of X-ray yield in a polychromatic, lab-scale, X-ray computed tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, J.C.E.; Chawla, Nikhilesh, E-mail: nchawla@asu.edu

    2015-05-21

    A modular X-ray computed micro-tomography (µXCT) system is characterized in terms of X-ray yield resulting both from the generated X-ray spectrum and from X-ray detection with an energy-sensitive detector. The X-ray computed tomography system is composed of a commercially available cone-beam microfocus X-ray source and a modular optically-coupled-CCD-scintillator X-ray detector. The X-ray yield is measured and reported in units independent from exposure time, X-ray tube beam target current, and cone-beam-to-detector geometry. The polychromatic X-ray source is modeled as a broad Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in order to understand the effect of the controllable parameters, that is, X-ray tube accelerating voltage and X-ray beam filtering. An approach is adopted which expresses the absolute number of emitted X-rays. The response of the energy-sensitive detector to the modeled spectrum is modeled as a function of scintillator composition and thickness. The detection efficiency model for the polychromatic X-ray detector considers the response of the light collection system and the electronic imaging array in order to predict absolute count yield under the studied conditions. The modeling approach is applied to the specific hardware implemented in the current µXCT system. The model's predictions for absolute detection rate are in reasonable agreement with measured values under a range of conditions applied to the system for X-ray microtomography imaging, particularly for the LuAG:Ce scintillator material.

  15. Advances in X-ray spectroscopy contributions in honour of professor Y. Cauchois

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    1982-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Spectroscopy covers topics relevant to the advancement of X-ray spectroscopy technology. The book is a collection of papers written by specialists in X-ray spectroscopy and pays tribute to the scientific work of Prof. Yvette Cauchois. The text is organized into four parts. Part I covers the analysis of X-ray transitions between atomic levels and relativistic theories of X-ray emission satellites and electron BremsStrahlung. Part II reviews the means provided by X-ray spectroscopy for the determination of the electronic structure of solids, while Part III discusses methods of

  16. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  17. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  18. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns. PMID:19044706

  19. Flash X-ray measurements with a time projection Compton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a ''time projection Compton spectrometer'' (TPCS) to measure the time-integrated photon energy spectrum between 0.1 and 2 MeV of short-pulse, intense bremsstrahlung sources. A target in the TPCS produces Compton electrons when illuminated by the flash X-ray source. Target electrons are trapped magnetically by current in a rod on the axis of an evacuated drift tube. The curvature and gradient of the magnetic field cause the electrons to drift parallel to the spectrometer axis. The time of electron arrival at the end of a 1 m drift encodes the energy spectrum of the X-ray burst. The detector is a plastic scintillator coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube. Despite heavy shielding, enough prompt X-rays penetrate to give a time fiducial. Background is measured on shots with the X-ray target removed. The response of the TPCS is calculated using the TIGERP computer code to model photon/electron transport in the target and a sophisticated algorithm to compute electron drift velocity. The response functions and signal are the known components of a matrix equation, which is solved to determine the unknown spectrum. We tested the TPCS with flash X-ray sources on the Saturn accelerator. Signals have been analyzed, spectra unfolded and results compared with other methods. (orig.)

  20. Selective photo-activation analysis with laser-driven x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Golovin, Grigory; Powers, Nathan; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Petersen, Chad; Zhang, Jun; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Zhao, Baozhen; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Umstadter, Donald; Haden, Dan; Silano, Jack; Karwowski, Hugon

    2013-04-01

    We discuss a technique for the identification of nuclear isotopes by selective photo-activation analysis. A narrow divergence beam of high-energy photons is produced when a laser driven electron beam Compton backscatters off a counter-propagating high-intensity laser pulse. The x-rays from this compact laser-driven synchrotron light source are MeV energy, narrow-bandwidth, tunable, polarized, and bright (10^8 photons s-1). Such characteristics make these x-rays well-suited for nuclear interrogation by means of triggering (γ,f) and (γ,xn) reactions. The narrow bandwidth of the x-ray light can be exploited to selectively activate nuclei with isotopic sensitivity, without causing unwanted background from collateral activation. Additionally, the polarized nature of the x-rays can be used to study anisotropy of neutron emission, for precise identification of isotopes. Activation by laser-driven synchrotron x-rays will be compared with activation by bremsstrahlung.

  1. Hard X-ray Detectability of Small Impulsive Heating Events in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, L.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Marsh, A.; Krucker, S.; Christe, S.

    2015-12-01

    Impulsive heating events ("nanoflares") are a candidate to supply the solar corona with its ~2 MK temperature. These transient events can be studied using extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray observations, among others. However, the impulsive events may occur in tenuous loops on small enough timescales that the heating is essentially not observed due to ionization timescales, and only the cooling phase is observed. Bremsstrahlung hard X-rays could serve as a more direct and prompt indicator of transient heating events. A hard X-ray spacecraft based on the direct-focusing technology pioneered by the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket could search for these direct signatures. In this work, we use the hydrodynamical EBTEL code to simulate differential emission measures produced by individual heating events and by ensembles of such events. We then directly predict hard X-ray spectra and consider their observability by a future spaceborne FOXSI, and also by the RHESSI and NuSTAR spacecraft.

  2. K-edge angiography utilizing a tungsten plasma X-ray generator in conjunction with gadolinium-based contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tungsten plasma flash X-ray generator is useful in order to perform high-speed enhanced K-edge angiography using cone beams because K-series characteristic X-rays from the tungsten target are absorbed effectively by gadolinium-based contrast media. In the flash X-ray generator, a 150 nF condenser is charged up to 80 kV by a power supply, and flash X-rays are produced by the discharging. The X-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbomolecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Since the electric circuit of the high-voltage pulse generator employs a cable transmission line, the high-voltage pulse generator produces twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. At a charging voltage of 80 kV, the estimated maximum tube voltage and current were approximately 160 kV and 40 kA, respectively. When the charging voltage was increased, the characteristic X-ray intensities of tungsten Kα lines increased. The Kα lines were clean, and hardly any bremsstrahlung rays were detected. The X-ray pulse widths were approximately 110 ns, and the time-integrated X-ray intensity had a value of approximately 0.35 mGy at 1.0 m from the X-ray source with a charging voltage of 80 kV. Angiography was performed using a film-less computed radiography (CR) system and gadolinium-based contrast media. In angiography of non-living animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts

  3. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miaja-Avila, L.; G. C. O'Neil; Uhlig, J.; C. L. Cromer; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary opti...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  5. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  6. Solar flares X-ray polarimetry in a wide energy band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Campana, Riccardo; Costa, Enrico; Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Soffitta, Paolo; Del Monte, Ettore; Rubini, Alda

    2012-07-01

    Polarimetry of solar flares X-ray emission is an additional tool for investigating particles dynamics within the solar atmosphere. Accelerated electrons by magnetic reconnection in the corona produce bremsstrahlung radiation as primary emission in the footpoints of a solar flare which has moreover the possibility to be Compton backscattered resulting in albedo emission. Non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission is expected to be a significant above 15 keV and highly polarized. The albedo component peaks between 20 and 50 keV, its polarization properties depend on the Compton scattering angle. Such a diffusion modifies the spectrum and the polarization of the primary bremsstrahlung emission. Hard X-ray polarimetry, spectroscopy and imaging are therefore necessary to disentangle and modeling the different components in a solar flare. We present a non imaging Compton polarimeter sensitive from 20 keV designed as a single scattering unit surrounded by absorbers of high atomic number. A photelectric polarimeter based on the Gas Pixel Detector technology sensitive in the 15-35 keV energy band can be coupled for imaging.

  7. Atomic Bremsstrahlung in ion-atom collisions (stripping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Bremsstrahlung produced in high energy (non relativistic) ion-atom collisions including retardation effects is studied. Mechanical states of the system are described by the symmetrical eikonal approximation and Hartree-Fock electronic wave functions for the calculation of the shape factor of each atom. Photon energy spectra are presented for collisions of protons against noble gases, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe. The contribution of each atomic shell to these spectra is studied, where lowest shell (1s) corresponds to the hard X-ray region and the higher shells correspond to lower photon energies. (Author)

  8. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  9. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  10. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  11. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition, many dentists are taking x-rays using digital technology. The image runs through a computer. The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than traditional methods. Other types of dental x-rays can create a 3-D picture ...

  12. A laser-plasma-produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Shimokawa, Takashi; Imai, Takashi; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kando, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. PMID:25862698

  13. A laser-plasma–produced soft X-ray laser at 89 eV generates DNA double-strand breaks in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it has been expected that X-ray laser will be widely applied to biomedical studies, this has not been achieved to date and its biological effects such as DNA damage have not been evaluated. As a first step for its biological application, we developed a culture cell irradiation system, particularly designed for a plasma-driven soft X-ray laser pulse, to investigate whether the soft X-ray laser is able to induce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells or not. The human adenocarcimona cell line A549 was irradiated with the soft X-ray laser at a photon energy of 89 eV and the repair focus formation of the DSBs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining with antiphosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs), ATM (p-ATM) and γ-H2AX antibody. The p-DNA-PKcs, ATM, and γ-H2AX foci were clearly identified after soft X-ray laser irradiation. Furthermore, the increase in the X-ray laser shot number, even from a single shot, results in the increase in p-DNA-PKcs foci. These results are the first evidence that the 89 eV soft X-ray laser is able to induce DSB in living cells. Our study demonstrated that this irradiation system is a useful tool for investigating the radiobiological effect of soft X-ray laser. (author)

  14. Experimental and analytical study of the bremsstrahlung radiation production at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bremsstrahlung photon beam from an X-ray tube with chromium anode has been studied, for an electron energy of 60 Kev. In the experimental step, a new measurement method has been developed. This is based on the detection and measurement of the fluorescence produced when the photons from the tube impinge on targets which are used as calibrated flux monitors. The composition and physical characteristics of the targets are well-known. In the steps of experimental data treatment, an analytical study of the theoretical models describing thick target bremsstrahlung yield is performed. A factorization which accounts for the elemental physical processes is obtained, employing simple mathematical functions. The characteristic parameters found in the numerical fit process lead to results in good agreement with the experimental observations from other authors and predict theoretical exposure values in perfect agreement with the exposures measured for X-ray beams generated in several operating conditions. (author)

  15. What can be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    Solar wind charge exchange produces diffuse X-ray emission with a variable surface brightness comparable to that of the cosmic background. While the temporal variation of the charge exchange emission allows some separation of the components, there remains a great deal of uncertainty as to the zero level of both. Because the production mechanisms of the two components are considerably different, their spectra would provide critical diagnostics to the understanding of both. However, current X-ray observatories are very limited in both spectral resolution and sensitivity in the critical soft X-ray (less than 1.0 keV) energy range. Non-dispersive high-resolution spectrometers, such as the calorimeter proposed for the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, will be extremely useful in distinguishing the cascade emission of charge exchange from the spectra of thermal bremsstrahlung cosmic plasmas.

  16. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Haque; A Moon; T Hirai; H Yamada

    2011-02-01

    The tabletop storage ring, 6 MeV MIRRORCLE, is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. In spite of low electron energy, the 6 MeV MIRRORCLE generates hard X-rays ranging from 10 keV up to its electron energy and milliwatt order submillimetre range FIR rays. Bremsstrahlung is the mechanism for the hard X-ray generation. Images produced with 11 × geometrical magnification display a sharply enhanced edge effect when generated using a 25 mm rod electron target. Bright far-infrared is generated in the same way using a conventional synchrotron light source, but with MIRRORCLE the spectral flux is found to be ∼ 1000 times greater than that of a standard thermal source. Partially coherent enhancement is observed in the case of FIR output.

  17. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobko, A., E-mail: lobko@inp.bsu.by [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Golubeva, E. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Ryazan State RadioEngineering University, 59/1 Gagarina Street, Ryazan 390005 (Russian Federation); Paddubskaya, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shenderova, O. [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Dr., S. 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States); Uglov, V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Valynets, N. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc.

  18. Digital X-ray detector based on a CCD matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of charge-coupled devices (CCD) as position-sensitive detectors for X-ray radiation is discussed. The experimental scheme contains a videotransmission camera to detect pulsed X-ray radiation and Vektor analog-to-digital converters and computer interface. It is shown that the sensitivity range of a K1200TsM1 matrix to bremsstrahlung with an average energy of 75 keV is 2.7·10-8-0.8·10-6 J/cm2. The spatial resolution of the resultant X-ray image is discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs

  19. Density and x-ray emission profile relationships in highly ionized high-Z laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a benchmark measurement of the electron density profile in the region where the electron density is 1019 cm–3 and where the bulk of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission occurs from isotropically expanding spherical high-Z gadolinium plasmas. It was found that, due to opacity effects, the observed EUV emission is mostly produced from an underdense region. We have analyzed time-resolved emission spectra with the aid of atomic structure calculations and find the multiple ion charge states around 18+ during the laser pulse irradiation

  20. X-ray back-lighter characterization for iron opacity measurements using laser-produced aluminium K-alpha emission

    OpenAIRE

    Rossall, A K; Gartside, L. M. R.; Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N K; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Gaffney, J; Rose, S. J.; Tallents, G J; , Tel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aluminium K ? emission (1.5 keV) produced by an 8 J, 500 ps, Nd:Glass laser incident at 45? onto a layered target of 0.8 ?m thick aluminium (front side) and 1?m thick iron (back side) has been used to probe the opacity of iron plasma. Source broadened spectroscopy and continuum emission analysis shows that whole beam self focussing within the aluminium plasma results in a two temperature spatial distribution. Thermal conduction from the laser-irradiated aluminium into the iron lay...

  1. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Clementson, J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schweikhard, L. [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-04-19

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  2. Unresolved puzzles in the x-ray emission produced by charge exchange measured on electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange recombination, the transfer of one or more electrons from an atomic or molecular system to a positive ion, is a common phenomenon affecting laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Controlled studies of this process in electron beam ion traps during the past one and a half decades have produced multiple observations that are difficult to explain with available spectral models. Some of the most recent observations are so puzzling that they bring in doubt the existence of a coherent predictive capability for line formation by charge exchange, making investigations of charge exchange a fertile ground for continued measurements and theoretical development.

  3. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, T R

    1996-01-08

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  4. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  5. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-05-21

    A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  6. X-ray observations of the supernova remnant IC 443

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Clark, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Presented observation data from OSO-7 are shown to confirm the identification of IC 443 as an X-ray source, with a spectrum which is consistent with either thermal bremsstrahlung or a power law. These data lead to an age of 3400 years for IC 443, much younger than previous estimates.

  7. Study of x-rays produced from debris-free sources with Ar, Kr and Kr/Ar mixture linear gas jets irradiated by UNR Leopard laser beam with fs and ns pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Moschella, J. J.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Weller, M. E.; Cline, W.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.

    2016-06-01

    Experiments of x-ray emission from Ar, Kr, and Ar/Kr gas jet mixture were performed at the UNR Leopard Laser Facility operated with 350 fs pulses at laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2 and 0.8 ns pulses at an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. Debris free x-ray source with supersonic linear nozzle generated clusters/monomer jet with an average density of ≥1019 cm-3 was compared to cylindrical tube subsonic nozzle, which produced only monomer jet with average density 1.5-2 times higher. The linear (elongated) cluster/gas jet provides the capability to study x-ray yield anisotropy and laser beam self-focusing with plasma channel formation that are interconnecting with efficient x-ray generation. Diagnostics include x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras and spectrometers. It was observed that the emission in the 1-9 keV spectral region was strongly anisotropic depending on the directions of laser beam polarization for sub-ps laser pulse and supersonic linear jet. The energy yield in the 1-3 keV region produced by a linear nozzle was an order of magnitude higher than from a tube nozzle. Non-LTE models and 3D molecular dynamic simulations of Ar and Kr clusters irradiated by sub-ps laser pulses have been implemented to analyze obtained data. A potential evidence of electron beam generation in jets' plasma was discussed. Note that the described debris-free gas-puff x-ray source can generate x-ray pulses in a high repetition regime. This is a great advantage compared to solid laser targets.

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  11. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  14. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  15. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  16. Graviton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graviton bremsstrahlung in the process of scattering of two charged spinless particles is considered. One of the particles is assumed to be massive. The cross sections of this process and of energy losses on graviton radiation are calculated. The possibility to apply the Weizsaecker-Williams method to this process is discussed. The results show that for both relativistic and nonrelativistic energies the graviton bremsstrahlung is approximately Gm2/α times smaller than electromagnetic one (G is the Newton gravitational constant, m - the mass of scattered particle). The results are in agreement with the statement about the weak character of interaction of gravitons with matter

  17. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  18. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  19. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  20. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) publishes Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation , ... eSubmitter Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff - Assembler's Guide to Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no ... might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  10. X-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  11. Innovative bremsstrahlung research at Physics International Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For bremsstrahlung diodes optimized for X-ray production below 2 MeV, the area-weighted mean dose in the near-field is controlled by the atomic number, Z, of the converter material, and the electrical power, P, into the diode, scaling approximately as ZP. However, given the constraints of a fixed electrical power pulse from a generator, one can still vary the end-point voltage of the bremsstrahlung radiation without significant sacrifice in X-ray dose, or sharpen the risetime of the X-ray pulse without sacrificing the average dose-rate. In this paper, the authors review the design of a triple series diode on the Double-EAGLE generator which reduces the end-point voltage of the bremsstrahlung source from 1.5 MV down to 0.3 MV. In addition, they discuss pulse sharpening of the radiation from a pinched beam diode by optimizing the dimension of the tantalum converter. Also, they review some recent work on a linear bremsstrahlung diode which in principle can form part of a large-area bremsstrahlung source for a multi-module pulsed power generator

  12. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10 × 10 × 10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30°–60°. Differential Compton and Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained from xraylib, an ANSI C library for x-ray-matter interactions, were applied to derive the incident fluence. MCNP5 simulations of the irradiation geometry provided the dose deposition per photon fluence as a function of depth in the phantom. Results: At 25 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose overestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 7.2 ± 3.0%–2.1 ± 3.0% for PMMA depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm, respectively. At 35 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose underestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 1.0 ± 3.4%–2.5 ± 3.4%, respectively. Conclusions: These results showed that TG-61 ion chamber dosimetry, used to calibrate dose output for cell irradiations, agreed with fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations to within approximately 7% and 3% at 25 and 35 keV, respectively.

  13. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; 10.1118/1.4761870

    2012-01-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a PMMA phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Differential Compto...

  14. Time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission of femtosecond-laser-produced plasmas in the 1.5-keV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Nagels-Silvert, V.; Geindre, J. P.; Gauthier, J. C.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    Recent experimental results on ion beams produced in high-intensity laser-solid interactions indicate the presence of very intense electric fields in the target. This suggests the possibility of efficiently heating a solid material by means of the fast electrons created during the laser-solid interactions and trapped in the target, rather than by the laser photons themselves. We tested this mechanism by irradiating very small cubic aluminum targets with the LULI 100-TW, 300-fs laser at 1.06-μm wavelength. X-ray spectra were measured with an ultra-fast streak camera, coupled to a conical Bragg crystal, providing spectra in the 1.5-keV range with high temporal and spectral resolution. The results indicate the creation of a hot plasma, but a very low coupling between the rapid electrons and the solid. A tentative explanation, in agreement with other experimental results and with preliminary particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, points out the fatal role of the laser prepulse.

  15. PIXE spectrum analysis taking into account bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous background appearing over the wide region of X-ray energy in the PIXE spectrum is very troublesome presence in the peak fitting. In the usual manner, the spectrum of continuous background is predicted as a function of polynomial and is subtracted from the X-ray spectrum. However, the parameters of the polynomial are determined with difficulty in the case that the continuous background exists under many peaks of characteristic X-rays. We calculated the production cross sections of continuous X-rays for several elements on the basis of the theories of quasi-free electron bremsstrahlung (QFEB), secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) and atomic bremsstrahlung (AB), and obtained the continuous X-ray spectrum as a function of atomic number and X-ray energy. X-ray spectra of a standard sample and of a bovine liver sample were analyzed by a pattern analysis method assuming the reference spectra consisting of characteristic X-rays and continuous X-rays for each element. The results of analysis are quite satisfactory. By the present method, the PIXE spectra can be analyzed under little influence of the background subtraction, and it enables us a full auto-analysis of PIXE spectrum

  16. Short-time X-ray diffraction with an efficient-optimized, high repetition-rate laser-plasma X-ray-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the production and application of ultrashort X-ray pulses. In the beginning different possibilities for the production of X-ray pulses with pulse durations of below one picosecond are presented, whereby the main topic lies on the so called laser-plasma X-ray sources with high repetition rate. In this case ultrashort laser pulses are focused on a metal, so that in the focus intensities of above 1016 W/cm2 dominate. In the ideal case in such way ultrafast electrons are produced, which are responsible for line radiation. In these experiments titanium Kα radiation is produced, thes photons possess an energy of 4.51 keV. For the efficient production of line radiation here the Ti:Sa laser is optimized in view of the laser energy and the pulse shape and the influence of the different parameters on the Kα production systematically studied. The influences of laser intensity, system-conditioned pre-pulses and of phase modulation are checked. It turns out that beside the increasement of the Kα radiation by a suited laser intensity a reduction of the X-ray background radiation is of deciding importance for the obtaining of clear diffraction images. This background radiation is mainly composed of bremsstrahlung. It can be suppressed by the avoidance of intrinsic pre-pulses and by means of 2nd-order phase modulation. By means of optical excitation and X-ray exploration experiments the production of acoustic waves after ultrashort optical excitation in a 150 nm thick Ge(111) film on Si(111) is studied. These acoustic waves are driven by thermal (in this time scale time-independent) and electronic (time dependent) pressure amounts. As essential results it turns out that the relative amount of the electronic pressure increases with decreasing excitation density

  17. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  18. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam

  19. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  20. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  1. Inflow Generated X-ray Corona Around Supermassive Black Holes and Unified Model for X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lile

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, covering the spatial domain from hundreds of Schwarzschild radii to $2\\ \\mathrm{pc}$ around the central supermassive black hole of mass $10^8 M_\\odot$, with detailed radiative cooling processes, are performed. Generically found is the existence of a significant amount of shock heated, high temperature ($\\geq 10^8\\ \\mathrm{K}$) coronal gas in the inner ($\\leq 10^4 r_\\mathrm{sch}$) region. It is shown that the composite bremsstrahlung emission spectrum due to coronal gas of various temperatures are in reasonable agreement with the overall ensemble spectrum of AGNs and hard X-ray background. Taking into account inverse Compton processes, in the context of the simulation-produced coronal gas, our model can readily account for the wide variety of AGN spectral shape, which can now be understood physically. The distinguishing feature of our model is that X-ray coronal gas is, for the first time, an integral part of the inflow gas and its observable characteristics are phys...

  2. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  3. Development of an X-ray microscope using a pulse train laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulse train laser with energy of 1 J was used to produce high intensity X-ray. We developed a soft X-ray microscope using a laser plasma X-ray source and an X-ray zooming tube. An X-ray image of Cu 2000 mesh was observed. (author)

  4. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  5. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  6. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  7. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  8. Beam propagation of x rays in a laser-produced plasma and a modified relation of interferometry in measuring the electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, using a quantum mechanical technique and introducing the so-called V representation (where the representation transformation is made by using the potential Hamiltonian V), we studied x-ray propagation in a linear plasma medium both analytically and numerically. A modified relation between the phase of the probe and the reference light and the electron density of the plasma is derived, in which the contribution of the gradient of the electron density has been taken into account. It is shown that this relation has the advantage in measurements of the electron density of a plasma using the x-ray interferometry technique of lessening the errors originating from the electron density gradient. The validity of x-ray interferometry is discussed in both mathematical and physical terms

  9. The impact of low-Z impurities on x-ray conversion efficiency from laser-produced plasmas of low-density gold foam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is an important approach to improve the x-ray conversion efficiency of laser-ablated high-Z plasmas by using low initial density materials for various applications. However, unavoidable low-Z impurities in the manufacture process of low-density high-Z foam targets will depress this effect. A general easy-to-use analytical model based on simulations was developed to evaluate the quantitative impact of impurities within the gold foam target on laser to x-ray conversion efficiency. In addition, the x-ray conversion efficiencies of 1 g/cm3 gold foams with two different initial contents of impurities were experimentally investigated. Good agreements have been achieved between the model results and experiments

  10. Determination of metals in samples of Cocuy hand craft penca, produced in Lara State, Venezuela, by use of Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cocuy is a hydro alcoholic mixture coming from the distillation of fermented juice of agave cocuy. It is originate from Venezuela and it is produced in arid and semi-arid regions of that Country. In the last years, government has been concerned to obtain the legalization of the cocuy produced by peasants from the Municipality Urdaneta. The characterization of the cocuy produced in this municipality is an important contribution for the community and for the health of the consumers. To study the characteristics of the process of cocuy production in that region, it was carried out a census of producers, and a survey was applied in order to obtain information about raw material, process and storage of the cocuy. Samples were taken from different producers, to which it was determined p H, acidity, alcoholic degree, dry extract, refraction index, and content of Cu, Zn, Fe and Pb. The determination of metal in samples of cocuy was carried out by the method of Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence. This technique is very appropriate for alcoholic matrices, since effects of matrices are not observed, contrary to the technique of Atomic Absorption, which is the suitable one for the quality standards for this kind of drinks. The method TXRF has the additional advantage of the simultaneous determination with sample volumes of microliters order. The in situ internal standardization (in the reflector) was investigated by use of two methodologies, and the traditional procedure of addition of the internal pattern was compared. The analytic quality of the obtained results for each procedure it was object of analysis and it will be discussed. The concentration of metal Zn, Fe and Pb was near to limit of detection of the technique. The accuracy of the obtained results for Cu was determined by comparison with the technique of Atomic Absorption and it will also be object of discussion. They were found differences between the content of metal and the alcoholic degree, among

  11. Efficient soft x-ray emission source at 13.5 nm by use of a femtosecond-laser-produced Li-based microplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated to optimize a Li-based microjet target coupled to dual subpicosecond laser pulses as a 13.5 nm soft x-ray emission source. An optimum pulse duration of 450 fs to achieve a maximum emission at 13.5 nm was well explained by the resonant absorption process. Utilization of dual femtosecond pulses revealed that the optimum pulse separation around 500 ps was necessary to achieve a maximum soft x-ray conversion efficiency of 0.2%, where plasma hydrodynamics could not be neglected. A one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic simulation reproduced this optimum pulse separation behavior

  12. Efficient soft x-ray emission source at 13.5 nm by use of a femtosecond-laser-produced Li-based microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Kubodera, Shoichi; Sasaki, Wataru; Yugami, Noboru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alex

    2005-06-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated to optimize a Li-based microjet target coupled to dual subpicosecond laser pulses as a 13.5 nm soft x-ray emission source. An optimum pulse duration of 450 fs to achieve a maximum emission at 13.5 nm was well explained by the resonant absorption process. Utilization of dual femtosecond pulses revealed that the optimum pulse separation around 500 ps was necessary to achieve a maximum soft x-ray conversion efficiency of 0.2%, where plasma hydrodynamics could not be neglected. A one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic simulation reproduced this optimum pulse separation behavior.

  13. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays' high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  14. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  15. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron or X-ray beam sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons, based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γn) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γn) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. For electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10 to 11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. (author)

  16. Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted from highly ionized atoms in the vacuum spark and laser-produced high power plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in atomic spectroscopy has greatly been reinforced in the last ten years. This gain of interest is directly related to the developments in different fields of research where hot plasmas are created. These fields include in particular controlled thermonuclear fusion research by means of inertial or magnetic confinement approaches and also the most recent efforts to achieve lasers in the XUV region. The present work is based on the specific contribution of the atomic spectroscopy group at the Hebrew University. The recent development of both theoretical and experimental tools allowed us to progress in the understanding of the highly ionized states of heavy elements. In this work the low-inductance vacuum-spark developed at the Hebrew University was used as the hot plasma source. The spectra were recorded in the 7-300 A range by means of a high-resolution extreme-grazing-incidence spectrometer developed at the Racah Institute by Profs. J.L. Schwob and B.S. Fraenkel. To the extend the spectroscopic studies to higher-Z atoms, the laser-produced plasma facility at Soreq Nuclear Center was used. In this work the spectra of the sixth row elements were recorded in the x-rays by means of a crystal spectrometer. All these experimental systems are briefly described in chapter one. Chapter two deals with the theoretical methods used in the present work for the atomic calculations. Chapter three deals with the spectra of elements of the fifth row emitted from the vacuum-spark in the 30-150 A range. These spectra as experimental data were used in order to test ab-initio computations along the NiI sequence 3d-nl transitions. The results of this work are presented in chapter four. Chapter five is devoted to the measurement and analysis of spectra emitted from the vacuum-spark by rare-earth elements. (author)

  17. A X-ray scanning machine for imaging atomic elements

    OpenAIRE

    Fenelon, A.G.R

    1988-01-01

    X-ray computer axial tomography is a well established technique for producing images which show the spatial variation of X-ray linear attenuation coefficient within an object. X-ray differential K absorbtion edge tomography is the application of computer axial tomography to form images of selected atomic elements within an object, and these images show the distribution of specific atomic element concentration. The technique is to measure the attenuation of X-rays on either side of the K a...

  18. Measurement 20-200 keV hard X-ray based on CdTe detector in EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Accurate and quantitative measurement of plasma radiation is a key issue to Tokamak, toroidal magnetic confinement device. The radiations from Tokamak cover large energy range. Driven by the determination of the obtaining of hard X-ray spectra, a new system based on a high performance CdTe detector was built up in EAST Tokamak, the first non-circle cross-section in the world. Purpose: Introduces the device of hard X-ray diagnosis system in the EAST Tokamak on the Port A. The system can measure the plasma hard X-ray (20-200 keV) spectra under different discharge conditions, including Ohmical shot and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) shot. The research of high speed electron which produced by LHCD is also the aim of the new system. Methods: A high performance CdTe detector was using in EAST Tokamak to measure the hard X-ray (20-200 keV) spectra. Results: The results show that the new system based on a high performance CdTe can meet the requirements for measuring the EAST Tokamak. Conclusions: A preliminary experimental result showed that the system can meet the requirements for measuring the X-ray bremsstrahlung of plasma in the energy range from 20 to 200 keV Calibration result and typical measurement result on EAST are present in this paper. (authors)

  19. Compact X-ray sources: X-rays from self-reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangles, Stuart P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-based particle acceleration offers a way to reduce the size of hard-X-ray sources. Scientists have now developed a simple scheme that produces a bright flash of hard X-rays by using a single laser pulse both to generate and to scatter an electron beam.

  20. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  1. Streaked, x-ray-transmission-grating spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A free standing x-ray transmission grating has been coupled with a soft x-ray streak camera to produce a time resolved x-ray spectrometer. The instrument has a temporal resolution of approx. 20 psec, is capable of covering a broad spectral range, 2 to 120 A, has high sensitivity, and is simple to use requiring no complex alignment procedure. In recent laser fusion experiments the spectrometer successfully recorded time resolved spectra over the range 10 to 120 A with a spectral resolving power, lambda/Δlambda of 4 to 50, limited primarily by source size and collimation effects

  2. Fabrication of large area X-ray diffraction grating for X-ray phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray lithography, which uses highly directional synchrotron radiation, is one of the technologies that can be used for fabricating micrometer-sized structures. In X-ray lithography, the accuracy of the fabricated structure depends largely on the accuracy of the X-ray mask. Since X-ray radiation is highly directional, a micro-fabrication technology that produces un-tapered and high aspect ratio highly absorbent structures on a low absorbent membrane is required. Conventionally, a resin material is used as the support membrane for large area X-ray masks. However, resin membranes have the disadvantage that they can sag after several cycles of X-ray exposure due to the heat generated by the X-rays. Therefore, we proposed and used thin carbon wafers for the membrane material because carbon has an extremely small thermal expansion coefficient. We fabricated new carbon membrane X-ray masks, and these results of X-ray lithography demonstrate the superior performance.

  3. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Schioppa

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray flu

  4. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses an X-ray apparatus that can be used for tomography with the aid of a computer. With this apparatus plus computer, it is possible to quickly achieve the required edge values whereby the influence of the movement is diminished

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  6. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  7. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses pyroelectric detectors which are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low energy x-rays. The authors report tests of LiTaO3, Sr.5Ba.5Nb2O6 and LiNbO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1 ns low energy x-rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100 ns x-rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  8. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyroelectric detectors are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low-energy x rays. We report our tests of LiTaO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1-ns low-energy x rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100-ns x rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  9. Inductive Voltage Adder Driven X-Ray Sources for Hydrodynamic Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerators were developed to provide high-current (100s of kA) power pulses at high voltage (up to 20 MV) using robust modular components. This architecture simultaneously resolves problems found in conventional pulsed and linear induction accelerators. A variety of high-brightness pulsed x-ray radiographic sources are needed from sub-megavolt to 16-MeV endpoints with greater source brightness (dose/spot) than presently available. We are applying IVA systems to produce very intense (up to 75 TW/cm2) electron beams for these flash radiographic applications. The accelerator electromagnetic pulse is converted to a directed electron beam at the end of a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line. The cantilevered cathode threading the accelerator cavities terminates in a small (1-mm diameter) needle, producing the electron beam which is transported to a grounded bremsstrahlung converter within a strong (approximately50-T) axial magnetic field. These systems produce mm-sized stable electron beams, yielding very intense x-ray sources. Detailed simulations of the electron beam generation, transport, and target interaction are presented along with scaling laws for the radiation production and x-ray spot size. Experimental studies confirm these simulations and show this reliable, compact, and inexpensive technology scales to 1000-R doses a meter from a mm-diameter source in 50 ns

  10. Inductive Voltage Adder Driven X-Ray Sources for Hydrodynamic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, V.; Cordova, S.; Droemer, D.; Gustwiller, J.; Hunt, E.; Johnson, D.L.; MacLeod, G.; Maenchen, John; Menge, P.; Molina, I.; Oliver, B; Olson, C.; Rosenthal, S; Rovang, D.; Smith, I.; Welch, D.; Woo, L.

    1999-06-17

    Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerators were developed to provide high-current (100s of kA) power pulses at high voltage (up to 20 MV) using robust modular components. This architecture simultaneously resolves problems found in conventional pulsed and linear induction accelerators. A variety of high-brightness pulsed x-ray radiographic sources are needed from sub-megavolt to 16-MeV endpoints with greater source brightness (dose/spot) than presently available. We are applying IVA systems to produce very intense (up to 75 TW/cm{sup 2}) electron beams for these flash radiographic applications. The accelerator electromagnetic pulse is converted to a directed electron beam at the end of a self-magnetically insulated vacuum transmission line. The cantilevered cathode threading the accelerator cavities terminates in a small (1-mm diameter) needle, producing the electron beam which is transported to a grounded bremsstrahlung converter within a strong ({approximately}50-T) axial magnetic field. These systems produce mm-sized stable electron beams, yielding very intense x-ray sources. Detailed simulations of the electron beam generation, transport, and target interaction are presented along with scaling laws for the radiation production and x-ray spot size. Experimental studies confirm these simulations and show this reliable, compact, and inexpensive technology scales to 1000-R doses a meter from a mm-diameter source in 50 ns.

  11. High speed gated x-ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single and multi-frame gated x-ray images with time-resolution as fast as 150 psec are described. These systems are based on the gating of microchannel plates in a stripline configuration. The gating voltage comes from the avalanche breakdown of reverse biased p-n junction producing high power voltage pulses as short as 70 psec. Results from single and four frame x-ray cameras used on Nova are described. 8 refs., 9 figs

  12. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D J; Almagri, A F; Burke, D R; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; Kaufman, M C; O'Connell, R

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Z(eff) and the particle diffusion coefficient D(r). A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Z(eff) and D(r). PMID:21034007

  13. Measurements of L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb by low-energy electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. L.; An, Z.; Zhu, J. J.; Tan, W. J.; Liu, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    The total L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb elements were measured by detecting the characteristic X-rays induced by the electron impact in the energy range of 6-28 keV. In this experiment, the thin films with thick aluminum substrates were used as the targets, and the experimental setup was improved. The influence of multiple scattering of electrons penetrating the targets films, electrons reflected from the thick aluminum substrates and bremsstrahlung photons produced when incident electrons impacted the targets were corrected by using the Monte Carlo method. The experimental results determined in this paper were compared with some theoretical models and other available experimental data in the literature. It was shown that the L-shell X-ray production cross-sections of Ag and Sb elements measured in this paper were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions within the uncertainties.

  14. Effective dose and organ doses due to gas Bremsstrahlung from electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremsstrahlung on residual gas is an important source of beam losses in electron-positron storage rings. The Bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a narrow cone in the forward direction, which produces a 'hot spot' of dose at the end of a straight section. Estimates of radiation hazard due to gas Bremsstrahlung have so far been performed by calculating the maximum dose equivalent (MADE) or similar quantities. However, the use of quantities conceived for broad parallel beams in the case of very narrow beams significantly overestimates the organ doses and effective dose. In this paper a more sophisticated computational model was used to calculate values of effective dose and absorbed doses in various organs due to gas Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by 0.1-10 GeV electrons. The Bremsstrahlung photons generated by the interaction of a mono-energetic electron beam in a 1 m long air target were made to impinge on a selected organ of an hermaphrodite anthropomorphic mathematical model placed at 1 and 10 m distances from the end of the target. Organ dose and effective dose were calculated for five representative organs, namely the right eye, ovaries, breast, testes and thyroid. Fits to the calculated values are given, as well as the dependence of photon fluence and dosimetric quantities on various parameters. The results are compared with previous estimates based on MADE and with values of ambient dose equivalent. (authors)

  15. Application of x-ray techniques in precision farming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision farming is a relatively new concept basing farming upon quantitative determination of various parameters in the farming practices. One of these parameters is accurate measurement of grain flow rates on real time basis. Although there are various techniques already available for this purpose, x-rays provide a very competitive alternative to the current state of art. In this work, the use of low energy bremsstrahlung x-ray, up to 30 keV, densitometry is demonstrated for grain flow rate measurements. Mass flow rates for corn are related to measured x-ray intensity in gray scale units with a 0.99 correlation coefficient for flow rates ranging from 2 kg/s to 6 kg/s. Higher flow rate values can be measured by using slightly more energetic x-rays or a higher tube current. Measurements were done in real time at a 30 Hz sampling rate. Flow rate measurements are independent of grain moisture due to a negligible change in the x-ray attenuation coefficients at typical moisture content values from 15% to 25%. Grain flow profile changes do not affect measurement accuracy. X-rays easily capture variations in the corn stream. Due to the low energy of the x-ray photons, biological shielding can easily be accomplished with 2 mm thick lead foil or 5 mm of steel

  16. X-Ray Emission from M32: X-Ray Binaries or a micro-AGN?

    OpenAIRE

    Eskridge, Paul B.; White III, Raymond E.; Davis, David S.

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed archival {\\it ROSAT} PSPC data for M32 in order to study the x-ray emission from this nearest elliptical galaxy. We fit spectra from three long exposures with Raymond-Smith, thermal bremsstrahlung, and power-law models. All models give excellent fits. The thermal fits have kT$\\approx$4 keV, the Raymond-Smith iron abundance is $0.4^{+0.7}_{-0.3}$ Solar, the power-law fit has $\\alpha$=1.6$\\pm$0.1, and all fits have $N_H$ consistent with the Galactic column. The source is center...

  17. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity. We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  18. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  19. X-ray generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 4 provides a comparative survey on generators for stationary applications as available on the German market. It provides decision-making tools, physical characteristics, suggestions for radiation protection and for safe appliance operation as well as a concept for inspections all of which have been developed jointly by physicians of various specialities, physicists, engineers, business men, hospital experts and medicotechnical X-ray staff on the basis of a well-tried working concept. The systematic representation of correlations relevant to decision-making processes is based on a profile of technico-physical characteristics (standard product information) which was established by way of interdisciplinary dialog and which will enable any hospital or clinic to easily equip its X-ray department in an economic and purposeful way. The information on device data, device descriptions and market survey furnish the data tested by the manufacturers without guarantee and subject to correction. (orig./HP)

  20. X-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An invention relating to the development of photo-resists used in X-ray lithography is described. A COP resist which has been exposed to X-ray radiation, is developed with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) developer and an ethanol solvent. The resist is first developed in a strong developing solution and then with a weaker developer whose concentration is slightly above that required to obtain complete development. Preferably the resist is exposed so as to obtain about a fifty per cent developed thickness and the developing is carried out in steps, the first with a concentration of 5:1.8 (MEK to ethanol) for five seconds, the second using concentrations of 5:1.8 and 5:2.7 for ten seconds and the third with a concentration of 5:2.7 for five seconds. (author)

  1. Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30 fs Ti:Sa laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. Additionally, we reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

  2. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  3. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  4. Dental x-ray diagnostic installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exemplary embodiment comprises an exposure unit including an X-ray tube and a cassette holder rotatable about vertical axes and between which the head of the patient is disposed. A radiation detector is disposed at the cassette holder for supplying an electrical signal corresponding to the dose rate when it is struck by X-rays and being interconnected with an X-ray tube voltage controller and a dose rate regulator in such manner that the X-ray tube voltage is influenced by the output of the radiation detector to control the dose rate to a value producing an optimum film blackening. A function generator determining the speed of the exposure unit is provided in which a speed curve is stored given which the radiation dose influencing the film is approximately constant

  5. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  6. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  7. K x-ray transitions from highly charged very slow Ne recoil ions produced by 1.4 MeV/amu very heavy ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K x-ray transitions in highly charged neon recoil ions have been observed in collisions of 1.4 MeV/amu Ar12+, Ti14+, Ni16+, Kr18+, Xe24+, Pb36+ and U40+ with a neon gas target. The spectral lines are attributed to excited states of Ne9+, Ne8+ and Ne7+. Experimental evidence is given for a secondary selective electron capture into outer shells of fully stripped slow target ions. (author)

  8. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum Kα lines are produced using a 20 μm-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of Kα photons was approximately 3x107 photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter

  9. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 1800 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  10. Study of the Z-dependence of external bremsstrahlung produced by beta particles of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Pm and sup 3 sup 2 P

    CERN Document Server

    Dhaliwal, A S

    2003-01-01

    The Z-dependence of external bremsstrahlung (EB) produced by beta particles of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Pm and sup 3 sup 2 P beta emitters in Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb targets has been studied, as a function of photon energy, on the basis of the theoretical and experimental EB spectral distributions. The present results show that the values of the Z-dependence index, obtained both from Elwert-corrected Bethe-Heitler and Tseng and Pratt theories and from experiments, are not constant. It is found that the index n increases with increasing photon energy.

  11. X-ray diffraction from shock-loaded polycrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, Damian C.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was demonstrated from shock-compressed polycrystalline metal on nanosecond time scales. Laser ablation was used to induce shock waves in polycrystalline foils of Be, 25 to 125 microns thick. A second laser pulse was used to generate a plasma x-ray source by irradiation of a Ti foil. The x-ray source was collimated to produce a beam of controllable diameter, and the beam was directed at the Be sample. X-rays were diffracted from the sample, and detected using films and x-ray ...

  12. 3d-4p x-ray spectrum emitted by highly ionized uranium from a laser-produced plasma in the 3.8<λ<4.4-A wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work extends a previous analysis of the x-ray spectrum of a laser-produced uranium plasma [P. Mandelbaum et al., Phys. Rev. A 44, 5752 (1991)] to the longer-wavelength range (3.8+65) through As-like (U+59) isoelectronic sequences are identified in the spectrum, in good agreement with the previous analysis of the spectrum emitted at shorter wavelengths

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ...

  14. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si02. The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  16. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much ...

  1. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of ... oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  4. DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of 10 globular clusters hosting millisecond pulsars is investigated. Subtraction of the known resolved point sources leads to detectable levels of unresolved emission in the core region of M28, NGC 6440, M62, and NGC 6752. The X-ray luminosities in the 0.3-8 keV energy band of this emission component were found to lie in the range ∼1.5 x 1031erg s-1 (NGC 6752) to ∼2.2 x 1032 erg s-1 (M28). The lowest limiting luminosity for X-ray source detections amongst these four clusters was 1.1 x 1030 erg s-1 for NGC 6752. The spectrum of the unresolved emission can be fit equally well by a power law, a thermal bremsstrahlung model, a blackbody plus power law, or a thermal bremsstrahlung model plus blackbody component. The unresolved emission is considered to arise from the cumulative contribution of active binaries, cataclysmic variables, and faint millisecond pulsars with their associated pulsar wind nebulae. In examining the available X-ray data, no evidence for any pulsar wind nebular emission in globular clusters is found. It is shown that the X-ray luminosity contribution of a faint source population based on an extrapolation of the luminosity function of detected point sources is compatible with the unresolved X-ray emission in the cores of NGC 6440 and NGC 6752. Adopting the same slope for the luminosity function for M62 as for NGC 6440 and NGC 6752 leads to a similar result for M62. For M28, the contribution from faint sources in the core can attain a level comparable with the observed value if a steeper slope is adopted. The characteristics on the faint source population as constrained by the properties of the unresolved X-ray emission are briefly discussed.

  5. Polarization Bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Korol, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces and reviews both theory and applications of polarizational bremsstrahlung, i.e. the electromagnetic radiation emitted during collisions of charged particles with structured, thus polarizable targets, such as atoms, molecules and clusters.   The subject, following the first experimental evidence a few decades ago, has gained importance through a number of modern applications.  Thus, the study of several radiative mechanisms is expected to lead to the design of novel light sources, operating in various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conversely, the analysis of the spectral and angular distribution of the photon emission constitutes a new tool for extracting information on the interaction of the colliding particles, and on their internal structure and dynamical properties.   Last but not least, accurate quantitative descriptions of the photon emission processes determine the radiative energy losses of particles in various media, thereby providing essential  information required f...

  6. New monoenergetic X ray medical digital imaging system based in gamma sources and low radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for X ray medical imaging, based on gamma sources and low radiation dose was investigated. A radiographic technique with extensive monoenergetic X rays sources is proposed in the present work, these sources produce only characteristic X rays by means of photo-excitation with gamma sources. A selection of suitable materials for photo-stimulate with a Co-57 source was made. The ones with high fluorescence yield wk , and a useful X ray energy for medicine use, were selected: Mo, Ag, Sn , I, Ba, Ce, W, Au, Pb, Bi. A detailed study of the properties of emission for these materials was made with tables and a Monte Carlo simulation tool (MCNP). This simulation showed us the behavior of the materials about several parameters as: material thickness, incidence angle of radiation, Kα and Kβ characteristic X ray flux emitted, total production of X photons in bulk of material, Bremsstrahlung radiation flux and Compton scattering. Spectral graphics were obtained, too. These data allowed us to optimize variables as thickness and incidence angle of radiation for each material in order to maximize the wanted X ray flux and minimize the Compton scattering. For example, when photons impinge on a foil of Mo with a grazing angle of 2.8 deg., we obtained the results depicted. The maximum efficiency of X ray production can be as high as 58% for Bi. The design of the geometrical form of the source implied a new work of optimization (maximum X ray flux, minimum γ-ray scattering and minimum physical dimensions). We tested various geometrical forms: pills, cones and several types of arrays of shells, in order to improve X ray emission and maintain a low level of γ ray scattering. Optimization of the geometrical forms increased the flux of X rays by a factor of 6 over the simpler pill form. In order to obtain a reasonable photon flux, these sources must have finite dimensions far from the point geometry, avoiding blurring in the image taking place. We developed a new image

  7. Active X-ray Optics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, René; Inneman, A.; Pina, L.; Černá, D.; Tichý, V.

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2013 - (Juha, L.; Bajt, S.; London, R.; Hudec, R.; Pína, L.), 877718/1-877718/7. (Proceedings of SPIE. 8777). ISBN 9780819495792. [Damage to VUV, EUV, and X-ray Optics IV; and EUV and X-ray Optics: Synergy between Laboratory and Space III. Praha (CZ), 15.04.2013-18.04.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : X-ray optics * active optics * active X-ray optics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  8. Introduction to the fundamental of X-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction to the fundamentals of X-ray physics is given. Starting with the construction of the atom, the generation of the characteristic X-radiation as well as the bremsstrahlung is explained. Following a description of the interaction with matter, the most important characteristics and classifications of the beam quality are mentioned, and the important definitions in the medical field are explained. (ORU/LH)

  9. Anomalous x-ray radiation of beam plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of non-equilibrium stationary plasma under the conditions of the planned plasma-chemical reactors based on beam-plasma discharge were investigated. The x-ray spectrum of the beam-plasma was measured and anomalous spectral properties were analyzed. Starting with some critical pressure the anomalous radiation was added to the classical bremsstrahlung spectrum. The occurrence of anomalous radiation can be used to diagnose the condition of beam transportation in such systems. (D.Gy.)

  10. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse

  11. Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovelin, J.; Vainio, R.; Andersson, H.; Valtonen, E.; Alha, L.; Mälkki, A.; Grande, M.; Fraser, G. W.; Kato, M.; Koskinen, H.; Muinonen, K.; Näränen, J.; Schmidt, W.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Anttila, M.; Vihavainen, T.; Kiuru, E.; Roos, M.; Peltonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Talvioja, M.; Portin, P.; Prydderch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Intensity X-ray and particle Spectrometer (SIXS) on the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will investigate the direct solar X-rays, and energetic protons and electrons which pass the Spacecraft on their way to the surface of Mercury. These measurements are vitally important for understanding quantitatively the processes that make Mercury's surface glow in X-rays, since all X-rays from Mercury are due to interactions of the surface with incoming highly energetic photons and space particles. The X-ray emission of Mercury's surface will be analysed to understand its structure and composition. SIXS data will also be utilised for studies of the solar X-ray corona, flares, solar energetic particles, and the magnetosphere of Mercury, and for providing information on solar eruptions to other BepiColombo instruments. SIXS consists of two detector subsystems. The X-ray detector system includes three identical GaAs PIN detectors which measure the solar spectrum at 1-20 keV energy range, and their combined field-of-view covers ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The particle detector system consists of an assembly including a cubic central CsI(Tl) scintillator detector with five of its six surfaces covered by a thin Si detector, which together perform low-resolution particle spectroscopy with a rough angular resolution over a field-of-view covering ˜1/4 of the whole sky. The energy range of detected particle spectra is 0.1-3 MeV for electrons and 1-30 MeV for protons. A major task for the SIXS instrument is the measurement of solar X-rays on the dayside of Mercury's surface to enable modeling of X-ray fluorescence and scattering on the planet's surface. Since highly energetic particles are expected to also induce a significant amount of X-ray emission via particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and bremsstrahlung when they are absorbed by the solid surface of the planet Mercury, SIXS performs measurements of fluxes and spectra of protons and electrons. SIXS performs

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  2. X-ray microscopy of live biological micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Al-Ani, Ma'an Nassar

    Real-time, compact x-ray microscopy has the potential to benefit many scientific fields, including microbiology, pharmacology, organic chemistry, and physics. Single frame x-ray micro-radiography, produced by a compact, solid-state laser plasma source, allows scientists to use x-ray emission for elemental analysis, and to observe biological specimens in their natural state. In this study, x-ray images of mouse kidney tissue, live bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia, and the bacteria's interaction with the antibiotic gentamicin, are examined using x-ray microscopy. For the purposes of comparing between confocal microscopy and x-ray microscopy, we introduced to our work the technique of gold labeling. Indirect immunofluorescence staining and immuno-gold labeling were applied on human lymphocytes and human tumor cells. Differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC) showed the lymphocyte body and nucleus, as did x-ray microscopy. However, the high resolution of x-ray microscopy allows us to differentiate between the gold particles bound to the antibodies and the free gold. A compact, tabletop Nd: glass laser is used in this study to produce x-rays from an Yttrium target. An atomic force microscope is used to scan the x-ray images from the developed photo-resist. The use of compact, tabletop laser plasma sources, in conjunction with x-ray microscopy, is a new technique that has great potential as a flexible, user-friendly scientific research tool.

  3. X-ray refraction-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional x-ray imaging for soft tissue often produced some adverse effects because of contrast medium and high-dose radiation. This report outlines the recently developed a very sensitive x-ray imaging method called as refraction contrast method or x-ray Schlieren method, which allows to detect density difference and irregularity in the soft tissue. In the apparatus (SPring-8 BL47XU), a light emitted from undulator was monochromatized by two-crystal x-ray spectroscope and x-ray passed through a sample was caught by imaging detector equipped with a combination of relay lens and CCD. When a glass capillary (outer diameter: 660 μm, inner diameter: 220 μm) was used as a measuring sample, it was confirmed that the image through geometrical refraction was obtained. When x-ray images of a dragonfly wing obtained by the Schlieren method (sample-detector distance: 5 m) and the conventional contact method were compared, it was demonstrated that reticulate structure of the wing was clearly observed by the former method but not at all by the latter one. At present, the study on efficacy of the refraction contrast imaging is under way using rodents. (M.N.)

  4. A million X-ray detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC)

    2016-06-01

    Part of the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre responsibilities include producing an X-ray catalogue of all X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton. The latest version, 3XMM, takes advantage of improvements made to the source characterisation, reducing the number of spurious detections, but providing better astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity, as well as spectra and timeseries for a quarter of all catalogue detections. The data release 5 (3XMM-DR5, April 2015) is derived from the first 13 years of observations with XMM-Newton. 3XMM-DR5 includes 565962 X-ray detections and 396910 unique sources, detected as many as 48 times. 3XMM-DR5 is therefore the largest X-ray source catalogue. 3XMM-DR6 will be made available during 2016 and will augment the catalogue with 70000 X-ray detections. Over the next decade the catalogue will reach 1 million X-ray detections, including galaxy clusters, galaxies, tidal disruption events, gamma-ray bursts, stars, stellar mass compact objects, supernovae, planets, comets and many other systems. Thanks to the wide range of data products for each catalogue detection, the catalogue is an excellent resource for finding populations of sources as well as new and extreme objects. Here we present results achieved from searching the catalogue and discuss improvements that will be provided in future versions.

  5. X-ray variability and period determinations in the eclipsing polar DP Leonis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Craig R.; Cordova, France A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of our ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations on the eclipsing magnetic cataclysmic variable DP Leo. The soft X-ray spectrum is modeled by a blackbody of kT = 24.8(sup +2.6 sub -8.1) eV. Severe limits are placed upon the flux from any hard bremsstrahlung component. A strong soft X-ray excess, with respect to hard X-ray emission, is found. The soft X-ray blackbody luminosity is larger than both the cyclotron and bremsstrahlung luminosities. An upper limit of 500 pc is obtained for the system's distance based upon the X-ray absorption (N(sub H) less than 5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm) and an estimate of 260(sup +150 sub -100) pc is determined from a published measurement of the secondary's flux. For the derived blackbody fit, the bolometric luminosity is found to be L(sub bb, bol) = 1.4(sup +7.1 sub -0.3) x 10(exp 31)(d/260 pc)(exp 2) ergs/s. Absorption by the accretion stream produces an intensity dip prior to each eclipse. Extreme variability in the shape of the light curve from eclipse to eclipse demonstrates that changes in the rate of accretion onto the white dwarf, the sizes of accretion filaments, or variations in the location or amount of absorbing matter in the system occur on timescales shorter than the orbital period (89.8 minutes). No evidence exists for accretion onto the stronger (59 MG) magnetic pole in the ROSAT data. A new ephemeris is presented for the eclipse of the white dwarf emission region by the secondary star and another is produced for the orbital conjunction of the two components. The rotation of the white dwarf is shown to be faster than the orbital period by (5.3 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) s. The origin of the asynchronous rotation may be activity cycle included orbital period variations or oscillations of the white dwarf's main pole about an equilibirium position. The accretion stream is modeled assuming that disruption of the stream along magnetic field lines occurs close to the white dwarf. The ROSAT

  6. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  7. Review of laser produced multi-keV X-ray sources from metallic foils, cylinders with liner, and low density aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Experimental results obtained within the last fifteen years on multi-keV X-ray sources irradiated with nanosecond scale pulse duration 3ω laser light at TW power levels by CEA and collaborators are discussed in this review paper. Experiments were carried out on OMEGA and GEKKO XII laser facilities where emitting materials in the 5-10 keV multi-keV energy range are intermediate Z value metals from titanium to germanium. Results focused on conversion efficiency improvement by a factor of 2 when an underdense plasma is created using a laser pre-pulse on a metallic foil, which is then heated by a second laser pulse delayed in time. Metal coated inner surface walls of plastic cylindrical tube ablated by laser beam impacts showed that plasma confinement doubles X-ray emission duration as it gives adequate plasma conditions (electron temperature and density) over a long period of time. Low-density aerogels (doped with metal atoms uniformly distributed throughout their volume or metal oxides) contained in a plastic cylinder have been developed and their results are comparable to gas targets. A hybrid target concept consisting of a thin metal foil placed at the end of a cylinder filled with low density aerogel has emerged as it could collect benefits from pre-exploded thin foils, efficient laser absorption in aerogel, and confinement by cylinder walls. All target geometry performances are relatively close together at a given photon energy and mainly depend on laser irradiation condition optimizations. Results are compared with gas target performances from recent NIF experiments allowing high electron temperatures over large dimension low density plasmas, which are the principal parameters for efficient multi-keV X-ray production.

  8. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  9. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multicell X-ray or gamma detector is used in computer tomography. To achieve good spatial resolution, the electrode plates are narrowly spaced in each cell and are designed identical over the whole length of the detector group. The uniform spacing and precise check of the angles between the electrodes and accurate control of the dimensions of the whole detector structure are achieved by depositing, in the fabrication process, a viscous, resin type material (e.g., epoxy resin) or glue at selected points between the electrodes and insulators. (ORU)

  10. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    to approximate that encountered under working conditions, however the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area whilst still retaining......Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes is described below. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  11. Test facility for astronomical x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Lewis, Robert A.; Bordas, J.

    1990-01-01

    to approximate that encountered under working conditions; however, the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area while still retaining......Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes, is described. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  12. Characterization of a triboelectric x-ray spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy X-ray imaging system has been useful in medical diagnostic in order to obtain high contrast in soft tissue. Recently, Camara et al. and most recently Hird et al. have produced low-energy X-rays using a triboelectric effect. The main aim of this work is to characterize the penetration (beam quality) of a triboelectric X-ray source in terms of the computed Half Value Layer (HVL). Additionally, the computed HVL of the triboelectric X-ray source has been compared with the HVL of X-ray tube Mo-anode (Apogee 5000). According to our computations the triboelectric X-ray source has a similar penetration such as a X-ray tube source.

  13. Characterization of a triboelectric x-ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Sánchez, E. Ulises; Romo-Espejel, J. A.; Aceves-Aldrete, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Low-energy X-ray imaging system has been useful in medical diagnostic in order to obtain high contrast in soft tissue. Recently, Camara et al. and most recently Hird et al. have produced low-energy X-rays using a triboelectric effect. The main aim of this work is to characterize the penetration (beam quality) of a triboelectric X-ray source in terms of the computed Half Value Layer (HVL). Additionally, the computed HVL of the triboelectric X-ray source has been compared with the HVL of X-ray tube Mo-anode (Apogee 5000). According to our computations the triboelectric X-ray source has a similar penetration such as a X-ray tube source.

  14. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    approximate that encountered under working conditions, however the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area whilst still retaining a......Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has to...... flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes is described below. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source at the...

  15. Correlation of highly charged ion and x-ray emissions from the laser-produced plasma in the presence of non-linear phenomena

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Láska, Leoš; Ryc, L.; Badziak, J.; Boody, F. P.; Gammino, S.; Jungwirth, Karel; Krása, Josef; Krouský, Eduard; Mezzasalma, A.; Parys, P.; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Torrisi, L.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Wolowski, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 160, 10-12 (2005), s. 557-566. ISSN 1042-0150. [Workshop PIBHI 2005 /2./. Giardini Naxos, 08.06.06-11.06.06] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser beam interactions * non-linear processes * self-focusing * highly charged ions * soft and hard x-rays Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.353, year: 2005

  16. Charge exchange produced K-shell x-ray emission from Ar16+ in a tokamak plasma with neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; Marion, M; Olson, R E

    2004-12-27

    High-resolution spectroscopy of hot tokamak plasma seeded with argon ions and interacting with an energetic, short-pulse neutral hydrogen beam was used to obtain the first high-resolution K-shell x-ray spectrum formed solely by charge exchange. The observed K-shell emission of Ar{sup 16+} is dominated by the intercombination and forbidden lines, providing clear signatures of charge exchange. Results from an ab initio atomic cascade model provide excellent agreement, validating a semiclassical approach for calculating charge exchange cross sections.

  17. A synchrotron/inverse Compton interpretation of a solar burst producing fast pulses at λ < 3 mm and hard X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently discovered new class of solar burst emission component exhibiting very fast pulses (durations ∼ 60 ms) at mm-waves only (λ 13 Hz, the burst sources must be short lived (∼ 60 ms), very small (7cm) and exhibiting high apparent brightness temperature (> or approx. 1010 K). This study suggest further theoretical studies on the nature of the primary acceleration sources, and on their location in the solar atmosphere. A number of crucial observational tests are needed, specially in the sub-mm and infrared range of frequencies, as well as at ratio and hard X-rays with simultaneous high spatial and time resolution. (Author)

  18. Impulse through-target x-ray tube spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitov, B. I.; Mukhachyov, Yu. S.

    2002-07-01

    At present x-ray compact tubes with pass-through anodes operating either in the pulse mode or in the direct voltage one are applied to the equipment for the shady microscopy, and the local XRF analysis. The report presents the calculated spectral intensity distributions of the bremsstrahlung versus the pass-through anode thickness. The spectral function of the bremsstrahlung Mo tube with the anode thickness over 100 microns is demosntrated to contract to the narrow energy interval lying near the characteristic anode radiation range. However under the same conditions the spectrum of the pulse Cu-anode tube tends to be dichromatic. The spectral distributions of the tube bremsstrahlung operating at the direct current and pulse voltage are compared.

  19. New electron-proton Bremsstrahlung rates for a hot plasma where the electron temperature is much smaller than the proton temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Observations of X-Ray sources harbouring a black hole and an accretion disc show the presence of at least two spectral components. One component is black-body radiation from an optically thick standard accretion disc. The other is produced in a optically thin corona and usually shows a powerlaw behaviour. Electron-proton (ep) bremsstrahlung is one of the contributing radiation mechanisms in the corona. Soft photons from the optically thick disc can Compton cool the electrons in the c...

  20. Demonstration of x-ray holography with an x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray holography offers the potential for obtaining high resolution three-dimensional images of in vitro biological microstructures. Significant progress toward this goal has been achieved with holography systems using synchrotron x-ray sources and recently spatial resolutions as small as 40 nm have been demonstrated. These experiments required x-ray exposures of an hour or longer, which makes high spatial resolution difficult to achieve in live biological specimens because of blurring of the image. This blurring is caused by specimen motion and prohibits the imaging of dynamical processes within the specimen. A possible solution to this problem is to exploit the extremely high brightness and long coherence lengths produced by x-ray lasers and create the hologram with exposure times of less than 1 nsec. This report presents the results from an experiment in which an x-ray laser was used to produce x-ray holograms. The holography geometry used was a Gabor in-line type modified by the inclusion of a high reflectivity multi-layer x-ray mirror used as a narrow bandpass filter

  1. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  2. Polarization bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authored by leading experts in the field. Self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Suitable as graduate text on the topic. This book introduces and reviews both theory and applications of polarizational bremsstrahlung, i.e. the electromagnetic radiation emitted during collisions of charged particles with structured, thus polarizable targets, such as atoms, molecules and clusters. The subject, following the first experimental evidence a few decades ago, has gained importance through a number of modern applications. Thus, the study of several radiative mechanisms is expected to lead to the design of novel light sources, operating in various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conversely, the analysis of the spectral and angular distribution of the photon emission constitutes a new tool for extracting information on the interaction of the colliding particles, and on their internal structure and dynamical properties. Last but not least, accurate quantitative descriptions of the photon emission processes determine the radiative energy losses of particles in various media, thereby providing essential information required for e.g. plasma diagnostics as well as astrophysical and medical applications (such as radiation therapy). This book primarily addresses graduate students and researchers with a background in atomic, molecular, optical or plasma physics, but will also be of benefit to anyone wishing to enter the field.

  3. Evaluation of bremsstrahlung contribution to photon transport in coupled photon-electron problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio; Salvat, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The most accurate description of the radiation field in x-ray spectrometry requires the modeling of coupled photon-electron transport. Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect actually produce electrons as secondary particles which contribute to the photon field through conversion mechanisms like bremsstrahlung (which produces a continuous photon energy spectrum) and inner-shell impact ionization (ISII) (which gives characteristic lines). The solution of the coupled problem is time consuming because the electrons interact continuously and therefore, the number of electron collisions to be considered is always very high. This complex problem is frequently simplified by neglecting the contributions of the secondary electrons. Recent works (Fernández et al., 2013; Fernández et al., 2014) have shown the possibility to include a separately computed coupled photon-electron contribution like ISII in a photon calculation for improving such a crude approximation while preserving the speed of the pure photon transport model. By means of a similar approach and the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE (coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo), the bremsstrahlung contribution is characterized in this work. The angular distribution of the photons due to bremsstrahlung can be safely considered as isotropic, with the point of emission located at the same place of the photon collision. A new photon kernel describing the bremsstrahlung contribution is introduced: it can be included in photon transport codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo) with a minimal effort. A data library to describe the energy dependence of the bremsstrahlung emission has been generated for all elements Z=1-92 in the energy range 1-150 keV. The bremsstrahlung energy distribution for an arbitrary energy is obtained by interpolating in the database. A comparison between a PENELOPE direct simulation and the interpolated distribution using the data base shows an almost perfect agreement. The use of the data base increases

  4. 21 CFR 872.1800 - Extraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral source x-ray system. 872.1800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1800 Extraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An extraoral source x-ray system is an AC-powered device that produces x-rays and is intended...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1810 - Intraoral source x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral source x-ray system. 872.1810 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1810 Intraoral source x-ray system. (a) Identification. An intraoral source x-ray system is an electrically powered device that produces x-rays and...

  6. X-ray emission from supernova remnants with particular reference to the Cygnus Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observational or theoretical results related to the study of supernova remnants (SNRs) are described. Some background information is given by reviewing the present status of our knowledge of supernovae and supernova remnants, both from theory and observations. Also the distribution of all known radio, optical, and X-ray SNRs in the Galaxy is shown and a comparison is made. The X-ray observations of the well-known X-ray SNR the Cygnus Loop are discussed in detail and the discovery of a new X-ray emitting SNR W44 is described. Other radio sources are investigated, and the observed X-ray emission of SNRs are analysed using thermal spectra like exponential or bremsstrahlung spectra. The X-ray line spectrum that emerges from SNRs is described in detail. (Auth.)

  7. Comparative experimental study of PIXE and X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIXE and X RF techniques are powerful analysis instruments in the determination of traces of elements. Although the physical processes characteristic X-rays production (ionization-emission) are similar in both methods, the representative background of each technique, responsible of its sensitivity, are different. This is because the interaction between exciter agents and the matter produces different effects. In PIXE, the background is caused by the radiation produced by the braking of the secondary electrons: Bremsstrahlung. In X RF, the background is due to the elastic and inelastic scattering of photons: Rayleigh and Compton effects. In this work, we have compared the results of the analysis of environmental samples using both methods, in order to know the scope of each one and develop them as complementary techniques. (Author)

  8. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  9. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Burghammer, Manfred [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Martínez-Criado, Gema [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.

  10. X-ray microprobe for the microcharacterization of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique properties of x rays offer many advantages over those of electrons and other charged particles for the microcharacterization of materials. X rays are more efficient in exciting characteristic x-ray fluorescence and produce higher fluorescent signal-to-background ratios than obtained with electrons. Such x-ray microprobes will also produce unprecedentedly low levels of detection in diffraction, EXAFS, Auger, and photoelectron spectroscopies for structural and chemical characterization and elemental identification. These major improvements in microcharacterization capabilities will have wide-ranging ramifications not only in materials science but also in physics, chemistry, geochemistry, biology, and medicine. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 126 X-Ray Attenuation and Absorption for Materials of Dosimetric Interest (Web, free access)   Tables and graphs of the photon mass attenuation coefficient and the mass energy-absorption coefficient are presented for all of the elements Z = 1 to 92, and for 48 compounds and mixtures of radiological interest. The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray, gamma ray, bremsstrahlung) from 1 keV to 20 MeV.

  12. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  13. Theoretical evaluation of induced radioactivity in food products by electron — or X-ray beam sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboutet, H.; Aucouturier, J.

    We evaluate first the energy density for electrons or X-ray beams necessary to produce a reference level of 1 kilogray at the maximum of dose, as a function of energy, for electrons and bremsstrahlung photons ( BX rays), based on experimental data obtained on radio-therapy beams, from 4 to 32 MeV, and irradiation beams from production plant CARIC. Then from the production of neutrons on the tungsten target and from (γ n) reactions on the deuterium content of the irradiated food, the slowing down and capture of these neutrons is estimated. Radioisotopes can be produced by (γ n) reactions on iodine, and to a lesser extent on tin, lead, barium, etc., but the major contribution is neutron activation, where the more critical elements are sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium. Induced activity is compared to natural activity coming from potassium 40, carbon 14 and radium, contained in all foods. We conclude that for electrons up to 1 Mrad the induced activity remains of the order of a few percent of natural activity, for energies below 10-11 MeV. Bremsstrahlung X-ray irradiations can give comparable levels as soon as the energy of the generating electron beam is above 3 MeV. The induced activity decays within a few days. There is only a small increase of induced activity as the energy changes from 5 to 10 MeV, for the same total applied dose.

  14. Studies on the development and applicability of modern industrial X-ray paper in dental radiology as a substitute for X-ray films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the applicability of advanced industrial X-ray paper (KODAK ''Industrex Instant'' 610) as a substitute for X-ray films in various fields of dental radiology. The studies covered intraoral and extraoral pictures of the teeth and shull, images of the hand skeleton produced by a dental X-ray device, and enlarged pantomograms, tomograms, and lateral and sagittal tele-X-ray images produced by special X-ray devices. In spite of the progress reported in the last few years in the field of X-ray papers, they cannot be recommended for clinical applications. (orig./MG)

  15. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  16. X-RAY SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS OF SILICON OXIDES ON SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, R; Lucas, C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the X-ray reflectivity and the X-ray scattering in the tails of the Bragg reflections from samples of silicon wafers with oxide layers produced by varying techniques and thicknesses. The measurements were performed by using a triple crystal spectrometer on a rotating anode X-ray source. The advantages of using a triple crystal spectrometer for these measurements are high resolution even when the surfaces are not macroscopically flat and a clear separation of the...

  17. GENERATION OF SUBPICOSECOND X-RAY PULSES IN STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supicosecond x-ray pulses are routinely produced at ALS, BESSY and SLS with slicing technique and used in pump-probe experiments with controlled delay between laser pump pulses and x-ray probe pulses. New development aiming for a production of a subpicosecond x-ray pulses using rf orbit deflection technique is under way at APS. Both techniques will be reviewed here

  18. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, S; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g., conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is $\\sim 0.1 \\%$ at energies $\\gtrsim kT$. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scale...

  19. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  20. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  1. Three dimensional digital X-ray microtomography with a microfocal X-ray generator and an MWPC area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray microscopy offers many potential applications in the life sciences and non-destructive testing for the study of small (micron-sized) structures. Digital capture of the X-ray images offers further possibilities for image processing and for tomography. We have combined a microfocal X-ray generator with a multi-step avalanche/multiwire proportional counter to produce a digital X-ray microscope. Spatial resolution down to around 10 microns has been observed. The digital data sets obtained from the system have been used to develop and explore 3-D tomographic images of an insect are presented, produced by a cone beam algorithm. (author)

  2. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  3. X-ray spectra for mamography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of Monte Carlo methods the X-ray spectra that produce Mammography equipment have been obtained. The mammographs are widely used with the purpose of diagnosing the cancer of the mammary glands. Different makers and mammographs models are distinguished by the voltage capacity and the current, exist as well as in the target type and filter. The targets that are used are Mo, Rh and W and the filters are Mo, Rh, Al and Be. In this work the results obtained by means of the MCNP code of the X-ray spectra take place when an electron beam of 28 keV is made impact on Mo, Rh and W targets, as well as the spectra that result of filtering these X rays using different types of filters. The resulting spectra contain the continuous spectrum of the stopping radiation, as well as the X rays characteristic of the used target. The utility of estimating the spectra of X rays by means of Monte Carlo is that it can use to estimate the absorbed dose by the gland, as well as the absorbed dose by other organs. It also allows to calculate the detector response. (Author)

  4. Mammography spectrum measurement using an x-ray diffraction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a diffraction spectrometer developed by Deslattes for the determination of mammographic kV is extended to the measurement of accurate, relative x-ray spectra. Raw x-ray spectra (photon fluence versus energy) are determined by passing an x-ray beam through a bent quartz diffraction crystal, and the diffracted x-rays are detected by an x-ray intensifying screen coupled to a charge coupled device. Two nonlinear correction procedures, one operating on the energy axis and the other operating on the fluence axis, are described and performed on measured x-ray spectra. The corrected x-ray spectra are compared against tabulated x-ray spectra measured under nearly identical conditions. Results indicate that the current device is capable of producing accurate relative x-ray spectral measurements in the energy region from 12 keV to 40 keV, which represents most of the screen-film mammography energy range. Twelve keV is the low-energy cut-off, due to the design geometry of the device. The spectrometer was also used to determine the energy-dependent x-ray mass attenuation coefficients for aluminium, with excellent results in the 12-30 keV range. Additional utility of the device for accurately determining the attenuation characteristics of various normal and abnormal breast tissues and phantom substitutes is anticipated. (author)

  5. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  6. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  7. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  8. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E≥5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called open-quotes jelly rollclose quotes or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes

  9. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  10. X-ray emission from single Wolf-Rayet stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes our knowledge of the X-ray emission from single WN, WC, and WO stars. These stars have relatively modest X-ray luminosities, typically not exceeding L_sun. The analysis of X-ray spectra usually reveals thermal plasma with temperatures reaching a few 10 MK. X-ray variability is detected in some WN stars. At present we don't fully understand how X-ray radiation in produced in WR stars, albeit there are some promising research avenues, such as the presence of CIRs in the winds of some stars. To fully understand WR stars we need to unravel mechanisms of X-ray production in their winds.

  11. Comparative X-ray diffraction study of the crystalline microstructure of tetragonal and monoclinic vanadium-zirconium dioxide solid solutions produced from gel precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructural characteristics of solid solutions, prepared by heating dried gel precursors with nominal compositions VxZr1-xO2 (0≤x≤0.1) at 723 and 1573 K, were determined from X-ray diffraction patterns. The crystalline microstructure of the resulting specimens, characterized by a prevalent crystallite shape, a volume-weighted crystallite size distribution and a second-order lattice strain distribution, was found to depend on the vanadium content. A characteristic feature of all size distributions was their bimodality, explained as a result of transformations between tetragonal and monoclinic phases during thermal treatment. A comparative study of the microstructure of both zirconia phases has been carried out, enabling reconstruction of a probable course of crystallization of both pure and vanadium-doped zirconias: on heating a sample, nucleation and the early growth stages involve crystallites of both phases; then on annealing and cooling, the crystallites of one phase transform into the other, depending on the thermal treatment temperature. Each logarithmic normal component of the crystallite size distribution of the resulting phase can be attributed to one of these processes. The limit of solubility of vanadium in tetragonal and monoclinic zirconia is estimated from the microstructural characteristics. (orig.)

  12. Photoionized plasmas induced in neon with extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray pulses produced using low and high energy laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 23 Hery St., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague, Czech Republic and Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    A comparative study of photoionized plasmas created by two soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (SXR/EUV) laser plasma sources with different parameters is presented. The two sources are based on double-stream Xe/He gas-puff targets irradiated with high (500 J/0.3 ns) and low energy (10 J/1 ns) laser pulses. In both cases, the SXR/EUV beam irradiated the gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the radiation pulse. Irradiation of gases resulted in formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the SXR/EUV range. The measured Ne plasma radiation spectra are dominated by emission lines corresponding to radiative transitions in singly charged ions. A significant difference concerns origin of the lines: K-shell or L-shell emissions occur in case of the high and low energy irradiating system, respectively. In high energy system, the electron density measurements were also performed by laser interferometry, employing a femtosecond laser system. A maximum electron density for Ne plasma reached the value of 2·10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. For the low energy system, a detection limit was too high for the interferometric measurements, thus only an upper estimation for electron density could be made.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for generating x-ray spectra in mammography is presented. This model used the ITS version 3 Monte Carlo code for simulating the radiation transport. Various target/filter combinations such as tungsten/aluminium, molybdenum/molybdenum, molybdenum/rhodium and rhodium/rhodium were used in the simulation. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were included in the model. The simulated x-ray emission spectra were compared with two sets of spectra, those of Boone et al (1997 Med. Phys. 24 1863-74) and IPEM report 78. The χ2 test was used for the overall goodness of fit of the spectral data. There is good agreement between the simulated x-ray spectra and the comparison spectra as the test yielded a probability value of nearly 1. When the transmitted x-ray spectra for specific target/filter combinations were generated and compared with a measured molybdenum/rhodium spectrum and spectra generated in IPEM report 78, close agreement is also observed. This was demonstrated by the probability value for the χ2 test being almost 1 for all the cases. However, minor differences between the simulated spectra and the 'standard' ones are observed. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray spectra in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.P. [Department of Optometry and Radiography, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China). E-mail: benngkp at netvigator.com; Kwok, C.S.; Ng, K.P.; Tang, F.H. [Department of Optometry and Radiography, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2000-05-01

    A model for generating x-ray spectra in mammography is presented. This model used the ITS version 3 Monte Carlo code for simulating the radiation transport. Various target/filter combinations such as tungsten/aluminium, molybdenum/molybdenum, molybdenum/rhodium and rhodium/rhodium were used in the simulation. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic x-ray production were included in the model. The simulated x-ray emission spectra were compared with two sets of spectra, those of Boone et al (1997 Med. Phys. 24 1863-74) and IPEM report 78. The {chi}{sup 2} test was used for the overall goodness of fit of the spectral data. There is good agreement between the simulated x-ray spectra and the comparison spectra as the test yielded a probability value of nearly 1. When the transmitted x-ray spectra for specific target/filter combinations were generated and compared with a measured molybdenum/rhodium spectrum and spectra generated in IPEM report 78, close agreement is also observed. This was demonstrated by the probability value for the {chi}{sup 2} test being almost 1 for all the cases. However, minor differences between the simulated spectra and the 'standard' ones are observed. (author)

  15. Method research of high Z materials detection based on high energy X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to detect nuclear materials the study of the atomic number (Z) identification method based on scattering spectrum analysis and high Z characteristic of special nuclear materials was presented. The method can identify materials by detecting and analyzing positron annihilation photons, bremsstrahlung photons and Compton scattered photons produced by the interaction between X-ray and matter. The results of Monte Carlo simulation show that the method can discriminate Z effectively, especially for high Z materials. An experimental facility based on 7 MeV linac was set up for feasibility study and scattering spectra were observed with a LaBr3 (Ce) detector. Preliminary results verify that high Z materials can be discriminated successfully. (authors)

  16. Synchrotron X-Ray Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles for Tumor Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly concentrated gold nanoparticles (20 ± 5 nm) were produced by an x-ray irradiation method. The particles were then examined for the interactions between gold and tumor cells under x-ray radiation conditions. The biological effects of gold nanoparticles were investigated in terms of the internalization, cytotoxicity and capability to enhance x-ray radiotherapy. The results of this investigation indicated that x-ray derived gold nanoparticles were nontoxic to CT-26 cell line and immobilized within cytoplasm. The irradiation experiments provided further evidence that gold nanoparticles were capable of enhancing the efficiency of radiotherapy

  17. Laser beam plasma pinch x-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system is provided for producing plasma pinch X-rays usable in X-ray lithography. Ionized heated plasma vapor is repeatably generated directly from solid material by impingement of a plurality of circumferentially spaced laser beams to generate an annulus of plasma. X-rays are generated by passing high current through the annular plasma in an axial gap between the solid material target electrode and another electrode, causing magnetic field radial inward plasma pinching to a central constricted area further heating the plasma and emitting X-rays. A central axially directed laser may further heat the plasma in the pinched area

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing ...

  19. X-ray Dynamic Defectoscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Visschers, J.; Jakůbek, J.; Ponchut, C.

    Orosei : IMC S.r.l., 2001. s. 47. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /3./. 23.09.2001-27.09.2001, Orosei] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/D064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 210000018 Keywords : X-ray Defectoscopy * Damage * X-ray Detectors Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  20. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray tube is connected to several different image processing devices in X-ray diagnostic equipment. Only a single organ selector is allocated to it, for which the picture parameters for each image processing device are selected. The choice of the correct combination of picture parameters is made by means of a selector switch. (DG)

  1. X-ray tube arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tube is described incorporating an elongated target/ anode over which the electron beam is deflected and from which x-rays are emitted. Improved methods of monitoring and controlling the amplitude of the beam deflection are presented. (U.K.)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  5. Coherent control of pulsed X-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, M. F.; Reis, D. A.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Adams, B.; Caraher, J. M.; Clarke, R.; Conover, C. W. S.; Dufresne, E. M.; Merlin, R.; Stoica, V.; Wahlstrand, J. K.

    2001-10-01

    Synchrotrons produce continuous trains of closely spaced X-ray pulses. Application of such sources to the study of atomic-scale motion requires efficient modulation of these beams on timescales ranging from nanoseconds to femtoseconds. However, ultrafast X-ray modulators are not generally available. Here we report efficient subnanosecond coherent switching of synchrotron beams by using acoustic pulses in a crystal to modulate the anomalous low-loss transmission of X-ray pulses. The acoustic excitation transfers energy between two X-ray beams in a time shorter than the synchrotron pulse width of about 100ps. Gigahertz modulation of the diffracted X-rays is also observed. We report different geometric arrangements, such as a switch based on the collision of two counter-propagating acoustic pulses: this doubles the X-ray modulation frequency, and also provides a means of observing a localized transient strain inside an opaque material. We expect that these techniques could be scaled to produce subpicosecond pulses, through laser-generated coherent optical phonon modulation of X-ray diffraction in crystals. Such ultrafast capabilities have been demonstrated thus far only in laser-generated X-ray sources, or through the use of X-ray streak cameras.

  6. Soft X-ray production by photon scattering in pulsating binary neutron star sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.; Meszaros, P.; Alexander, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed as a source of soft (less than 1 keV) radiation in binary pulsating X-ray sources, in the form of photon scattering which leaves the electron in an excited Landau level. In a plasma with parameters typical of such sources, the low-energy X-ray emissivity of this mechanism far exceeds that of bremsstrahlung. This copious source of soft photons is quite adequate to provide the seed photons needed to explain the power-law hard X-ray spectrum by inverse Comptonization on the hot electrons at the base of the accretion column.

  7. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The beam line has a unity magnification toroidal mirror that produces a 50 by 200 micron focus just inside an x-ray hutch at the position of an x-y slit. The beam path in the hutch consists of source defining slits, a four bounce Ge or Si monochromator, followed by elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror pair which focuses the beam from the slits to sub micron dimensions (0.8 x 0.8 microns). An important feature of this arrangement is the ability to switch between white and monochromatic beams that are essential for characterizing crystals or crystal grains in the sub-micron range. Since sample rotation is fixed they have facilities for precision translation of the specimen to allow them to scan different crystal regions or grains. The sample stage rests on a state of the art six-circle diffractometer equipped with encoders in the main rotation stages calibrated to a second of arc. The detector is a 4K x 4K CCD (Bruker) with a 9 x 9 cm view area mounted on a detector arm that can be positioned around the sample. The detector itself can also be positioned to better than 1 micron along the detector arm. Using this facility they have been able to measure the orientation structure of single grains of passivated or buried Al interconnect test structures. Such structures or their equivalents are important in connecting individual components on integrated circuits. Their sub-micron dimensions result in very high current densities that can result in interconnect failures. The variation in sub-grain structure in a single grain is rich in detail. They have obtained detailed maps of misorientations in single grains using white beam Laue diffraction patterns From these they have been

  8. On the Use of Wide-Angle Energy-Sensitive Detectors in White-Beam X-Ray Single-Crystal Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Staun Olsen, J.; Gerward, Leif

    1980-01-01

    The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation.......The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation....

  9. An X-ray Temperature Map of Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1997-01-01

    We present an X-ray temperature map of the Coma cluster of galaxies obtained with the ROSAT PSPC. As expected from the X-ray surface brightness distribution the intracluster gas of Coma is not isothermal. The temperature structure resembles a bow shock of hot gas produced by the passage of the subcluster around NGC 4839 through the main cluster, confirming hydrodynamical simulations.

  10. Anomalous nonlinear X-ray Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Matthias; Trigo, Mariano; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella A.; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B.; Reis, David A.

    2015-11-01

    X-ray scattering is typically used as a weak linear atomic-scale probe of matter. At high intensities, such as produced at free-electron lasers, nonlinearities can become important, and the probe may no longer be considered weak. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions: the concerted nonlinear Compton scattering of two identical hard X-ray photons producing a single higher-energy photon. The X-ray intensity reached 4 × 1020 W cm-2, corresponding to an electric field well above the atomic unit of strength and within almost four orders of magnitude of the quantum-electrodynamic critical field. We measure a signal from solid beryllium that scales quadratically in intensity, consistent with simultaneous non-resonant two-photon scattering from nearly-free electrons. The high-energy photons show an anomalously large redshift that is incompatible with a free-electron approximation for the ground-state electron distribution, suggesting an enhanced nonlinearity for scattering at large momentum transfer.

  11. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division I.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  12. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  13. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Tenhunen, Mikko (Dept. of Physics, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: jani.keyrilainen@hus.fi; Bravin, Alberto (Bio-medical Beamline ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Fernandez, Manuel (High Brilliance Beamline ID2, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Virkkunen, Pekka (Dept. of Radiology, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Suortti, Pekka (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2010-10-15

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  14. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  15. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  16. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  17. L X-ray intensity ratios for high Z elements induced with X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Limin

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intensity ratios I(Lα1,2)/I(Lβ1,2), I(Lα1,2)/I(Lγ) and I(Lβ1,2)/I(Lγ) for elements Ta, W, Au and Pb by 13.1 keV bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, experimental values were compared with the theoretical results and other experimental results. Theoretical results of the intensity ratios were calculated with theoretical subshell photoionization cross sections, fractional X-ray emission rates, fluorescence yields, and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. Good agreement can be observed between experimental values and theoretical results. Comparing with L1 and L2 subshells, the ionization cross section of L3 subshell shows a large increase for Ta and W with the variation of excitation energy from 59.5 keV to 13.1 keV.

  18. X-ray measurements at the stand-alone electron cooler for LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the X-rays emitted in the energy region from 2 to 30 keV from the electron beam in the electron cooler built for the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). Besides an intense continuum of bremsstrahlung photons, a high rate of characteristic X-rays is also observed. A sensitive dependence of the intensity of these lines on the parameters of the electron cooler, such as beam energy, loss current, and the residual pressure is found. This gives information about the parts of the cooler which are hit by electrons, in particular by those in the loss current, and therefore demonstrates that X-rays could be a sensitive diagnostics for electron beam losses. The results give indications of the background which can be expected in X-ray measurements of electron-ion recombination in the cooler. A beneficial use of this X-ray background could be for wavelength calibration. (orig.)

  19. Carbon nanotubes and fullerites in high-energy and X-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that the unique structures of carbon nanotubes and single-crystals of C60 fullerenes may have applications to X-ray, neutron and high-energy particle physics, based on channeling, Bragg diffraction and coherent radiation. These are reviewed, pointing out the peculiarities and advantages of nanocrystals compared to ordinary crystals. New applications are explored: X-rays and neutron channeling, undulator radiation in periodically bent nanotubes, 'channeled' transition radiation. Quantum and classical channeling, channeling in bent nanocrystals, Bragg scattering of X-rays and neutrons, channeling radiation, coherent bremsstrahlung, parametric X-ray and nanotube undulator radiation are particularly studied using both analytical and Monte-Carlo methods. Continuous potentials, electron densities, transverse energy levels, and spectra of various types of coherent radiation are calculated. Large dechanneling lengths of positive particles, bending efficiencies, reflecting coefficients of soft X-rays and PXR yields are predicted. Principles of particle detectors using photo- and secondary electron emissions are discussed

  20. X-ray quasars and the X-ray background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Einstein X-ray observations of a sample of 202 radio-and optically-selected quasars due to Ku, Helfand and Lucy and to Zamorani et al. are analysed. Correlations between X-ray, optical and radio luminosities are examined. The contribution of radio-loud quasars to the 2-keV X-ray background is estimated using high-frequency radio-source counts, and the contribution due to radio-quiet, optically bright quasars using optical counts. It is shown that radio-loud quasars and radio-quiet optically bright quasars together contribute approximately 15 per cent of the observed 2-keV X-ray background. The contribution of optically faint radio-quiet quasars is uncertain, but may be limited to a maximum of approximately 30 per cent if recent indications of a flattening in optical counts at faint magnitudes are correct. (author)

  1. Coherence effects in nuclear bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, H

    2002-01-01

    The production of nuclear bremsstrahlung (Egamma > 30 MeV) has been studied in heavy-ion collisions, as well as proton and alpha-particle collisions with nuclei. In heavy-ion reactions the measured photon spectra show an exponential shape dominated by the incoherent sum of photons produced in first-

  2. X-ray diffraction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides an x-ray diffraction apparatus permitting the rotation of the divergence sit in conjunction with the rotation of the x-ray irradiated specimen, whereby the dimensions of the x-ray irradiated portion of the specimen remain substantially constant during the rotation of the specimen. In a preferred embodiment, the divergence slit is connected to a structural element linked with a second structural element connected to the specimen such that the divergence slit rotates at a lower angular speed than the specimen

  3. X-ray crystal interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various configurations of the X-ray crystal interferometer are reviewed. The interferometer applications considered include metrology, the measurement of fundamental physical constants, the study of weakly absorbing phase objects, time-resolved diagnostics, the determination of hard X-ray beam parameters, and the characterization of structural defects in the context of developing an X-ray Michelson interferometer. The three-crystal Laue interferometer (LLL-interferometer), its design, and the experimental opportunities it offers are given particular attention. (instruments and methods of investigation)

  4. Pb isotopes induced Bremsstrahlung in bone, muscle and teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The few isotopes Pb such as 210Pb, 211Pb, 212Pb, 213Pb, 214Pb and 215Pb are good beta emitters. These beta emitting Pb isotopes induces Bremsstrahlung radiation and could have different energies and intensities. The Bremsstrahlung yield is a function of two components namely internal Bremsstrahlung and external Bremsstrahlung. The intensity of external Bremsstrahlung (EB) largely depends on the energy of the emitted beta particles an atomic number of the surrounding matrix material. On the other hand, internal Bremsstrahlung component inherently depends on the interaction of the emitted beta particle with the nucleus of the source radionuclide itself. The shapes of Bremsstrahlung spectra are a basic ingredient in the understanding and quantification of beta-ray dosimetry. It is useful to have a convenient reference on the shapes of Bremsstrahlung spectra from various nuclides. The Bremsstrahlung spectra produced by Pb beta isotopes such as 210Pb, 211Pb, 212Pb, 213Pb, 214Pb and 215Pb in bone, muscle and teeth are computed. The computed spectral distributions are presented. The spectral shapes are primarily responsible for variations in the shapes of depth-dose distributions. They are intended to provide a quick and convenient reference for spectral shapes and to give an indication of the wide variation in these shapes. The computed Bremsstrahlung spectrum is used in the evaluation of Bremsstrahlung dose. The evaluated beta Bremsstrahlung dose as a function distance for the studied nuclides is also presented. The beta Bremsstrahlung dose decreases with the increase of distance. (author)

  5. Polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission due to electron pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, S. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.; Churazov, E. M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Astrophysical plasmas are typically magnetized, with the Larmor radii of the charged particles many orders of magnitude smaller than their collisional mean free paths. The fundamental properties of such plasmas, e.g. conduction and viscosity, may depend on the instabilities driven by the anisotropy of the particle distribution functions and operating at scales comparable to the Larmor scales. We discuss a possibility that the pressure anisotropy of thermal electrons could produce polarization of thermal bremsstrahlung emission. In particular, we consider coherent large-scale motions in galaxy clusters to estimate the level of anisotropy driven by stretching of the magnetic-field lines by plasma flow and by heat fluxes associated with thermal gradients. Our estimate of the degree of polarization is ˜0.1 per cent at energies ≳kT. While this value is too low for the forthcoming generation of X-ray polarimeters, it is potentially an important proxy for the processes taking place at extremely small scales, which are impossible to resolve spatially. The absence of the effect at the predicted level may set a lower limit on the electron collisionality in the ICM. At the same time, the small value of the effect implies that it does not preclude the use of clusters as (unpolarized) calibration sources for X-ray polarimeters at this level of accuracy.

  6. Angular resolution measurements at SPring-8 of a hard X-ray optic for the New Hard X-ray Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Spiga, D.; Raimondi, L.; Furuzawa, A.; Basso, S; Binda, R.; Borghi, G.; Cotroneo, V.; Grisoni, G.; Kunieda, H.; Marioni, F.; Matsumoto, H; Mori, H.; Miyazawa, T.; B. Negri; Orlandi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with on- ground X-ray facilities...

  7. K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl and Lα, Lβ X-ray production cross sections of Ba by 6-30 keV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl and Lα, Lβ X-ray production cross sections of Ba by 6-30 keV electron impact have been measured. The target was prepared by evaporating the thin film of compound BaCl2 to the thick pure carbon substrate. The effects of multiple scattering of electrons penetrating the target films, electrons reflected from the thick pure carbon substrates and Bremsstrahlung photons produced when incident electrons impacted on the targets are corrected by using Monte Carlo method. For Ba L-shell X-ray characteristic peaks, the spectra were fitted by using spectrum-fitting program ALLFIT to extract more accurately the Lα and Lβ peak counts. The experimental results, reported here for the first time in the energy region of 6-30 keV, were compared with some theoretical results developed recently.

  8. Polycapillary X-ray optics for microdiffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycapillary optics, i.e. shaped arrays consisting of hundreds of thousands of hollow glass capillary tubes, can be used to redirect, collimate or focus X-ray beams. X-rays emitted over a large angular range from conventional laboratory-based sources can be transformed into a beam with a small angular divergence or focused onto a small sample or sample area. Convergent beams of X-rays, with convergence angles as high as 15 , have been produced using polycapillary X-ray optics. Focused-spot sizes as small as 20 μm have been achieved, with flux densities two orders of magnitude larger than that produced by pinhole collimation. This results in a comparable decrease in data collection times because of the increase in direct-beam intensity and reciprocal-space coverage. In addition, the optics can be employed to reduce background and provide more convenient alignment geometries. The inverse dependence of the critical angle for total external reflection on photon energy results in suppression of high-energy photons. This effect can be employed to allow the use of higher tube potentials to increase the characteristic line emission and has also been employed to increase significantly the Kα/Kβ ratio in Cu radiation. Measurements of X-ray diffraction data and crystallographic analyses have been performed for systems ranging from elemental crystals to proteins. Data from a lysozyme protein 'standard' with a slightly convergent beam, taken in 3 min per frame with 2 oscillation with a 2.8 kW source, refined to an intensity variance of 5% compared to a standard data set. High-quality data were also obtained with a 0.03 kW fixed-anode source and a 2 convergent lens in 5 min per frame. (orig.)

  9. X-Ray Morphology,Kinematics and Geometry of the Eridanus Soft X-Ray Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyu; Burrows, David N.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Snowden, Steve L.; Penprase, Bryan E.

    1994-12-01

    We present mosaics of X-ray intensity maps and spectral fit results for selected regions of the Eridanus soft X-ray Enhancement (EXE), as well as kinematics of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region and geometrical properties of this X-ray emitting bubble. The work is based on pointed observations with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, 21 cm observations with the NRAO 140 foot telescope at Green Bank and interstellar Na D line observations with the NOAO Coude Feed telescope at Kitt Peak. The ROSAT pointed observations examine two regions of the EXE. The first is an X-ray absorption lane produced by an IR filament which is located at galactic coordinates of about (199(deg) , -45(deg) ). The second is in the vicinity of the northern (galactic) boundary of the 1/4 keV EXE, at galactic coordinates of about (200(deg) , -25(deg) ). Both our spatial and spectral analysis suggest that variations in emission measure and NH are primarily reponsible for the observed variations of the X-ray intensity. Using 100mu intensities obtained from IRAS maps and NH column densities obtained from our X-ray spectral fits, we find 100 microns/NH ratios across the IR filament that are compatible with typical high latitude values. Maps of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region at 21 cm reveal that these clouds may belong to two different expanding systems, with one possibly associated with our Local Bubble and the other with the boundary of the EXE. Combination of 21 cm data with interstellar Na D line observations toward stars in the directions of some of the X-ray absorbing clouds along (l,b) ~ (200(deg) ,-40(deg) ) indicate that the near side of the EXE is farther than 151 pc and the distance to the center of the EXE at this latitude is about 226 pc. The density and the thermal pressure found for this X-ray emitting superbubble are 0.015 cm(-3) and 4.9 times 10(4) cm(-3) K.

  10. Efficient lensing element for x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient x-ray lens with an effective speed of order less than approximately f/50 for lambda greater than approximately 10 A x-rays is described. Fabrication of this lensing element appears feasible using existing microfabrication technology. Diffraction and refraction are coupled in a single element to achieve efficient x-ray concentration into a single order focal spot. Diffraction is used to produce efficient ray bending (without absorption) while refraction is used only to provide appropriate phase adjustment among the various diffraction orders to insure what is essentially a single order output. The mechanism for ray bending (diffraction) is decoupled from the absorption mechanism. Refraction is used only to achieve small shifts in phase so that the associated attenuation need not be prohibitive. The x-ray lens might be described as a Blazed Fresnel Phase Plate (BFPP) with a spatially distributed phase shift within each Fresnel zone. The spatial distribution of the phase shifts is chosen to concentrate essentially all of the unabsorbed energy into a single focal spot. The BFPP transforms the incident plane wave into a converging spherical wave having an amplitude modulation which is periodic in r2. As a result of the periodic amplitude modulation, the BFPP will diffract energy into foci other than the first order real focus. In cases of small absorption such effects are negligible and practically all the unabsorbed energy is directed into the first order real focus

  11. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays over a century ago the techniques applied to the engineering of X-ray sources have remained relatively unchanged. From the inception of thermionic electron sources, which, due to simplicity of fabrication, remain central to almost all X-ray applications, there have been few fundamental technological advances. However, with the emergence of ever more demanding medical and inspection techniques, including computed tomography and tomosynthesis, security inspection, high throughput manufacturing and radiotherapy, has resulted in a considerable level of interest in the development of new fabrication methods. The use of conventional thermionic sources is limited by their slow temporal response and large physical size. In response, field electron emission has emerged as a promising alternative means of deriving a highly controllable electron beam of a well-defined distribution. When coupled to the burgeoning field of nanomaterials, and in particular, carbon nanotubes, such systems present a unique technological opportunity. This review provides a summary of the current state-of-the-art in carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray sources. We detail the various fabrication techniques and functional advantages associated with their use, including the ability to produce ever smaller electron beam assembles, shaped cathodes, enhanced temporal stability and emergent fast-switching pulsed sources. We conclude with an overview of some of the commercial progress made towards the realisation of an innovative and disruptive technology.

  12. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source

  13. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and ...

  15. Duodenal X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication provides an overview of duodenal X-ray diagnostics with the aid of barium meals in 1362 patients. The introducing paragraphs deal with the topographic anatomy of the region and the methodics of X-ray investigation. The chapter entitled ''processes at the duodenum itself'' describes mainly ulcers, diverticula, congenital anomalies, tumors and inflammations. The neighbourhood processes comprise in the first place diseases having their origin at the pancreas and bile ducts. As a conclusion, endoscopic rectograde cholangio-pancreaticography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are pointed out as advanced X-ray investigation methods. In the annex of X-ray images some of the described phenomena are shown in exemplary manner. (orig./MG)

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like a photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . ... when feasible to protect from radiation. You must hold very still and may be asked to keep ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  20. Picosecond x-ray science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report discusses the exciting times for short pulse X-rays and the current users of the technology in the United States. Tracking nuclear motions with X-rays transcends scientific disciplines and includes Biology, Materials Science, Condensed Matter and Chemistry. 1 picosecond accesses many phenomena previously hidden at 100ps. Synchrotron advantage over laser plasma and LCLS is that it's easily tunable. There is a large and diverse user community of this technology that is growing rapidly. A working group is being formed to implement 'fast track' Phases 1 and 2 which includes tunable, polarized, monochromatic, focused X-rays; variable pulse length (1 to 100ps) and 1 kHz, 109 X-rays/s with 1% bandwidth. ERL would be a major advance for ultrafast time-resolved studies.

  1. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru; Klestov, S. A., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  4. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ... around joints, and in evaluating the hips of children with congenital problems. top of page This page ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  9. X-ray thickness gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New design of X-ray gauge of rolled product thickness is suggested. It is supplied with self-compensation unit, removing the error, caused by changes of half-cycles of supply voltage of radiation source

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray tube is connected to ... equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  17. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  18. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  19. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  20. The Jefferson Lab Sub-picosecond X-ray Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, J. R.; Benson, S. V.; Bohn, C. L.; Douglas, D. R.; Dylla, H. F.; Gubeli, J. F.; Happek, U.; Jordan, K.; Krafft, G. A.; Neil, G. R.; Piot, P.; Shinn, M. D.; Williams, G. P.

    2003-08-01

    The kW-class infrared (IR) Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Lab had the capability of producing intracavity Thomson scattering of the IR off the electron beam thus producing high average flux, sub-picosecond x-rays. We have measured these x-rays and demonstrated the energy tuneability range from 3.5 keV to 18 keV. The corresponding flux and brightness has been estimated and will be discussed. This year, 2002, the FEL was disassembled and has been reconfigured to produce 10 kW average power IR. We present the estimated x-ray capabilities for the new FEL and discuss potential applications.

  1. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  2. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  3. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  4. Absorbed dose distributions in a tissue-equivalent absorber for Bremsstrahlung produced at the beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Pisharody, M; Berkvens, P; Colomp, P

    2000-01-01

    The absorbed-dose distributions for Bremsstrahlung, incident on a tissue-equivalent phantom, were measured with LiF : Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at two insertion device beamlines of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The measurements were carried out for two different electron beam energies of 4 and 6 GeV. The corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra and power were measured using a high-resolution lead glass total absorption calorimeter. The results are compared with similar measurements carried out at other facilities. The normalized Bremsstrahlung absorbed dose in a cross-sectional area of 100 mm sup sup 2 , at a depth of 150 mm of the phantom, was measured as 6.1 and 3.6 kGy h sup sup - sup sup 1 W sup sup - sup sup 1 for the corresponding Bremsstrahlung spectra of 4 and 6 GeV.

  5. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  6. X-ray diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A falling load type X-ray diagnostic apparatus comprises a low voltage power source, AC-DC converting means connected to the low voltage power source so as to apply a rectified low DC voltage, chopping means connected to the AC-DC converting means and chopping said DC voltage into a low AC voltage, high voltage applying means for transforming said low AC voltage into a high AC voltage, said high AC voltage being applied as a tube voltage to an X-ray tube from which X-rays are irradiated toward an object to be examined, means for controlling a filament heating power of the X-ray tube, programming means for supplying a control signal to said filament heating control means so as to reduce the emission current of said X-ray tube during the irradiation, and chopper control means for controlling the chopping ratio of said chopping means by evaluating said rectified DC voltage with a preset tube voltage generated in said programming means, said programming means compensating said tube voltage by receiving said control signal in such a manner that said tube voltage is maintained substantially constant during the irradiation by varying said preset tube voltage so as to control the chopping ratio based upon the reduction of the filament heating power for the X-ray tube

  7. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/ΔE is greater than 104 and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally

  8. The Origin of Diffuse X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray Emission from the Galactic Center Region: Cosmic Ray Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Wardle, M; Lis, D C

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) The inner couple hundred pcs of our Galaxy is characterized by significant amount of synchrotron-emitting gas, which appears to co-exist with a large reservoir of molecular gas. The spatial correlation between fluorescent Fe K-alpha line emission at 6.4 keV and molecular line emission from Galactic center molecular clouds has been explained as reflected X-rays from a past outburst of Sgr A*. Here we present multi-wavelength study of a representative Galactic center cloud Sgr C using Chandra, VLA and FCRAO. We note a correlation between the nonthermal radio filaments in Sgr C and the X-ray features, suggesting that the two are related. We account for this distribution in terms of the impact of the relativistic particles from local (nonthermal filaments) and extended sources with diffuse neutral gas producing both a nonthermal bremsstrahlung X-ray continuum emission, as well as diffuse 6.4 keV line emission. The production rate of Fe Kalpha photons associated with the injection of electrons into a cl...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video ... Ultrasound Video: Pediatric MRI Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: About Us | ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: ... Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: ...

  11. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  12. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, M.V.; Shilin, Yu.N.; Zheludeva, S.I. E-mail: zheludeva@ns.crys.ras.ru; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O.P.; Arutynyan, E.H.; Kheiker, D.M.; Kreines, A.Ya.; Lider, V.V.; Pashaev, E.M.; Shilina, N.Yu.; Shishkov, V.A

    2000-06-21

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  13. Exploring coherent phenomena and energy discrimination in X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Thomas

    2011-05-04

    Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the generation of photons in materials that are selected for different applications according to their densities, dimensions, and atomic numbers. The photons produced in these targets are commonly detected by measuring the integrated amount of energy released in films or digital imaging systems. This thesis aims at extending these two paradigms. First, it is shown that the use of single-crystalline, i.e. well-ordered targets, can significantly soften photon spectra created by megavoltage electrons when compared to usual targets. The reason for this is an effect called ''coherent bremsstrahlung''. It is shown that this type of radiation bears the potential of increasing the quality of megavoltage images and reducing radiation dose for image guided radiotherapy. Second, new spectroscopic pixel detectors of the Medipix2 family operated with cadmium telluride sensors are characterised and thus potential benefits and difficulties for X-ray imaging are investigated. Besides describing in detail how to calibrate these detectors, emphasis is placed on determining their energy responses, modulation transfer functions, and detective quantum efficiencies. Requirements for photon counting megavoltage imaging are discussed. The detector systems studied are finally used to perform spectral computed tomography and to illustrate the benefits of energy discrimination for coherent scatter imaging. (orig.)

  14. Exploring coherent phenomena and energy discrimination in X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional X-ray imaging is based on the generation of photons in materials that are selected for different applications according to their densities, dimensions, and atomic numbers. The photons produced in these targets are commonly detected by measuring the integrated amount of energy released in films or digital imaging systems. This thesis aims at extending these two paradigms. First, it is shown that the use of single-crystalline, i.e. well-ordered targets, can significantly soften photon spectra created by megavoltage electrons when compared to usual targets. The reason for this is an effect called ''coherent bremsstrahlung''. It is shown that this type of radiation bears the potential of increasing the quality of megavoltage images and reducing radiation dose for image guided radiotherapy. Second, new spectroscopic pixel detectors of the Medipix2 family operated with cadmium telluride sensors are characterised and thus potential benefits and difficulties for X-ray imaging are investigated. Besides describing in detail how to calibrate these detectors, emphasis is placed on determining their energy responses, modulation transfer functions, and detective quantum efficiencies. Requirements for photon counting megavoltage imaging are discussed. The detector systems studied are finally used to perform spectral computed tomography and to illustrate the benefits of energy discrimination for coherent scatter imaging. (orig.)

  15. Multicell X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector for X-radiation or other ionizing radiation is described comprising a pair of curved metal bars lying in spaced apart parallel planes. Ceramic members are bonded to the respective bars in facing relationship. Each ceramic member has a plurality of radially extending circumferentially spaced grooves facing similar grooves in the other member. A plurality of electrode plates are held in juxtaposed and circumferentially spaced apart relationship by disposing their respective upper and lower edges in the grooves of opposed ceramic members. The faces of adjacent electrode plates define gas-filled gaps in which photoelectron-ion pairs are produced when radiation enters from the front edges of the plates. The above described assembly is disposed within a pressurized gas-filled chamber having an X-ray transmissive window adjacent the front edges of the plates. A cover encloses the chamber. It has insulator feed-throughs for connecting the electrode plates with external electric circuits. Photoelectrons and/or ions, created by the ionizing radiation, are collected on the electrode plates and thereby generate an electrical signal which corresponds to the incident ionizing radiation. (Auth.)

  16. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  17. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, J.; /DESY; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  18. X-rays and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is one of the specialized books issued by the Arab Atomic Energy Agency about the key technologies of interest to Arab researchers . The book contains 10 chapters as follows: the nature of X-ray, methods of production and measurement of X-rays, X-ray and materials, X-ray crystallography, X-ray and chemistry, X-ray and physics, biological effects of X-ray, radiography in the field of medicine and biology, X-ray in the field of industry, other applications in agriculture, imaging artifacts and paintings and geology.

  19. Discovery of Diffuse Hard X-ray Emission Around Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Terada, N.; Miyoshi, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Our discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter is reported. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations revealed several types of X-rays in the vicinity of Jupiter such as auroral and disk emission from Jupiter and faint diffuse X-rays from the Io Plasma Torus (see Bhardwaj et al. 2007 for review). To investigate possible diffuse hard X-ray emission around Jupiter with the highest sensitivity, we conducted data analysis of Suzaku XIS observations of Jupiter on Feb 2006. After removing satellite and planetary orbital motions, we detected a significant diffuse X-ray emission extending to 6 x 3 arcmin with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of 3e15 erg/s. The emitting region very well coincided with the Jupiter's radiation belts and the bright spot seemed to move according to the Io's motion. The 1-5 keV X-ray spectrum was represented by a simple power law model with a photon index of 1.4. Such a flat continuum strongly suggests non-thermal origin. We hence examined three mechanisms: bremsstrahlung by keV electrons, synchrotron emission by TeV electrons, and inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by MeV electrons. The former two can be rejected because of the X-ray spectral shape and implausible existence of TeV electrons around Jupiter, respectively. The last possibility was found to be possible because tens MeV electrons, which have been confirmed in inner radiation belts (Bolton et al. 2002), can kick solar photons to the keV energy range and provide a simple power-law continuum. We estimated an average electron density from the X-ray luminosity assuming the oblate spheroid shaped emitting region with 8 x 8 x 4 Jovian radii. The necessary density was 0.02 1/cm3 for 50 MeV electrons. Hence, our results may suggest a new particle acceleration phenomenon related to Io.

  20. Nucleus-Nucleus Bremsstrahlung from Ultrarelativistic Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph; Chikanian, Alexei; Sandweiss, Jack

    1998-01-01

    The bremsstrahlung produced when heavy nuclei collide is estimated for central collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Soft photons can be used to infer the rapidity distribution of the outgoing charge. An experimental design is outlined.