WorldWideScience

Sample records for breeze training transcript

  1. A speech-perception training tool to improve phonetic transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgitt, Noelle R.; Munson, Benjamin; Carney, Edward J.

    2005-09-01

    University instruction in phonetics requires students to associate a set of quasialphabetic symbols and diacritics with speech sounds. In the case of narrow phonetic transcription, students are required to associate symbols with sounds that do not function contrastively in the language. This learning task is challenging, given that students must discriminate among different variants of sounds that are not used to convey differences in lexical meaning. Consequently, many students fail to learn phonetic transcription to a level of proficiency needed for practical application (B. Munson and K. N. Brinkman, Am. J. Speech Lang. Path. [2004]). In an effort to improve students' phonetic transcription skills, a computerized training program was developed to trains students' discrimination and identification of selected phonetic contrasts. The design of the training tool was based on similar tools that have been used to train phonetic contrasts in second-language learners of English (e.g., A. Bradlow et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 3115 [1997]). It consists of multiple stages (bombardment, discrimination, identification) containing phonetic contrasts that students have identified as particularly difficult to perceive. This presentation will provide a demonstration of the training tool, and will present preliminary data on the efficacy of this tool in improving students' phonetic transcription abilities.

  2. The sea breeze circulation during the Land Sea Breeze Experiment (LASBEX) in central California.

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The sea breeze circulation was investigated using a combination of acoustic Doppler sodar, Doppler lidar and conventional observations in central California on the coast of Monterey Bay in September 1987. The study was called LASBEX (Land Sea Breeze EXperiment) and used the combined effort and resources of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), NOAA Wave Propagation Lab (WPL) and Naval Environmental Prediction Research Facility (NEPRF). A monostatic three-axis phased-array Doppler sodar was...

  3. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  4. Cosmic Rays in a Galactic Breeze

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the non-thermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through Galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a Galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to gamma-ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of $\\approx 200$ GV.

  5. Beaufort Sea Mesoscale Meteorology Modeling Study: Sea Breeze Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Beaufort Sea and its adjacent continental areas are prominent geographical features which are largely covered by sea ice on a seasonal basis over the ocean and bounded by the Brooks Range in the south on land. This complex geographical environment offers unique challenges for mesoscale meteorology modeling. Further oil development in this area requires improved understanding of the surface wind field, a crucial parameter for assessing and predicting dispersal and movement of oil spills. As thus a study has been established to investigate the mesoscale features of the surface wind field throughout this region, specifically in relation to the sea breeze and topographic effects. In this study, we focus on the sea breeze effect. Based on the analysis of observed surface winds at the weather stations along the Beaufort coast, as well as model simulations with the weather research and forecast model (WRF), we found that the sea breeze along the Beaufort Sea coast is of different from the temperate latitude. Due to the stable Arctic boundary layer (inversion), which is unfavorable for the vertical convection, the offshore flow aloft occurs at relatively low level. In addition, due to continuous solar radiation, the sea breeze along the Beaufort coast is not followed by the land breeze. However the sea breeze’s strength and horizontal extent demonstrate a diurnal variation. The wind direction shows clockwise turning from 12:00 AKST to 00:00 AKST. Sea breeze could be a dominant factor causing the wind variation along the Beaufort Sea coast.

  6. The Influence of Soil Moisture, Coastline Curvature, and Land-Breeze Circulations on Sea-Breeze Initiated Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David R.; Lynn, Barry H.; Boone, Aaron; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2000-01-01

    Idealized numerical simulations are performed with a coupled atmosphere/land-surface model to identify the roles of initial soil moisture, coastline curvature, and land breeze circulations on sea breeze initiated precipitation. Data collected on 27 July 1991 during the Convection and Precipitation Electrification Experiment (CAPE) in central Florida are used. The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud resolving model is coupled with the Goddard Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE) land surface model, thus providing a tool to simulate more realistically land-surface/atmosphere interaction and convective initiation. Eight simulations are conducted with either straight or curved coast-lines, initially homogeneous soil moisture or initially variable soil moisture, and initially homogeneous horizontal winds or initially variable horizontal winds (land breezes). All model simulations capture the diurnal evolution and general distribution of sea-breeze initiated precipitation over central Florida. The distribution of initial soil moisture influences the timing, intensity and location of subsequent precipitation. Soil moisture acts as a moisture source for the atmosphere, increases the connectively available potential energy, and thus preferentially focuses heavy precipitation over existing wet soil. Strong soil moisture-induced mesoscale circulations are not evident in these simulations. Coastline curvature has a major impact on the timing and location of precipitation. Earlier low-level convergence occurs inland of convex coastlines, and subsequent precipitation occurs earlier in simulations with curved coastlines. The presence of initial land breezes alone has little impact on subsequent precipitation. however, simulations with both coastline curvature and initial land breezes produce significantly larger peak rain rates due to nonlinear interactions.

  7. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Moisseeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  8. Granulation of coke breeze fine for using in the sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke breeze is the main fuel used in the sintering process. The value of -3+1 mm. represents the most favorable particle size for coke breeze in the sintering process. About 20% of total coke fines (-0.5 mm are produced during different steps of preparation. Introducing these fines during the sintering process proves to be very harmful for different operating parameters. Thus ,this study aims at investigating the production of granules resulting from these fines using molasses as organic binder and its application in sintering of an iron ore. The results showed that the granules having the highest mechanical properties were obtained with 14.5 wt % molasses addition. The sintering experiments were performed by using coke breeze in different shapes (-3+1 mm in size, coke breeze without sieving and coke breeze granules -3+1 mm. The reduction experiments, microscopic structure and X-ray analysis for the produced sinter were carried out. The results revealed that, all sinter properties (such as shatter test, productivity of sinter machine and blast furnace, reduction time and chemical composition for produced sinter by using coke breeze with size -3+1 mm and coke breeze granules were almost the same. The iron ore sinter which was produced by using coke breeze without sieving yielded low productivity for both sinter machine and blast furnace. Furthermore, using coke breeze without sieving in sintering of an iron ore decreases the vertical velocity of sinter machine and increases the reduction time.

  9. A Numerical Study of Sea Breeze and Spatiotemporal Variation in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Hainan Island, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian-Qian; Cai, Xu-Hui; Song, Yu; Kang, Ling

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations of sea breezes and the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at Hainan Island, China during summer and winter are discussed. The different behaviour of sea breezes and the ABL on the leeward and windward sides of the island are examined, and it is found that offshore flows are more likely to create a strong sea-breeze signature, whereas the process of sea-breeze development under onshore flows is difficult to capture. At the location where the sea-breeze signal is remarkable, the height of the coastal ABL displays an abnormal decrease, corresponding to a transitional point from a continental ABL to a thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formed under sea-breeze conditions. This is corroborated by the sudden increase in the water vapour mixing ratio and/or wind speed, indicating the arrival of the sea breeze. Regarding the spatial distribution, the TIBL height decreases abruptly just ahead of the sea-breeze front, and above the cold air mass. When the sea-breeze front occurs with a raised head, a cold air mass is separated from the sea-breeze flow and penetrates inland. This separation is attributed to the interaction between the sea breeze and valley breeze, while the dry airflow entraining to the sea-breeze flow may also partially contribute to this air mass separation.

  10. Impact of sea breeze of the sea off Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Neetu, S.; Shetye, S.R.; Chandramohan, P.

    1997 (when sea breeze was well developed on most days) show that the spectra of the sea breeze related sea peaked at 0.22 + - 0.05 Hz and had frequencies greater than approximately 0.15 Hz. The TMA spectrum (Bouws et al., 1985), formulated as extension...

  11. Application of fine-grained coke breeze fractions in the process of iron ore sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Niesler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The testing cycle, described in the paper, included fine-grained coke breeze granulation tests and iron concentrate sintering tests with the use of selected granulate samples. The use of granulated coke breeze in the sintering process results in a higher process efficiency, shorter sintering duration and fuel saving.

  12. Estimating the seaward extent of sea breeze from QuickSCAT scatterometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aparna, M.; Shetye, S.R.; Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.

    An objective method for quantifying the seaward extent of the sea breeze is presented. The underlying assumption is that the offshore decay in the strength of the sea breeze results in an offshore decay of the vector correlation between the wind...

  13. Impacts of topography and land degradation on the sea breeze over eastern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.F.; Kroon, L.J.M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional non-hydrostatic atmospheric model RAMS, version3b, is used to examine the impact of complex topography on the sea breeze under heterogeneous and degradation land use characteristics. In the study, it is shown that topography plays an important role in the sea-breeze circulation b

  14. Sea breeze-induced wind sea growth in the central west coast of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.; Seemanth, M.; Samiksha, S.V.; Sudheesh, K.; Kerkar, J.; Vethamony, P.

    perpendicular transect (pls refer to Figure 4 for the locations). It has been found that location A is not significantly influenced by the sea breeze, whereas a gradual growth is observed from B to E. The high impact of sea breeze is noticeable at locations...

  15. Sea breeze Initiated Rainfall over the east Coast of India during the Indian Southwest Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, M; Warrior, H; Raman, S; Aswathanarayana, P A; Mohanty, U C; Suresh, R

    2006-09-05

    Sea breeze initiated convection and precipitation is investigated along the east coast of India during the Indian southwest monsoon season. The sea breeze circulations are observed approximately 70 to 80% of the days during the summer months (June to August) along the Chennai coast. Observations of average sea breeze wind speeds are stronger at a rural location as compared to the wind speeds observed inside the urban region of Chennai. The sea breeze circulation is shown to be the dominant mechanism for initiating rainfall during the Indian southwest monsoon season. Roughly 80% of the total rainfall observed during the southwest monsoon over Chennai is directly related to the convection initiated by sea breeze circulation.

  16. Changes in nearshore waves during the active sea/land breeze period off Vengurla, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Singh, J.

    A unique feature observed in the tropical and subtropical coastal area is the diurnal sea-breeze/land-breeze cycle. We examined the nearshore waves at 5 and 15 m water depth during the active sea/land breeze period (January–April) in the year 2015...

  17. Interactions between the thermal internal boundary layer and sea breezes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyn, D.G. [The Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Geography, Atmospheric Science Programme, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-10-01

    In the absence of complex terrain, strongly curved coastline or strongly varying mean wind direction, the Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) has well known square root behaviour with inland fetch. Existing slab modeling approaches to this phenomenon indicate no inland fetch limit at which this behaviour must cease. It is obvious however that the TIBL cannot continue to grow in depth with increasing fetch, since the typical continental Mixed Layer Depths (MLD) of 1500 to 2000 m must be reached between 100 and 200 km from the shoreline. The anticyclonic conditions with attendant strong convection and light winds which drive the TIBL, also drive daytime Sea Breeze Circulations (SBC) in the coastal zone. The onshore winds driving mesoscale advection of cool air are at the core of TIBL mechanisms, and are invariably part of a SBC. It is to be expected that TIBL and SBC be intimately linked through common mechanisms, as well as external conditions. (au)

  18. Lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region and their influence during BAQS-Met 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. L. Sills

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological observations from the BAQS-Met field experiment during the summer months of 2007 were integrated and manually analyzed in order to identify and characterize lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region of North America, and assess their potential impact on air quality. Lake breezes occurred frequently, with one or more lake breezes identified on 90 % of study days. They affected all parts of the study region, including southwestern Ontario and nearby portions of southeast Lower Michigan and northern Ohio, with lake-breeze fronts occasionally penetrating from 100 km to over 200 km inland. Occurrence rates and penetration distances were found to be higher than previously reported in the literature. This comprehensive depiction of observed lake breezes allows an improved understanding of their influence on the transport, dispersion, and production of pollutants in this region.

    The observational analyses were compared with output from subsequent runs of a high-resolution numerical weather prediction model. The model accurately predicted lake breeze occurrence and type in a variety of synoptic wind regimes, but selected cases showed substantial differences in the detailed timing and location of lake-breeze fronts, and with the initiation of deep moist convection. Knowledge of such strengths and weaknesses aids in the interpretation of results from air quality models driven by this meteorological model.

  19. The seasonal characteristics of the breeze circulation at a coastal Mediterranean site in South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federico, S.; Pasqualoni, L.; Sempreviva, Anna Maria;

    2010-01-01

    at about 600 m from the coastline in a flat open area at the foot of a mountain chain located in a region of complex orography. We study the seasonal behaviour of the sea-land breeze circulation by analysing two years of hourly data of wind speed and direction, temperature, radiation and relative humidity......We present a study on the characteristics of the sea breeze flow at a coastal site located in the centre of the Mediterranean basin at the southern tip of Italy. This study is finalized to add new data on breeze circulations over a narrow peninsula and present a unique experimental coastal site...... from a surface meteorological station, eighteen-months data from a wind profiler, and two-year data from the ECMWF analysis. Results show that breezes dominate the local circulation and play a major role for the local climate. They are modulated by the season, through the sea-land temperature...

  20. Granulation of coke breeze fine for using in the sintering process

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed F.M.; El-Hussiny N.A.; Shalabi M.E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Coke breeze is the main fuel used in the sintering process. The value of -3+1 mm. represents the most favorable particle size for coke breeze in the sintering process. About 20% of total coke fines (-0.5 mm) are produced during different steps of preparation. Introducing these fines during the sintering process proves to be very harmful for different operating parameters. Thus ,this study aims at investigating the production of granules resulting from these fines using molasses as organ...

  1. Idealized WRF model sensitivity simulations of sea breeze types and their effects on offshore windfields

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, C. J.; S. R. Dorling; von Glasow, R.; Bacon, J

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour and characteristics of the marine component of sea breeze cells have received little attention relative to their onshore counterparts. Yet there is a growing interest and dependence on the offshore wind climate from, for example, a wind energy perspective. Using idealized model experiments, we investigate the sea breeze circulation at scales which approximate to those of the Southern North Sea, a region of major ongoing offshore wind farm development. We also contrast the...

  2. Idealized WRF model sensitivity simulations of sea breeze types and their effects on offshore windfields

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, C. J.; S. R. Dorling; Glasow, R.; Bacon, J

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour and characteristics of the marine component of sea breeze cells have received little attention relative to their onshore counterparts. Yet there is a growing interest and dependence on the offshore wind climate from, for example, a wind energy perspective. Using idealized model experiments, we investigate the sea breeze circulation at scales which approximate to those of the southern North Sea, a region of major ongoing offshore wind farm development. We also contrast the scales...

  3. Sea Breezes over the Red Sea: Affect of topography and interaction with Desert Convective Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Basit A.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2014-05-01

    Thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze, its interaction with coastal mountains, desert plateau and desert convective boundary layer have been investigated in the middle region of the Red Sea around 25°N, at the Western coast of Saudi Arabia. Sea and land breeze is a common meteorological phenomenon in most of the coastal regions around the world. Sea-Breeze effects the local meteorology and cause changes in wind speed, direction, cloud cover and sometimes precipitation. The occurrence of sea-breeze, its intensity and landward propagation are important for wind energy resource assessment, load forecasting for existing wind farms, air pollution, marine and aviation applications. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breeze modifies the desert Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) by forming Convective Internal Boundary Layer (CIBL), and propagates inland as a density current. The leading edge of the denser marine air rapidly moves inland undercutting the hot and dry desert air mass. The warm air lifts up along the frontal boundary and if contains enough moisture a band of clouds is formed along the sea breeze front (SBF). This study focuses on the thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze as it propagates over coastal rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, east of the Red Sea coast, and the desert plateau across the mountain range. Additional effects of topographical gaps such as Tokar gap on the dynamics of sea-land breezes have also been discussed. Interaction of SBF with the desert convective boundary layer provide extra lifting that could further enhance the convective instability along the frontal boundary. This study provides a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics of interaction of the SBF and convective internal boundary layer over the desert. Observational data from a buoy and meteorological stations have been utilized while The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system has been employed in real and 2D idealized configuration.

  4. Scaling Characteristics of Developing Sea Breezes Simulated in a Water Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Renmin; Sun, Jianning; Luo, Tao; Wu, Xuping

    2013-09-01

    Sea-breeze circulations in a stably stratified environment have been simulated in a water tank. The floor of the tank was divided into two halves representing land and sea; the land side was heated from the bottom of the tank, and the sea side was insulated by an underlying sponge slab. The temperature profiles over both land and sea sides, the land-sea temperature difference, and the horizontal temperature distributions were measured. Particle tracking velocimetry was applied to obtain the two-dimensional velocity field orthogonal to the coastline. It was shown that the overall flow consists of a closed circulation caused by the horizontal temperature difference between land and sea, and a strong updraft occurring at the sea-breeze front. The dimensionless governing parameters are calculated from the measurements and used to characterize the developing sea breezes. The analysis confirms the scaling laws for sea-breeze velocity and depth. The results indicate that the scaling characteristics of the sea-breeze translation speed during the developing period are different to those during the following maintaining period. A criterion for the onset of the sea breeze is proposed based on these results.

  5. Idealized WRF model sensitivity simulations of sea breeze types and their effects on offshore windfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Steele

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour and characteristics of the marine component of sea breeze cells have received little attention relative to their onshore counterparts. Yet there is a growing interest and dependence on the offshore wind climate from, for example, a wind energy perspective. Using idealized model experiments, we investigate the sea breeze circulation at scales which approximate to those of the Southern North Sea, a region of major ongoing offshore wind farm development. We also contrast the scales and characteristics of the pure and the little known corkscrew and backdoor sea breeze types, where the type is pre-defined by the orientation of the synoptic scale flow relative to the shoreline. We find, crucially, that pure sea breezes, in contrast to corkscrew and backdoor types, can lead to substantial wind speed reductions offshore and that the addition of a second eastern coastline emphasises this effect through generation of offshore "calm zones". The offshore extent of all sea breeze types is found to be sensitive to both the influence of Coriolis acceleration and to the boundary layer scheme selected. These extents range, for example for a pure sea breeze produced in a 2 m s−1 offshore gradient wind, from 10 km to 40 km between the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino and the Yonsei State University schemes, respectively. The corkscrew type restricts the development of a backdoor sea breeze on the eastern coast and is also capable of traversing a 100 km offshore domain even under high gradient wind speed (>15 m s−1 conditions. Realistic variations in sea surface skin temperature during the sea breeze season do not significantly affect the circulation, suggesting that a thermal contrast is only needed as a precondition to the development of the sea breeze. We highlight how sea breeze impacts on circulation need to be considered in order to improve the accuracy of

  6. Cycle training modulates satellite cell and transcriptional responses to a bout of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Walton, R Grace; Fry, Christopher S; Michaelis, Sami L; Groshong, Jason S; Finlin, Brian S; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated whether moderate-intensity cycle ergometer training affects satellite cell and molecular responses to acute maximal concentric/eccentric resistance exercise in middle-aged women. Baseline and 72 h postresistance exercise vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from seven healthy middle-aged women (56 ± 5 years, BMI 26 ± 1, VO2max 27 ± 4) before and after 12 weeks of cycle training. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I- and II-associated satellite cell density and cross-sectional area was determined via immunohistochemistry. Expression of 93 genes representative of the muscle-remodeling environment was also measured via NanoString. Overall fiber size increased ~20% with cycle training (P = 0.052). MyHC I satellite cell density increased 29% in response to acute resistance exercise before endurance training and 50% with endurance training (P exercise (acute resistance × training interaction, P exercise. Similar satellite cell and gene expression response patterns indicate coordinated regulation of the muscle environment to promote adaptation. Moderate-intensity endurance cycle training modulates the response to acute resistance exercise, potentially conditioning the muscle for more intense concentric/eccentric activity. These results suggest that cycle training is an effective endurance exercise modality for promoting growth in middle-aged women, who are susceptible to muscle mass loss with progressing age. PMID:27650251

  7. Cycle training modulates satellite cell and transcriptional responses to a bout of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Walton, R Grace; Fry, Christopher S; Michaelis, Sami L; Groshong, Jason S; Finlin, Brian S; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated whether moderate-intensity cycle ergometer training affects satellite cell and molecular responses to acute maximal concentric/eccentric resistance exercise in middle-aged women. Baseline and 72 h postresistance exercise vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from seven healthy middle-aged women (56 ± 5 years, BMI 26 ± 1, VO2max 27 ± 4) before and after 12 weeks of cycle training. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I- and II-associated satellite cell density and cross-sectional area was determined via immunohistochemistry. Expression of 93 genes representative of the muscle-remodeling environment was also measured via NanoString. Overall fiber size increased ~20% with cycle training (P = 0.052). MyHC I satellite cell density increased 29% in response to acute resistance exercise before endurance training and 50% with endurance training (P training, MyHC I satellite cell density decreased by 13% in response to acute resistance exercise (acute resistance × training interaction, P trained state in response to resistance exercise. Similar satellite cell and gene expression response patterns indicate coordinated regulation of the muscle environment to promote adaptation. Moderate-intensity endurance cycle training modulates the response to acute resistance exercise, potentially conditioning the muscle for more intense concentric/eccentric activity. These results suggest that cycle training is an effective endurance exercise modality for promoting growth in middle-aged women, who are susceptible to muscle mass loss with progressing age.

  8. Modelling sea breeze climatologies and interactions on coasts in the southern North Sea: Implications for offshore wind energy

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Christopher; Dorling, Stephen; von Glasow, Roland; Bacon, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Current understanding of the behaviour of sea breezes in the offshore environment is limited but rapidly requires improvement due, not least, to the expansion of the offshore wind energy industry. Here we report on contrasting characteristics of three sea-breeze types on five coastlines around the southern North Sea from an 11 year model-simulated climatology. We present and test an identification method which distinguishes sea-breeze types which can, in principle, be adapted for other coastl...

  9. Idealized WRF model sensitivity simulations of sea breeze types and their effects on offshore windfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Steele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour and characteristics of the marine component of sea breeze cells have received little attention relative to their onshore counterparts. Yet there is a growing interest and dependence on the offshore wind climate from, for example, a wind energy perspective. Using idealized model experiments, we investigate the sea breeze circulation at scales which approximate to those of the southern North Sea, a region of major ongoing offshore wind farm development. We also contrast the scales and characteristics of the pure and the little known corkscrew and backdoor sea breeze types, where the type is pre-defined by the orientation of the synoptic scale flow relative to the shoreline. We find, crucially, that pure sea breezes, in contrast to corkscrew and backdoor types, can lead to substantial wind speed reductions offshore and that the addition of a second eastern coastline emphasises this effect through generation of offshore "calm zones". The offshore extent of all sea breeze types is found to be sensitive to both the influence of Coriolis acceleration and to the boundary layer scheme selected. These extents range, for example for a pure sea breeze produced in a 2 m s−1 offshore gradient wind, from 0 km to 21 km between the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino and the Yonsei State University schemes respectively. The corkscrew type restricts the development of a backdoor sea breeze on the opposite coast and is also capable of traversing a 100 km offshore domain even under high along-shore gradient wind speed (>15 m s−1 conditions. Realistic variations in sea surface skin temperature and initializing vertical thermodynamic profile do not significantly alter the resulting circulation, though the strengths of the simulated sea breezes are modulated if the effective land-sea thermal contrast is altered. We highlight how sea breeze impacts on circulation need to be

  10. Lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region and their influence during BAQS-Met 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. L. Sills

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale observations from the BAQS-Met field experiment during the summer of 2007 were integrated and manually analyzed in order to identify and characterize lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region of North America, and assess their potential impact on air quality. Lake breezes were found to occur on 90% of study days, often occurring in conditions previously thought to impede their development. They affected all parts of the study region, including southwestern Ontario and nearby portions of southeast Michigan and northern Ohio, occasionally penetrating inland from 100 km to over 200 km. Occurrence rates and penetration distances were found to be higher than previously reported in the literature. This more accurate depiction of observed lake breezes allows a better understanding of their influence on the production and transport of pollutants in this region.

    The observational analyses were compared with output from subsequent runs of a high-resolution numerical weather prediction model. The model accurately predicted lake breeze occurrence in a variety of synoptic wind regimes, but selected cases showed substantial differences in the detailed timing and location of lake-breeze fronts, and with the initiation of deep moist convection. Knowledge of such strengths and weaknesses will assist with interpretation of results from air quality modelling driven by this meteorological model.

  11. Urban effects of Chennai on sea breeze induced convection and precipitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matthew Simpson; Sethu Raman; R Suresh; U C Mohanty

    2008-12-01

    Doppler radar derived wind speed and direction profiles showed a well developed sea breeze circulation over the Chennai, India region on 28 June, 2003. Rainfall totals in excess of 100 mm resulted from convection along the sea breeze front. Inland propagation of the sea breeze front was observed in radar reflectivity imagery. High-resolution MM5 simulations were used to investigate the influence of Chennai urban land use on sea breeze initiated convection and precipitation. A comparison of observed and simulated 10 m wind speed and direction over Chennai showed that the model was able to simulate the timing and strength of the sea breeze. Urban effects are shown to increase the near surface air temperature over Chennai by 3.0 K during the early morning hours. The larger surface temperature gradient along the coast due to urban effects increased onshore flow by 4.0m s−1. Model sensitivity study revealed that precipitation totals were enhanced by 25 mm over a large region 150 km west of Chennai due to urban effects. Deficiency in model physics related to night-time forecasts are addressed.

  12. Flow vector, Mach number and abundance of the Warm Breeze of neutral He observed by IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Marzena A.; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Schwadron, Nathan; Sokol, Justyna M.; Bzowski, Maciej; Heirtzler, David M.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    With the velocity vector and temperature of the pristine interstellar neutral (ISN) He recently obtained with high precision from a coordinated analysis by the IBEX Science Team, we analyzed the IBEX observations of neutral He left out from this analysis. These observations were collected during the interstellar neutral observation seasons 2010---2014 and cover the region in the Earth's orbit where the Warm Breeze persists. The Warm Breeze is a newly discovered population of neutral He in the heliosphere. We search for the inflow velocity vector and the temperature of the Warm Breeze and used the same simulation model and a very similar parameter fitting method to that used for the analysis of ISN He. We approximate the parent population of the Warm Breeze in front of the heliosphere with a homogeneous Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function and find a temperature of ~9 500 K, an inflow speed of ~11.3 km/s, and an inflow longitude and latitude in the J2000 ecliptic coordinates 251.6°, 12.0°. The abundance of the Warm Breeze relative to the interstellar neutral He is 5.6% and the Mach number of the flow is 1.97. We discuss implications of this result for the heliospheric physics and an insight into the behavior of interstellar plasma in the outer heliosheath.

  13. Warm Breeze from the starboard bow: a new population of neutral helium in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiak, M A; Sokół, J M; Swaczyna, P; Grzedzielski, S; Alexashov, D B; Izmodenov, V V; Moebius, E; Leonard, T; Fuselier, S A; Wurz, P; McComas, D J

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the signals from neutral He atoms observed from Earth orbit in 2010 by IBEX. The full He signal observed during the 2010 observation season can be explained as a superposition of pristine neutral interstellar He gas and an additional population of neutral He that we call the Warm Breeze. The Warm Breeze is approximately two-fold slower and 2.5 times warmer than the primary interstellar He population, and its density in front of the heliosphere is ~7% that of the neutral interstellar helium. The inflow direction of the Warm Breeze differs by ~19deg from the inflow direction of interstellar gas. The Warm Breeze seems a long-term feature of the heliospheric environment. It has not been detected earlier because it is strongly ionized inside the heliosphere, which brings it below the threshold of detection via pickup ion and heliospheric backscatter glow observations, as well as by the direct sampling of GAS/Ulysses. Possible sources for the Warm Breeze include (1) the secondary population of inters...

  14. Land Breeze and Thermals: A Scale Threshold to Distinguish Their Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Land breeze is a type of mesoscale circulation developed due to thermal forcing over a heterogeneous landscape. It can contribute to atmospheric dynamic and hydrologic processes through affecting heat and water fluxes on the land-atmosphere interface and generating shallow convective precipitation. If the scale of the landscape heterogeneity is smaller than a certain size, however, the resulting land breeze becomes weak and becomes mixed up with other thermal convections like thermals. This study seeks to identify a scale threshold to distinguish the effects between land breeze and thermals. Two-dimensional simulations were performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to simulate thermals and land breeze. Their horizontal scale features were analyzed using the wavelet transform. The thermals developed over a homogeneous landscape under dry or wet conditions have an initial scale of 2-5 km during their early stage of development. The scale jumps to 10-15 km when condensation occurs. The solution of an analytical model indicates that the reduced degree of atmospheric instability due to the release of condensation potential heat could be one of the contributing factors for the increase in scale.The land breeze, on the other hand, has a major scale identical to the size of the landscape heterogeneity throughout various stages of development. The results suggest that the effects of land breeze can be clearly distinguished from those of thermals only if the size of the landscape heterogeneity is larger than the scale threshold of about 5 km for dry atmospheric processes or about 15 km for moist ones.

  15. Transforming the Transcript to Reflect the Whole Scholar: Legitimizing Pedagogical Training for Graduate Student Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Josh; Decker, Mark Lowry

    2011-01-01

    Although universities acknowledge that teacher training is critical for ensuring quality undergraduate education, research has repeatedly demonstrated that universities typically do an inadequate job of preparing graduate students for their instructor role. In this paper, we show that both graduate students and universities find the pedagogical…

  16. 78 FR 62300 - Prairie Breeze Wind Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Prairie Breeze Wind Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding, of Prairie Breeze Wind Energy LLC's application for...

  17. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammerman, Shane [Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department, NV (United States)

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own

  18. Object-location training elicits an overlapping but temporally distinct transcriptional profile from contextual fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, Shane G; Schoch, Hannah; Wimmer, Mathieu E; Hawk, Joshua D; Walsh, Jennifer L; Giese, Karl P; Abel, Ted

    2014-12-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning is known to induce changes in gene expression, but information on gene expression differences between different learning paradigms that require the hippocampus is limited. The bulk of studies investigating RNA expression after learning use the contextual fear conditioning task, which couples a novel environment with a footshock. Although contextual fear conditioning has been useful in discovering gene targets, gene expression after spatial memory tasks has received less attention. In this study, we used the object-location memory task and studied gene expression at two time points after learning in a high-throughput manner using a microfluidic qPCR approach. We found that expression of the classic immediate-early genes changes after object-location training in a fashion similar to that observed after contextual fear conditioning. However, the temporal dynamics of gene expression are different between the two tasks, with object-location memory producing gene expression changes that last at least 2 hours. Our findings indicate that different training paradigms may give rise to distinct temporal dynamics of gene expression after learning.

  19. The Effects of Highly Detailed Urban Roughness Parameters on a Sea-Breeze Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varquez, Alvin Christopher G.; Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effects of detailed urban roughness parameters on a sea-breeze simulation. An urban roughness database, constructed using a new aerodynamic parametrization derived from large-eddy simulations, was incorporated as a surface boundary condition in the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length at several densely built-up urban grids were three times larger than conventional values due to the consideration of building-height variability. A comparison between simulations from the modified model and its default version, which uses uniform roughness parameters within a conventional method, was conducted for a 2-month period during summer. Results showed a significant improvement in the simulation of surface wind speed but not with temperature. From the 2-month study period, a day with an evident sea-breeze penetration was selected and simulated at higher temporal resolution. Sea-breeze penetration weakened and was more delayed over urbanized areas. The slow sea-breeze penetration also lessened heat advection downwind allowing stronger turbulent mixing and a deeper boundary layer above urban areas. Horizontal wind-speed reduction due to the increased urban surface drag reached heights of several hundreds of metres due to the strong convection.

  20. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  1. Impact of sea breeze on wind-seas off Goa, west coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Neetu; Satish Shetye; P Chandramohan

    2006-04-01

    After withdrawal of the Indian Summer Monsoon and until onset of the next monsoon,i.e.,roughly during November-May, winds in the coastal regions of India are dominated by sea breeze.It has an impact on the daily cycle of the sea state near the coast.The impact is quite significant when large scale winds are weak.During one such event,1 –15 April 1997,a Datawell directional waverider buoy was deployed in 23 m water depth off Goa,west coast of India.Twenty-minute averaged spectra,collected once every three hours,show that the spectrum of sea-breeze-related ‘wind-seas’ peaked at 0.23 ± 0.05 Hz. These wind-seas were well separated from swells of frequencies less than 0.15 Hz.The TMA spectrum (Bouws et al 1985) matched the observed seas spectra very well when the sea-breeze was active and the fetch corresponding to equilibrium spectrum was found to be 77 ± 43 km during such occasions. We emphasize on the diurnal cycle of sea-breeze-related sea off the coast of Goa and write an equation for the energy of the seas as a function of the local wind.

  2. An interview with Dr. Ruth Breeze and Dr. Florentina Taylor on foreign language teaching and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Ricardo-María

    2015-01-01

    The author conducted an online interview with Dr. Ruth Breeze (University of Navarra, Spain) and Dr. Florentina Taylor (University of Greenwich, UK) about the present and future of foreign language teaching, following up on conversations initiated in York, Pamplona and Lancaster.

  3. Bay Breeze Influence on Surface Ozone at Edgewood, MD During July 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Ryan M.; Thompson, Anne M.; Martins, Douglas K.; Clark, Richard D.; Goldberg, Daniel L.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Delgado, Ruben; Dickerson, Russell R.; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Tzortziou, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Surface ozone (O3) was analyzed to investigate the role of the bay breeze on air quality at two locations in Edgewood, Maryland (lat: 39.4deg, lon: -76.3deg) for the month of July 2011. Measurements were taken as part of the first year of NASA's "Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality" (DISCOVER-AQ) Earth Venture campaign and as part of NASA's Geostationary for Coastal and Air Pollution Events Chesapeake Bay Oceanographic campaign with DISCOVER-AQ (Geo-CAPE CBODAQ). Geo-CAPE CBODAQ complements DISCOVER-AQ by providing ship-based observations over the Chesapeake Bay. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is determining the relative roles of sources, photochemistry and local meteorology during air quality events in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. Surface characteristics, transport and vertical structures of O3 during bay breezes were identified using in-situ surface, balloon and aircraft data, along with remote sensing equipment. Localized late day peaks in O3 were observed during bay breeze days, maximizing an average of 3 h later compared to days without bay breezes. Of the 10 days of July 2011 that violated the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 8 h O3 standard of 75 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at Edgewood, eight exhibited evidence of a bay breeze circulation. The results indicate that while bay breezes and the processes associated with them are not necessary to cause exceedances in this area, bay breezes exacerbate poor air quality that sustains into the late evening hours at Edgewood. The vertical and horizontal distributions of O3 from the coastal Edgewood area to the bay also show large gradients that are often determined by boundary layer stability. Thus, developing air quality models that can sufficiently resolve these dynamics and associated chemistry, along with more consistent monitoring of O3 and meteorology on and along the complex coastline of Chesapeake Bay must be a

  4. Nearshore Coastal Dynamics on a Sea-Breeze Dominated Micro-Tidal Beach (NCSAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Freyermuth, A.; Puleo, J. A.; Ruiz de Alegría-Arzaburu, A.; Figlus, J.; Mendoza, T.; Pintado-Patino, J. C.; Pieterse, A.; Chardon-Maldonado, P.; DiCosmo, N. R.; Wellman, N.; Garcia-Nava, H.; Palemón-Arcos, L.; Roberts, T.; López-González, J.; Bravo, M.; Ojeda, E.; Medellín, G.; Appendini, C. M.; Figueroa, B.; González-Leija, M.; Enriquez, C.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.; Salles, P.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive field experiment devoted to the study of coastal processes on a micro-tidal beach was conducted from March 30th to April 12th 2014 in Sisal, Yucatán México. Wave conditions in the study area are controlled by local (i.e., sea-breezes) and meso-scale (i.e., Nortes) meteorological events. Simultaneous measurements of waves, tides, winds, currents, sediment transport, runup, and beach morphology were obtained in this experiment. Very dense nearshore instrumentation arrays allow us the study of the cross-/along- shore variability of surf/swash zone dynamics during different forcing conditions. Strong sea-breeze wind events produced a diurnal cycle with a maximum wind speed of 14 m/s. The persistent sea-breeze system forces small-amplitude (Hs1 m) Norte event, lasting 48 hours, reached the coast on April 8th generating a long-period swell (Tp>10 s) arriving from the NNW. This event induced an eastward net sediment transport across a wide surf zone. However, long-term observations of sand impoundment at a groin located near the study area suggests that the net sediment transport in the northern Yucatan peninsula is controlled by sea-breeze events and hence swash zone dynamics play an important role in the net sediment budget of this region. A comparative study of surf and swash zone dynamics during both sea-breeze and Norte events will be presented. The Institute of Engineering of UNAM, throughout an International Collaborative Project with the University of Delaware, and CONACYT (CB-167692) provided financial support. The first author acknowledges ONR Global for providing financial support throughout the Visiting Scientist Program.

  5. Characteristics of Sea Breeze Front Development with Various Synoptic Conditions and Its Impact on Lower Troposphere Ozone Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo-Eun JI; Soon-Hwan LEE; Hwa-Woon LEE

    2013-01-01

    To examine the correlation between the sizes of sea breeze fronts and pollutants under the influence of synoptic fields,a numerical simulation was conducted in the southeast coastal area of the Korean Peninsula,where relatively high concentrations of pollutants occur because of the presence of various kinds of industrial developments.Sea breeze and sea breeze front days during the period 2005-09 were identified using wind profiler data and,according to the results,the number of days were 72 and 53,respectively.When synoptic forcing was weak,sea breeze fronts moved fast both in horizontal fields and in terms of wind velocity,while in thc case of strong synoptic forcing,sea breeze fronts remained at the coast or moved slowly due to strong opposing flows.In this case,the sea breeze front development function and horizontal potential temperature difference were larger than with weak synoptic forcing.The ozone concentration that moves together with sea breeze fronts was also formed along the frontal surfaces.Ozone advection and diffusion in the case of strong synoptic forcing was suppressed at the frontal surface and the concentration gradient was large.The vertical distribution of ozone was very low due to the Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) being low.

  6. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammerman, Shane [Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department, NV (United States)

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own

  7. Impaired transcriptional activity of Nrf2 in age-related myocardial oxidative stress is reversible by moderate exercise training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellamuthu S Gounder

    Full Text Available Aging promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS in cardiomyocytes, which leads to contractile dysfunction and cardiac abnormalities. These changes may contribute to increased cardiovascular disease in the elderly. Inducible antioxidant pathways are regulated by nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2 through antioxidant response cis-elements (AREs and are impaired in the aging heart. Whereas acute exercise stress (AES activates Nrf2 signaling and promotes myocardial antioxidant function in young mice (~2 months, aging mouse (>23 months hearts exhibit significant oxidative stress as compared to those of the young. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-dependent regulation of Nrf2-antioxidant mechanisms and redox homeostasis in mouse hearts and the impact of exercise. Old mice were highly susceptible to oxidative stress following high endurance exercise stress (EES, but demonstrated increased adaptive redox homeostasis after moderate exercise training (MET; 10m/min, for 45 min/day for ~6 weeks. Following EES, transcription and protein levels for most of the ARE-antioxidants were increased in young mice but their induction was blunted in aging mice. In contrast, 6-weeks of chronic MET promoted nuclear levels of Nrf2 along with its target antioxidants in the aging heart to near normal levels as seen in young mice. These observations suggest that enhancing Nrf2 function and endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms by MET, may combat age-induced ROS/RNS and protect the myocardium from oxidative stress diseases.

  8. A climatological study of sea breeze clouds in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula (Alicante, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin-Molina, C. [Grupo de Climatologia, Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Cataluna (Spain)]. E-mail: cazorin@ceam.es; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A. [Grupo de Climatologia, Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Cataluna (Spain); Calbo, J. [Grupo de Fisica Ambiental, Universidad de Girona, Campus Montilivi, Cataluna (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Sea breezes blow under anticyclonic weather types, weak surface pressure gradients, intense solar radiation and relatively cloud-free skies. Generally, total cloud cover must be less than 4/8 in order to cause a thermal and pressure difference between land and sea air which allows the development of this local wind circulation. However, many numerical and observational studies have analyzed the ability of sea breezes to generate clouds in the convective internal boundary layer and in the sea breeze convergence zone. Accordingly, the aim of this study is to statistically analyze the impact of sea breezes on cloud types in the convective internal boundary layer and in the sea breeze convergence zone. The study area is located in the southeast of the Iberian Peninsula (province of Alicante, Spain) and the survey corresponds to a 6-yr study period (2000-2005). This climatological study is mainly based on surface cloud observations at the Alicante-Ciudad Jardin station (central coastal plain) and on an extensive cloud observation field campaign at the Villena-Ciudad station (Prebetic mountain ranges) over a 3-yr study period (2003-2005). The results confirm the hypothesis that the effect of sea breezes on cloud genera is to increase the frequency of low (Stratus) and convective (Cumulus) clouds. Sea breezes trigger the formation of thunderstorm clouds (Cumulonimbus) at the sea breeze convergence zone, which also have a secondary impact on high-level (Cirrus, Cirrocumulus, Cirrostratus), medium-level (Altostratus, Altocumulus) and low-level clouds (Stratus, Stratocumulus, Nimbostratus) associated with the Cumulonimbus clouds (e.g., Cumulonimbus anvil). [Spanish] Las brisas marinas soplan bajo tipos de tiempo anticiclonicos, debiles gradientes de presion atmosferica, radiacion solar intensa y cielos practicamente despejados. Por lo general, la cobertura nubosa total debe ser inferior a 4/8 para que se genere un diferencial termico y de presion entre el aire sobre las

  9. Reducibility mill scale industrial waste via coke breeze at 850-950ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaballah N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mill scale is a very attractive industrial waste due to its elevated iron content (about = 69.33% Fe besides being suiTab. for direct recycling to the blast furnace via sintering plant. In this paper the characteristics of raw materials and the briquettes produced from this mill scale were studied by different methods of analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced with different amounts of coke breeze at varying temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined. The activation energy of this reaction ≈ 61.5 kJ/mole for reduction of mill scale with coke breeze in the form of briquettes with 2% molasses where the chemical reaction interface model is applicable.

  10. Investigation of sea-breeze convergence in Salento Peninsula (southeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Alcimoni Nelci; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Rizza, Umberto; Acevedo, Otavio Costa; Degrazia, Gervasio Annes

    2015-06-01

    The frequency, the location and the characteristics of convective rainfall events induced by the convergence of different sea breeze systems on a Mediterranean peninsula (Salento, in southeastern Italy) are analyzed. Such events have been studied considering satellite/radar images and output fields from two Limited Area Models in the summer period of 2011-2013. A total of 20 days have been detected in which the precipitation due to sea-breeze convergence was clearly observed in satellite and radar images. The synoptic conditions associated with these events have been identified considering the averages of some relevant meteorological parameters in the selected days and the anomaly with respect to the climate. The presence of a cold trough in the central Mediterranean basin appears as a fundamental ingredient for the occurrence of sea breeze convergence and associated precipitation. High-resolution simulations with two state-of-art numerical models have revealed that both of them are generally able to simulate a convergence pattern correctly, apart from a couple of cases for each model. The higher rainfall amounts occur with weak synoptic wind, and weak-to-moderate values of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE). When the synoptic wind is of moderate intensity, the region of convergence moves toward the Adriatic coast for a prevailing southerly component, and toward the Ionian coast for a prevailing northerly component. On the opposite, the skin sea surface temperature is relatively uniform and the difference between the Ionian and the Adriatic Seas, surrounding the peninsula on the east and west side, is generally smaller than 1 K, having only a marginal effect on the sea breeze patterns. Similarly, the value of CAPE before the occurrence of rainfall has low prognostic value. The results shows that limited area models with a grid spacing of few km appear as appropriate tools for the simulation for such relatively small scale phenomena.

  11. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT ON THE EFFECT OF URBANIZATION UPON SUMMER LAND-SEA BREEZES IN THE COASTLAND OF GUANGXI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Wei-jun; SHEN Tong-li; DING Zhi-ying; SONG Jie-hui

    2010-01-01

    The 2003-2006 observations were utilized to analyze the surface characteristics of summer land-sea breezes along the coastland of Guangxi and the Weather Research and Forecast model was applied to simulate the breeze structure on August 1-2,2006.Results show that 1)the intensity and distributions of the breezes reproduced from improved urban underlying surface were close to observations.In the daytime the coastwise urban band was a convergent belt of sea breeze,corresponding to the centers of torrential rains; in the nighttime hours the surface of the Gulf of Tonkin(the Vietnamese name)or the Northern Bay(the Chinese name)acted as a convergent zone of land breezes,likely to produce convectivecloud cluster; 2)the experiment on urbanization showed the heat island effect enhancing(weakening)the sea(land)breeze development.Furthermore,the heat island effect mitigated the atmospheric cooling viaradiation over the cities in the night,weakening sinking motion correspondingly,thereby suppressing the dominant factor responsible for the steady development of temperature inversion.As a result,the inversion vigor was reduced greatly,but nevertheless no strong effect of the decreased subsidence was found upon the inversion height.

  12. Transient land breeze: Eclipse induced wind flow modifications—Observations over plant canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, B. S.; Latha, R.; Sreeja, P.; Dharmaraj, T.

    2012-11-01

    An experiment is conducted over Cassava plant canopy at a coastal station at CTCRI, Thiruvananthapuram (8°29'N, 76°59E) to study the response of meteorological parameters and land-sea breeze circulations to the annular solar eclipse on January 15, 2010. Observations reveal decrease of solar radiation to a minimum of 96 W m-2 during the peak eclipse period. Air temperature drops by 4 °C and relative humidity increases by 20%. Sensible heat flux reduces to zero. Transient land breeze occurs for a few minutes with a time lag of about 1 h possibly due to outflow from the umbra region or temperature gradient over land with the eclipse progressing in the eastward direction. Sea breeze is delayed by about 3 h on the next day of eclipse. Spectral energy density of wind (u, v, w) and temperature attains a minimum value during totality and increases later, attributable to reduction in turbulence due to eclipse-induced stability.

  13. A sea breeze induced thunderstorm over an inland station over Indian South Peninsula - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Jyoti; Kesarkar, Amit P.; Karipot, Anandakumar; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.; Rajasekhar, M.; Sathiyamoorthy, V.; Kishtawal, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic interaction of sea breeze with the prevailing synoptic flows can give rise to meteorological conditions conducive for the occurrence to the thunderstorms over coastal and adjoining regions. Here, we present a rare case study of the genesis of the thunderstorm that occurred on 4th May 2011 at 1500Z over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), one of the tropical inland stations (100 km) near to the east coast of the Indian peninsula. The objective of present work is to understand the underlying physical mechanism of initiation of such convection over this region. A set of meteorological observations obtained from microwave radiometer profiler, eddy covariance flux tower system, and Doppler weather radar, are used for investigating the convection genesis characteristics. In conjunction with observations, to bridge the gap of lack of high resolutional spatial observations, the high-resolution (2 km) model analysis is developed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and four-dimensional data assimilation technique. The analysis of thermodynamical and dynamical indices carried out from the model analysis as well as observations. Results obtained from this study indicated the presence of a wind discontinuity line and a warm air advection from the north Indian region towards Gadanki caused this area hot dry and convectively active. The sea breeze front propagated over hot and dry area few hours before the genesis of the thunderstorm. The moisture flux convergence increased with the inland propagation of sea breeze front. We found that the inland penetration of sea-breeze front caused advection of moist and cold air over warm and dry region; reduction in dew point depression causing bulging of dry line and lowering of lifting condensation level; development of shear in wind direction and speed; increase in low level convergence and vertical velocity, upward transport of moist air and finally increase in helicity of the environment. The wind shear instability

  14. Time course analysis reveals gene-specific transcript and protein kinetics of adaptation to short-term aerobic exercise training in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Egan

    Full Text Available Repeated bouts of episodic myofibrillar contraction associated with exercise training are potent stimuli for physiological adaptation. However, the time course of adaptation and the continuity between alterations in mRNA expression and protein content are not well described in human skeletal muscle. Eight healthy, sedentary males cycled for 60 min at 80% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak each day for fourteen consecutive days, resulting in an increase in VO2peak of 17.5±3.8%. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken at baseline, and on the morning following (+16 h after exercise the first, third, seventh, tenth and fourteenth training sessions. Markers of mitochondrial adaptation (Cyt c and COXIV expression, and citrate synthase activity were increased within the first week of training, but the mtDNA/nDNA ratio was unchanged by two weeks of training. Accumulation of PGC-1α and ERRα protein during training suggests a regulatory role for these factors in adaptations of mitochondrial and metabolic gene expression. A subset of genes were transiently increased after one training session, but returned to baseline levels thereafter, which is supportive of the concept of transcriptional capacity being particularly sensitive to the onset of a new level of contractile activity. Thus, gene-specific temporal patterns of induction of mRNA expression and protein content are described. Our results illustrate the phenomenology of skeletal muscle plasticity and support the notion that transcript level adjustments, coupled to accumulation of encoded protein, underlie the modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism and phenotype by regular exercise.

  15. Aircraft study of the impact of lake-breeze circulations on trace gases and particles during BAQS-Met 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Hayden

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available High time-resolved aircraft data, concurrent surface measurements and air quality model simulations were explored to diagnose the processes influencing aerosol chemistry under the influence of lake-breeze circulations in a polluted region of southwestern Ontario, Canada. The analysis was based upon horizontal aircraft transects conducted at multiple altitudes across an entire lake-breeze circulation. Air mass boundaries due to lake-breeze fronts were identified in the aircraft meteorological and chemical data, which were consistent with the frontal locations determined from surface analyses. Observations and modelling support the interpretation of a lake-breeze circulation where pollutants were lofted at a lake-breeze front, transported in the synoptic flow, caught in a downdraft over the lake, and then confined by onshore flow. The detailed analysis led to the development of conceptual models that summarize the complex 3-D circulation patterns and their interaction with the synoptic flow. The identified air mass boundaries, the interpretation of the lake-breeze circulation, and the air parcel circulation time in the lake-breeze circulation (3.0 to 5.0 h enabled formation rates of organic aerosol (OA/ΔCO and SO42− to be determined. The formation rate for OA (relative to excess CO in ppmv was found to be 11.6–19.4 μg m−3 ppmv−1 h−1 and the SO42− formation rate was 5.0–8.8% h−1. The formation rates are enhanced relative to regional background rates implying that lake-breeze circulations are an important dynamic in the formation of SO42− and secondary organic aerosol. The presence of cumulus clouds associated with the lake-breeze fronts suggests that these enhancements could be due to cloud processes. Additionally, the effective confinement of pollutants along the shoreline may have limited pollutant dilution leading to

  16. Aircraft study of the impact of lake-breeze circulations on trace gases and particles during BAQS-Met 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Hayden

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available High time-resolved aircraft data, concurrent surface measurements and air quality model simulations were explored to diagnose the processes influencing aerosol chemistry under the influence of lake-breeze circulations in a polluted region of southwestern Ontario, Canada. The analysis was based upon horizontal aircraft transects at multiple altitudes across an entire lake-breeze circulation. Air mass boundaries due to lake-breeze fronts were identified in the aircraft meteorological and chemical data, which were consistent with the frontal locations determined from surface analyses. Observations and modelling support the interpretation of a lake-breeze circulation where pollutants were lofted at a lake-breeze front, transported in the synoptic flow, caught in a downdraft over the lake, and then confined by onshore flow. The detailed analysis led to the development of conceptual models that summarize the complex 3-D circulation patterns and their interaction with the synoptic flow. The identified air mass boundaries, the interpretation of the lake-breeze circulation, and best estimates for air parcel circulation times in the lake-breeze circulation (1.2 to 3.0 h enabled formation rates of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA/ΔCO and SO42− to be determined. The formation rate for OOA, relative to excess CO, was found to be 2.5–6.2 μg m−3 ppmv−1 h−1 and the SO42− formation rate was 1.8–4.6% h−1. The formation rates are enhanced relative to regional background rates implying that lake-breeze circulations are an important dynamic in the formation of SO42− and secondary organic aerosol. The presence of cumulus clouds associated with the lake-breeze fronts suggests that these enhancements could be due to cloud processes. Additionally, the effective confinement of pollutants along the shoreline may have limited pollutant dilution

  17. A study of the Merritt Island, Florida sea breeze flow regimes and their effect on surface heat and moisture fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubes, M. T.; Cooper, H. J.; Smith, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected during the Convective and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment were analyzed as part of an investigation of the sea breeze in the vicinity of Merritt Island, Florida. Analysis of near-surface divergence fields shows that the classical 24-hour oscillation in divergence over the island due to the direct sea breeze circulation is frequently disrupted and exhibits two distinct modes: the classical sea breeze pattern and deviations from that pattern. A comparison of clear day surface energy fluxes with fluxes on other days indicates that changes in magnitudes were dominated by the presence or absence of clouds. Non-classical sea breeze days tended to lose more available energy in the morning than classical sea breeze days due to earlier development of small cumulus over the island. A composite storm of surface winds, surface energy fluxes, rainfall, and satellite visible data was constructed. A spectral transmittance over the visible wavelengths for the cloud cover resulting from the composite storm was calculated. It is shown that pre-storm transmittances of 0.8 fall to values near 0.1 as the downdraft moves directly over the site. It is also found that under post-composite storm conditions of continuous clear sky days, 3.5 days are required to evaporate back into the atmosphere the latent heat energy lost to the surface by rainfall.

  18. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of a front which passed the coast between the North Sea and northern Germany and thereby experienced some modifications of its mesoscale characteristics. The event was observed during the field experiment FRONTEX'89. The two-dimensional non-hydrostatic simulations presented in this paper resemble some of the observed characteristics and yield a detailed description of the evolution of the surface front. Over the sea several narrow frontal rain bands develop in the boundary layer which becomes unstable due to the increasing sea surface temperature near the coast. The rain bands move forward relative to the front due to the cross frontal circulation which is enhanced by the release of latent heat in the ascending warm air and by the cooling of the cold air below by evaporating precipitation. Over the heated land surface a sea-breeze front develops ahead of the synoptic-scale cold front. The strong frontal gradients of the sea-breeze front mask the broader frontal zone of the cold front at the ground. The sea-breeze front triggers deep convection ahead of the cold front in the afternoon and takes over all characteristics of the synoptic-scale front in the evening. The simulations show the mechanisms that caused the observed evolution and modification of the synoptic-scale cold front. They emphasize the strong influence of the surface heat fluxes on the characteristics of fronts on the mesoscale. The most important feature of the numerical model, necessary for the proper representation of the frontal characteristics on the mesoscale, is its high resolution. The simulations are restricted by the difficulties of finding an initial state and appropriate boundary conditions so that the results fit the observations for a long time period and that spin-up problems are avoided.

  19. Using Breeze for Communication and Assessment of Internships: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Wilkinson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An important component of internships is the connection between students, universities and employers. “High-quality internships . . . encourage contact between faculty and students as well as develop cooperation among students,” (Implementing and Assessing Internships, 2002, 67. This “good practice” must exist to ensure good performance assessment (Implementing and assessing internships 2002. Students in an internship program were given web cameras and access to the software Breeze to use for a video journal. Focus groups were conducted to determine the students’ opinions of using this type of assessment. Students overwhelmingly preferred this type of assessment and saw the benefits of using the technology beyond the internship.

  20. Atmospheric diffusion at coastal site in presence of sea-breeze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coastal sites present special features so much by the dominant wind system then by the lower layers of the atmosphere. Two types of experiments were handled on a coastal site in presence of sea breeze. First, vertical atmospheric sounding by radiosounding and by throwing experimental balloons; then the discharge of tracer: the SF6. The first experiment lead us to put in a prominent position the Internal Boundary Layer and the determination of its height. Whereas the second experiment allowed us to estimate the diffusion parameters of the site as well as to obtain interesting conclusions on diffusivity of the environment studied and the influence of certain factors

  1. Reducibility study of Rossetta ilmenite ore briquettes and powder with coke breeze at 800-1100°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd el Gawad Hala H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite ore fine and coke breeze as reduced material were briquetted with different amounts of organic materials such as molasses or pitch were studied in this investigation. The produced briquettes at reasonable condition were reduced in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature range 800 - 1100oC to determine the factors controlling the reduction and to determine the controlling mechanism. Also ilmenite ore fine with coke breeze were reduced at the same temperature range in nitrogen atmosphere without briquetting process, for the sake of comparison.

  2. Numerical simulation of sea breeze characteristics observed at tropical coastal site, Kalpakkam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Jamima; J Lakshminarasimhan

    2004-06-01

    Sea breeze characteristics around Kalpakkam tropical coastal site are studied using an Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) mesoscale model, which is non-hydrostatic, compressible atmospheric prediction model following the terrain coordinate system. Various options such as surface physics, atmospheric radiation physics, Coriolis force, microphysics, cumulus parameterization and 1.5 level TKE closure scheme for diffusion are included in the model. A joint meteorological field experiment was carried out by IITM-Pune and IGCAR at Kalpakkam by deploying state-of-the-art sensors and tether balloon systems for observing the height profiles of meteorological parameters. The data obtained from the field experiment are used here to compare the results from numerical simulations. From the simulated results, it is seen that duration of the sea breeze is 6 hours which agrees well with the observations. The height of the Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) is also simulated from the vertical profiles of potential temperature. Simulated wind speed and wind directions are compared with the 50m tower data and potential temperature profiles are compared with the kytoon data. Results are in good agreement with the observed values except during night time wherein a small difference is seen in the wind speed.

  3. 33 CFR 334.775 - Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola Bay, Pensacola and Gulf Breeze, Fla.; naval restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola Bay, Pensacola and Gulf Breeze, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.775 Section 334.775 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.775 Naval Air Station Pensacola, Pensacola Bay, Pensacola and Gulf...

  4. Impact of land-sea breezes at different scales on the diurnal rainfall in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, Shih-Yu

    2014-10-01

    The formation mechanism of diurnal rainfall in Taiwan is commonly recognized as a result of local forcings involving solar thermal heating and island-scale land-sea breeze (LSB) interacting with orography. This study found that the diurnal variation of the large-scale circulation over the East Asia-Western North Pacific (EAWNP) modulates considerably the diurnal rainfall in Taiwan. It is shown that the interaction between the two LSB systems—the island-scale LSB and the large-scale LSB over EAWNP—facilitates the formation of the early morning rainfall in western Taiwan, afternoon rainfall in central Taiwan, and nighttime rainfall in eastern Taiwan. Moreover, the post-1998 strengthening of a shallow, low-level southerly wind belt along the coast of Southeast China appears to intensify the diurnal rainfall activity in Taiwan. These findings reveal the role of the large-scale LSB and its long-term variation in the modulation of local diurnal rainfall.

  5. The interaction of the sea breezes with the boundary layer along the Red Sea coast and its effect on the dust transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Basit Ali; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2013-04-01

    Sea and land breezes are common meteorological phenomena in most coastal regions of the world. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breezes modifies the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by forming a convective internal boundary layer (CIBL), which can trap dust and other pollutants in the thin convective layer while the return flow can transport dust and pollutants from the land towards the sea. We used the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system to study the structure and dynamics of sea breezes in the middle region of the Red Sea (around 25°N) on the western coast of Saudi Arabia. Results showed the existence of two thermal circulations on both the western and eastern coasts of the Red Sea. The modeling results are consistent with observations from buoys and meteorological towers along the Saudi Arabian coast and suggest that the onset of the sea breeze in this area typically occurs at about 0800 Local Standard Time (LST). The sea breeze decays after 1700 LST, although the timing of the onset and decay could be affected by the sea-land thermal gradient, topography, the sea-land orientation and the direction and strength of the wind. The depth of the predicted inflow layer reaches one kilometer while the height of sea breeze head may reach three kilometers. The rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, along the Saudi coast line, restricts the inland propagation of the sea breeze and significantly affects the structure of the flow. We conducted a detailed process analysis of our simulation results to understand the sea breeze and PBL interaction and its effect on local meteorology and dust transport.

  6. Atmospheric electrical field measurements near a fresh water reservoir and the formation of the lake breeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lopes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to access the effect of the lakes in the atmospheric electrical field, measurements have been carried out near a large man-made lake in southern Portugal, the Alqueva reservoir, during the ALqueva hydro-meteorological EXperiment 2014. The purpose of these conjoint experiments was to study the impact of the Alqueva reservoir on the atmosphere, in particular on the local atmospheric electric environment by comparing measurements taken in the proximity of the lake. Two stations 10 km apart were used, as they were located up- and down-wind of the lake (Amieira and Parque Solar, respectively, in reference to the dominant northwestern wind direction. The up-wind station shows lower atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG values than the ones observed in the down-wind station between 12 and 20 UTC. The difference in the atmospheric electric PG between the up-wind and the down-wind station is ~30 V/m during the day. This differential occurs mainly during the development of a lake breeze, between 10 and 18 UTC, as a consequence of the surface temperature gradient between the surrounding land and the lake water. In the analysis presented, a correlation is found between the atmospheric electric PG differences and both wind speed and temperature gradients over the lake, thus supporting the influence of the lake breeze over the observed PG variation in the two stations. Two hypotheses are provided to explain this observation: (1 The air that flows from the lake into the land station is likely to increase the local electric conductivity through the removal of ground dust and the transport of cleaner air from higher altitudes with significant light ion concentrations. With such an increase in conductivity, it is expected to see a reduction of the atmospheric electric PG; (2 the resulting air flow over the land station carries negative ions formed by wave splashing in the lake's water surface, as a result of the so-called balloelectric effect

  7. The influence of the summer sea breeze on thermal comfort in Funchal (Madeira). A contribution to tourism and urban planning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Antonio; Lopes, Sergio; Joao Alcoforado, Maria [Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal). Centro der Estudos Geograficos; Matzarakis, Andreas [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorological Inst.

    2011-10-15

    Tourism plays a crucial role for the development of coastal areas. Despite the mildness of Madeira's climate, very hot days can occur during summer, a situation to which most tourists from northern Europe (the majority of foreign tourists) are poorly adapted. As sea breezes strongly contribute to moderate heat stress in urban environments, their influence on the thermal comfort on the island has been studied. Sea breezes occurred on 84 % of the days during the period under study (May to October 2006). They usually start around 09:30 h and end after 22:00 h, with an average duration of about 12:50 hours and a mean velocity of 2.9 m/s. Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET) was used to evaluate the thermal comfort of a sample of days during the summer of 2006. It was concluded that most of the sites in the city are ''slightly comfortable'' during normal days with sea breeze, but only shore sites and the highest green areas offer some comfort during hot days. Inside the city, the thermal perception is generally ''hot'' and strong heat stress can occur. As sea breezes are important to mitigate heat stress, some basic guidelines were presented: urban planners should take advantage of this wind system avoiding dense construction near the shoreline that would act as a barrier to the renewal of the air inside the city. In terms of tourism, planners and local authorities should provide solutions to mitigate the negative effects during hot periods, creating a system to warn and relocate more vulnerable tourists to places near the shore line, to the mountains, to gardens and air-conditioned buildings. In combination with other components (beauty of the island, gastronomy, cultural values and safety), climate information can be a factor of attractiveness to tourists. (orig.)

  8. Air pollutant transport in a coastal environment. Part 1: Two-dimensional simulations of sea-breeze and mountain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rong; Turco, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the southern California coastal region, observations of the vertical distributions of pollutants show that maximum concentrations can occur within temperature inversion layers well above the surface. A mesoscale model is used to study the dynamical phenomena that cause such layers, including sea breezes and mountain flows, and to study the characteristics of air pollutant transport in a coastal environment capped by a temperature inversion. The mathematical and physical structure of the model is described. Two-dimensional simulations corresponding to four configurations of coastal plains and mountains are discussed. The simulations reveal that pollutant transport over a coastal plain is strongly influenced by the topographic configuration, including the height of coastal mountains and their distance from the coastline. Sea breezes induced by land-sea thermal contrasts, as well as upslope winds induced along mountain flanks, both create vertical transport that can lead to the formation of elevated pollution layers. The sea-breeze circulation generates pollution layers by undercutting the mixed layer and lofting pollutants into the stable layer. Heating of mountain slopes acts to vent pollutants above the mountain ridge during the day; during the evening, pollutants can be injected directly into the inversion layer from the decaying upslope flows. In a land-sea configuration with mountains close to the coastline, the sea breeze and heated-mountain flow are strongly coupled. In the afternoon, this interaction can produce upslope flow from which polluted air is detrained into the inversion layer as a return circulation. When the mountains lie farther inland, however, pollutants may be trapped aloft when the mixed layer stabilizes in the late afternoon. As the nocturnal boundary layer forms over the coast in the evening, polluted mixed-layer air is effectively left behind in the inversion layer. In the Los Angeles Basin, the formation mechanism for elevated

  9. Simulating Sea Breeze Type Climatologies: Implications for Wind Energy, Weather Forecasting and Sailing in the Southern North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The energy industry is currently undergoing a revolution. In the southern North Sea, renewable energy production targets, set by European governments to counter growing concerns over climate change, have sparked an initiative to rapidly construct a large number of offshore wind farms. To meet the targets, the industry must overcome many challenges, one of which is to capitalize on the coastal and offshore wind resource. One particular relative component of the sea breeze system, including the...

  10. Analysis of the Sea-breeze Eolic potential in the Llobregat Delta area using Aerodyn numerical simulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Olmeda Rabadan, David; Rojas Gregorio, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    From hourly data of wind speed from 1993 to 2011 recorded in the automatic Weather Station of the Meteorological Weather Service placed in Viladecans (Llobregat Delta) a stadistic study will be realized during the Sea-breeze months (march to September) to determine the range of wind speed at several height. From these data and using a average hourly wind speed data series built a numerical simulation at several height will be done to determine the eolic potential to create electric energy. ...

  11. Interstellar neutral helium in the heliosphere from IBEX observations. IV. Flow vector, Mach number, and abundance of the Warm Breeze

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiak, M A; Bzowski, M; Sokol, J M; Fuselier, S A; Galli, A; Heirtzler, D; Kucharek, H; Leonard, T W; Moebius, D J McComas E; Park, J; Schwadron, N A; Wurz, P

    2016-01-01

    With the velocity vector and temperature of the pristine interstellar neutral (ISN) He recently obtained with high precision from a coordinated analysis summarized by McComas et al.2015b, we analyzed the IBEX observations of neutral He left out from this analysis. These observations were collected during the ISN observation seasons 2010---2014 and cover the region in the Earth's orbit where the Warm Breeze persists. We used the same simulation model and a very similar parameter fitting method to that used for the analysis of ISN He. We approximated the parent population of the Warm Breeze in front of the heliosphere with a homogeneous Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function and found a temperature of $\\sim 9\\,500$ K, an inflow speed of 11.3 km s$^{-1}$, and an inflow longitude and latitude in the J2000 ecliptic coordinates $251.6^\\circ$, $12.0^\\circ$. The abundance of the Warm Breeze relative to the interstellar neutral He is 5.7\\% and the Mach number is 1.97. The newly found inflow direction of the Warm Bree...

  12. Effect of the catalyzing combustion of coke breeze on the energy saving in sinter process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of additive ZC-1 for catalyzing combustion of coke breeze in sintering of iron one fines was studied by using X-ray Diffraction, TGA and GC (Gas Chromatographer), by which energy saving was achieved on sinter pot test. The results show that the distance between cleavage planes is enlarged and the π-electrons are re-distibuted because of the insertion of cations/molecules of ZC-1 into the cleavage planes of carbon , resulting in the weakening of C-C bond, improving the adsorption of oxygen and lowering the activation energy of gasification of carbon from 25.8 kJ/mol to 18.9 kJ/mol , and the burning rate being increased and combustion residual reduced, all of which can lead to lower solid fuel consumption . Compared with the sintering test without addition of additives , the solid fuel consumption is reduced by 16.0%, meanwhile, the rate of finished sinter, the output of finished sinter and the tumbling index are increased by 2.03%, 7.0% and 3.71%, respectively, with incorporating 0.2% of additive ZC-1 in the sintering mixture, which is in agreement with the catalyzing mechanism of ZC-1.

  13. Fire Whirl Evolution Observed during a Valley Wind-Sea Breeze Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Seto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This observational study documented the atmospheric environment of a prescribed fire conducted in a narrow valley when a small fire whirl developed during a mesoscale wind reversal. Based on analysis of in situ meteorological measurements, it is hypothesized that the fire whirl formed due to the presence of strong vertical wind shear caused by the interaction of a sea breeze front with a weaker up-valley wind. Vorticity generated by the interaction of the wind shear and the fire front was estimated to be ~0.2 s−1. Peak turbulence kinetic energy was caused by the wind shear rather than the buoyancy generated by the fire front. It was also found that the convective Froude number itself may not be sufficient for fire whirl prediction since it is less relevant to the near-surface boundary-layer turbulence generated by environmental wind shear. Observations from this case study indicate that even low-intensity prescribed fires can result in the formation of fire whirls due to mesoscale changes in the ambient atmospheric environment.

  14. Evaluation of the atmospheric model WRF on the Qatar peninsula for a converging sea-breeze event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Nayak, Sashikant; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Qatar, a narrow peninsula covering an area of 11437 sq km, extends northwards into the Arabian Gulf for about 160km and has a maximum width of 88km. The convex shape of the coast-line and narrowness of the peninsula results in the Qatar region experiencing complex wind patterns. The geometry is favorable for formation of the land-sea breeze from both coastal sides of the peninsula. This can lead to the development of sea breeze convergence zones in the middle of the country. Although circulations arising from diurnal thermal contrast of land and water are amongst most intensively studied meteorological phenomena, there is no reported study for the Qatar peninsula and very few studies are reported for the Arabian Gulf region as whole. It is necessary to characterize the wind field for applications such as assessing air pollution, renewable energy etc. A non-hydrostatic mesoscale model, Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) with a nested high resolution grid permits the investigation of such fine scale phenomena. Data from eighteen land based Automated Weather Stations (AWS) and two offshore buoys deployed and maintained by the Qatar Meteorological Department were analyzed. Based on the analysis a clear case of sea breeze convergence were seen on 18 September 2015. Model simulations were used to investigate the synoptic conditions associated with the formation of this event. The season is characterized by week ambient north westerly wind over the Arabian Gulf. The WRF model performance is validated using observed in-situ data. Model simulations show that vertical extent of sea breeze cell was up to 1 km and the converging sea breeze regions were characterized with high vertical velocities. The WRF simulation also revealed that with high resolution, the model is capable of reproducing the fine scale patterns accurately. The error of predictions in the inner domain (highest resolution) are found to be relatively lower than coarse resolution domain. The maximum wind speed

  15. Simulation of oasis breeze circulation in the arid region of the Northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Shihua; AN Xingqin; CHEN Yüchun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the process of oasis-desert circulation (ODC) is simulated by MM5V3.5 model through designing an ideal oasis-desert scheme and assuming that initial atmosphere is at rest (V = 0). The findings showed that the key of forming special oasis boundary structure is the difference of energy and water between oasis and desert. The evaporation of oasis surface consumes heat energy, and the low temperature of oasis causes an oasis breeze circulation (OBC), which drives an ODC with a downdraft over the oasis and an updraft over the desert. Later, the cold, dry and stable boundary over oasis is gradually formed, on the contrary,the atmospheric boundary over desert on the edge of oasis is hot, humid and unstable and its height is about 600 hPa. The updraft over the desert forms a wet ring that acts as a vertical wall weakening the low-level moisture exchange between the oasis and desert. The downdraft of OBC increases the atmospheric stability that reduces the oasis evaporation. The low-level outflow from the oasis (into the desert) prevents the dry, hot air flowing from the desert into the oasis.Thus an oasis self-preservation mechanism may be formed due to OBC. The horizontal area influenced by oasis is twice as oasis area and the vertical range is four times as oasis. The ODC is strong in the daytime and reaches the strongest at 17:00, and the influenced area is the largest at 20:00.

  16. Uma teoria termodinâmica para brisas: teste utilizando simulações numéricas A thermodynamic theory for breezes: test using numeric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clênia Rodrigues Alcântara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi testar uma teoria termodinâmica em brisas marítimas-terrestres acopladas com brisas de vale-montanha através de simulações numéricas tridimensionais em uma região da costa leste do Nordeste Brasileiro, considerando a presença e a ausência da topografia. Embora o contraste de temperatura entre as superfícies seja importante na formação da brisa, a eficiência termodinâmica é fundamental na determinação da sua intensidade. Tem-se que a inclinação faz com que a diferença de pressão entre dois pontos fique maior durante o dia e menor durante a noite contribuindo para a formação de brisas marítimas mais intensas e de brisas terrestres menos intensas, respectivamente. A máxima queda de pressão ocorre por volta de três horas antes da máxima intensidade da brisa. Isso porque grande parte da energia disponibilizada para as circulações é gasta para vencer dissipação, principalmente, no período diurno, quando esses processos são realmente efetivos. Do ponto de vista puramente termodinâmico a inclinação da montanha atua para intensificar a brisa durante o dia e para enfraquecê-la durante a noite.In this work we test a thermodynamic theory for sea-land breeze coupled with valley-mountain breeze through tri-dimensional numeric simulations. We verify the presence of such a breeze in Northeast Brazil's east coast and perform experiments with and without the topography of the region. Although the temperature contrast between two surfaces is important in forming the breezes, the thermodynamic efficiency is a key parameter for the breeze intensity. The presence of the slope causes the pressure difference between two points to increase during the day and to decrease during the night. This contributes for more intense daytime breeze and less intense nighttime ones. The maximum pressure drop occurs about three hours prior the maximum intensity of the sea breeze. This is because most of the available

  17. Interaction Of Mesoscale Convective Systems With The Land - Sea Breezes Along The Guinea Coast Of West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, A.; Omotosho, B. J.; Sylla, M. B.; Fink, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    1-3 hourly METARS/SYNOP observation data of wind (speed and direction), air temperature over land, covering the period 1983-2012, were used in order to characterize land-sea breezes (LSB) over five coastline stations (Abidjan, Accra, Lomé, Cotonou and Ikeja-Lagos) in the Guinean Coast, West Africa. In additional to this, 8 years (2003-2010) sea surface temperature (SST) data from adjacent Atlantic Ocean and monthly METARS/SYNOP observation data of precipitation (1983-2012) were also used. Based on wind speed and direction, the wind roses of all months over all stations have been plotted. These wind roses reveal that, globally, the northerly winds occurred rarely for the months of February, March, and April at Cotonou (Benin Republic).This is seen for other stations (Lomé and Accra). The night/morning time northerly winds appear at all stations, except Accra where there is no northerly wind or is very weak. According to the stations basis, the period of that night/morning northerly winds varies, except in summer period (July - September), where the normal s/w monsoon winds can weaken override at all stations. Set criteria based on the diurnal reversal of wind direction, and the thermal gradient necessary to drive the wind circulation, was used to identify land-sea breeze days. On station-wide basis, sea-breezes occur, at least all period of year, but less frequent in the summer months, where the minimum value of monthly mean temperature gradient is observed for selected stations.

  18. Effect of Sea Breeze on Air Pollution in the Greater Athens Area. Part II: Analysis of Different Emission Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Paola; Thunis, Philippe; Martilli, Alberto; Clappier, Alain

    2000-04-01

    The Mediterranean Campaign of Photochemical Tracers-Transport and Chemical Evolution that took place in the greater Athens area from 20 August to 20 September 1994 has confirmed the role of sea-breeze circulation in photochemical smog episodes that had been suggested already by a number of experiments and numerical studies.The meteorological and photochemical modeling of this campaign were discussed in Part I. Part II focuses on the study of the 14 September photochemical smog event associated with a sea-breeze circulation. The objective of the study is to identify and to understand better the nonlinear processes that produce high ozone concentrations. In particular, the effect of land and sea breezes is investigated by isolating the effect of nighttime and daytime emissions on ozone concentrations. The same principle then is used to isolate the effect on ozone concentrations of the two main sources of emissions in the greater Athens area: the industrial area around Elefsis and the Athens urban area. Last, the buildup of ozone from one day to another is investigated.From this study, it comes out that ozone production in the Athens area is mainly a 1-day phenomenon. The increased values of photochemical pollutant (up to 130 ppb at ground level) reached during summertime late afternoons on mountain slopes to the north and northeast of the city are related mainly to the current-day emissions. Nevertheless, the recirculation of old pollutants can have an important effect on ozone concentrations in downtown Athens, the southern part of the peninsula, and over the sea, especially near Aigina Island.

  19. An assessment of the sea breeze energy potential using small wind turbines in peri-urban coastal areas

    OpenAIRE

    Mazón Bueso, Jordi; Rojas Gregorio, José Ignacio; Jou, Jordi; Valle, Aaron; Olmeda, David; Sanchez,Carlos

    2015-01-01

    From wind speed data recorded hourly at 2 m high during 18 years (1993-2010) in the Llobregat Delta (15 km south of Barcelona city; northeast of the Iberian Peninsula), wind speed distributions at 10 m high were computed for the whole year and for the sea breeze period (from March 1 to September 30, from 10 to 19 local time). Weibull probability density functions fitted to the distributions were used to assess the wind energy generated by two off-grid small wind turbines: the IT-PE-100 and th...

  20. Physical training and weight loss in dogs lead to transcriptional changes in genes involved in the glucose-transport pathway in muscle and adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Uribe, Juber; Vitger, Anne D; Ritz, Christian; Fredholm, Merete; Bjørnvad, Charlotte R; Cirera, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a worldwide problem in humans and domestic animals. Interventions, including a combination of dietary management and exercise, have proven to be effective for inducing weight loss in humans. In companion animals, the role of exercise in the management of obesity has received relatively little attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in the transcriptome of key energy metabolism genes in muscle and adipose tissues in response to diet-induced weight loss alone, or combined with exercise in dogs. Overweight pet dogs were enrolled on a weight loss programme, based on calorie restriction and physical training (FD group, n = 5) or calorie restriction alone (DO group, n = 7). mRNA expression of 12 genes and six microRNAs were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In the FD group, FOXO1 and RAC1 were expressed at lower levels in adipose tissue, whereas ESRRA and AKT2 were more highly expressed in muscle, when compared with the DO group. Comparing expression before and after the intervention, in the DO group, nine genes and three microRNAs showed significant altered expression in adipose tissue (PPARG, ADIPOQ and FOXO1; P ESRRA, AKT2, PGC1a and mir-23; P < 0.001) in muscle. Thus, calorie restriction causes regulation of several metabolic genes in both tissues. The mild exercise, incorporated into this study design, was sufficient to elicit transcriptional changes in adipose and muscle tissues, suggesting a positive effect on glucose metabolism. The study findings support inclusion of exercise in management of canine obesity.

  1. Physical training and weight loss in dogs lead to transcriptional changes in genes involved in the glucose-transport pathway in muscle and adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Uribe, Juber; Vitger, Anne D; Ritz, Christian; Fredholm, Merete; Bjørnvad, Charlotte R; Cirera, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a worldwide problem in humans and domestic animals. Interventions, including a combination of dietary management and exercise, have proven to be effective for inducing weight loss in humans. In companion animals, the role of exercise in the management of obesity has received relatively little attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in the transcriptome of key energy metabolism genes in muscle and adipose tissues in response to diet-induced weight loss alone, or combined with exercise in dogs. Overweight pet dogs were enrolled on a weight loss programme, based on calorie restriction and physical training (FD group, n = 5) or calorie restriction alone (DO group, n = 7). mRNA expression of 12 genes and six microRNAs were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In the FD group, FOXO1 and RAC1 were expressed at lower levels in adipose tissue, whereas ESRRA and AKT2 were more highly expressed in muscle, when compared with the DO group. Comparing expression before and after the intervention, in the DO group, nine genes and three microRNAs showed significant altered expression in adipose tissue (PPARG, ADIPOQ and FOXO1; P muscle. Thus, calorie restriction causes regulation of several metabolic genes in both tissues. The mild exercise, incorporated into this study design, was sufficient to elicit transcriptional changes in adipose and muscle tissues, suggesting a positive effect on glucose metabolism. The study findings support inclusion of exercise in management of canine obesity. PMID:26701817

  2. Utilizing TRMM to Analyze Sea Breeze Thunderstorm Patterns During El Nino Southern Oscillations and Their Effects upon Available Fresh Water for South Florida Agricultural Planning and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Clayton; Billiot, Amanda; Lee, Lucas; McKee, Jake

    2010-01-01

    Water is in high demand for farmers regardless of where you go. Unfortunately, farmers in southern Florida have fewer options for water supplies than public users and are often limited to using available supplies from surface and ground water sources which depend in part upon variable weather patterns. There is an interest by the agricultural community about the effect weather has on usable surface water, however, research into viable weather patterns during La Nina and El Nino has yet to be researched. Using rainfall accumulation data from NASA Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite, this project s purpose was to assess the influence of El Nino and La Nina Oscillations on sea breeze thunderstorm patterns, as well as general rainfall patterns during the summer season in South Florida. Through this research we were able to illustrate the spatial and temporal variations in rainfall accumulation for each oscillation in relation to major agricultural areas. The study period for this project is from 1998, when TRMM was first launched, to 2009. Since sea breezes in Florida typically occur in the months of May through October, these months were chosen to be the months of the study. During this time, there were five periods of El Nino and two periods of La Nina, with a neutral period separating each oscillation. In order to eliminate rainfall from systems other than sea breeze thunderstorms, only days that were conducive to the development of a sea breeze front were selected.

  3. A Tropical Lake Breeze System : The Effect on Surface NO, NO2, O3, and CO2 Mixing Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Moura, M. A.; Eça D'Almeida Rocha, C. H.; Trebs, I.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2003-04-01

    During the Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment 2001 (CLAIRE2001, July 2001), we investigated diel variations of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO_2), ozone (O_3) and carbon dioxide (CO_2) mixing ratios at Balbina Limnological Station (01^o55'994''S, 59^o28'071''W, Amazonia,Brazil). We applied sensitive and species-specific chemiluminescence (NO, NO_2, O_3) and NDIR (CO_2) analysers to record ambient mixing ratios on 1 min intervals. Simultaneously, we extensively monitored (micro-)meteorological qauntities (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and -direction, thermal stratification, rainfall intensity, soil temperatures and moisture, as well as radiation fluxes (global, net, short wave, NO_2 photolysis, and photosynthetic active)). Balbina Limnological Station is located just a few hundred meters south of a 2.360 km^2 hydroelectric power dam (Usina Hidrelétrica de Balbina) and about 100m north from the edge of a primary rainforest. Marked differences in surface albedo and heat storage capacity generate a local wind system, the lake breeze, which advects air from the dam (09:00 to 15:00 local) and from the rainforest (18:00 to 06:00 local), respectively. Generally, we observed marked diel variations of NO, NO_2, O_3, and CO_2 (high/low levels during night/day) and O_3 (low/high levels during night/day). Especially in the tropics, this behaviour is usually related to (a) accumulation of soil emissions (NO, CO_2), chemical reactions (NO, from NO_2-O_3 reaction) and surface destruction (O_3) in a shallow and strong nocturnal boundary layer inversion, and (b) to soil emission (NO), photochemical reactions (NO-NO_2-O_3), dry deposition/plant uptake (NO_2, O_3, and CO_2) and strong turbulent vertical mixing in the daytime mixed layer. However, under the specific conditions of the lake breeze soil emission and dry deposition/ plant uptake can be neglected during daytime. Consequently, the investigation of daytime mixing ratios can be confined to

  4. Gene Transcription and Virulence Potential of Listeria monocytogenes Strains After Exposure to Acidic and NaCl Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Inger; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    response and invasion (clpC, clpP, inlA, inlB, prfA, and sigB) were induced in 4140. Long-term adaptation of EGD-e to NaCl stress increased transcription of genes important for the intracellular life cycle (actA, hly, iap, inlA, inlB, plcA, plcB, and prfA), while few changes were observed for 4140...

  5. Studying the pelletization of rosseta ilmenite concentrate with coke breeze using molasses and reduction kinetics of produced pellets at 800-1150ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hussiny N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite ore fine and coke breeze as reduced material which were pelletized with different amounts of molasses were studied in this investigation. The produced pellets at optimum condition were reduced in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature range 800-1150ºC to determine the controlling mechanism. The reduction indicated that the reduction rates increased as the temperature increased and the controlling mechanism of reaction rate is solid-solid reaction.

  6. A numerical study of sea breeze circulation observed at a tropical site Kalpakkam on the east coast of India, under different synoptic flow situations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C V Srinivas; R Venkatesan; K M Somayaji; A Bagavath Singh

    2006-10-01

    A simulation study of the sea breeze circulation and thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) characteristics has been carried out at the tropical site Kalpakkam on the east coast of India, for operational atmospheric dispersion prediction. The community based PSU/NCAR MM5 Mesoscale meteorological model is used for the study. Three cases on typical days in summer (24 May 2003), southwest (SW) monsoon (1 July 2001) winter season (2 February 2003) with different largescale flow pattern are studied. The MM5 model is used with 3 nested domains with horizontal grid resolutions 18 km, 6 km and 2 km and 26 vertical levels. The model is integrated for 24 hours in the above cases with initial and boundary conditions taken from NCEP-FNL analyses data. Observations of 10 meteorological stations and coastal boundary layer experiments conducted at Kalpakkam are used for comparison and validation of the simulation. The characteristics of simulated sea breeze and TIBL at Kalpakkam are seen to vary in the above cases according to the prevailing large-scale winds and surface fluxes. The sea breeze circulation is seen to develop early with larger strength and inland propagation in the summer case under the influence of moderate synoptic wind and strong heating conditions than in the SW monsoon and winter cases. The horizontal and vertical extents of TIBL are found to be larger in the summer case than in other cases. Although model parameters agree in general with observations, all the fine features are not clearly captured and some slowness in model sea breeze development is also seen. The results indicate the need to improve i) the initial conditions by assimilation of available surface/upper air observations to reduce model bias and ii) surface net radiation parameterisation. The model could predict the essential features of the local circulation and further improvement is expected with better initial condition data and incorporation of more realistic surface data.

  7. The role of refinery flaring events and bay breezes on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Fried, A.; Pickering, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area with maximum 8-hour average ozone peaking along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv. The NASA P-3B aircraft observed plumes from refinery flares west and northwest of Galveston Bay that were transported over the water. Continental air pollution from the north was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and a CMAQ model simulation with integrated source apportionment, which tracks the contribution of emissions source groups and regions on ozone concentrations.

  8. The role of bay breezes and regional transport on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Estes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area. Maximum 8-hour average ozone peaked along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv, at La Porte Sylvan Beach. Continental air pollution from the north and northeast was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front at La Porte Sylvan Beach. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and WRF and CMAQ model simulations.

  9. Severe Weather Caused by Heat Island and Sea Breeze Effects in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vemado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP is one of the most populated regions of the planet with one of the largest impervious regions as well. This research work aims to characterize MASP heat island (HI effect and its interaction with the local sea breeze (SB inflow in rainfall amounts and deep convection. The combined SB-HI produces direct circulation over the MASP and produces severe weather and socioeconomic impacts. All SB-HI episodes between 2005 and 2008 are identified and analyzed with surface and upper air measurements, weather radar, and satellite data. The current work indicates that intense SB-HI episodes are related to air and dew point temperatures above 30°C and 20°C, respectively, right after the passage of the SB front over MASP. Results indicate that the precipitation related to SB-HI episodes is up to 600 mm or about four times higher than that in rural or less urbanized areas in its surroundings. Measurements indicate that 74% of SB-HI episodes are related to NW winds in earlier afternoon hours. Moving cold fronts in southern Brazil tend to intensify the SB-HI circulation in MASP. A conceptual model of these patterns is presented in this paper.

  10. Impact of continuously varied SST on land-sea breezes and ozone concentration over south-western coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa-Woon; Kim, Yoo-Keun; Jeon, Won-Bae; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Hyuk

    2011-11-01

    Several comparison studies including numerical experiments were carried out at the well urbanized Gwangyang Bay region, Korea, to clarify the relationship between the continuously varied SST distribution and meteorology and how that impacts the ozone concentration. The numerical models used in this study were Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and Comprehensive Air quality Model with eXtensions (CAMx) for meteorological and photochemical ozone fields, respectively. Based on buoy observations, the sea surface temperature (SST) had a noticeable influence on the near surface wind field and distribution of photochemical ozone because the mean SST near Gwangyang Bay changed by 2.8 °C over the five day period. Sea breeze with temporally varied SST was better represented than that estimated without the SST variation. Temporally changed SST distribution and its impact are more crucial factors for estimating the ozone concentration under weak synoptic conditions. And the accuracy of the estimated ozone concentration associated with the time varied SST tends to depend on the distance from the coastline. The acquisition of ocean conditions, including temporal variation in the SST, is indispensible for assessing and predicting the air quality, especially in well urbanized area near the coast.

  11. Teoria para o trabalho de expansão aplicada às brisas do nordeste Brasileiro Theory for expansion work applied to breezes of Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clênia R. Alcântara

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo investiga-se numericamente a interação entre brisas marítima-terrestre e de vale-montanha, que ocorrem no nordeste brasileiro devido à presença do Planalto da Borborema, aplicando o trabalho de expansão associado ao ramo inferior das circulações. Resultados da teoria da máquina térmica são comparados aos resultados 3D, obtidos com a versão brasileira do modelo RAMS. Os resultados indicaram que o efeito do contraste de temperatura no trabalho ligado às circulações (Wa, isoladamente, contribui para a formação de brisas marítimas mais intensas e de brisas terrestres menos intensas. Na realidade, o que se observa são brisas terrestres com intensidades iguais ou até maiores que das brisas marítimas. Assim, a contribuição da montanha para a intensidade das circulações de brisa no período noturno mostra-se extremamente não-linear. O trabalho de expansão que realmente está ligado às circulações, contribui em apenas 7% para o trabalho total. Dessa forma, a maior parte do trabalho total está associada ao trabalho de compressão que a atmosfera realiza para compensar a perda por resfriamento radiativo, e muito da energia disponibilizada para as circulações é gasta para vencer os processos dissipativos.The purpose of this work is to further understand the interactions between sea-land breeze and valley-mountain breeze that occur at the coast of Northeast Brazil due to the presence of the Borborema plateau, using the associated expansion work at the lower branch of these circulations. Results of the thermal machine theory are compared to the 3D results obtained from the Brazilian RAMS model version. The results indicate that the sole effect of temperature contrast on the work associated with circulations (Wa is more intense sea breezes and weaker land breezes. Actually, one can observe land breezes whose intensities are equal or even larger than sea breezes. Thus, the mountain contribution for the intensity of

  12. Time course analysis reveals gene-specific transcript and protein kinetics of adaptation to short-term aerobic exercise training in human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Brendan Egan; Paul L O'Connor; Juleen R. Zierath; Donal J O'Gorman

    2013-01-01

    Repeated bouts of episodic myofibrillar contraction associated with exercise training are potent stimuli for physiological adaptation. However, the time course of adaptation and the continuity between alterations in mRNA expression and protein content are not well described in human skeletal muscle. Eight healthy, sedentary males cycled for 60 min at 80% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) each day for fourteen consecutive days, resulting in an increase in VO2peak of 17.5±3.8%. Skeletal musc...

  13. Aerosol extinction properties over coastal West Bengal Gangetic plain under inter-seasonal and sea breeze influenced transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S.; Priyadharshini, B.; Pani, S. K.; Bharath Kumar, D.; Faruqi, A. R.; Bhanja, S. N.; Mandal, M.

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the atmospheric aerosol extinction properties under an influence of inter-seasonal and sea breeze (SB) transport processes over coastal West Bengal (WB) Gangetic plain (WBGP). The predominant frequency of airmass back trajectory path was through the Arabian Sea (AS) during southwest monsoon (SWmon) and that through the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) during transition to winter (Twin) season and the Bay of Bengal during transition to summer (Tsumm) season. Aerosol surface concentration (Sconc) and aerosol extinction exhibited heterogeneity in the seasonal variability over coastal WBGP with their highest seasonal mean being during winter and summer seasons respectively. Seasonal mean extinction was respectively 17% and 30% higher during winter and summer seasons than that during SWmon. While angstrom exponent (AE) was less than one during SWmon, Tsumm, and summer seasons, it was near to one during Twin and winter monsoon (Wmon), and was more than one during winter season. Relative contribution (%) of upper (at altitude above 1 km) aerosol layer (UAL) to aerosol extinction during summer was four times of that during winter. Seasonally distinct vertical distribution of aerosol extinction associated with meteorological and SB influenced transport and that due to influence of high rise open burning emissions was inferred. Possible aerosol subtypes extracted during days in Tsumm were inferred to be mostly constituted of dust and polluted dust during daytime, in addition to polluted continental and smoke in UAL during nighttime. In contrast to that at nearby urban location (Kolkata, KOL), intensity of updraft of airmass evaluated during evening/SB activity hour (1730 local time, (LT)) at study site (Kharagpur, KGP) was as high as 3.5 times the intensity during near to noon hour (1130 LT); this intensity was the highest along coast of westBengal-Orissa. Enhanced Sconc and relative contribution of UAL to aerosol extinction (58% compared to 36% only at nearby urban

  14. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HELIUM IN THE HELIOSPHERE FROM IBEX OBSERVATIONS. IV. FLOW VECTOR, MACH NUMBER, AND ABUNDANCE OF THE WARM BREEZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, Marzena A.; Swaczyna, P.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBK PAN), 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Galli, A.; Wurz, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Leonard, T. W.; Möbius, E.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N. A., E-mail: mkubiak@cbk.waw.pl [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Following the high-precision determination of the velocity vector and temperature of the pristine interstellar neutral (ISN) He via a coordinated analysis summarized by McComas et al., we analyzed the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations of neutral He left out from this analysis. These observations were collected during the ISN observation seasons 2010–2014 and cover the region in the Earth's orbit where the Warm Breeze (WB) persists. We used the same simulation model and a parameter fitting method very similar to that used for the analysis of ISN He. We approximated the parent population of the WB in front of the heliosphere with a homogeneous Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution function and found a temperature of ∼9500 K, an inflow speed of 11.3 km s{sup −1}, and an inflow longitude and latitude in the J2000 ecliptic coordinates 251.°6, 12.°0. The abundance of the WB relative to ISN He is 5.7% and the Mach number is 1.97. The newly determined inflow direction of the WB, the inflow directions of ISN H and ISN He, and the direction to the center of the IBEX Ribbon are almost perfectly co-planar, and this plane coincides within relatively narrow statistical uncertainties with the plane fitted only to the inflow directions of ISN He, ISN H, and the WB. This co-planarity lends support to the hypothesis that the WB is the secondary population of ISN He and that the center of the Ribbon coincides with the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The common plane for the direction of the inflow of ISN gas, ISN H, the WB, and the local ISMF is given by the normal direction: ecliptic longitude 349.°7 ± 0.°6 and latitude 35.°7 ± 0.6 in the J2000 coordinates, with a correlation coefficient of 0.85.

  15. Modelling the chemistry and transport of bromoform within a sea breeze driven convective system during the SHIVA Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Hamer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We carry out a case study of the transport and chemistry of bromoform and its product gases (PGs in a sea breeze driven convective episode on 19 November 2011 along the North West coast of Borneo during the "Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere" (SHIVA campaign. We use ground based, ship, aircraft and balloon sonde observations made during the campaign, and a 3-D regional online transport and chemistry model capable of resolving clouds and convection explicitly that includes detailed bromine chemistry. The model simulates the temperature, wind speed, wind direction fairly well for the most part, and adequately captures the convection location, timing, and intensity. The simulated transport of bromoform from the boundary layer up to 12 km compares well to aircraft observations to support our conclusions. The model makes several predictions regarding bromine transport from the boundary layer to the level of convective detrainment (11 to 12 km. First, the majority of bromine undergoes this transport as bromoform. Second, insoluble organic bromine carbonyl species are transported to between 11 and 12 km, but only form a small proportion of the transported bromine. Third, soluble bromine species, which include bromine organic peroxides, hydrobromic acid (HBr, and hypobromous acid (HOBr, are washed out efficiently within the core of the convective column. Fourth, insoluble inorganic bromine species (principally Br2 are not washed out of the convective column, but are also not transported to the altitude of detrainment in large quantities. We expect that Br2 will make a larger relative contribution to the total vertical transport of bromine atoms in scenarios with higher CHBr3 mixing ratios in the boundary layer, which have been observed in other regions. Finally, given the highly detailed description of the chemistry, transport and washout of bromine compounds within our simulations, we make a series of recommendations about

  16. Mesoscale modeling of smoke transport over the Southeast Asian Maritime Continent: Interplay of sea breeze, trade wind, typhoon, and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ge, Cui; Yang, Zhifeng; Hyer, Edward J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Chew, Boon-Ning; Mahmud, Mastura; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhang, Meigen

    2013-03-01

    The online-coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRFchem) is used to simulate the transport of smoke particles over the Southeast Asian Maritime Continent during September-October 2006. In this period, dry conditions associated with the moderate El Niño event caused the largest regional biomass burning outbreak since 1997. Smoke emission in WRFchem is specified according to the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) database derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire products. The modeled smoke transport pathway is found to be consistent with the MODIS true color images and measured mass concentration of surface PM10 (particulate matter with diameter less than 10 μm). The interplay of sea/land breezes, typhoons and storms over the subtropical western Pacific Ocean, trade winds, and topographic effects, can be clearly seen in the model simulation. The most severe smoke events in 1-5 October 2006 are found to be associated with the meteorological responses to the typhoon Xangsane (#18) over the western subtropical Pacific Ocean, which moved smoke from Sumatra eastward in the lower troposphere (below 700 hPa), forming smoke layers mixed with and above the boundary layer clouds over Borneo. In contrast, the second largest week-long smoke transport event of 15-18 October 2006 was associated with the seasonal monsoonal transition period, during which smoke plumes were wide spread over the 5°S-5°N zone as a result of (a) the near surface divergence coupled with the 700 hPa bifurcation of wind (flowing both to the west and to the east), and (b) the near-surface southeasterly and easterly winds along the equator transporting smoke from Borneo to Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia. Analysis of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) shows that smoke particles in October 2006 were primarily located within 3.5 km above the surface. Smoke particles contributed roughly half

  17. The mechanism of coking pressure generation I: Effect of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze on coking pressure and plastic coal layer permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Merrick Mahoney; Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato; Anthony Le Bas; Sid McGuire [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2010-07-15

    One of the most important aspects of the cokemaking process is to control and restrain the coking pressure since excessive coking pressure tends to lead to operational problems and oven wall damage. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanism of coking pressure generation, the permeability of the plastic coal layer and the coking pressure for the same single coal and the same blended coal were measured and the relationship between them was investigated. Then the 'inert' (pressure modifier) effect of organic additives such as high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze was studied. The coking pressure peak for box charging with more uniform bulk density distribution was higher than that for top charging. It was found that the coking pressure peaks measured at different institutions (NSC and BHPBilliton) by box charging are nearly the same. The addition of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze to a low volatile matter, high coking pressure coal greatly increased the plastic layer permeability in laboratory experiments and correspondingly decreased the coking pressure. It was found that, high volatile matter coking coal decreases the coking pressure more than semi-anthracite at the same plastic coal layer permeability, which indicates that the coking pressure depends not only on plastic coal layer permeability but also on other factors. Coking pressure is also affected by the contraction behavior of the coke layer near the oven walls and a large contraction decreases the coal bulk density in the oven center and hence the internal gas pressure in the plastic layer. The effect of contraction on coking pressure needs to be investigated further. 33 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. A Discriminative Model for Polyphonic Piano Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliner Graham E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a discriminative model for polyphonic piano transcription. Support vector machines trained on spectral features are used to classify frame-level note instances. The classifier outputs are temporally constrained via hidden Markov models, and the proposed system is used to transcribe both synthesized and real piano recordings. A frame-level transcription accuracy of 68% was achieved on a newly generated test set, and direct comparisons to previous approaches are provided.

  19. Training safely, Training safety

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Wu; An, M.; Jin, Y.; H. Geng

    2014-01-01

    It is the basic requirement of maritime safety education to guarantee the safety of teaching operation while training the crew's occupation safety capability. Marine Training Center of Shanghai Maritime University has undertaken the practical teaching of "marine survival" for many years and come up with the whole safety procedures of training. Based on the requirements of SOLAS convention and regulations of STCW over crew training, this paper introduces the safety allocation, utilization and ...

  20. Florida Agriculture - Utilizing TRMM to Analyze Sea Breeze Thunderstorm Patterns During El Nino Southern Oscillations and Their Effects Upon Available Fresh Water for South Florida Agricultural Planning and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiot, Amanda; Lee, Lucas; McKee, Jake; Cooley, Zachary Clayton; Mitchell, Brandie

    2010-01-01

    This project utilizes Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Landsat satellite data to assess the impact of sea breeze precipitation upon areas of agricultural land use in southern Florida. Water is a critical resource to agriculture, and the availability of water for agricultural use in Florida continues to remain a key issue. Recent projections of statewide water use by 2020 estimate that 9.3 billion gallons of water per day will be demanded, and agriculture represents 47% of this demand (Bronson 2003). Farmers have fewer options for water supplies than public users and are often limited to using available supplies from surface and ground water sources which depend in part upon variable weather patterns. Sea breeze thunderstorms are responsible for much of the rainfall delivered to Florida during the wet season (May-October) and have been recognized as an important overall contributor of rainfall in southern Florida (Almeida 2003). TRMM satellite data was used to analyze how sea breeze-induced thunderstorms during El Nino and La Nina affected interannual patterns of precipitation in southern Florida from 1998-2009. TRMM's Precipitation Radar and Microwave Imager provide data to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere, precipitation rates and intensity, and the distribution of precipitation. Rainfall accumulation data derived from TRMM and other microwave sensors were used to analyze the temporal and spatial variations of rainfall during each phase of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Through the use of TRMM and Landsat, slight variations were observed, but it was determined that neither sea breeze nor total rainfall patterns in South Florida were strongly affected by ENSO during the study period. However, more research is needed to characterize the influence of ENSO on summer weather patterns in South Florida. This research will provide the basis for continued observations and study with the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission.

  1. Local scale atmospheric diffusion at a coastal site in the presence of breeze effect (phase III: data elaboration and model development). Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this contract is the characterization, from the thermal and anemological point of view, of the lower layers of the atmosphere at a coastal site, affected by breeze circulation. Data are utilized to set up diffusion models for accidental releases of airborne materials, both of short and prolonged duration. Five inland meteorological campaigns, starting from Jan. 82 (Jan., Apr., Jul., Oct. 1982, Jan. 1983), have been carried out; an appropriate extension of the contract allowed the execution of two more campaigns in the open sea (Apr., Jul. 1983), utilizing the oceanographic ship ''Bannock'' kindly supplied by CNR. The analysis of the data showed the development of a well defined IBL during on-shore flow only in Spring and Summer, while an inversion layer was detectable aloft independently of the season (provided that an anticyclonic situation was present). According to those relevant features a simple diffusion model has been developed for short duration releases at local scale. Finally, the analysis and elaboration of the data, collected on site by a meteorological automatic station, allowed the extension of the model to prolonged releases

  2. Local scale atmospheric diffusion at a coastal site in the presence of breeze effect (Phase I and II: data collection at a coastal site and off shore)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this contract is the characterization, from the thermal and anemological point of view of the lower layers of the atmosphere at a coastal site, affected by breeze circulation. Data are utilized to set up diffusion models for accidental releases of airborne materials, both of short and prolonged duration. Five inland meteorological campaigns, starting from Jan. 82 (Jan., Apr., Jul., Oct. 1982, Jan. 1983), have been carried out; an appropriate extension of the contract allowed the execution of two more campaigns in the open sea (Apr., Jul. 1983), utilizing the oceanographic ship ''Bannock'' kindly supplied by CNR. The analysis of the data showed the development of a well defined IBL during on-shore flow only in Spring and Summer, while an inversion layer was detectable aloft independently of the season (provided that an anticyclonic situation was present). According to those relevant features a simple diffusion model has been developed for short duration releases at local scale. Finally, the analysis and elaboration of the data, collected on site by a meteorological automatic station, allowed the extension of the model to prolonged releases

  3. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Language Training Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  4. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  5. Research on the Interaction of Tianjin Urban Heat Island Circulation and Sea Breeze Circulation%天津地区城市热岛环流与海风环流相互作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    东高红; 尉英华; 解以扬; 刘一玮; 李英华

    2015-01-01

    Using the mesoscale TJ-WRF model data and encryption automatic weather station (AWS)data, etc.,we analyze the distribution characteristics of Tianjin urban heat island circulation and sea breeze cir-culation as well as the interaction of them.Through several typical weather cases (Local strong thunder-storms seen in urban areas and the weather without any processes affected by the sea breeze),the trigger mechanism of the interaction between urban heat island circulation and sea breeze circulation for local thun-derstorms is analyzed.The results show that the extended height of urban heat island circulation is near 800 hPa,spatial extention is about 20 km,and the upward motion is obvious.The extended height of sea breeze circulation is near 800-750 hPa and spatial extention is about 40-60 km.The stretch height of the sea breeze front is about 950-900 hPa in the forefront of the sea breeze circulation,and the upward speed is 0.2 m·s-1 on average,slightly stronger than the heat island circulation.The sea breeze can weaken the urban heat island effect while the urban heat island can block the sea breeze circulation.With the sea breeze circulation pushed near to the urban,the sea breeze circulation and the urban heat island circulation encounter,then the two circulations get superimposed and the upward motion is significantly strength-ened,causing the maximum upward speed to go up to 0.6 m·s-1 .Under the favorable weather conditions the local severe thunderstorms can be triggered.%利用中尺度数值模式(TJ-WRF)模拟资料及天津加密自动气象站资料等,选取几个典型天气过程(城区附近局地强雷暴天气过程、受海风影响明显的无天气过程)个例,分析研究天津城市热岛环流与海风环流的空间结构特征及相互作用;重点对城市热岛环流与海风环流相互作用触发局地强雷暴的机制进行分析。结果表明:城市热岛环流的伸展高度基本在800 hPa

  6. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  7. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  8. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  9. Harvesting wind energy from the sea breeze in peri-urban coastal areas by means of small scale wind turbines - Case study: Viladecans, Llobregat Delta, northeast of Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose I.; Cabrera, Barbara; Mazon, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Wind speed data recorded during 18 years (1993-2010) in the Llobregat Delta (15 km south of Barcelona city; northeast of the Iberian Peninsula) were used to assess the wind energy generated by off-grid small scale wind turbines (the IT-PE-100 and the HP-600W) for the whole year and for the sea breeze period. The computations were made using QBlade, FAST and AeroDyn simulation tools and manufacturer power curves. Using manufacturer data, the HP-600W with hub-height 8 m would deliver 157 kWh during the whole year (78 kWh during the sea breeze period), with an average power of 18 W (37 W). In this work, the results of the simulations are compared with power and energy production data measured in an HP-600W turbine installed in situ from December 2014 to April 2016. Also, the measured power is compared to the power obtained by applying the measured wind in the period 2014-2016 to the manufacturer power curve and the power curve obtained with the simulations. The results of the computations agree with the experimental data, thus validating the proposed approach for wind resource estimation. The feasibility of using a vertical axis wind turbine for obtaining wind energy from the local, thermal wind regimes is also studied. This research confirms that the sea-breeze is an interesting wind energy resource for micro-generation in peri-urban coastal areas where large-scale wind farms cannot be implemented.

  10. Evaluating Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huanhai; Zhang Lei's

    2008-01-01

    @@ Clause 6.2.2: Competence, Awareness and Training in ISO9001:2000 standard sets the training requirements for organizations. Problems with evaluating the outcomes of training arise during examination and verification.

  11. Morphology of nuclear transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Gene expression control is a fundamental determinant of cellular life with transcription being the most important step. The spatial nuclear arrangement of the transcription process driven by RNA polymerases II and III is nonrandomly organized in foci, which is believed to add another regulatory layer on gene expression control. RNA polymerase I transcription takes place within a specialized organelle, the nucleolus. Transcription of ribosomal RNA directly responds to metabolic requirements, which in turn is reflected in the architecture of nucleoli. It differs from that of the other polymerases with respect to the gene template organization, transcription rate, and epigenetic expression control, whereas other features are shared like the formation of DNA loops bringing genes and components of the transcription machinery in close proximity. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the understanding of the structural prerequisites of nuclear transcription, of the arrangement in the nuclear volume, and of the dynamics of these entities. Here, we compare ribosomal RNA and mRNA transcription side by side and review the current understanding focusing on structural aspects of transcription foci, of their constituents, and of the dynamical behavior of these components with respect to foci formation, disassembly, and cell cycle. PMID:26847177

  12. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  13. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  14. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  15. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  16. PROSPECTS FOR COKE BREEZE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Mihnovets

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches give grounds to believe in the possibility of receiving briquettes from coke waste mixed with peat dry coal and their use for smelting iron in the cupola or as a household fuel.

  17. 海风锋在渤海西岸局地暴雨过程中的作用%The Role of Sea Breeze Front in Local Storm of Bohai Coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    东高红; 何群英; 刘一玮; 解以扬; 戴云伟

    2011-01-01

    利用常规观测资料、地面加密自动站资料、多普勒雷达观测资料及中尺度TJ-WRF模式输出资料,对2009年7月6日天津宁河地区出现的暴雨天气过程进行了分析,重点分析了渤海湾海风锋对沿岸局地暴雨的触发机理。结果表明:此次局地暴雨过程是在有利天气背景条件下发生的,暴雨发生地存在局地层结不稳定和较好的水汽条件。海风锋本身有一辐合抬升区,区域内有弱对流存在;当海风锋移到局地存在层结不稳定且水汽充足的区域,其抬升区的辐合上升运动迅速加强,从而触发该地区雷暴的新生发展;海风锋与迎面移来的雷暴相遇,会对雷暴的加速发展起到加强作用。利用中尺度WRF模式输出资料进行分析看到,两条辐合线相交处易激发出强雷暴,雷暴出现在近地层大气暖干区的北端、湿空气的交汇处;海风锋对雷暴的新生发展有明显的触发抬升作用。%Using the data obtained by conventional observations,ground densified automatic weather stations, Doppler radar observations and mesoscale TJ-WRF model,we analyze the heavy rain occurring on 6 July 2009 at Ninghe District of Tianjin and highlight the trigger mechanism of coastal local storm caused by sea breeze front of the Bohai Gulf.The results show that the heavy rain occurred in the favorable weather conditions,and there were local instability and adequate vapor conditions.Sea breeze front itself has a convergent uplift area where weak convection exists;when sea breeze front moves to the unstable and adequate vapor areas,it will strengthen the convergence positive movement of convergent uplift area and lead to the new storm development.The meeting of the sea breeze front and thunderstorm will play a strengthened role in its development.By analyzing the data obtained by mesoscale WRF model,we can see that at the warm and dry ground in front area near the north end of the wet air interchange

  18. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and professional french coursesThe next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  19. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  20. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  1. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  2. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  3. Training Visions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, "Training" asks the 2011 winners to give their predictions for what training--either in general or specifically at their companies--will look like in the next five to 10 years. Perhaps their "training visions" will spark some ideas in one's organization--or at least help prepare for what might be coming in the next decade or so.

  4. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  5. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...

  6. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  7. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  8. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  9. Automatic Music Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapuri, Anssi; Virtanen, Tuomas

    Written musical notation describes music in a symbolic form that is suitable for performing a piece using the available musical instruments. Traditionally, musical notation indicates the pitch, target instrument, timing, and duration of each sound to be played. The aim of music transcription either by humans or by a machine is to infer these musical parameters, given only the acoustic recording of a performance.

  10. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  11. Field training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individualized, personal training can be used to increase an employee's awareness of the HSE program. Such training can stimulate personal commitment and provide personal skills that can be utilized for the benefit of the overall HSE effort. But, providing such training within our industry can be a difficult task due to the scheduling, travel arrangements, and cost associated with bringing employees from isolated, remote locations to centrally located training facilities. One method of overcoming these obstacles involves the use of field instructors to provide the training at the many, and varied number of individuals can be reached with minimal disruption to their work scheduling or to their time off. In fact, this type of on-site training is already used by some oil companies and drilling contractors with encouraging results. This paper describes one drilling contractor's experiences with such a training program. The results after eight years how that this program not only can provide and efficient, economical means of employee training, but also can have a direct application to employee motivation regarding a company's HSE effort

  12. [Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Robert A., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue collects three articles concerning reading-teacher training. "Language, Failure, and Panda Bears" by Patricia M. Cunningham calls attention to dialect difficulties in the classroom and provides ideas for teacher training programs and for public schools to solve this problem. William H. Rupley, in "Improving Teacher Effectiveness in…

  13. Operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional operator job is changing, which among other things has generated a need for better job training. Surprisingly increased process automation has lead to increased operator qualifications, i.e. basic job training but also up-date and rehearsal training within certain fixed intervals. There are several, similar models for instructional system development available in the literature. One model which is of special interest integrates Operator Training development and Man-Machine Interfaces development. The extent to which Systematic Operator Training has been implemented varies with branches and companies. The nuclear power branch is given as an example in the report. This branch probably represents something better than the average among the process industries.(author)

  14. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  15. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  16. SNFing HIV transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukrinsky Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is an essential regulator of transcription of cellular genes. HIV-1 infection induces exit of a core component of SWI/SNF, Ini1, into the cytoplasm and its association with the viral pre-integration complex. Several recent papers published in EMBO Journal, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Retrovirology provide new information regarding possible functions of Ini1 and SWI/SNF in HIV life cycle. It appears that Ini1 has an inhibitory effect on pre-integration steps of HIV replication, but also contributes to stimulation of Tat-mediated transcription. This stimulation involves displacement of the nucleosome positioned at the HIV promoter.

  17. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A post-transcriptional operon is a set of monocistronic mRNAs encoding functionally related proteins that are co-regulated by a group of RNA-binding proteins and/or small non-coding RNAs so that protein expression is coordinated at the post-transcriptional level. The post-transcriptional operon m...

  18. Training Attestations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2004-01-01

    In the past, paper Training Attestations were printed during the first quarter of a New Year for Staff Members having followed courses and seminars the previous year in the context of CERN's official Training Programmes.  The attestations were sent to Divisional Training Officers (DTO's) for distribution to all Staff Members concerned within their Division. In practise many Staff Members did not find this paper useful, however some expressed a wish to be able to have access to a self-service facility in case of need. This change was discussed by the Joint Training Board (JTB) and with the DTO's during 2003 and was supported. As a consequence, following a collaboration between HR-PMD and IT-AIS, from 2004 onwards paper Training Attestations will no longer be printed and distributed as before. Those requiring a list of training followed in the past can now obtain their attestation directly from the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application for all training followed since 1997. https://hrt.cern...

  19. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  20. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  1. Addressing some Common Problems in Transcript Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer conferencing is one of the more useful parts of computer-mediated communications (CMC, and is virtually ubiquitous in distance education. The temptation to analyze the resulting interaction has resulted in only partial success, however (Henri, 1992; Kanuka and Anderson, 1998; Rourke, Anderson, Garrison and Archer, 1999; Fahy, Crawford, Ally, Cookson, Keller and Prosser, 2000. Some suggest the problem is made more complex by failings of both technique and, more seriously, theory capable of guiding transcript analysis research (Gunawardena, Lowe and Anderson, 1997.We have previously described development and pilot-testing of an instrument and a process for transcript analysis, call the the TAT (Transcript Analysis Tool, based on a model originally developed by Zhu (1996. We found that the instrument and coding procedures used provided acceptable – sometimes excellent – levels of interrater reliability (varying from 70 percent to 94 percent in pilot applications, depending upon user training and practice with the instrument, and that results of pilots indicated the TAT discriminated well among the various types of statements found in online conferences (Fahy, et al., 2000.

  2. Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person's own weight to build muscles and strength. Olympic lifting, or powerlifting, which people often think of ... in the group effectively. Here are some basic rules to follow in strength training: Start with body ...

  3. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus on the experi......This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus...... on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  4. Ubiquitin and proteasomes in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription-from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus-is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system--from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome-are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  5. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    in different cell types. This thesis presents several methods for analysis and description of promoters. We focus particularly the binding sites of TFs and computational methods for locating these. We contribute to the ¿eld by compiling a database of binding preferences for TFs which can be used for site...... published providing an unbiased overview of the transcription start site (TSS) usage in a tissue. We have paired this method with high-throughput sequencing technology to produce a library of unprecedented depth (DeepCAGE) for the mouse hippocampus. We investigated this in detail and focused particularly...

  6. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  7. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  8. French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 13 October to 19 December 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Language Training Françoise Benz Tel.73127 language.training@cern.ch

  9. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 28 April to 27 June 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz or Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 73127, Mr. Liptow: Tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 24 hours Price: 528 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training

  10. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Marquet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of reverse transcription and its importance for viral infectivity further points toward reverse transcription and potentially its initiation step as an important drug target.

  11. Power Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuk, Marvin; Mathis, Joe

    This curriculum guide is part of a series designed to teach students about diesel engines. The materials in this power trains guide apply to both on-road and off-road vehicles and include information about chain and belt drives used in tractors and combines. These instructional materials, containing nine units, are written in terms of student…

  12. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowl...

  13. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a goo...

  14. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain the...

  15. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  16. Automatic transcription of polyphonic music using a note masking technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Ronan

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed Music transcription is a complex cognitive task that requires a trained musician to listen to a piece of music, write down what notes were played and the timing of the notes. The task is further complicated if the music is polyphonic, where several notes are played simultaneously, requiring the musician to listen repeatedly to the piece of music so as to work out the notes that were played and their timing. This thesis describes a polyphonic note detection syst...

  17. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  18. Utilisation of the binders prepared from coal tar pitch and phenolic resins for the production metallurgical quality briquettes from coke breeze and the study of their high temperature carbonization behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benk, Ayse [University of Erciyes, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Chemistry, 38039, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    To reduce the cost of the formed coke briquettes which can be used as a substitute fuel to the metallurgical coke for the blast furnace from the coke breeze alternative binders and their blends were used. The high temperature behavior was investigated. The binders tested were: the nitrogen blown, air blown coal tar pitch and the blend of air blown coal tar pitch with the phenolic resins blends. The phenolic resin blends were prepared by mixing equal amount of resole and novalac. From the results, nitrogen blowing resulted in the weakest briquettes. The air blowing procedure should be preferred in place of nitrogen blowing for this purpose. When the air blown coal tar pitch was used alone as a binder, the briquettes must be cured at 200 C for 2 h, then carbonized at a temperature above 670 C. Since it requires higher temperature at carbonization stage, using air blown coal tar pitch alone as a binder was not economical. Therefore, the briquettes were prepared from the blended binder, containing air blown coal tar pitch and phenolic resins blend. The optimum amount of air blown coal tar pitch was found to be 50% w/w in the blended binder. Curing the briquettes at 200 C for 2 h was found to be sufficient for producing strong briquettes with a tensile strength of 50.45 MN/m{sup 2}. When these cured briquettes were carbonized at temperatures 470 C, 670 C and 950 C, their strength were increasing continuously, reaching to 71.85 MN/m{sup 2} at the carbonization temperature of 950 C. These briquettes can be used as a substitute for the metallurgical coke after curing; the process might not require un-economical high temperature carbonization stage. (author)

  19. Sports Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Practitioners of martial arts have long seen a need for a precise method of measuring the power of a karate kick or a boxer's punch in training and competition. Impax sensor is a piezoelectric film less than one thousandth of an inch thick, yet extremely durable. They give out a voltage impulse when struck, the greater the force of impact, the higher the voltage. The impulse is transmitted to a compact electronics package where voltage is translated into a force-pounds reading shown on a digital display. Impax, manufactured by Impulse Technology, Inc. is used by martial arts instructors, practitioners, U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center, football blocking sleds, and boxers as well as police defensive tactics, providing a means of evaluating the performance of recruits.

  20. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF. For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  1. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    Permanence A "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier - French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne - English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00   New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF, DALF). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link:  English courses French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  2. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    PermanenceA "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00 New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF and BULATS). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link: http://English courses http://French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  3. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  4. Evidência observacional das brisas do lago de Balbina (Amazonas e seus efeitos sobre a concentração do ozônio Observational evidence of lake breezes at Balbina lake (Amazonas, Brazil and their effect on ozone concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Lima Moura

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Mecanismos de vento local, tal como as brisas, influenciam o transporte e dispersão dos gases. Medidas da direção do vento e concentração de ozônio (O3 à 10 metros de altura foram realizadas durante a execução do projeto LBA/CLAIRE-2001 (Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazônia / Cooperative LBA Airbone Regional Experiment - 2001, no período de 02 a 28.07.2001, nas dependências do Laboratório de Limnologia (01º 55' S, 59º28' W, 174 m pertencente à Usina Hidrelétrica de Balbina, Amazonas. O lago artificial tem uma área de 2.360 km², sendo suficientemente grande para estabelecer um regime de brisas. As brisas de lago e floresta apresentam-se de forma bem definidas, sendo que a brisa de lago fica melhor caracterizada no período mais quente do dia (10 às 14 horas, enquanto a brisa de floresta evidencia-se no período de 16 às 08 horas com o resfriamento radiativo mais intenso da floresta, o que acarreta um forte contraste térmico. Enquanto isso, a concentração média diária (24 h de O3 foi de 8,7 ppbv com média de 10,6 ppbv no período diurno e 3,5 ppbv no período noturno. Os resultados também indicaram que quando a brisa é de lago, mesmo a noturna, a concentração de O3 é muito maior do que correspondente a concentração referente a brisa de floresta.Local wind systems, such as sea or lake breezes, strongly affect the transport and dispersion of atmospheric trace gases. Based on its size and location, the artificial lake of Balbina in the Amazon - can be expected to give rise to a lake/forest breeze regime. During the period 2 to 28 July 2002, within the LBA/CLAIRE-2001 experiment, we have continually measured the ozone concentrations (O3 and the wind directions close to the Balbina dam. We found that there is indeed a well established breeze system, with lake breezes prevailing during mid-day (10 to 14 LT while forest breezes prevail from the afternoon to early morning (16 to 8 LT. During the latter

  5. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  6. The grammar of transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Segal, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotes employ combinatorial strategies to generate a variety of expression patterns from a relatively small set of regulatory DNA elements. As in any other language, deciphering the mapping between DNA and expression requires an understanding of the set of rules that govern basic principles in transcriptional regulation, the functional elements involved, and the ways in which they combine to orchestrate a transcriptional output. Here, we review the current understanding of various grammatical rules, including the effect on expression of the number of transcription factor binding sites, their location, orientation, affinity and activity; co-association with different factors; and intrinsic nucleosome organization. We review different methods that are used to study the grammar of transcription regulation, highlight gaps in current understanding, and discuss how recent technological advances may be utilized to bridge them. PMID:24390306

  7. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  8. Media Training

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  10. Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis - with special reference to mitochondrial transcription factors and lipin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman Appel, Susanna E

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is one prominent adaptation to endurance training in skeletal muscle tissue. An increased mitochondrial density of the muscle fibres contributes to an enhanced aerobic capacity and thereby to improved fatigueresistance. Multiple signalling pathways and transcriptional networks are involved in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. The transcriptional co-regulator lipin-1 is one factor proposed to contribute, based on its ability to interact with PGC-1α a...

  11. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos fami...

  12. SELECTING AND TRAINING THE TRAINING OFFICER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAYLOR, NANCY

    TO ACHIEVE THE OBJECTIVES OF TRAINING IN INDUSTRY--TECHNICAL AND LIBERAL EDUCATION, SPECIFIC JOB SKILLS, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATTITUDES--THE TRAINING OFFICER MUST KNOW THE COMPANY WITHIN WHICH HE IS WORKING, AS WELL AS MANAGEMENT THEORY AND TRAINING METHODS. THE SELECTION OF TRAINING OFFICERS IS BASED ON A JOB SPECIFICATION, AN OUTGROWTH OF A…

  13. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions...

  14. French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For further information and registration, please consu...

  15. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, rol...

  16. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of...

  17. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: ...

  18. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in Engl...

  19. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-p...

  20. Iterative Chat Transcript Analysis: Making Meaning from Existing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Baumgart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – In order to better contextualize library data about patron satisfaction with reference services, we analyzed an existing corpus of chat transcripts. Having conducted a similar analysis in 2010, we also compared librarian behaviors over time. Methods – Drawing from the library literature, we identified a set of librarian behaviors closely associated with patron satisfaction. These behaviors include listening to and understanding patrons’ needs, inviting patrons to use the service again, and providing instruction or completing a search for patrons. Analysis of the chat transcripts included establishing a coding schema, applying these codes to individual chat transcripts, and analyzing these codes across the corpus of transcripts for frequency and correlation with other codes. The currently presented analysis used chat transcripts from the fall of 2013 and seeks changes in librarian behavior over time in order to gauge the success of establishing best practices and improving training standardization over the last three years. Results – The analysis shows that librarian behaviors have changed over time, pointing to what campus librarians are doing well, and that implementation of best practices at a campus level after the 2010 analysis may have increased these positive behaviors. The analysis also shows opportunities for further standardization and reinforcement of best practices. Conclusion – Qualitative analysis of already-collected data serves as a model for other units and suggests areas for process improvement, including enhanced coder training and code schema design. Further analysis of chat patrons’ questions is also warranted, including investigation of the relationship between subject- and location-specific questions and referrals.

  1. Acetylation-mediated suppression of transcription-independent memory: bidirectional modulation of memory by acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Merschbaecher

    Full Text Available Learning induced changes in protein acetylation, mediated by histone acetyl transferases (HATs, and the antagonistic histone deacetylases (HDACs play a critical role in memory formation. The status of histone acetylation affects the interaction between the transcription-complex and DNA and thus regulates transcription-dependent processes required for long-term memory (LTM. While the majority of studies report on the role of elevated acetylation in memory facilitation, we address the impact of both, increased and decreased acetylation on formation of appetitive olfactory memory in honeybees. We show that learning-induced changes in the acetylation of histone H3 at aminoacid-positions H3K9 and H3K18 exhibit distinct and different dynamics depending on the training strength. A strong training that induces LTM leads to an immediate increase in acetylation at H3K18 that stays elevated for hours. A weak training, not sufficient to trigger LTM, causes an initial increase in acetylation at H3K18, followed by a strong reduction in acetylation at H3K18 below the control group level. Acetylation at position H3K9 is not affected by associative conditioning, indicating specific learning-induced actions on the acetylation machinery. Elevating acetylation levels by blocking HDACs after conditioning leads to an improved memory. While memory after strong training is enhanced for at least 2 days, the enhancement after weak training is restricted to 1 day. Reducing acetylation levels by blocking HAT activity after strong training leads to a suppression of transcription-dependent LTM. The memory suppression is also observed in case of weak training, which does not require transcription processes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that acetylation-mediated processes act as bidirectional regulators of memory formation that facilitate or suppress memory independent of its transcription-requirement.

  2. 针对微风发电的城市风场特性初步研究%A Preliminary Research of Urban Wind Farm Characteristics for the Breeze Power Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李登君; 韦雅文; 季丰

    2013-01-01

    近年来,风电行业在全球都获得了快速发展。但传统风电机组在城市环境中却难以正常工作。为了实现在城市中进行微风发电,就需要探究其原因,对城市风场特性进行分析和研究。本研究以南京作为代表城市,使用便携式风速仪和固定式气象站对城市环境中的风场特性进行了观测和分析。根据结果,总结出影响风力发电效果的城市风场特性主要有三大方面:低风速、频变风向和湍流。最后对照传统风力发电选址的技术标准提出城市风力发电的发展方向。%In recent years, the wind power industry in the world has achieved rapid growth. But traditional wind turbine is difcult to work properly in an urban environment. A preliminary study of urban wind farm characteristics was made in order to fnd out the reason and make the generation breeze in urban area to become reality. In this study, portable anemometer and fxed weather station were used to observe and analysis for the characteristics of urban wind farm in Nanjing city, which was made as representative. According to the measurement results, the three mainly infuencing factors of urban wind farm characteristics that impact the efect of wind power generation are:low wind velocity, frequent changing wind direction and turbulence. At last, the direction of development for urban wind power generation was put forward according to the technical standards of address selection for traditional wind power generation.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  4. English training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  5. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  6. "Training Floors" and "Training Ceilings": Metonyms for Understanding Training Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felstead, Alan; Jewson, Nick

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a conceptual framework for mapping and understanding training trends. It uses the metonyms of floors and ceilings to distinguish between different types of training configurations. The argument is made that the ups and downs of employer reports of training activity are a crude basis on which to make judgements about the…

  7. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  8. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs

  9. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  10. 2011 Training Industry Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents "Training" magazine's exclusive analysis of the U.S. training industry, featuring 2011 training expenditures, budgetary allocations, delivery methods, and training priorities. Now in its 30th year, The Industry Report is recognized as the training industry's most trusted source of data on budgets, staffing, and programs. This…

  11. Training from the Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocheu, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The time to plan training is in the research and development stage of a new product. Seven major steps are online training, process validation, skills certification, development of manufacturing training instructions, skills verification, transfer training, and offline training and certification. (SK)

  12. Management Training in Retailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veness, C. Rosina

    Intended for prospective members of the new Distributive Industrial Training Board in Great Britain, this training guide concentrates on managerial functions in retailing; the selection of trainees; the planning of in-company and external training programs; scheduling and continuity of training; roles of training personnel; and the use of various…

  13. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  14. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs. CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions.

  15. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Uosaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM differentiation. However, control of the CM maturation that is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs, which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent-stem-cell-derived CMs mature early in culture but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation.

  16. Spaced cognitive training promotes training transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuowei eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training studies yield wildly inconsistent results. One dimension on which studies vary is the scheduling of training sessions (Morrison & Chein, 2011. In this study, we systematically address whether or not spacing of practice influences training and transfer. We randomly assigned 115 fifth grade children to an active control group or one of four training groups who received working memory training based on a running span task (Zhao et al., 2011. All groups received the same total amount of training: 20 sessions of training with 60 trials for an average of 20 minutes per session. The training was spread across 2 days, 5 days, 10 days, or 20 days. The active control group received 20-minute sessions of math instruction for 20 sessions. Before and after training participants in all five groups performed a single transfer test that assessed fluid intelligence, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test. Overall, participants in all four training groups improved significantly on the training task (at least partially, as reflected by increased speed. More importantly, the only training group to show significant improvement on the Raven's was the group who had the greatest amount of spacing (20 days group during training and improvement in this group was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  17. Fanning the Optimal Breeze with an Abanico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Grace; Marthelot, Joel; Reis, Pedro; MIT EGS Lab Team

    Flexible hand-held fans, or abanicos, are universally employed as cooling devices that are both portable and sustainable. Their to and fro axial motion about one's hand generates an airflow that increases the evaporation rate near the skin and refreshes. We study this problem in the context of fluid-structure interaction, through precision model experiments. We first characterize the elastic properties of a semi-circular thin plates with various thickness and evaluate their aerodynamic performance in a custom built apparatus. The air velocity profile that results from the flapping motion of the fan is characterized for different driving conditions. A systematic variation of the geometric and elastic parameters, along with an exploration of the parameter space of the periodic driving motion (amplitude and frequency), allows us to establish optimal design and operational conditions for maximal output of the generated airflow, while minimizing the input power.

  18. Intrinsic transcript cleavage activity of RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova, M; Newlands, J; Das, A; Goldfarb, A; Borukhov, S

    1995-01-01

    The GreA and GreB transcript cleavage factors of Escherichia coli suppress elongation arrest and may have a proofreading role in transcription. With the use of E. coli greA-greB- mutant, RNA polymerase is demonstrated to possess substantial intrinsic transcript cleavage activity. Mildly alkaline pH mimics the effect of the Gre proteins by inducing transcript cleavage in ternary complexes and antagonizing elongation arrest through a cleavage-and-restart reaction. Thus, transcript cleavage cons...

  19. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  20. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next ses...

  1. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Febr...

  2. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Feb...

  3. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or...

  4. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 M...

  5. Staff training in organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Vomáčka, Štěpán

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is focused to areas of staff training in organization. The first part summarize general problems of staff training as a part of human resources management and concepts are explained such as motivation to education, human recources management, staff training methods, analyses of staff training needs, methods of development needs identification, staff training planning, corporate staff training, e-learning and evaluation of personnel development results. The second part of this thes...

  6. Dynamic training devices in CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, J.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot training effectiveness and flying safety of a seasonal tour flight company are described. The change from single pilot to two pilot operated twin otters is examined. The use of the ATC 810 training device, its possibilities and training capacity is outlined. Problem areas which may arise, emergency system and pilot/passenger interaction are analyzed.

  7. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of st

  8. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  9. Ensemble approach combining multiple methods improves human transcription start site prediction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, David G

    2010-01-01

    The computational prediction of transcription start sites is an important unsolved problem. Some recent progress has been made, but many promoters, particularly those not associated with CpG islands, are still difficult to locate using current methods. These methods use different features and training sets, along with a variety of machine learning techniques and result in different prediction sets.

  10. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  11. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  12. Evidence that Transcript Cleavage Is Essential for RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurdsson, Stefan; Dirac-Svejstrup, A. Barbara; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During transcript elongation in vitro, backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a frequent occurrence that can lead to transcriptional arrest. The polymerase active site can cleave the transcript during such backtracking, allowing transcription to resume. Transcript cleavage is either stimulated by elongation factor TFIIS or occurs much more slowly in its absence. However, whether backtracking actually occurs in vivo, and whether transcript cleavage is important to escape it, has...

  13. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  14. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs

  16. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  17. Training propositional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, K C; Meiser, T; Naumer, B

    2000-08-01

    Two experiments compared the effects of four training conditions on propositional reasoning. A syntactic training demonstrated formal derivations, in an abstract semantic training the standard truth-table definitions of logical connectives were explained, and a domain-specific semantic training provided thematic contexts for the premises of the reasoning task. In a control training, an inductive reasoning task was practised. In line with the account by mental models, both kinds of semantic training were significantly more effective than the control and the syntactic training, whereas there were no significant differences between the control and the syntactic training, nor between the two kinds of semantic training. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern of effects using a different set of syntactic and domain-specific training conditions. PMID:10994233

  18. Training evaluation final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    In the area of management training, 'evaluation' refers both to the specific evaluation instrument used to determine whether a training effort was considered effective, and to the procedures followed to evaluate specific training requests. This report recommends to evaluate new training requests in the same way new procurement or new projects are evaluated. This includes examining training requests from the perspective of KSC goals and objectives, and determining expected ROI of proposed training program (does training result in improved productivity, through savings of time, improved outputs, and/or personnel reduction?). To determine whether a specific training course is effective, a statement of what constitutes 'good performance' is required. The user (NOT the Training Branch) must define what is 'required level of performance'. This 'model' will be the basis for the design and development of an objective, performance-based, training evaluation instrument.

  19. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  20. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  1. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...... MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model...

  2. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  3. Training In Diversity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Treven

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The labor force all around the world is becoming increasingly diverse. Thus, organizations that can manage employee diversity effectively gain a competitive advantage. In such organizations diversity training is a necessity. Diversity training helps managers understand and value individual differences and develop strong diagnostic skills. The paper explores various approaches to training, like awareness-based and skill-based diversity training. A special attention to potential problems that may occur in the process of diversity training is given.

  4. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos family protein (ΔFosB), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), among several others, in drug addiction. As will be seen, each factor displays very different regulation by drugs of abuse within the brain's reward circuitry, and in turn mediates distinct aspects of the addiction phenotype. Current efforts are geared toward understanding the range of target genes through which these transcription factors produce their functional effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. This work promises to reveal fundamentally new insight into the molecular basis of addiction, which will contribute to improved diagnostic tests and therapeutics for addictive disorders. PMID:23430970

  5. Regulation of Transcription Elongation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Washburn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will review our current understanding of transcription elongation and termination in E. coli. We discuss why transcription elongation complexes pause at certain template sites and how auxiliary host and phage transcription factors affect elongation and termination. The connection between translation and transcription elongation is described. Finally we present an overview indicating where progress has been made and where it has not.

  6. A Biclustering Approach to Combinatorial Transcription Control

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Venkataraghavan

    2005-01-01

    Combinatorial control of transcription is a well established phenomenon in the cell. Multiple transcription factors often bind to the same transcriptional control region of a gene and interact with each other to control the expression of the gene. It is thus necessary to consider the joint conservation of sequence pairs in order to identify combinations of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind. Conventional motif finding algorithms fail to address this issue. We propose a nove...

  7. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  8. Training and Availability of Braille Transcribers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Anne L.; Wall, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of Braille transcribers in 40 states found Braille production systems rely on volunteers and hence Braille transcription is not considered a bona fide career. The majority cited low funding and resources as obstacles to change. Issues of certification, training, availability, and definition are discussed, along with recommendations.…

  9. A Grounded Theory Study of Supervision of Preservice Consultation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore a university-based supervision process for consultants-in-training (CITs) engaged in a preservice level consultation course with applied practicum experience. The study was approached from a constructivist worldview using a grounded theory methodology. Data consisted of supervision session transcripts,…

  10. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  11. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  12. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  13. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  14. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  17. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  18. Model-based redesign of global transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to the design or redesign of biological systems. In particular, one possible goal could be the rewiring of the transcription regulation network by exchanging the endogenous promoters. To achieve this objective, we have adapted current methods to the inference of a model based on ordinary differential equations that is able to predict the network response after a major change in its topology. Our procedure utilizes microarray data for training. We have experimentally validated our inferred global regulatory model in Escherichia coli by predicting transcriptomic profiles under new perturbations. We have also tested our methodology in silico by providing accurate predictions of the underlying networks from expression data generated with artificial genomes. In addition, we have shown the predictive power of our methodology by obtaining the gene profile in experimental redesigns of the E. coli genome, where rewiring the transcriptional network by means of knockouts of master regulators or by upregulating transcription factors controlled by different promoters. Our approach is compatible with most network inference methods, allowing to explore computationally future genome-wide redesign experiments in synthetic biology. PMID:19188257

  19. Rethinking Transcription Coupled DNA Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a sub-pathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, pla...

  20. Automatic transcription of polyphonic singing

    OpenAIRE

    Paščinski, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    In this work we focus on automatic transcription of polyphonic singing. In particular we do the multiple fundamental frequency (F0) estimation. From the terrain recordings a test set of Slovenian folk songs with polyphonic singing is extracted and manually transcribed. On the test set we try the general algorithm for multiple F0 detection. An interactive visualization of the main parts of the algorithm is made to analyse how it works and try to detect possible issues. As the data set is ne...

  1. Biofeedback Training as Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, David G.; Walters, E. Dale

    1975-01-01

    Encourages professionals in helping relationships to explore and experience biofeedback training for voluntary self-regulation. A sample biofeedback training program is described. Observations of participants in biofeedback programs are presented. (Author/BW)

  2. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  3. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Marie Lahchimi, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  4. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  5. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tél : 74924)  

  6. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  7. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  8. Human factors in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Human Factors concept is a focused effort directed at those activities which require human involvement. Training is, by its nature, an activity totally dependent on the Human Factor. This paper identifies several concerns significant to training situations and discusses how Human Factor awareness can increase the quality of learning. Psychology in the training arena is applied Human Factors. Training is a method of communication represented by sender, medium, and receiver. Two-thirds of this communications model involves the human element directly

  9. Training Recurrent Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten With

    1997-01-01

    Training recurrent networks is generally believed to be a difficult task. Excessive training times and lack of convergence to an acceptable solution are frequently reported. In this paper we seek to explain the reason for this from a numerical point of view and show how to avoid problems when...... training. In particular we investigate ill-conditioning, the need for and effect of regularization and illustrate the superiority of second-order methods for training...

  10. Kalman Filter Neuron Training

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Haruhiko; KOYAMA, Shuhei; HONAMI, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Takao

    1991-01-01

    An attempt of implementing Kalman filter algorithm in the procedure for training the neural network was made and evaluated. The Kalman filter neuron training program (KNT) was coded. The performance of Kalman filter in KNT was compared to commonly used neuron training algorithm. The study revealed that KNT requires much less calculation time to accomplish neuron training than commonly used other algorithms do. KNT also gave much smaller final error than any other algorithms tested in this study.

  11. Criticality safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Criticality safety training is an important element of the Plutonium Facility safety program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Training consists of student self-study handbooks and hands-on performance-based training in a mock-up laboratory containing gloveboxes, trolley conveyor system, and self-monitoring instruments. A 10-minute video tape and lecture was presented to describe how training in this area is conducted.

  12. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  13. Training and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntley, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Some philosophers of education think that there is a pedagogically informative concept of training that can be gleaned from Wittgenstein's later writings: training as initiation into a form of life. Stickney, in "Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A response to Michael Luntley" takes me to task for ignoring this…

  14. Human Factors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  15. Foundry Industry Training Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industrial Training Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Foundry Industry Training Committee has encouraged the foundry industry in developing systematic manpower training and development programs at all levels. Features developed include competitions as a technique of standard setting, recommendations for technician training, and a widely used manpower information system. (MW)

  16. Time Use on Trains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how travel time is used and how passengers conceptualise travel time in Danish intercity trains and intercity fast trains. The new contribution to the literature this study can offer is in the inclusion of all kinds of passengers in the different compartments to understand train...

  17. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  18. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  19. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  20. Transcription Termination: Variations on Common Themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrua, Odil; Boudvillain, Marc; Libri, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Transcription initiates pervasively in all organisms, which challenges the notion that the information to be expressed is selected mainly based on mechanisms defining where and when transcription is started. Together with post-transcriptional events, termination of transcription is essential for sorting out the functional RNAs from a plethora of transcriptional products that seemingly have no use in the cell. But terminating transcription is not that easy, given the high robustness of the elongation process. We review here many of the strategies that prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have adopted to dismantle the elongation complex in a timely and efficient manner. We highlight similarities and diversity, underlying the existence of common principles in a diverse set of functionally convergent solutions. PMID:27371117

  1. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  2. Effective mechanic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for the training of mechanics is discussed, and the increased interest within the utility industry of placing a similar importance on this training as it has traditionally placed on operator training, is expressed. Effective approaches and techniques are described. Fundamental mechanical maintenance concepts and their practical application are discussed, including the use of supporting video programs. The importance of follow-up practical shop exercise which reinforces classroom instruction is stressed, drawing from practical utility experience. Utilizing success in training as a measure of eligibility for advancement is discussed as well as the interface between training and the company bargaining unit

  3. Training techniques for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and disadvantages of commonly used training techniques in relation to cost-effective, prevention-oriented Quality Assurance are examined. Important questions are whether training techniques teach cost effectiveness and whether the techniques are, themselves, cost effective. To answer these questions, criteria for evaluating teaching techniques for cost effectiveness were developd, and then commonly used techniques are evaluated in terms of specific training program objectives. Motivation of personnel is also considered important to the success of a training program, and methods are outlined by which recognition of the academic quality of industrial training can be used as a motivational technique

  4. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  5. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M;

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...... genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision....

  6. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, K J; Liang, S

    2000-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg2+ binding.

  7. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  8. Training System for the Expiration Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Akio; Mitsuhashi, Yoshinori; Araki, Chikahiro

    For a speech therapist, the breathing method is one of the important techniques to train a person who has difficulty in speaking. Insufficient number of therapists makes it difficult to apply these breath training methods widely. Therefore, development of a new breath training method will be mandatory. With this reason, a new training system is developed and described in this paper. In this new method, expiration pattern of a speech therapist analyzing through an air flow sensor is constructed into visual graphic image in order to recognize expiration pattern easily. With experimental use of this system to without handicapped trainees, they could successfully imitate trainer's pronunciation easily. A person who has difficulty in speaking will be able to learn easily how to do expiration for speaking through visual pattern.

  9. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  10. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  11. Computer training aids for nuclear operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Navy's Nuclear Propulsion School at HMS SULTAN which is responsible for training all ratings and officers who operate Submarine Pressurised Water Reactor plants, has available a varied selection of classroom simulator training aids as well as purpose built Submarine Manoeuvring Room simulators. The use of these classroom training aids in the twelve months prior to Autumn 1981 is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using relatively expensive computer based aids to support classroom instruction for students who do not investigate mathematically the dynamics of the Reactor Plant are identified. The conclusions drawn indicate that for students of limited academic ability the classroom simulators are disproportionately expensive in cost, maintenance load, and instructional time. Secondly, the experience gained in the use of the Manoeuvring Room Simulators to train future operators who have just finished the academic phase of their training is outlined. The possible pitfalls for the instructor are discussed and the lessons learnt, concluding that these simulators provide a valuable substitute for the live plant enabling trainees to be brought up to a common standard and reducing their on job training time to an acceptable level. (author)

  12. Team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous reports and articles have been written recently on the importance of team skills training for nuclear reactor operators, but little has appeared on the practical application of this theoretical guidance. This paper describes the activities of the Training and Education Department at GPU Nuclear (GPUN). In 1987, GPUN undertook a significant initiative in its licensed operator training programs to design and develop initial and requalification team skills training. Prior to that time, human interaction skills training (communication, stress management, supervisory skills, etc.) focused more on the individual rather than a group. Today, GPU Nuclear conducts team training at both its Three Mile Island (YMI), PA and Oyster Creek (OC), NJ generating stations. Videotaped feedback is sued extensively to critique and reinforce targeted behaviors. In fact, the TMI simulator trainer has a built-in, four camera system specifically designed for team training. Evaluations conducted on this training indicated these newly acquired skills are being carried over to the work environment. Team training is now an important and on-going part of GPUN operator training

  13. Training needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one basic requirement which all educators and trainers agree upon as the basis for training is the need. A training need may be described as existing anytime an actual condition differs from a desired condition. In other words, when an employee fails to perform a task according to that person's job description, a training need is established. The training needs assessment process will identify the specific training required to perform a specific, desired task. Training needs must be identified, objectives written and appropriate curriculum developed which targets the specific needs of a job, unit or organization before one can truly say they they have a valid, cost-effective training program. A needs assessment is, therefore, paramount to and the foundation of the training process. The purposes of a training needs assessment are to: 1) Provide a deliberate and orderly process for planning and developing training programs which ensure instructional needs and objectives are met; and 2) Assure that personnel are taught, in a cost-effective way, the knowledge, skills and abilities essential to successful task performance

  14. Archaeal Transcription: Function of an Alternative Transcription Factor B from Pyrococcus furiosus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Micorescu, Michael; Grünberg, Sebastian; Franke, Andreas; Cramer, Patrick; Thomm, Michael; Bartlett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the hyperthermophile archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus encodes two transcription factor B (TFB) paralogs, one of which (TFB1) was previously characterized in transcription initiation. The second TFB (TFB2) is unusual in that it lacks recognizable homology to the archaeal TFB/eukaryotic TFIIB B-finger motif. TFB2 functions poorly in promoter-dependent transcription initiation, but photochemical cross-linking experiments indicated that the orientation and occupancy of transcription com...

  15. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  16. Carbohydrate availability and exercise training adaptation: too much of a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Hawley, John A; Morton, James P

    2015-01-01

    Traditional nutritional approaches to endurance training have typically promoted high carbohydrate (CHO) availability before, during and after training sessions to ensure adequate muscle substrate to meet the demands of high daily training intensities and volumes. However, during the past decade, data from our laboratories and others have demonstrated that deliberately training in conditions of reduced CHO availability can promote training-induced adaptations of human skeletal muscle (i.e. increased maximal mitochondrial enzyme activities and/or mitochondrial content, increased rates of lipid oxidation and, in some instances, improved exercise capacity). Such data have led to the concept of 'training low, but competing high' whereby selected training sessions are completed in conditions of reduced CHO availability (so as to promote training adaptation), but CHO reserves are restored immediately prior to an important competition. The augmented training response observed with training-low strategies is likely regulated by enhanced activation of key cell signalling kinases (e.g. AMPK, p38MAPK), transcription factors (e.g. p53, PPARδ) and transcriptional co-activators (e.g. PGC-1α), such that a co-ordinated up-regulation of both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes occurs. Although the optimal practical strategies to train low are not currently known, consuming additional caffeine, protein, and practising CHO mouth-rinsing before and/or during training may help to rescue the reduced training intensities that typically occur when 'training low', in addition to preventing protein breakdown and maintaining optimal immune function. Finally, athletes should practise 'train-low' workouts in conjunction with sessions undertaken with normal or high CHO availability so that their capacity to oxidise CHO is not blunted on race day.

  17. Carbohydrate availability and exercise training adaptation: too much of a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Hawley, John A; Morton, James P

    2015-01-01

    Traditional nutritional approaches to endurance training have typically promoted high carbohydrate (CHO) availability before, during and after training sessions to ensure adequate muscle substrate to meet the demands of high daily training intensities and volumes. However, during the past decade, data from our laboratories and others have demonstrated that deliberately training in conditions of reduced CHO availability can promote training-induced adaptations of human skeletal muscle (i.e. increased maximal mitochondrial enzyme activities and/or mitochondrial content, increased rates of lipid oxidation and, in some instances, improved exercise capacity). Such data have led to the concept of 'training low, but competing high' whereby selected training sessions are completed in conditions of reduced CHO availability (so as to promote training adaptation), but CHO reserves are restored immediately prior to an important competition. The augmented training response observed with training-low strategies is likely regulated by enhanced activation of key cell signalling kinases (e.g. AMPK, p38MAPK), transcription factors (e.g. p53, PPARδ) and transcriptional co-activators (e.g. PGC-1α), such that a co-ordinated up-regulation of both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes occurs. Although the optimal practical strategies to train low are not currently known, consuming additional caffeine, protein, and practising CHO mouth-rinsing before and/or during training may help to rescue the reduced training intensities that typically occur when 'training low', in addition to preventing protein breakdown and maintaining optimal immune function. Finally, athletes should practise 'train-low' workouts in conjunction with sessions undertaken with normal or high CHO availability so that their capacity to oxidise CHO is not blunted on race day. PMID:24942068

  18. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...

  19. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes.......Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  20. The NAC transcription factors of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael; Holm, Preben Bach; Gregersen, Per L.

    2011-01-01

    It is now 15 years ago the first NAC transcription factor was described in the literature (Souer et al. 1996), since then a number of plant species have been fully sequenced revealing the NAC gene family to be one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants (Shen et al 2009). The NAC...

  1. Transcription and the aspect ratio of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    analysis of transcription. It is shown that under certain reasonable assumptions transcription is only possible if the aspect ratio is in the regime corresponding to further twisting. We find this constraint to be in agreement with long-established crystallographic studies of DNA....

  2. PGC-1beta is downregulated by training in human skeletal muscle: no effect of training twice every second day vs. once daily on expression of the PGC-1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P;

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family of transcriptional coactivators (PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta, and PRC) is differentially regulated by training once daily vs. training twice daily every second day and that this difference might...

  3. Early Exercise Affects Mitochondrial Transcription Factors Expression after Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yongshan Hu; Jianhong Zhu; Pengyue Zhang; Jie Jia; Hongying Sha; Yi Wu; Qi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that exercise training is neuroprotective after stroke, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To clarify this critical issue, the current study investigated the effects of early treadmill exercise on the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors. Adult rats were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Expression of two genes critical for transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome pro...

  4. Cross cultural training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王容

    2014-01-01

    Under the background of economic globalization, the globalization of human resources management determines the success of enterprise success or failure, in a sense, human resource is the first resource of the enterprise. Cross-cultural training is the core problems in global human resource management, it can let employees quickly familiar with the company's business and job content, understand the enterprise culture and core idea, to play a huge role in promoting enterprise development. Therefore, strengthen enterprise staff training, improve the comprehensive quality of enterprise personnel has become the urgent problems now in the process of enterprise development. Articles in samsung electronics of South Korea, for example, introduces the samsung especial y cross-cultural training content, training method and training effect. And analysis of cross-cultural training impact in the global business team and establish business relationship.

  5. Language Training: Anglais

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 2 hours a week between 26 April and 1 July 2004. Timetable: Thursdays 12.00 to 14.00 Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students and 20 hours) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  6. Safety training news

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

      SELF-RESCUE MASK The "Self-Rescue Mask" face-to-face training course has been replaced by a revised version. This measure concerns both the initial and the refresher course. For personnel who have successfully attended the initial or refresher Self-Rescue Mask training within the last three years, their Self-Rescue Mask training will still be valid.  The course description and registration form can be found in the training catalogue on the Safety Training Service’s website or catalogue. The Self-Rescue Mask training course is a mandatory prerequisite for following the new "Portable ODH Detector" e-learning course.   PORTABLE ODH DETECTOR A new e-learning awareness course, "Portable ODH Detector", is available via the SIR application on CERN’s intranet. Personnel requiring a portable ODH detector of the DRÄGER x-am 5000 type to allowed access th...

  7. Academic Training: String Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 June from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8 & 10 June, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4, 3rd floor on 9 June String Theory by C. Johnson / Univ. of Southern California, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  9. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Tsuchiya; Ryoichi Misaka; Kosaku Nitta; Ken Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterizedby a typical bZip structure; these transcription factorsact as important regulators of the development anddifferentiation of many organs and tissues, includingthe kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroupsthat are characterized according to their structure largeMaf transcription factors and small Maf transcriptionfactors. The large Maf subgroup consists of fourproteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neuralretina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is adistinct molecule that has been attracting the attentionof researchers because it acts as a strong transactivatorof insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors arelikely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. Inthis review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in variousorgans.

  10. Automatic Phonetic Transcription for Danish Speech Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkedal, Andreas Søeborg

    to acquire and expensive to create. For languages with productive compounding or agglutinative languages like German and Finnish, respectively, phonetic dictionaries are also hard to maintain. For this reason, automatic phonetic transcription tools have been produced for many languages. The quality...... of automatic phonetic transcriptions vary greatly with respect to language and transcription strategy. For some languages where the difference between the graphemic and phonetic representations are small, graphemic transcriptions can be used to create ASR systems with acceptable performance. In other languages...... representations, e.g. morphological analysis, decompounding, letter-to-sound rules, etc. Two different phonetic transcribers for Danish will be compared in this study: eSpeak (Duddington, 2010) and Phonix (Henrichsen, 2014). Both transcribers produce a richer transcription than ASR can utilise such as stress...

  11. Training in oral medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, J M

    2001-01-01

    88 members of the UK specialty society of oral medicine were asked about career satisfaction and their views on training programmes. 70% responded (79% of consultants and all accredited trainees). Men work longer hours than women, report less control over their work and experience more stress. Although high work satisfaction is reported, nearly one-third regret their choice of specialty. Men more than women do locum work while training. Most respondents would welcome flexible training, job sh...

  12. Preliminary research on the carbonyl compounds under of sea-land breeze at the west coast of the Pearl River Estuary%珠江口西岸冬季海陆风背景下羰基化合物的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄延娟; 王伯光; 刘灿

    2011-01-01

    A field observation was continuously conducted at Xinken, Guangzhou, China, using DNPH-HPLC/UV method to measure the composition and the concentration of volatile carbonyl compounds under sea-land breeze in the winter period from December 7th-9th, 2008. The distribution of carbonyl and their sources were studied. The results show that 17 carbonyl species were detected with a concentration range from 7.78×10 9 to 31.78×10-9. The concentrations of most carbonyls were higher on the ground than on the roof. Acetone was the most abundant carbonyl species at Xinken,followed by formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The three compounds accounted for more than 70% of all measured carbonyls. Two different variation trends of the carbonyl compounds at Xinken were found. The first one was on December 8th suggesting the long-distance transport of urban pollutants while the other one was on December 7th and December 9th showing the influence of sea-land breeze. Based on the ratios among formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and propanal and the component correlation analysis, it indicates that the carbonyl compounds were mainly impacted by the urban anthropogenic pollution sources which had a close relationship with the long-distance transport and sea-land breeze influence. Secondary products from atmospheric photochemical reactions and local emission from vegetation were also the important contributors.%于2008年12月7~9日对珠江三角洲新垦的大气环境进行连续加强观测,采用DNPH-HPL洲分析方法测量了冬季海陆风条件下大气挥发性羰基化合物的组成及浓度水平,研究了污染特征和来源.结果表明,新垦大气中共检测到17种挥发性羰基化合物,浓度变化范围为7.78×10-9~31.78×10-9,大多数物质地面浓度高于楼顶.其中浓度最高的污染物是丙酮,其次是甲醛和乙醛,三者占总羰基化合物浓度的比例高于70%.大气挥发性羰基化合物的浓度分布呈现出以12月8日为代表的受城区污

  13. Lithuania training needs analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present assessment of training needs in the Lithuanian natural gas sector is one of a total of four programmes on which Danish Oil and Natural Gas (DONG) and Lithuanian Gas (LG) cooperate. DONG's contribution is financed by the Danish Foreign Ministry. Long-term Objective is enhancement of the natural gas sector in Lithuania for efficient, cost-effective and environmentally responsible energy supply and utilization, in accordance with international standards. Immediate Objective is to establish a basis of competence in the Lithuanian Gas Sector, manage the modernization process effectively, and develop the involved human resources to the required performance level. The strategy for training in the Lithuanian natural gas sector proposed by this report integrates recommendations under three main headings: Six programmes of training and development. Strengthening of the institutional framework and the system for training. Upgrading of training capacity. The six programmes comprise: Legislation and Educational Planning. Management Development. Economy. Marketing and Sales. Supervisory Skills Development. Training Skills Development. Management and Specialists' Workshops on Technology. Following organisation for implementation of recommendations is proposed: Steering Board. Advisory Board. Coordination Group. Project Management Group. Group of Lithuanian Specialists. Group of Advisers. Short-term Consultants/Teachers. Lithuanian Consultants/Teachers. The project is envisaged to be implemented in carefully timed phases allowing for coordination between management workshops, training programmes and revision work regarding the institutional framework for training and the training system. (EG)

  14. Employee Training in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Fortin, Nicole; Parent, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we first analyze the determinants of training using data from the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS). We find that education plays a key role in the receipt of all forms of training except in the case of employer-sponsored training. We also find substantial differences across demographic groups in the relationship between literacy skills and training. In the second part of the paper we merge the 1994 IALS to the 2003 IALSS and perform an analysis of the ...

  15. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  16. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2004, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided various nuclear education and training courses for 1,962 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. The NTC has developed education programs for master/doctorial course on advanced nuclear engineering in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology which was established in 2003. Additionally, nuclear education programs such as nuclear technical training courses for the promotion of cooperation with member countries, have developed during the project period. The center has also developed and conducted 7 training courses on nuclear related technology. In parallel, the center has produced 20 training materials including textbooks, 3 multi-media education materials, and 56 Video On Demand (VOD) cyber training materials. In order to promote international cooperation for human resources development, the NTC has implemented a sub-project on the establishment of a web-portal including database for the exchange of information and materials within the framework of ANENT. Also, the center has cooperated with FNCA member countries to establish a model of human resources development, as well as with member countries on bilateral cooperation bases to develop training programs. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 318 international and domestic events (training courses, conferences, workshops, etc.) during the project period

  17. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  18. Intermittent Transcription Dynamics for the Rapid Production of Long Transcripts of High Fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Depken

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal cellular function relies on the efficient and accurate readout of the genetic code. Single-molecule experiments show that transcription and replication are highly intermittent processes that are frequently interrupted by polymerases pausing and reversing directions. Although intermittent dynamics in replication are known to result from proofreading, their origin and significance during transcription remain controversial. Here, we theoretically investigate transcriptional fidelity and show that the kinetic scheme provided by the RNA-polymerase backtracking and transcript-cleavage pathway can account for measured error rates. Importantly, we find that intermittent dynamics provide an enormous increase in the rate of producing long transcripts of high fidelity. Our results imply that intermittent dynamics during transcription may have evolved as a way to mitigate the competing demands of speed and fidelity in the transcription of extended sequences.

  19. Evolution and diversification of the basal transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttke, Sascha H C

    2015-03-01

    Transcription initiation was once thought to be regulated primarily by sequence-specific transcription factors with the basal transcription machinery being largely invariant. Gradually it became apparent that the basal transcription machinery greatly diversified during evolution and new studies now demonstrate that diversification of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) family yielded specialized and largely independent transcription systems.

  20. Criterion-based laparoscopic training reduces total training time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Alevizos, L.; De Hingh, I.H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of criterion-based laparoscopic training over time-oriented training are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare these types of training based on training outcome and time efficiency. Methods During four training sessions within 1 week (one session per day) 34 medical interns (

  1. Criterion-based laparoscopic training reduces total training time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Alevizos, L.; De Hingh, I.H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of criterion-based laparoscopic training over time-oriented training are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare these types of training based on training outcome and time efficiency. Methods During four training sessions within 1 week (one session per day) 34 medical interns (

  2. Proactive driver training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossler, W. [Kinetic Safety Consulting Inc., Grande Prairie, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Skid avoidance training is a recent approach to driver training and has been employed in various countries with a high degree of success. Among top ranked countries, motor vehicle incidents trends indicate higher incident rates among drivers are often due to lack of knowledge, experience and risk awareness. If lowered age limit experience is attained under direct supervision and in safe training conditions, it was suggested, incident frequency is reduced. A Norway study confirmed an increase in vehicle incident rates after drivers had received skid control training. The drivers were unable to maintain skill levels needed to react to critical driving tasks and had unrealistic expectations of skill after training. However, a skid avoidance training program launched in Sweden in 1999 has resulted in a 50 per cent reduction of vehicle incidents in the last 2 years. Details of the Skidcar System were presented, including details of the driving simulator, where simulation of actual driving situations is achieved by simply adjusting the amount of grip the vehicle has with the driving surface. Instructors modify driving behaviors based upon the driver's ability to maintain grip. There are over 200 units in North America. In addition, a Proactive Light Vehicle Driver Training/ Heavy Vehicle Assessment Program was initiated in 2003, with a motor vehicle incident rate reduction of 50 per cent at the end of 2004. Various examples of situations in which drivers have used their skid avoidance skills to avoid incidents were included. It was noted that the trend among driver training professionals has been towards decision-based rather than skills-based training, as skills-based training will diminish over time, and requires frequent re-training periods. Cognitive and perceptual skills were examined, as well as cognitive, associative and autonomous learning phases. It was concluded that skid avoidance is largely a decision-based skill. tabs, figs.

  3. Positive reinforcement training in rhesus macaques-training progress as a result of training frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernström, A-L; Fredlund, H; Spångberg, M; Westlund, K

    2009-05-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) efficiency was examined as a function of training frequency in 33 pair- or triple-housed female rhesus macaques. The animals were trained three times a week, once a day or twice a day, using PRT and a clicker as a secondary reinforcer. All animals were trained on 30 sessions, with an average of 5 min per training session per animal. The behaviors, trained in succession, were Targeting (reliably touching and following a Target); Collaborating (dominant animals allowing subordinates to train while stationing); Box-training (accepting being enclosed in a small compartment while responding to Target training) and initial Injection training.Fulfilled criteria for Targeting were obtained in 32/33 animals in a median of nine training sessions. Collaboration was obtained in 27/33 animals in a median of 15 training sessions. However, only four animals completed Box-training during the 30 training sessions and started Injection training. When comparing training success in terms of number of training sessions, training twice a day was less efficient than the other two treatments. In terms of daily progress, our results suggest that from a management perspective, daily training is more conducive to quick training success than thrice weekly training. In addition, in this study no further advantages could be gained from training twice a day.

  4. Prunus transcription factors: Breeding perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor João Bianchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs. In peach, 1,533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome.

  5. Transcriptional control of spermatogonial maintenance and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hye-Won; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2014-06-01

    Spermatogenesis is a multistep process that generates millions of spermatozoa per day in mammals. A key to this process is the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC), which has the dual property of continually renewing and undergoing differentiation into a spermatogonial progenitor that expands and further differentiates. In this review, we will focus on how these proliferative and early differentiation steps in mammalian male germ cells are controlled by transcription factors. Most of the transcription factors that have so far been identified as promoting SSC self-renewal (BCL6B, BRACHYURY, ETV5, ID4, LHX1, and POU3F1) are upregulated by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Since GDNF is crucial for promoting SSC self-renewal, this suggests that these transcription factors are responsible for coordinating the action of GDNF in SSCs. Other transcription factors that promote SSC self-renewal are expressed independently of GDNF (FOXO1, PLZF, POU5F1, and TAF4B) and thus may act in non-GDNF pathways to promote SSC cell growth or survival. Several transcription factors have been identified that promote spermatogonial differentiation (DMRT1, NGN3, SOHLH1, SOHLH2, SOX3, and STAT3); some of these may influence the decision of an SSC to commit to differentiate while others may promote later spermatogonial differentiation steps. Many of these transcription factors regulate each other and act on common targets, suggesting they integrate to form complex transcriptional networks in self-renewing and differentiating spermatogonia.

  6. Notation systems for transcription: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Catherine; O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    A 21-syllable question posed by Bernard Shaw in a CNN television interview with Margaret Thatcher was presented to 90 participants, either as an audio recording or as a typed transcript or as both. Participants were asked to speak it, as closely as possible, as Shaw had (or, in conditions without the audio recording, as he might have). The typed version was either an ordinary transcript or a transcript in one of three transcription systems used currently in research on spoken discourse, all of which incorporate notations for prosody. Hence, there were nine conditions in all, with five women and five men in each. Contrary to the experimental hypothesis, approximations to Shaw's original temporal measures of performance were not degraded but were instead improved significantly by the addition of a prosodically notated transcript to the audio recording and significantly more in the absence of the audio recording. Presentation of the ordinary transcript alone produced the worst approximation to Shaw's temporal measures. The usefulness, accuracy, and readability of transcripts prepared according to detailed notation systems are discussed.

  7. Training in laparoscopic urology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Laguna; T.M. Reijke; H. Wijkstra; J.J.M.C.H. de la Rosette

    2006-01-01

    Purpose of review Training in laparoscopy has become an important issue in the current surgical scenario. In this overview we aim to update the current knowledge in the field of laparoscopic urological training and to highlight the potential dangers of using simulation for accreditation and selectio

  8. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be adequ

  9. Training a cataract surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Babar Qureshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Training in cataract surgery is one of the key factors needed to ensure high quality cataract surgery with good visual outcomes and patient satisfaction. The training has to impart the right skills to the right person by the right trainer and in the right environment.

  10. Academic Vocational Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Søren; Keller, Hanne Dauer; Stegeager, Nikolaj

    2010-01-01

    they come). Starting from a theoretical viewpoint based on traditional learning theory, supplemented by much new research on the transfer of training, as well as on Donald A. Schön’s classic work on practicum as a crucial component in the training of practitioners, our paper presents and illustrates...

  11. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...

  12. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  13. 2010 Training Industry Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Now in its 29th year, The Industry Report is recognized as the training industry's most trusted source of data on budgets, staffing, and programs. This year, the study was conducted by an outside research firm in June-August 2010, when members from the "Training" magazine database were e-mailed an invitation to participate in an online survey.…

  14. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstone of safe operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is personnel performing the day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Training that is conducted efficiently and effectively and is directly related to the needs of the job (i.e. performance-based training) is fundamental to safe operation. Responsibility for the safe operation of these facilities is a line management function. Therefore, achieving performance-based training requires commitment from the organization for which training is provided. This commitment includes making subject matter experts available for participation in and review of the products of the performance-based training process. It also includes budgeting and scheduling the time required for both initial and continuing training. This commitment must be made by corporate and facility senior management from the beginning. Management must get involved at the start to ensure that they are not only cognizant of ongoing activities, but are also involved to the degree necessary to thoroughly understand the process. Policies implemented and support demonstrated by senior management provide the driving force to ensure that training programs receive the attention that is imperative if facility training programs are to be successful

  15. Importance of Gait Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Importance of Gait Training by Scott Cummings, PT, CPO, FAAOP It is the goal of most every lower-limb amputee to walk “normally” again. ... all lower-limb amputees will benefit from gait training at some point in their recovery to help ...

  16. Training the Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veri, Clive C.; Vonder Haar, T. A.

    Guidelines are furnished for application of psychological theory (including principles of learning, motivation, and reinforcement) in the training room, job or task analysis, formation of learning objectives, and selection of appropriate training techniques and audiovisual aids. The importance of clear communication and a supportive learning…

  17. Packaging Your Training Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Pamela

    1977-01-01

    The types of packaging and packaging materials to use for training materials should be determined during the planning of the training programs, according to the packaging market. Five steps to follow in shopping for packaging are presented, along with a list of packaging manufacturers. (MF)

  18. Automotive Power Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide mechanics with an understanding of the operation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of automotive power trains and certain auxiliary equipment. The course contains six study units covering basic power trains; clutch principles and operations; conventional…

  19. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  20. Sensing train integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Hans; Westenberg, Roel; Schoemaker, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to check integrity of cargo trains based on a distributed wireless sensor network (WSN). The WSN is autonomous and gathers information about the composition of the train without outside help or intervention. If the WSN infers from its data that an unexpected change

  1. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  2. Do Sectoral Training Funds Stimulate Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Pascal; Glebbeek, Arie C.; Van Lieshout, Harm

    2010-01-01

    Sectoral levelling funds are an arrangement aimed at alleviating a well-known theoretical problem of underinvestment in worker training because of free-rider behaviour of firms. In the Netherlands, collective agreements require firms to participate in such funds in a number of sectors. Using a comprehensive dataset of Dutch firms, we attempt to…

  3. Intercultural Training: Six Measures Assessing Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Andrea; Mertesacker, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop recommendations for measures assessing intercultural training needs for international human resource management. Based on scientific as well as application-oriented criteria the aim is to select six measures assessing general intercultural competencies and with the help of behaviour ratings in…

  4. All aboard the Safety Train(ing)!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Would you like to influence CERN’s safety courses? Do you want to help build better training courses? If your answer is yes to one or both of these questions: now is the time! The Safety Training section is looking for volunteers from the whole CERN community to test new courses before they go online for all members of the personnel.    The Safety Training section is redesigning the CERN e-learning package in order to adopt a more educational approach and to make the courses a more enjoyable experience. The section is now calling for volunteers. “We know we can do much more with testers’ help and feedback,” explains Christoph Balle, Safety Training section leader. “By having the end users actively involved in the process, we’ll achieve our goal of communicating safety in the best possible way. As the volunteers will play an active role in the development of the courses, they will be providing a service to the whole community.&am...

  5. Our evolving knowledge of the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The development of a genome-scale approach to identification of the 5' ends of capped mRNAs (CAGE) has given new insights into many aspects of mammalian RNApolII transcription control. They include the identification of the minimal initiator motif, the different types of proximal promoter architecture, the promoters of noncoding RNAs, the transcription of retrotransposons, and the extensive impact of alternative promoters on the proteome. CAGE also offers applications as a form of expression profiling that measures promoter use, allowing more precise development of transcriptional network models.

  6. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  7. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protein...... level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has...

  8. Optogenetic control of transcription in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Light inducible protein-protein interactions are powerful tools to manipulate biological processes. Genetically encoded light-gated proteins for controlling precise cellular behavior are a new and promising technology, called optogenetics. Here we exploited the blue light-induced transcription system in yeast and zebrafish, based on the blue light dependent interaction between two plant proteins, blue light photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 and the bHLH transcription factor CIB1 (CRY-interacting bHLH 1. We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing rapid transcription suppression and activation in zebrafish.

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  10. Monitoring spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, Thomas; Houghton, Conor; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the SPIKE-distance has been proposed as a parameter-free and time-scale independent measure of spike train synchrony. This measure is time-resolved since it relies on instantaneous estimates of spike train dissimilarity. However, its original definition led to spuriously high instantaneous values for event-like firing patterns. Here we present a substantial improvement of this measure which eliminates this shortcoming. The reliability gained allows us to track changes in instantaneous clustering, i.e., time-localized patterns of (dis)similarity among multiple spike trains. Additional new features include selective and triggered temporal averaging as well as the instantaneous comparison of spike train groups. In a second step, a causal SPIKE-distance is defined such that the instantaneous values of dissimilarity rely on past information only so that time-resolved spike train synchrony can be estimated in real-time. We demonstrate that these methods are capable of extracting valuable information from ...

  11. Training Public Health Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  12. LEAH interdisciplinary training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Cynthia L; Rickert, Vaughn D

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) interdisciplinary training program in the United States. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau authorized by legislation provides monies to train leaders in adolescent health through a competitive grant process. Currently, seven academic medical centers have funding to provide leadership in adolescent health (LEAH) training in five core disciplines: medicine, nursing, psychology, social work and nutrition. LEAH training programs both ensure high clinical competence in core disciplines serving adolescents and prepare trainees for leadership positions in adolescent health and public health care realms. Together, these programs trained almost 1000 long-term trainees across these five disciplines, and graduates from these programs are working in 45 of the 50 states within the United States. About 90% of these graduates are working with maternal and child/adolescent health populations, and almost all have held leadership positions in the areas of public health, advocacy, public policy, academic medical centers and/or clinical care settings.

  13. Bivalent-like chromatin markers are predictive for transcription start site distribution in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Zhang

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing of 5' capped transcripts has revealed a variety of transcription initiation patterns, from narrow, focused promoters to wide, broad promoters. Attempts have already been made to model empirically classified patterns, but virtually no quantitative models for transcription initiation have been reported. Even though both genetic and epigenetic elements have been associated with such patterns, the organization of regulatory elements is largely unknown. Here, linear regression models were derived from a pool of regulatory elements, including genomic DNA features, nucleosome organization, and histone modifications, to predict the distribution of transcription start sites (TSS. Importantly, models including both active and repressive histone modification markers, e.g. H3K4me3 and H4K20me1, were consistently found to be much more predictive than models with only single-type histone modification markers, indicating the possibility of "bivalent-like" epigenetic control of transcription initiation. The nucleosome positions are proposed to be coded in the active component of such bivalent-like histone modification markers. Finally, we demonstrated that models trained on one cell type could successfully predict TSS distribution in other cell types, suggesting that these models may have a broader application range.

  14. Cognitive training for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the HTA report is to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training methods to treat cognitive disorders of dementia and other diseases with cognitive deficits. For this purpose, a systematic literature search was carried out first based on the DIMDI superbase retrieval. The identified publications were judged and selected by two independent, methodically competent experts. 33 publications were included in the report. Based on the studies for a normal cognitive development in old age a theory that healthy older people have a considerable capacity reserve for an improved performance in abstract abilities of thinking can be assumed. The first symptoms for older people at risk for dementia are a reduced cognitive capacity reserve. Cognitive training methods therefore focus abilities of abstract memory. Apart from types of dementia another two groups of diseases with cognitive deficits were included in the HTA report: cerebral lesions and schizophrenic psychoses. Studies with mild as well as forms of dementia heavy forms including the Alzheimer disease were included. The described training methods were very heterogeneous with regard to their contents, the temporal sequence and the outcome parameter. The studies were methodically partly contestable. Approximately a third of the studies of all publications could show improvements in the cognitive achievements by the training. Three studies concerning cognitive training methods in case of cerebral lesions were included. All three studies demonstrated a significant improvement in the training group in some outcome parameters. Special cognitive training methods were used for the treatment of cognitive deficits at schizophrenic psychoses. The neurocognitive training (NET, the "Cognitive Remediation Therapy" as well as the strategic training with coaching proved to be effective. The studies, however, were hardly comparable and very heterogeneous in detail. Summarising the cognitive training

  15. lncScore: alignment-free identification of long noncoding RNA from assembled novel transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Song, Xiaofeng; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq based transcriptome assembly has been widely used to identify novel lncRNAs. However, the best-performing transcript reconstruction methods merely identified 21% of full-length protein-coding transcripts from H. sapiens. Those partial-length protein-coding transcripts are more likely to be classified as lncRNAs due to their incomplete CDS, leading to higher false positive rate for lncRNA identification. Furthermore, potential sequencing or assembly error that gain or abolish stop codons also complicates ORF-based prediction of lncRNAs. Therefore, it remains a challenge to identify lncRNAs from the assembled transcripts, particularly the partial-length ones. Here, we present a novel alignment-free tool, lncScore, which uses a logistic regression model with 11 carefully selected features. Compared to other state-of-the-art alignment-free tools (e.g. CPAT, CNCI, and PLEK), lncScore outperforms them on accurately distinguishing lncRNAs from mRNAs, especially partial-length mRNAs in the human and mouse datasets. In addition, lncScore also performed well on transcripts from five other species (Zebrafish, Fly, C. elegans, Rat, and Sheep). To speed up the prediction, multithreading is implemented within lncScore, and it only took 2 minute to classify 64,756 transcripts and 54 seconds to train a new model with 21,000 transcripts with 12 threads, which is much faster than other tools. lncScore is available at https://github.com/WGLab/lncScore. PMID:27708423

  16. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim;

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training....... The resting motor thresholds of tongue MEPs were lowered by training with TDS and TPT (Ptraining with TDS and TPT (P

  17. Distributed versus massed training: efficiency of training psychomotor skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen W. van Dongen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality simulators have shown to be valid and useful tools for training psychomotor skills for endoscopic surgery. Discussion arises how to integrate these simulators into the surgical training curriculum. Distributed training is referred to as short training periods, with rest periods in between. Massed training is training in continuous and longer training blocks. This study investigates the difference between distributed and massed training on the initial development and retention of psychomotor skills on a virtual reality simulator. Four groups of eight medical students lacking any experience in endoscopic training were created. Two groups trained in a distributed fashion, one group trained in a massed fashion and the last group not at all (control group. All performed a post-test immediately after finishing their training schedule. Two months after this test a second post- test was performed. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA with Post-Hoc test Tukey-Bonferoni was used to determine differences in mean scores between the four groups, whereas a pvalue ≤0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Distributed training resulted in higher scores and a better retention of relevant psychomotor skills. Distributed as well as massed training resulted in better scores and retention of skills than no training at all. Our study clearly shows that distributed training yields better results in psychomotor endoscopic skills. Therefore, in order to train as efficient as possible, training programs should be (re-programmed accordingly.

  18. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  19. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  20. Molecular biology Mediating transcription and RNA export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Taatjes, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    The finding that the Mediator protein complex contributes to messenger RNA export from the nucleus in yeast adds to a growing list of roles for the complex in regulating transcriptional processes. PMID:26450052

  1. Dynamics of transcription-translation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D.; Edwards, R.

    2016-09-01

    A theory for qualitative models of gene regulatory networks has been developed over several decades, generally considering transcription factors to regulate directly the expression of other transcription factors, without any intermediate variables. Here we explore a class of models that explicitly includes both transcription and translation, keeping track of both mRNA and protein concentrations. We mainly deal with transcription regulation functions that are steep sigmoids or step functions, as is often done in protein-only models, though translation is governed by a linear term. We extend many aspects of the protein-only theory to this new context, including properties of fixed points, description of trajectories by mappings between switching points, qualitative analysis via a state-transition diagram, and a result on periodic orbits for negative feedback loops. We find that while singular behaviour in switching domains is largely avoided, non-uniqueness of solutions can still occur in the step-function limit.

  2. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  3. Transcription of piano music with deep learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jug, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of music is a complex process of transcribing an audio recording into a symbolic notation. The goal of this thesis was to examine transcription of piano music with deep learning, for which three models of deep neural networks were implemented: multilayer perceptron, convolutional neural network and deep belief network. Through the use of deep belief network, unsupervised pretraining for automatic extraction of musical features from audio signals was also tested. Learning of thes...

  4. Extraction of Transcript Diversity from Scientific Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Parantu K Shah; Jensen, Lars J.; Stéphanie Boué; Peer Bork

    2005-01-01

    Synopsis Given the functional complexity of higher eukaryotes, the relatively small number of genes in the human and other mammalian genomes came as a surprise to the scientific community. Later it was discovered that the majority of genes are subject to alternative splicing (“cutting and pasting”) or associated mechanisms that ultimately increase the diversity of transcripts that code for proteins. Studies exploring transcript diversity are currently dominated by high-throughput experiments ...

  5. Do transcriptional enhancers also augment DNA replication?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, D T; Subramani, S

    1988-01-01

    Enhancers are DNA elements that augment transcription in cis, independent of distance and orientation. Evidence such as hormone dependent neoplastic cell growth and the stimulation of viral replication by sequences present in enhancers suggests that enhancers may also directly affect DNA replication. We tested this hypothesis in recombinant plasmids by asking whether sequences that stimulated DNA replication shared the properties of transcriptional enhancers. The homologous simian virus 40 (S...

  6. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  7. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  8. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  9. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin;

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  10. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  11. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  12. Nuclear Manpower Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y. and others

    2006-01-15

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2005, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided 67 nuclear education and training courses for 3,658 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. In addition, 6 students (MS and Ph D.) have taken nuclear technology related courses offered by UST-KAERI. The project has developed 8 programs and 12 courses. They includes programs for IAEA training, bilateral education and training, and in-house training as well as courses dealing with maintenance of nuclear power plants and management of electricity generation, thermal-hydraulics nuclear hydrogen, nuclear safeguards, radiation emergency preparedness and etc. National and international cooperation has been promoted. For ANENT, test operation, data loading and revision of the web-portal have been undertaken. Also the web-portal operation system has been established. For FNCA, NTC has cooperated for the establishment of a model of human resource development and the exchange of information/materials. With WNU, the NTC has made an effort for hosting 2007 WNU Summer Institute. The infrastructure for nuclear education and training has been strengthened. Basic directions for providing the customers with better service, This includes showing kindness to the customer, renovation of the interior of training facilities, and upgrading of web-based management system for learning and using facilities of NTC. Other efforts have resulted in the publication of 25 course materials (10 for international courses and 15 for national courses), and the improvement of education and training equipment. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 296 international and domestic events in 2005.

  13. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2005, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided 67 nuclear education and training courses for 3,658 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. In addition, 6 students (MS and Ph D.) have taken nuclear technology related courses offered by UST-KAERI. The project has developed 8 programs and 12 courses. They includes programs for IAEA training, bilateral education and training, and in-house training as well as courses dealing with maintenance of nuclear power plants and management of electricity generation, thermal-hydraulics nuclear hydrogen, nuclear safeguards, radiation emergency preparedness and etc. National and international cooperation has been promoted. For ANENT, test operation, data loading and revision of the web-portal have been undertaken. Also the web-portal operation system has been established. For FNCA, NTC has cooperated for the establishment of a model of human resource development and the exchange of information/materials. With WNU, the NTC has made an effort for hosting 2007 WNU Summer Institute. The infrastructure for nuclear education and training has been strengthened. Basic directions for providing the customers with better service, This includes showing kindness to the customer, renovation of the interior of training facilities, and upgrading of web-based management system for learning and using facilities of NTC. Other efforts have resulted in the publication of 25 course materials (10 for international courses and 15 for national courses), and the improvement of education and training equipment. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 296 international and domestic events in 2005.

  14. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22643861

  15. Employee Training: An International Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kapsalis, Constantine

    1997-01-01

    Canada’s training effort relative to the rest of the IALS countries, measured in terms of hours of training per employee, was found to be average. The average employee in Canada received 44 hours of training in 1994, similar to the hours of training per employee in Switzerland, the United States and Germany. However, Canada’s training effort was considerably less than the Netherlands (74 hours per employee). One finding of particular interest to Canada is the virtual equality of training ...

  16. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to shut down Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Information on number of the personnel who extended their knowledge and improved skills by the type of training is presented

  17. Physical Training and Cardioprotection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Zhang; Keith L. March; Dongming Hou

    2003-01-01

    Experimental, clinical and epidemiologic studies have provided strong evidence that physical training has beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that exercise increases coronary blood flow and myocardial perfusion. Importantly, training also can stimulate angiogenesis and accelerate collateral vessel growth in animal models with coronary artery occlusion. Cardiac adaptation such as increased vascularity or capillary density has been evidenced after regular endurance exercises. More recently, several studies indicate that physical training induces high levels of myocardial heat shock protein and antioxidant protein expression, which may play an important role in myocardial protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  18. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  19. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual session of this course will take place on 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  20. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced using Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on December 12, 2008 and January 30, 2009. Register using our catalogue : http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  1. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  2. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  3. MODALITIES OF TRAINING PARAMETER ALTERNATION IN NOWADAYS STRENGTH TRAINING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANISAVLJEV IGOR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Large number of variables could be alternated during the process of planning and programming in sports training. Superior training results in majority of sports are achieved by optimally manipulating training parameters in appropriate sequences and combinations. Additionally, in some sports they might be the result of appropriate periodization pattern. Today's tendency in strength training practice is training movements instead of training muscles. Exercise classification according to the dominant movement types, allows creating new modalities in training alternation. Additional variations in volume, intensity, rest brakes, repetition velocity andinter-repetition rest can be the important part of functional strength training program. Alternation and combination of different training parameters makes appropriate training stimulus for strength increase in the most of nowadays sports. Optimal alternation of basic training parameters should be the first part in the processof planning and programming. As a result, majority of athletes might not need advanced periodization patterns for optimal improvement in muscle strength and power

  4. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  5. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels ofperoxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1αand the downstream targetscytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, andIdh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (allPrespiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  6. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination of long noncoding RNA transcripts hosting microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J; Jopling, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major part in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with cotranscriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. Although most miRNAs are located within introns of protein-coding transcripts, a substantial minority of miRNAs originate from long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, for which transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lncRNA transcripts containing miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) do not use the canonical cleavage-and-polyadenylation pathway but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a new RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells.

  7. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  8. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  9. Interactive Karyotyping Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kotwaliwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the wide use of newer techniques in genetic diagnostics, there remains a need for technologists to learn human chromosome morphology, identify abnormal metaphases and report clinical abnormalities. Global short age of cytogenetic trainers and a time consuming training process makes Karyotyping training difficult. We have developed a web based interactive Karyotyping training tool, KaryoTutor©, that allows technologists to learn karyotyping in an interactive environment and aids the trainer in the training process. KaryoTutor©provides visual clues for identifying abnormal chromosomes, provides instant test scores and includes a reference library of ideograms,sample chromosome images and reference materials. Trainees are able to recursively work on a case till a satisfactory result is achieved,with KaryoTutor providing interactive inputs.Additionally, trainers can assign cases and monitor trainee progress using audit trail management and other administrative features.

  10. The Last Horse Trains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Horse trains used to be the chief means of transport in southwest China's mountainous areas, areas that were almost inaccessible because of the difficult terrain. They have largely disappeared as most such areas are already serviced by modern road systems. At binzhonluo, however, the last horse trains can still be found, their drivers being Nus, Lisus and Tibetans. As I discovered at country fairs, goods shipped in by horse trains from Tibetan are mostly butter tea, edible fungus and wild orchid plants, and goods shipped to Tibet include drinks, batteries, salt and instant noodles. For centuries,horse trains have traversed the Nujiang Canyon or the Tibetan-Yi Corridor which, to be accurate, should be called an economic and cultural corridor linking Tibet and the rest of China.

  11. Language Training: French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 27 April to 26 June 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 27 April to 26 June 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Language Training French Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  12. Does CRM training work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Formal cockpit resource management training in crew coordination concepts increases the percentage of crews rated as above average in performance and decreases the percentage of crews rated as below average.

  13. Training of OJT instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OJT (on-the-job) instructor training needs to include several important elements. They need to provide OJT instructors with the policies and procedures for conducting and documenting the training; they need to acquaint them with performance objectives and train them to measure performance against these objectives; but most of all they need to teach them how to demonstrate a manipulative skill at the level of the objective, for this is the most likely single teaching method that the OJT instructor will use. This teaching skill consists of several discrete elements, all of which can be taught and learned. Finally, the OJT instructor needs to know how to create a job performance measure to assess the achievement of the learners. This paper describes such a training program

  14. [Government and training demands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Klaauw, J M

    1998-06-01

    The availability of adequately trained professionals in sufficient numbers is an essential condition for guaranteeing good quality of health care. The Individual Health Care Professions Act fosters the quality by defining the educational requirements and the area of professional competence. The proposal of the working group 'Competition, Deregulation and Quality of Legislation in the health care' to make the dental hygienist free accessible for the patient is in accordance with the policy of the government to foster the efficiency by task delegation. The replacement of sectorial EU-directives by general directives for the free movement of professionals within the European Economic Area has more drawbacks than advantages. Most EU-memberstates are not a proponent for a vocational year after the basic dental training. Deficiencies in the basic dental training should have been met by lengthening the basic training. PMID:12132401

  15. United Airlines LOFT training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, D.; Traub, B.

    1981-01-01

    Line oriented training is used in a broader, more generic sense that as a specific program under FAR 12.1409 and AC 120-35. A company policy was adopted more than twenty years ago requiring that all pilot checks and recurrent training be conducted with a full crew occupying the seats they occupy on the line. Permission was obtained to reschedule the hours for recurrent proficiency training to include one and one-half hours of LOFT flight. The number of emergencies and abnormal procedures which could be undertaken were considered and the introduction of an a occasional incapacitation revealed which person is the most difficult to replace on the widebodies. By using the LOFT concept, every training period can be structured like a typical line flight. The use of LOFT in simulator syllabus development and problems that need to be refined are discussed.

  16. Training in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Leo R.

    1983-01-01

    A train trip through Pennsylvania is an education in the history and current activities and industries of the state. One can observe the old railroad depots, landscapes, railroad work crews, strip mines, and Amish communities. (KC)

  17. Modernization of personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personnel training in German nuclear power plants adheres to high standards complying with government regulations. The development of PC technology allows the introduction of new training methods, e.g. computer based training (CBT), as well as their integration into existing systems. In Germany, the operators of nuclear power plants have developed their own computer based standards with a screen design, a hardware platform and an assessment standard. 25% of the theoretical training of the shift personnel is covered by CBT. The CBT-Programmes offer multimedia features: videos, photographs, sound, graphs and switching diagrams of existing systems, practice oriented simulations and 3-D animations. Interaction is the most important attribute of an efficient self-learning-programme. A typical example of such an appropriate theme is the CBT-Lesson ''Pressure Surges in Pipes and Components of Power Plants''. (author)

  18. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  19. Innovation, Productivity, and Training

    OpenAIRE

    Dostie, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    The firm's stock of human capital is an important determinant of its ability to innovate. As such, any increase in this stock through firm-sponsored training might lead to more innovation. We test this hypothesis using detailed data on firms' human capital investments and innovation performance, the Canadian longitudinal linked employer-employee data from 1999-2006. Our results, with workplace fixed-effects and allowing for time-varying productivity shocks, demonstrate that more training lead...

  20. Making Vocational Training Work

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, Anthony; Baxter, David; Onur, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the efficacy and sustainability of the outcomes from vocational training delivered in DDR programs pertaining to (i) issues related to the design and implementation of vocation¬al training and activities, and (ii) issues relating to the external economic and social environment as well as the history and profile of ex-combatants who have un¬dergone vo...

  1. Upper Extremity Proprioceptive Training

    OpenAIRE

    Partin, Nina B.; Stone, Jennifer A; Ryan, Edward J.; Lueken, Joseph S.; Timm, Kent E.

    1994-01-01

    Proprioception following lower extremity injuries is commonly recommended, but there is little information on proprioception training following upper extremity injuries. No studies have evaluated whether proprioception programs for athletes in open kinetic chain activities (throwing, shot putting) should be different than programs for athletes in closed kinetic chain activities (gymnastics, swimming, kayaking, or rowing). In this paper, we provide a rationale for proprioception training for u...

  2. Training cleanroom personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, A M

    1991-01-01

    PEOPLE: the one resource that all companies have in common. Companies in general, and especially those involved in the clean or aseptic manufacturing environments cannot rely solely on technological innovation to increase quality and productivity. They must optimize their human assets to raise performance levels. Training is a critical factor. The training process is not simply to impart knowledge; but through education and involvement on a personal level, to alter behavior: CULTURE.

  3. Training brain networks and states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Brain training refers to practices that alter the brain in a way that improves cognition, and performance in domains beyond those involved in the training. We argue that brain training includes network training through repetitive practice that exercises specific brain networks and state training, which changes the brain state in a way that influences many networks. This opinion article considers two widely used methods - working memory training (WMT) and meditation training (MT) - to demonstrate the similarities and differences between network and state training. These two forms of training involve different areas of the brain and different forms of generalization. We propose a distinction between network and state training methods to improve understanding of the most effective brain training.

  4. Extraction of transcript diversity from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcript diversity generated by alternative splicing and associated mechanisms contributes heavily to the functional complexity of biological systems. The numerous examples of the mechanisms and functional implications of these events are scattered throughout the scientific literature. Thus, it is crucial to have a tool that can automatically extract the relevant facts and collect them in a knowledge base that can aid the interpretation of data from high-throughput methods. We have developed and applied a composite text-mining method for extracting information on transcript diversity from the entire MEDLINE database in order to create a database of genes with alternative transcripts. It contains information on tissue specificity, number of isoforms, causative mechanisms, functional implications, and experimental methods used for detection. We have mined this resource to identify 959 instances of tissue-specific splicing. Our results in combination with those from EST-based methods suggest that alternative splicing is the preferred mechanism for generating transcript diversity in the nervous system. We provide new annotations for 1,860 genes with the potential for generating transcript diversity. We assign the MeSH term "alternative splicing" to 1,536 additional abstracts in the MEDLINE database and suggest new MeSH terms for other events. We have successfully extracted information about transcript diversity and semiautomatically generated a database, LSAT, that can provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific gene expression. LSAT (Literature Support for Alternative Transcripts is publicly available at http://www.bork.embl.de/LSAT/.

  5. Evolution of gastroenterology training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanna Telleman; Trevlyn Felicity Burger; Chris Jacob Johan Mulder

    2009-01-01

    There have been rapid developments in gastroenterology (GE) over the last decade. Up until the late 1980s, GE-training was incorporated in Internal Medicine training. The introduction of endoscopy has necessitated the need for additional training. Around the world different national boards have developed their own curricula which will be discussed in this paper. Emphasis will be placed on the curriculum recently introduced in The Netherlands. The internal medicine component has become a two-year requirement (Common Trunk) and the duration of training in GE has been extended to four years. Because of the growing complexity of GE, there are now four subspecialties: Interventional Endoscopy, Neuromotility, Oncology and Hepatology that trainees can choose from. These subspecialties each have predefined specific requirements. The World Gastroenterology Organization has drawn up a standard curriculum which can be of help to the boards in different countries. The curriculum emphasizes the knowledge and skill components. The curriculum also defines the training recommendations, the requirements of training facilities and competence evaluation of fellows and facilities, while less is said about research, finance and the number of gastroenterologists required. In the coming decades the curriculum will need to be revised continuously. Personalization of the curriculum will be the next challenge for the years to come.

  6. Certification of training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    Training has been around as an informal process for countless years. Most higher order animals require some level of training in hunting, social skills, or other survival related skills to continue their existence beyond early infancy. Much of the training is accomplished through imitation, trial and error, and good luck. In some ways the essentials of training in aviation have not deviated from this original formula a great deal. One of the major changes in aviation and other technical areas is that more complex response chains based on a broader base of knowledge are now required. 'To certify' means many things according to the American Heritage dictionary of the English Language. These meanings range from 'to guarantee as meeting a standard' to 'to declare legally insane'. For this discussion, we will use the definition 'an action taken by some authoritative body that essentially guarantees that the instruction meets some defined standard'. In order to make this certification, the responsible body subjects the educational process, training, training device, or simulator to some type of examination to determine its adequacy or validity.

  7. Train Right or Don't Train at All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Nancy K.; Deller, John

    1985-01-01

    A program to train bank operations supervisors to conduct quarterly informal performance appraisals involved three modes: content-only training, content-plus-procedure training, and no training. While content-plus-procedure was predictably the most satisfactory, content-only, because it lacked a practice component, was less effective than no…

  8. Identification of epididymis-specific transcripts in the mouse and rat by transcriptional profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel S. Johnston; Terry T. Turner; Joshua N. Finger; Tracy L. Owtscharuk; S. Kopf; Scott A. Jelinsky

    2007-01-01

    As part of our efforts to identify novel contraceptive targets in the epididymis we performed transcriptional profiling on each of the 10 and 19 segments of the mouse and rat epididymidis, respectively, using Affymetrix whole genome microarrays. A total of 17 096 and 16 360 probe sets representing transcripts were identified as being expressed in the segmented mouse and rat epididymal transcriptomes, respectively. Comparison of the expressed murine transcripts against a mouse transcriptional profiling database derived from 22 other mouse tissues identified 77transcripts that were expressed uniquely in the epididymis. The expression of these genes was further evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of RNA from 21 mouse tissues. RT-PCR analysis confirmed epididymis-specific expression of Defensin Beta 13 and identified two additional genes with expression restricted only to the epididymis and testis. Comparison of the 16 360 expressed transcripts in the rat epididymis with data of 21 other tissues from a rat transcriptional profiling database identified 110 transcripts specific for the epididymis.Sixty-two of these transcripts were further investigated by qPCR analysis. Only Defensin 22 (E3 epididymal protein)was shown to be completely specific for the epididymis. In addition, 14 transcripts showed more than 100-fold selective expression in the epididymis. The products of these genes might play important roles in epididymal and/or sperm function and further investigation and validation as contraceptive targets are warranted. The results of the studies described in this report are available at the Mammalian Reproductive Genetics (MRG) Database (http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu/).

  9. Annual training manual for security training: Protective force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Westinghouse is committed to high quality training relevant to the need of the Protective Forces at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The training programs at WIPP are designed to qualify Security personnel to perform WIPP security missions in a professional and responsible manner. The program consists of basic as well as sustainment training, as further described in this plan. This plan documents the WIPP Security training program for security personnel for calendar year 1990. The programs detailed in this plan are designed to adequately train persons to ensure the uninterrupted continuity of Department of Energy (DOE)/Westinghouse operations. The Security Training Program consists of four basic elements. These elements are (1) basic level training; (2) on-the-job training; (3) refresher training; and (4) in-service training.

  10. Effect of high-intensity training on exercise-induced gene expression specific to ion homeostasis and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Bangsbo, Jens; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2003-01-01

    Changes in gene expression during recovery from high-intensity, intermittent, one-legged exercise were studied before and after 5.5 wk of training. Genes related to metabolism, as well as Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, were selected for analyses. After the same work was performed before and after the...... training period, several muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis muscle. In the untrained state, the Na+-K+-ATPase alpha1-subunit mRNA level was approximately threefold higher (P < 0.01) at 0, 1, and 3 h after exercise, relative to the preexercise resting level. After 3-5 h of recovery in the...... resting mRNA levels were observed as a result of training. In conclusion, cellular adaptations to high-intensity exercise training may, in part, be induced by transcriptional regulation. After training, the transcriptional response to an exercise bout at a given workload is diminished....

  11. Antioxidant supplementation does not alter endurance training adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yfanti, Christina; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Nielsen, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a considerable commercial market, especially within the sports community, claiming the need for antioxidant supplementation. One argument for antioxidant supplementation in sports is that physical exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS......) production, which may cause cell damage. However, RONS production may also activate redox sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors, which subsequently may promote training adaptation. PURPOSE: Our aim was to investigate the effects of combined vitamin C and E supplementation to healthy...... individuals on different measures of exercise performance after endurance training. METHODS:: Using a double-blinded placebo-controlled design, moderately trained young men received either oral supplementation with vitamins C and E (n=11) or placebo (n=10) before and during 12 weeks of supervised, strenuous...

  12. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  13. Aircraft Simulators and Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Paul W.

    Flight simulators are built as realistically as possible, presumably to enhance their training value. Yet, their training value is determined by the way they are used. Traditionally, simulators have been less important for training than have aircraft, but they are currently emerging as primary pilot training vehicles. This new emphasis is an…

  14. Sustainable Library Development Training Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This Sustainable Library Development Training Package supports Peace Corps' Focus In/Train Up strategy, which was implemented following the 2010 Comprehensive Agency Assessment. Sustainable Library Development is a technical training package in Peace Corps programming within the Education sector. The training package addresses the Volunteer…

  15. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  16. Training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of formal education and the lack of skills in the oil and gas industry among Northerners were substantial barriers to their employment in the exploration projects. Eventually, training programs were created to ensure that Northern residents had an opportunity to acquire the skills necessary for them to benefit from Northern employment opportunities. Initially, Northern employees were sent to Southern training schools located in Edmonton, Calgary and Victoria, where besides training in operating machinery on the oil rigs and drill ships, they also received instruction on how to manage money, deal with financial institutions, and generally to cope in a wage-based economy. This program proved to be only marginally successful since, according to several people interviewed, going south frequently developed into simply taking advantage of the opportunity to have a good time. According to the same people, learning and productivity levels among the trainees were consistently low, making the program uneconomical. In due course, a hands-on, on-the-job training system was adopted. This, too, proved to be less than effective, because Northern trainees still lacked the formal education to progress beyond entry level menial jobs, and it was still expensive, as well as dangerous. Eventually, an off-season training program - Tuk Tech - was started with government help. This initiative was the most successful in training people to work in many capacities, 'everything from radio operators to chefs to nurses' as well as instilling fundamental life skills. Although exploration has ceased for the immediate future, training remains vital for the Northern population to take advantage of any future opportunities

  17. Outsourcing of training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, Flour Daniel Hanford, Inc. along with several other partners were awarded the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). The contract for Management and Integration (M and I) differed significantly from previous contracts awarded at the Hanford site. As the lead contractor, FHD was expected to help diversify the area economy by outsourcing upwards of 50% f the work previously performed by contractor staff, with outsourcing reference to local business. In addition to creating private sector jobs, FDH was expected to infuse 'best commercial practices' into the Hanford clean-up effort, thus achieving greater results within the available funding levels approved by the U.S. Congress. In 1997, FDH Training began the process of outsourcing site-wide training. The process took nearly a year from start to contract award and included the delivery and maintenance of over 100 nuclear and non-nuclear worker training courses. In March of 1998, Fluor Daniel Hanford outsourced a large segment of the general training required for Department of Energy nuclear and non-nuclear workers at Hanford. The segment of training that was outsourced impacts the safety and operations of the different Hanford Site facilities managed by seven major subcontractors who make up the Project Hanford Management Companies (PHMC). This work was outsourced to Exitech Columbia Corporation in a competitive bid process. The three major types of training outsourced were: Hazardous Materials Health and Safety; General Industry Health and Safety; Technical Development and Quality. During the first 16 months of this outsourcing effort we have learned several important lessons that I would like to take a few minutes and share with you. I believe that these lessons learned will be applicable to virtually every outsourcing effort undertaken by a training organization

  18. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  19. Program-specific distribution of a transcription factor dependent on partner transcription factor and MAPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlinger, Julia; Simon, Itamar; Harbison, Christopher T; Hannett, Nancy M; Volkert, Thomas L; Fink, Gerald R; Young, Richard A

    2003-05-01

    Specialized gene expression programs are induced by signaling pathways that act on transcription factors. Whether these transcription factors can function in multiple developmental programs through a global switch in promoter selection is not known. We have used genome-wide location analysis to show that the yeast Ste12 transcription factor, which regulates mating and filamentous growth, is bound to distinct program-specific target genes dependent on the developmental condition. This condition-dependent distribution of Ste12 requires concurrent binding of the transcription factor Tec1 during filamentation and is differentially regulated by the MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1. Program-specific distribution across the genome may be a general mechanism by which transcription factors regulate distinct gene expression programs in response to signaling. PMID:12732146

  20. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria - ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  1. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  2. Conservation and implications of eukaryote transcriptional regulatory regions across multiple species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Minghua

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence shows that whole genomes of eukaryotes are almost entirely transcribed into both protein coding genes and an enormous number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. Therefore, revealing the underlying regulatory mechanisms of transcripts becomes imperative. However, for a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, we need to identify the regions in which they are found. We will call these transcriptional regulation regions, or TRRs, which can be considered functional regions containing a cluster of regulatory elements that cooperatively recruit transcriptional factors for binding and then regulating the expression of transcripts. Results We constructed a hierarchical stochastic language (HSL model for the identification of core TRRs in yeast based on regulatory cooperation among TRR elements. The HSL model trained based on yeast achieved comparable accuracy in predicting TRRs in other species, e.g., fruit fly, human, and rice, thus demonstrating the conservation of TRRs across species. The HSL model was also used to identify the TRRs of genes, such as p53 or OsALYL1, as well as microRNAs. In addition, the ENCODE regions were examined by HSL, and TRRs were found to pervasively locate in the genomes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that 1 the HSL model can be used to accurately predict core TRRs of transcripts across species and 2 identified core TRRs by HSL are proper candidates for the further scrutiny of specific regulatory elements and mechanisms. Meanwhile, the regulatory activity taking place in the abundant numbers of ncRNAs might account for the ubiquitous presence of TRRs across the genome. In addition, we also found that the TRRs of protein coding genes and ncRNAs are similar in structure, with the latter being more conserved than the former.

  3. Battles and hijacks: noncoding transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jégu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription.

  4. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  6. Enhancement of CIITA transcriptional function by ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Susanna F; Zika, Eleni; Conti, Brian; Zhu, Xin-Sheng; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2003-11-01

    Although increasing evidence indicates that there is a direct link between ubiquitination and mono-ubiquitination and transcription in yeast, this link has not been demonstrated in higher eukaryotes. Here we show that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA), which is required for expression of genes encoding MHC class II molecules, is ubiquitinated. This ubiquitination enhanced the association of CIITA with both MHC class II transcription factors and the MHC class II promoter, resulting in an increase in transactivation function and in the expression of MHC class II mRNA. The degree of CIITA ubiquitination was controlled by histone acetylases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs), indicating that the crucial cellular processes mediated by these enzymes are linked to regulate transcription. Thus, ubiquitin positively regulates a mammalian coactivator by enhancing its assembly at the promoter.

  7. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  9. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  10. Employer Training Needs in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen A. Woodbury

    1992-01-01

    The Survey of Employer Training Needs in Hawaii was undertaken to gather information and data on the needs and preferences of employers in Hawaii regarding government assistance with training. The need for such information was created by passage of Act 68, Session Laws of Hawaii 1991, which created the Hawaii Employment and Training Fund "to assist employers and workers through innovative programs to include, but not be limited to, business-specific training, upgrade training, new occupationa...

  11. Corporate Training in Virtual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Nebolsky; Nicholas K. Yee; Valery A. Petrushin; Anatole V. Gershman

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents virtual training worlds that are relatively low-cost distributed collaborative learning environments suitable for corporate training. A virtual training world allows a facilitator, experts and trainees communicating and acting in the virtual environment for practicing skills during collaborative problem solving. Using these environments is beneficial to both trainees and corporations. Two system prototypes – the sales training and the leadership training virtual worl...

  12. Trainee Readiness For Diversity Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhyung Chung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although trainee readiness is critical for diversity training effectiveness, extant research has not paid attention to the relationship between trainee readiness for diversity training and diversity training outcomes. This study identifies motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training and proposes a theoretical framework of how individual characteristics (perceived discrimination, demographic attributes, and previous diversity-related experience and organizational characteristics (diversity climate and demographic dissimilarity influence motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training.

  13. RNA polymerase III transcription in cancer: the BRF2 connection

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm Laura; Cabarcas Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription is responsible for the transcription of small, untranslated RNAs involved in fundamental metabolic processes such mRNA processing (U6 snRNA) and translation (tRNAs). RNA pol III transcription contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic capacity of a cell and a direct link exists between cancer cell proliferation and deregulation of RNA pol III transcription. Accurate transcription by RNA pol III requires TFIIIB, a known target of regulatio...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project :6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1: 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1 : 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL : 2 - 4.6.2...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 days) LabVIEW Hands-on : 20.4.2004 (half-day, p.m.) FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 -...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FrontPage XP - niveau 2 : 26 & 27.4.2004 (2 jours) The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 26 - 30.4.2004 (5 days) Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Pla...

  17. Ethics Training in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Guloksuz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although ethics training is one of the core components of psychiatric education, it is not sufficiently addressed in the curricula of many educational institutions. It is shown that many of the psychiatry residents received no ethics training in both residency and medical school. Predictably, over half of the psychiatry residents had faced an ethical dilemma that they felt unprepared to meet, and nearly all of them indicated ethics education would have helped them to solve this dilemma. In addition to learning about the fundamental topics of ethics like confidentiality, boundary violations, justice, benefience and nonmaleficence, psychiatrists must also learn to deal with other hidden ethical dilemmas which are mostly due to the changing world order. It is obvious that residency training should include a well developed ethics curriculum. However, some still believe that ethical principles cannot be taught and are formed in one’s early moral development. Accepting the fact that teaching ethics is difficult, we believe that it is getting easier with the new methods for teaching in medicine. These methods are clinical supervisions, rol-models, case studies, role playing, small group discussions, team based learning and “let’s talking medicine” groups which is a useful methods for discussing ethics dilemmas on daily practice and C.A.R.E (Core Beliefs, Actions, Reasons, Experience which is a special training method for teaching ethics. In this review, the need of ethics training in residency curriculum will be discussed and new methods for teaching ethics will be proposed.

  18. SAT in operations training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of tasks for analysis is made based on the decision tree that incorporates management's expectations of task difficulty and importance. The training setting (e.g., OJT, classroom, simulator, or laboratory) and the steps necessary to prepare the final training plan (along with example training plans for RO/SRO) was presented. The On-the-Job Training Manual is composed of a special video of each system that guides the trainee through a specified route in the plant showing the keypoints about the specific system. This Manual includes scanned photos of the main components and very detailed layout drawings to quickly walk-through a system. Two data bases were established to keep track of all the systems and tasks associated with a job post and to maintain the JPMs. SAT application in Spain, Argentina, Novovoronezh (Russia), and Hungary has varied by the time and human resources necessary to develop a complete SAT or a simplified SAT (which omits the taxonomic code for obtaining knowledge and skills associated to each task). An example of simulator training program materials and its correlation with the JPMs was presented along with a simulator evaluation guide showing how to assess RO/SRO behaviour

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Computational Electromagnetics with the ELEKTRA Module of OPERA-3D : 27 & 28.4.2004 (2 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 3 - 5.5.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Base 2 : 6 & 7.5.2004 (2 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project : 6 & 13.5.2004 (2 days) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.5.2004 (2 jours) Oracle 9i : SQL : 10 - 12.5.2004 (3...

  20. LEAH interdisciplinary training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Cynthia L; Rickert, Vaughn D

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) interdisciplinary training program in the United States. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau authorized by legislation provides monies to train leaders in adolescent health through a competitive grant process. Currently, seven academic medical centers have funding to provide leadership in adolescent health (LEAH) training in five core disciplines: medicine, nursing, psychology, social work and nutrition. LEAH training programs both ensure high clinical competence in core disciplines serving adolescents and prepare trainees for leadership positions in adolescent health and public health care realms. Together, these programs trained almost 1000 long-term trainees across these five disciplines, and graduates from these programs are working in 45 of the 50 states within the United States. About 90% of these graduates are working with maternal and child/adolescent health populations, and almost all have held leadership positions in the areas of public health, advocacy, public policy, academic medical centers and/or clinical care settings. PMID:26115496

  1. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 - 14.11.03(3 days) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 - 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - niveau 2 : 18 - 21.11.03 (4 jours) Project Planning with MS-Project  (free of charg...

  2. TECHNICAL TRAINING: Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) : 28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 – Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to PSpice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS ...

  3. Technical Training: Places Available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Oracle 9i: SQL: 17 - 19.5.2004 (3 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9i : New f...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.5.2004 (2 jours) VisualEliteHDL : 25 & 26.5.2004 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : 27 & 28.5.2004 (2 jours) STEP7 Programming Level 1: 1 - 4.6.2004 (4 days) Oracle 9i : Programming with PL/SQL: 2 - 4.6.2004 (3 days) CST Microwave Studio: 3 & 4.6.2004 (2 days) Oracle 9...

  5. Technical Training: Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) 16.3...

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 1.4.2004 (morning) FrontPage XP - niveau 1 : 5 & 6.4.2004 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20.4 et 3, 4.5.2004 (4 jours) Oracle 8i/9i - Develop Web-based Applications with PL/SQL : 19 & 20.4.2004 (2 days) Introduction to ANSYS : 20 - 23.4.2004 (4 day...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Pa...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Instructor-led WBTechT study for Microsoft applications :12.2.2004 (morning) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) LabVIEW TestStand I (E) : 23 & 24.2.2004 (2 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 19.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 ...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004(3 jours) Instructor-led WBTechT study or follow-up for Microsoft applications : 26.2.2004 (morning) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW hands-on (E) : 16.3.2004 (afternoon) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.2004 ...

  11. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 (6 X 4-hour sessions) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 9.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS MTF in Practice : 10.3.2004 (morning, free of charge) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 11.3.2004 (1 day, free of charge) LabVIEW hands-on (E):...

  12. Academic Training: 2003 - 2004 Academic Training Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch 3rd Term - 5 April to 2nd July 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 April Complex Systems, Chaos and Measurements by P. Collet / Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France 26, 27, 28, 29 April The Theory of Heavy Ion Collisions by U. Wiedemann / CERN-PH/TH 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 May Particle Identification at the LHC by D. Fournier / LAL, Orsay, France 1, 2, 3, 4 June Neural Systems, Genetic Algorithms by V. Robles Forcada and M. Perez Hernandez / Univ. Politecnica de Madrid E. 7, 8, 9, June Real Time Process Control by T. Riesco / CERN-TS 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 June The Cosmic Microwave Background by M. Zaldarriaga / Harvard University, USA 21, 22, 23, June Fixed Target Physics at CERN : Results and Prospects by J. Engelen / CERN-DG 28, 29, 30 June, 1, 2, July Search for Dark Matter by B. Sadoulet / Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstrac...

  13. Language Training : English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  14. Toxicogenomics: transcription profiling for toxicology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Chou, Jeff; Watkins, Paul B; Kaufmann, William K

    2009-01-01

    Toxicogenomics, the application of transcription profiling to toxicology, has been widely used for elucidating the molecular and cellular actions of chemicals and other environmental stressors on biological systems, predicting toxicity before any functional damages, and classification of known or new toxicants based on signatures of gene expression. The success of a toxicogenomics study depends upon close collaboration among experts in different fields, including a toxicologist or biologist, a bioinformatician, statistician, physician and, sometimes, mathematician. This review is focused on toxicogenomics studies, including transcription profiling technology, experimental design, significant gene extraction, toxicological results interpretation, potential pathway identification, database input and the applications of toxicogenomics in various fields of toxicological study. PMID:19157067

  15. The retinoblastoma protein as a transcriptional repressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Ed, H

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is one of the best-studied tumour suppressor gene products. Its loss during the genesis of many human tumours, its inactivation by several DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, and its ability to inhibit cell growth when introduced into dividing cells all suggest that pRB...... negatively regulates some aspect of normal cell growth. The discovery that pRB associates with transcription factors such as E2F has provided the first model for pRB function. In this review, we discuss how pRB may regulate cell growth by repressing transcription of genes essential for cell proliferation....

  16. Direct competition assay for transcription fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Lucyna; Kireeva, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Accurate transcription is essential for faithful information flow from DNA to RNA and to the protein. Mechanisms of cognate substrate selection by RNA polymerases are currently elucidated by structural, genetic, and biochemical approaches. Here, we describe a fast and reliable approach to quantitative analyses of transcription fidelity, applicable to analyses of RNA polymerase selectivity against misincorporation, incorporation of dNMPs, and chemically modified rNMP analogues. The method is based on different electrophoretic mobility of RNA oligomers of the same length but differing in sequence.

  17. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhal, Bruce D.; Dang, My-Trang T.; Li, Xiaopeng; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2012-01-01

    An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG) system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed. PMID:22500179

  18. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce D. Uhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed.

  19. Innovative techniques in maintenance training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance based training has its beginning with a Job and Task Analysis (JTA), and culminates with the presentation of the developed training material. For optimum training effectiveness, a post training feedback mechanism is utilized to update and/or upgrade material content. A Job Task Analysis uses subject matter experts and supporting documentation to define the skills and knowledge necessary to perform functions from total position responsibilities to the simplest tasks, depending on desired results. Once skills and knowledge are defined, decisions on needed curriculum can be made including objectives, exams, and training settings (classroom, lab, or job site). This focused curriculum and the determination of best training settings are innovations of the performanced based training system. Past training experience has illustrated that a baseline level of classroom training acts as a catalyst for optimum hands-on training. The trainee exits the training phase able to do the job proficiently. This provides the training customer with quality training with minimum investment. Maintenance Training at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) integrates the knowledge and skill needs by providing the individual with focused classroom presentations followed by sufficient laboratory time to practice actual task activities. Labs are configured to represent plant equipment and work environment to the maximum extent possible and duplicate in-plant work orders and procedures are used. This allows actions to be analyzed and corrective feedback given as necessary. As an added benefit, any mistakes made during training has minimal, if any, impact on plant performance

  20. 75 FR 78731 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-0115, Application for Training, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... agency, class name, start date, and all required financial payment information. NCTC uses data from the form to generate class rosters, class transcripts, and statistics, and as a budgeting tool for projecting training requirements. It is also used to track attendance, mandatory requirements, tuition,...

  1. Serotonin- and Training-Induced Dynamic Regulation of CREB2 in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Shah, Shreyansh; Cleary, Leonard J.; Byrne, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory and plasticity, including long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF) of the "Aplysia" sensorimotor synapse, depend on the activation of transcription factors that regulate genes necessary for synaptic plasticity. In the present study we found that treatment with 5-HT and behavioral training produce biphasic changes in the expression of…

  2. Training Directors' Conceptualizations of the Intersections of Diversity and Trainee Competence Problems: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David S. Shen; Forrest, Linda; Elman, Nancy S.

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology has demonstrated leadership on multicultural issues through serious and committed attention to diversity in scholarship, conferences, and training and recruitment. Yet a survey of the literature on trainees with competence problems resulted in limited references to race/ethnicity and/or gender (REG). Using transcripts of…

  3. Blood transcriptional signature of recombinant human erythropoietin administration and implications for antidoping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durussel, Jérôme; Haile, Diresibachew W; Mooses, Kerli; Daskalaki, Evangelia; Beattie, Wendy; Mooses, Martin; Mekonen, Wondyefraw; Ongaro, Neford; Anjila, Edwin; Patel, Rajan K; Padmanabhan, Neal; McBride, Martin W; McClure, John D; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2016-03-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is frequently abused by athletes as a performance-enhancing drug, despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Although the methods to detect blood doping, including rHuEPO injections, have improved in recent years, they remain imperfect. In a proof-of-principle study, we identified, replicated, and validated the whole blood transcriptional signature of rHuEPO in endurance-trained Caucasian males at sea level (n = 18) and Kenyan endurance runners at moderate altitude (n = 20), all of whom received rHuEPO injections for 4 wk. Transcriptional profiling shows that hundreds of transcripts were altered by rHuEPO in both cohorts. The main regulated expression pattern, observed in all participants, was characterized by a "rebound" effect with a profound upregulation during rHuEPO and a subsequent downregulation up to 4 wk postadministration. The functions of the identified genes were mainly related to the functional and structural properties of the red blood cell. Of the genes identified to be differentially expressed during and post-rHuEPO, we further confirmed a whole blood 34-transcript signature that can distinguish between samples collected pre-, during, and post-rHuEPO administration. By providing biomarkers that can reveal rHuEPO use, our findings represent an advance in the development of new methods for the detection of blood doping. PMID:26757800

  4. Alliance-focused training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Muran, J Christopher; Safran, Jeremy D

    2015-06-01

    Alliance-focused training (AFT) aims to increase therapists' ability to recognize, tolerate, and negotiate alliance ruptures by increasing the therapeutic skills of self-awareness, affect regulation, and interpersonal sensitivity. In AFT, therapists are encouraged to draw on these skills when metacommunicating about ruptures with patients. In this article, we present the 3 main supervisory tasks of AFT: videotape analysis of rupture moments, awareness-oriented role-plays, and mindfulness training. We describe the theoretical and empirical support for each supervisory task, provide examples based on actual supervision sessions, and present feedback about the usefulness of the techniques from trainees in our program. We also note some of the challenges involved in conducting AFT and the importance of maintaining a strong supervisory alliance when using this training approach.

  5. Measuring spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, T; Haas, J S; Morelli, A; Politi, A; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Haas, Julie S.; Kreuz, Thomas; Morelli, Alice; Politi, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Estimating the degree of synchrony or reliability between two or more spike trains is a frequent task in both experimental and computational neuroscience. In recent years, many different methods have been proposed that typically compare the timing of spikes on a certain time scale to be fixed beforehand. Here, we propose the ISI-distance, a simple complementary approach that extracts information from the interspike intervals by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous frequencies. The method is parameter free, time scale independent and easy to visualize as illustrated by an application to real neuronal spike trains obtained in vitro from rat slices. In a comparison with existing approaches on spike trains extracted from a simulated Hindemarsh-Rose network, the ISI-distance performs as well as the best time-scale-optimized measure based on spike timing.

  6. Education and vocational training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Faculty Institute in Applied Health Physics started in the summer of 1974 in response to the nation's needs for persons trained at the bachelor's level in health physics technology. Surveys indicate that between 3300 and 6000 new trained technologists will be needed by 1985. They will be required for nuclear power reactors, fuel-cycle operations, nuclear medicine, regulatory activities, and as replacements for currently employed workers. The Faculty Institute program provides support for contacting college officials to make them aware of these forecasts and interest them in instituting undergraduate health physics course work at their institutions. In addition, the program provides support for ten faculty participants from different universities to spend ten weeks during the summer in the Health Physics Division. These participants have access to the staff and the diverse research and field facilities of the Division. They also utilize the facilities of the Special Training Division at ORAU

  7. INITIAL TRAINING OF RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Alejandra Cruz-Pallares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The document presents results of a research that used as strategy a complementary training project with thirty-three students of a Bachelors Degree in Primary School 1997(DPS,1997 of an Education Faculty for the initial training of investigators, applied by four teachers members of the academic research group in Mexico; that develops through process of action research methodology. Highlighted in results is the strengthening of the competition of reading, understanding and writing scientific texts, which is analogous to the first feature of the graduate profile called intellectual skills. Among the conclusions it is emphasized that the initial training of teachers in a task that is quite interesting, challenging and complex, as is the educational complex phenomenon.

  8. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  9. Training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals essentially with problems of training and education in a developing country that has made the decision to launch a nuclear programme. All teaching has a double aim: to transfer knowledge, and to form responsible individuals. In a state each pedagogic action has a relatively definite aim. In the nuclear field this aim can be construction of a research or power reactor (or participation in its construction) or the operation of these reactors. There are no well-defined borders between these various aims and for each aim the overall needs should be defined. The personnel needs can be expressed by a series of desired outlines for each function. The starting point should be the students or the active population (in particular those who have already been employed in a conventional power station). The means to proceed from the original state to the desired situation will be sought. The number of people trained should be at least twice that needed (accidents, holidays, resignations). For technicians and engineers a good basic knowledge of fundamental science is necessary in every case. It should be kept in mind that the government ought to be informed beforehand on the alternate choices by advisers trained in specialized courses, i.e. IAEA courses for decision-makers. First, the local educational means shall be used. For very specialized functions the supplier of the power station will provide an adequate training. Specialized teaching centres abroad will provide additional knowledge to those who already have the required fundamental education. Theoretical learning can be useful only after a long period of training in a reactor department in the country itself or abroad. This training should tend to actual integration in a team. A certain amount of information should be given preferably in situ, in particular in the field of health physics, as each member of the staff must be fully aware of its importance. (author)

  10. Human Mitochondrial Transcription Revisited: ONLY TFAM AND TFB2M ARE REQUIRED FOR TRANSCRIPTION OF THE MITOCHONDRIAL GENES IN VITRO*

    OpenAIRE

    Litonin, Dmitry; Sologub, Marina; Shi, Yonghong; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Human mitochondrial transcription is driven by a single subunit RNA polymerase and a set of basal transcription factors. The development of a recombinant in vitro transcription system has allowed for a detailed molecular characterization of the individual components and their contribution to transcription initiation. We found that TFAM and TFB2M act synergistically and increase transcription efficiency 100–200-fold as compared with RNA polymerase alone. Both the light-strand promoter (LSP) an...

  11. Technical Training: WBTechT offers online training

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005 The 2005 CERN Web-Based Technical Training (WBTechT) portal is a computer-skills site offering multimedia learning. Visit http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/ to self-register, consult the available programmes or request a course via EDH. A self-directed online course costs 50.- CHF for desktop applications and 90.- CHF for technical applications for three months' unlimited access. Visit the WBTechT portal or http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining, and contact Technical.Training@cern.ch or your DTO to find out more information. ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  12. Technical Training: WBTechT offers online training

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005 The 2005 CERN Web-Based Technical Training portal is a computer-skills site offering multimedia learning. Visit http://www.course-source.net/sites/cern/ to self-register, consult the available programmes or request a course via EDH. A self-directed online course costs 50.- CHF for desktop applications and 90.- CHF for technical applications for three months' unlimited access. Visit the WBTechT portal or http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining, and contact Technical.Training@cern.ch or your DTOs to find out more information. ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  13. Turning training into play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo;

    2011-01-01

    Embodied gaming has been adopted and gained credibility in the field of physical rehabilitation. In this paper, we report on findings from a six-month-long study of three groups of senior citizens, and their use of Nintendo Wii Fit in a supervised physical training context. We argue that the study...... participants generally found physical training both fun and socially engaging, and experienced improved fitness. We also argue that embodied gaming motivates seniors to do more than they think themselves capable of, and allows seniors with different mental and physical capabilities to play together. However...

  14. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years increased attention has been given to all aspects of the operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Contributing to this is the finding that the severity of the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 has, in large part, been attributed to personnel training deficiencies. Initially the impact of the Three Mile Island accident and the lessons learned were directed at DOE Category A reactor facilities. This resulted in numerous initiatives to upgrade the safety of operations and to improve the training of personnel responsible for operating these facilities

  15. Nuclear education and training

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) first published in 2000 Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern? , which highlighted significant issues in the availability of human resources for the nuclear industry. Ten years on, Nuclear Education and Training: From Concern to Capability considers what has changed in that time and finds that, while some countries have taken positive actions, in a number of others human resources could soon be facing serious challenges in coping with existing and potential new nuclear facilities. This is exacerbated by the increasing rate of retirement as the w

  16. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb. PMID:27207833

  18. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb.

  19. Training to handle unexpected events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of conducting hands-on training to deal with complex situations is well recognized. Since most utilities now own or have ordered their own control room simulators, access to simulator training facilities has improved greatly. Most utilities now have a control room shift rotation that includes a dedicated training shift. The opportunities for practicing operational control over unexpected and off-normal events are just beginning to be recognized. Areas that are being enhanced include teamwork training, diagnostics training, expanded simulator training programs, improvements in simulator instructor training, emergency procedures training, and training on the use of probabilistic risk assessment studies. All these efforts are aimed at the goal of improving the plant staff's ability to cope with unexpected and off-normal events

  20. Research reactor education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME present in this document some of the questions that can be rightfully raised concerning education and training of nuclear facilities' staffs. At first, some answers illustrate the tackled generic topics: importance of training, building of a training program, usable tools for training purposes. Afterwards, this paper deals more specifically with research reactors as an actual training tool. The pedagogical advantages they can bring are illustrated through an example consisting in the description of the AZUR facility training capabilities followed by the detailed experiences CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME have both gathered and keeps on gaining using research reactors for training means. The experience shows that this incomparable training material is not necessarily reserved to huge companies or organisations' numerous personnel. It offers enough flexibility to be adapted to the specific needs of a thinner audience. Thus research reactor staffs can also take advantages of this training method. (author)

  1. Mitochondrial transcription: How does it end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Byrnes; M Garcia-Diaz

    2011-12-31

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  2. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  3. 40 CFR 164.82 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transcripts. 164.82 Section 164.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING HEARINGS, UNDER THE FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT, ARISING FROM REFUSALS...

  4. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  5. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casperson, Gerald F. (Ballwin, MO); Schmidhauser, Christian T. (Berkeley, CA); Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  6. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casperson, G.F.; Schmidhauser, C.T.; Bissell, M.J.

    1999-12-21

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  7. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M. The underphosphory......The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M....... The underphosphorylated form is able to interact with the E2F transcription factor. Recently, we have cloned a cDNA for E2F-1. By using this clone and a series of non-pRB binding mutants, we have been able to show that the binding of pRB to E2F-1 causes inhibition of E2F-mediated transactivation. pRB's inhibition of E2F......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  8. Hidden Transcripts of Flight Attendant Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexandra G.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes (using flight attendants) hidden transcripts--interactions, stories, myths, and rituals in which employees participate beyond direct observation--to provide an avenue to identify resistance and change in the organizing process. Challenges the outdated ideal of transmissional meaning, questions organizational power by including the…

  9. Integrating transcriptional controls for plant cell expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Mockaitis, Keithanne; Estelle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The plant hormones auxin and brassinosteroid promote cell expansion by regulating gene expression. In addition to independent transcriptional responses generated by the two signals, recent microarray analyses indicate that auxin and brassinosteroid also coordinate the expression of a set of shared target genes.

  10. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  11. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hughes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  12. Transcriptional Responses to the Auxin Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, Dolf; Wagner, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is arguably the most important signaling molecule in plants, and the last few decades have seen remarkable breakthroughs in understanding its production, transport, and perception. Recent investigations have focused on transcriptional responses to auxin, providing novel insight into the fun

  13. Interaction of Restin with transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yousheng; LU; Fan; QI; Yinxin; WANG; Ruihua; ZHANG; Jia

    2005-01-01

    Restin, a member of melanoma-associated antigen superfamily gene, was first cloned from differentiated leukemia cell induced by all trans-retinoic acid, and was able to inhibit cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism was not clear. Since Restin was localized in cell nucleus, and its homolog member, Necdin (neuronal growth suppressor factor), could interact with transcription factors p53 and E2F1, we proposed that Restin might also function as Necdin through interacting with some transcription factors. In this study, transcription factors p53, AP1,ATFs and E2Fs were cloned and used in the mammalian two-hybrid system to identify their interaction with Restin. The results showed that only ATF3 had a strong interaction with Restin. It is interesting to know that ATF3 was an important transcription factor for G1 cell cycle initiation in physiological stress response. It was possible that the inhibition of cell proliferation by Restin might be related with the inhibition of ATF3 activity.

  14. Mitochondrial transcription: how does it end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  15. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  16. Systematic clustering of transcription start site landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J;

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters...

  17. In Vitro Transcription Assays and Their Application in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Ma, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In vitro transcription assays have been developed and widely used for many years to study the molecular mechanisms involved in transcription. This process requires multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and a series of transcription factors that act to modulate the activity of RNAP during gene expression. Sequencing gel electrophoresis of radiolabeled transcripts is used to provide detailed mechanistic information on how transcription proceeds and what parameters can affect it. In this paper we describe the protocol to study how the essential elongation factor NusA regulates transcriptional pausing, as well as a method to identify an antibacterial agent targeting transcription initiation through inhibition of RNAP holoenzyme formation. These methods can be used a as platform for the development of additional approaches to explore the mechanism of action of the transcription factors which still remain unclear, as well as new antibacterial agents targeting transcription which is an underutilized drug target in antibiotic research and development.

  18. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  19. Training for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, John

    An indepth study of how to select and train for effective leadership is based on the belief that though innate character traits play a role of leadership, leadership potential can be developed. The author's theory known as "functional leadership," stresses that leadership is an interaction among leader, group members, and situation. The good…

  20. Training logbook for radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Leer, J.W.H.; Kinay, M.; Heeren, G.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To develop a structured logbook for trainees in the medical specialty of radiotherapy with Europe that records the increasing experience throughout their training period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A working party appointed by the European Board of Radiotherapy developed a draft version of a Europea

  1. Training Circuit Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Young Electronics Company's new product is a testboard developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a tool for training and qualifying personnel in board assembly and in the art of soldering components without damaging boards or components. The boards are used for pre- employment testing and employee requalification.

  2. Exercise training in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  3. Basic Science Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.09.2004 (4 jours) Introduction to the CERN EDMS : 22.6.2004 (1 day) The CERN EDMS for local administrators : 23 & 24.6.2004 (2 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 - 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING...

  5. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild;

    coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...

  6. Training of Penitentiary Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The training of penitentiary staff directly influences the efficiency of a prison system and the observance of human rights in places of detention. On the one hand, there are no "perfect" detainees. The causes that led to imprisonment could be diverse. On the other hand, the possibilities and resources available to a prison system could be limited…

  7. Does Love Need Training?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In early January, a "love training course" in Beijing attracted much public attention. It was reported that nine people attended the course, with some of them even coming from other regions of the country. Most of the trainees were under the age of 30, including a PhD candidate.

  8. Technician Training Experience

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    There is a real shortage of skilled engineers & technicians in Europe and yet at the same time high unemployment levels. For years CERN has offered a great training ground for engineers & physicists and we are now aiming to do the same for technicians. Th

  9. Assertive Training in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, David L.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a group approach to helping the nonassertive client. After describing the group composition and goals, he presents a session by session description for conducting the assertive training group. In addition, he presents suggestions based on experiences in leading the group. (Author)

  10. [Training can be fun!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Julie; Robert, Philippe; Foulon, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Serious games are becoming ever more innovative and increasingly popular within the healthcare profession. Developed as a remote training tool, they support health professionals in a fun way, enabling them to update their knowledge and aptitude. This article looks at a serious game developed for nursing homes. PMID:26145695

  11. Water loop for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures used to operate the water loop of the Institute of Nuclear Enginering (IEN) in Brazil are presented. The aim is to help future operators of the training water loop in the operation technique and in a better comprehension of the phenomena occured during the execution of an experience. (E.G.)

  12. Training's Annual Salary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwasser, Donna

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trainers' (n=2,003) salaries compared salaries based on size of companies, geographic location, level of education, experience, gender, and age. At $60,794, the average training salary is only 2.8 percent higher than last year, compared to a 4.6 percent increase for the average salaried employee. (JOW)

  13. Vocational Training in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooney, Roy; Dunne, Paul

    This monograph, one of a series of studies of vocational education in the countries of the European Communities, describes the vocational training system in Ireland. The study was compiled from existing statistics and descriptions, and most figures cited refer to 1984. The report is organized in eight chapters. Chapter 1 covers population,…

  14. Teacher-Training Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    The Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is an English teaching center which also runs an introductory course to train teachers of English. This article describes some of the projects completed by prospective teachers; they include language games, pictures, cartoons, role-playing and writing creative dialogue. (CHK)

  15. TNT: Teams Need Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centre County Vocational-Technical School, Pleasant Gap, PA. CIU 10 Bi-County Development Center for Adults.

    This document includes a final report and curriculum manual from a project to help adult educators teach team training by developing a curriculum for use in teaching teamwork skills in work force literacy programs and by providing two half-day seminars to assist adult educators with effectively using the curriculum. The manual for work force…

  16. RECON training materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of materials for use in a DOE/RECON training session includes information about terminal commands, logging on, document availability, search strategy models, and some of the data bases available on DOE/RECON. An evaluation questionnaire is included

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW Real-Time (F) : 7 - 9.6.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Migration 6 to 7: 14.6.2005 (1 day) IT3T/1 - Read your mail and more with Outlook 2003 : 14.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/2 - Creating, managing and using distribution lists with Simba2 : 16.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 16 & 17.6.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation de fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 6.0 : 20.6.2005 (1journée) Introduction to ANSYS: 21 - 24.6.2005 (4 days) IT3T/3 - Working remotely with Windows XP : 28.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) IT3T/4 - Editing Websites with Frontpage 2003 : 30.6.2005 (IT Technical Training Tutorial, free of charge) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoC...

  18. Language Training: French

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registra...

  19. Hard Training Bears Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Perfect skills take time to acquire. An outstanding performance, while it may be short, is the harvest of many years’ training. Hearty rounds of applause Reward the artists’ diligence. The flowers of the arts are fertilized with sweat; Consummate skills bridge all ages, And new always springs from old

  20. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This rev